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Critical Sociology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.541
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 40  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0896-9205 - ISSN (Online) 1569-1632
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • About the Authors

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 379 - 380
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Volume 48, Issue 3, Page 379-380, May 2022.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T06:42:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221087549
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • As the World Drowns

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      Authors: A. E. Garrison
      Pages: 541 - 541
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Volume 48, Issue 3, Page 541-541, May 2022.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T06:42:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221087548
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 3 (2022)
       
  • Identity, Social Character, and the Clash of Social Movements

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      Authors: Lauren Langman
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      At this moment in time, the very future of democracy in America has become a serious question. Many journalists and commentators have raised questions of crisis of White, Christian, male authority that impel an ‘illiberal democracy’, one-party rule, and/or a new civil War. The wave of progressive movements in the 1960s, resurgent in the 21st century, and challenging traditional, essentialist, identities and values were experienced by many as threats and dangers, fostering fears, anxieties, and grievances that elicited backlashes engendering various reactionary movements that are now a powerful force. These ‘authoritarian populisms’, racialized nationalisms, gendered ethnoreligious nationalisms, neo-fascisms, and indeed some clearly fascist movements extolling racial, gender, or Christian supremacy are mobilizing to preserve the culture and country of the ‘real people’ who feel victimized, challenged, and face demise. A basic fault of modern political economies has been the fundamental conflict between political democracy, majority rule, and/or rules of law and the economic anarchy, which privileges a few while many face duress; these conditions lead to the irrationality and scapegoating, especially racism, sexism, and ethnocentrism flourish to foster a variety of authoritarian, reactionary mobilizations across the globe.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T08:43:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221093028
       
  • Book review: A Critical Political Economy of the Middle East and North
           Africa edited by Joel Beinin, Bassam Haddad, and Sherene Seikaly

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      Authors: Fouad Mami
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T11:53:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221095328
       
  • A Forgotten History: Marxist Ecology after Marx

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      Authors: Ning Zhang
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T11:15:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221095273
       
  • About the Authors

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      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T09:08:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221096887
       
  • Book review: Rethinking Alternatives With Marx: Economy, Ecology and
           Migration

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      Authors: Nupur Pattanaik
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T06:48:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221095317
       
  • ‘No South Asian Riders, Please’: The Politics of Visibilisation in
           Platformed Food Delivery Work during the COVID-19 Pandemic in Hong Kong

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      Authors: Lisa Y.M. Leung
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic has intensified the need for online food delivery services (such as Deliveroo and Foodpanda), creating new job opportunities for South Asian youths. However, outbreaks of infected cases in districts populated by South Asians have spurred ‘racist’ remarks by customers, perhaps triggered by a flurry of negative mainstream news reports and social media outbursts targeted at South Asians. These behaviours reveal the added precariousness of ethnic minority employment. This paper examines the inter-sectional politics of race and class involved in platformed work, in the case of food delivery services. It discusses how the algorithmically controlled platformed economy may have an impact on racial minority workers. Employing the conceptual framing of ‘invisibility’, and notions around ‘platformed/ gig labour’, it argues that neo-liberalised infrastructural capitalism aggravates algorithmic surveillance of racial minority workers. It suggests the possible resilience of racial minority workers in the globally popular business model.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T06:44:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221091449
       
  • Critical Marxism in Post-Soviet Russia

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      Authors: Aleksandr Buzgalin
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T11:25:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221092174
       
  • Spiking the Sociological Canon

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      Authors: David Fasenfest
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-25T11:52:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221093705
       
  • Trump’s Charisma

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      Authors: Ivan Light
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Max Weber insisted that followers grant charismatic authority, but he did not address the cultural prerequisites that enable leaders to acquire it from them. Prophecy is the royal road. When a prophetic tradition has taught people to expect saviors in times of crisis, believers are primed to award charismatic authority to someone who resembles their expectation. The case of Donald Trump illustrates the importance of prophecy on the bestowal of charismatic authority. Within the Republican Party, two distinct prophetic traditions validated Trump’s salvific mission, thus enabling him to acquire power of command. Adhering to Biblical prophecy, conservative Protestants identified Donald Trump as God’s agent in preparation for the return of Jesus Christ. Also within the Republican Party, adhering to developmental economics, secular conservatives identified Donald Trump as a heroic entrepreneur whose vigor would restore America’s greatness. Because of Trump’s striking resemblance to Batman, the comic superhero’s many fans also had prior ideational access to Trump’s salvific mission. In the United States, the messianic prophecy of a tough-guy entrepreneur can derive from sacred culture, academic culture, popular culture, or from all three. The confluence produced a voter bloc primed to award charismatic authority to Trump.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-23T09:53:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221087425
       
  • Institutions, Occupations and Connectivity: The Embeddedness of Gig Work
           and Platform-Mediated Labour Market in Hong Kong

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      Authors: Tat Chor Au-Yeung, Jack Qiu
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Informed by the economic sociology of work, this qualitative study employs a dynamic and multi-dimensional notion of embeddedness to critique the social bases of gig work and the platform-mediated labour market, with a series of embedding, disembedding and re-embedding forces. Conducting in-depth interviews with 24 gig workers, the findings reveal how gig work is incorporated into Hong Kong’s labour market and the ways in which gig work is reshaping the power of workers via digital platforms. First, gig work is institutionally embedded in a policy framework centred on weak regulation and protection, resulting in platforms’ expandable and retractable control over labour. Second, gig work is embedded in occupational norms and professional practices, in which workers practise multi-platforming and marketplace resistance when defending their interests. Finally, the embedded connectivity of gig work boosts the scalability of labour market competition but engenders algorithmic opacity. The marketplace bargaining power of gig workers is twofold: workers’ dependence on platforms and their working status. Hence, the embeddedness of gig work and platforms is far from stable but involves new tensions that challenge the gigification and platformisation of work.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-14T09:20:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221090581
       
  • The Broken Promise of Human Capital Theory: Social Embeddedness, Graduate
           Entrepreneurs and Youth Employment in China

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      Authors: Yuyang Kang, Ka Ho Mok
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Human capital theory has been one of the most influential theories in national policymaking since the 1980s. The major assertion is that individuals can attain better employment outcomes through investing in degrees and credentials. Following the economic reforms of the late 1970s, Chinese families have reverted to the tradition of investing in the education of their children, hoping that the human capital accumulated through higher education will translate into economic capital, enhancing their children’s upward social mobility. However, the rapid expansion of Chinese higher education since 1999 has caused an educational inflation, adversely affecting graduate employment. This article critically examines China’s response to global capitalism through bureaucratic adjustment of higher education expansion in managing the market transition and social reproduction of labour challenges within a relatively short historic period of ‘compressed development’. Without effective articulation between higher education expansion and the changing labour needs during the market transition, the rush to higher education expansion has created different forms of social and economic contradictions. More specifically, this article argues that social embeddedness including parental influence, institutional policies, and social capital are important factors to be considered in explaining the relationship between education and work in the Chinese context.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-14T09:17:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221088894
       
  • Work Faster, Harder, Cheaper' Global, Local and Sectoral
           Co-Configurations of Job Insecurities Among Hong Kong Creative Workers

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      Authors: Tommy Tse
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This research challenges the growing theoretical Global North–South divide and refines an ‘ex-centric’ theorisation of creative labour in the context of the increasingly monopolising but competitive capitalism in Asia. While it argues that job insecurity is not just a universal, objective condition, but varying, subjective experiences of anxiety and dissatisfaction for creative workers, we adopt a pluralist epistemological approach and identify the nuanced intersections among key global, local, and sectoral trends – increased use of digital technology, an Indigenous and outdated work ethic, and a devaluation of creativity both in industry and society – that co-configure Hong Kong creative workers’ divergent perceptions of and responses to job insecurities. Rather than merely focusing on job tenure insecurity and employment insecurity, we classify and highlight the conceptual distinctions among eight types of job insecurity for Hong Kong creative workers, some of which enable creative worker-actor’s response, resilience, and resistance to the exploitative creative labour process.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-14T09:15:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221087345
       
  • Normalizing and Resisting the New Precarity: A Case Study of the
           Indonesian Gig Economy

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      Authors: Diatyka Widya Permata Yasih
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The article examines the effects of the normalization of a new form of precarious work—tied to the gig economy and shaped by the imperatives of neoliberalism—in impeding the formation of solidarity that would enable workers to challenge structural issues that shape their precarity, although without entirely preventing collective organization. While the article focuses on the manifestation of the new precarity and workers’ responses in the app-based transport service in Indonesia, it seeks insights from the different experiences of other countries. It is argued here that the historical absence of the Standard Employment Relationship (SER), and the historically rooted ineffectiveness of labor and broader society movements aggravate problems in translating the precarity discourse into the organizational struggles of contemporary labor.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-09T05:26:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221087130
       
  • Gramsci, the Relativity of the Integral State-Society, and the COVID-19
           Interregnum

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      Authors: Yue Zhou Lin
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Gramscian scholars have engaged with Gramsci’s leitmotif (‘rhythm of thought’) and the stato integrale (integral state), a concept he introduced in Autumn 1930. This represents remarkable progress in the Marxist community. But what requires further attention is the interconnection between an integral state and a totalitarian one, two of the three expressions of state-society formations that Perry Anderson identified as Gramsci’s antinomies. This article argues that the integral state is fragile but hegemonic if it can be sustained. Otherwise, it can degenerate into a totalitarian state. The article refigures the ‘integral state’ as the ‘integral state-society’. It exists relatively, depending on whether the ‘integral momentum’ or the ‘totalitarian tendency’ prevails in a dynamic interaction between radical Left, Far Right, and those currents in between. Identifying this relativity helps to formulate a deeper understanding of Gramsci’s thought and show how his legacy supports a class struggle perspective on the COVID-19 interregnum.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-09T05:24:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221086490
       
  • Travelling Lite, or the History of (Almost) Everything

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      Authors: Tom Brass
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-09T05:21:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221085831
       
  • Worker Co-Operatives for the 21st Century

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      Authors: Tim Christiaens
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-09T05:19:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221085796
       
  • Decolonizing Sociology for Social Justice in Bangladesh: Delta Scholarship
           Matters

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      Authors: M. Anwar Hossen
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Sociology is one of the major disciplines to foster understanding and protection of the livelihoods of local people. For instance, the discipline can describe the linkage between the environment and people and the effects of environmental change on local groups of people in a Delta country such as Bangladesh. However, the imperial philosophy of modernity that dominates the discipline and which is evident in the Sociology department at the University of Dhaka (UofD) underscores a considerable distance between academic conceptualizations of local perspectives on issues such as climatic change and the actual views of the local people of Bangladesh. Grounded on this assertion, this paper explores a question: What are the challenges for Sociology to represent Delta people and protect their social justice' The paper depends on the content analysis of sociological practices at UofD: imperial modernity and climatic adaptation. The findings of the paper argue that Sociology has been failing to represent the local meanings of climatic change due to the domination of imperial conceptualizations of modernity. Climate finance conceptualized by a Western perspective, and Sociology, as a discipline, fails to represent locally contextualized meanings related to climate finance; thus, the marginalized groups of people are increasingly facing survival challenges responsible for climate apartheid. Only a decolonized Sociology can challenge this imperial domination and play an effective role in reducing the discipline’s gap of understanding of the local people and in promoting social justice in Delta Bangladesh.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-09T05:17:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221085687
       
  • Walking on Two Legs: Black Marxism and the Sociological Canon

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      Authors: Michael Burawoy
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-09T05:06:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221085641
       
  • Politicized Megaprojects and Public Sector Interventions: Mass Consent
           Under Neoliberal Statism

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      Authors: Cihan Tuğal
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Scholars have argued that megaprojects’ turn away from issues of employment, and mass housing are among the core traits of neoliberalism. Turkey, though once seen as a paragon of neoliberalism, problematizes this generalization. Erdoğanist megaprojects have created jobs and residence for millions, and garner consent. ‘Embedded neoliberalism’, a concept frequently used to explain increasing state involvement under neoliberalism, sheds light on the governing AKP’s power, but is insufficient in explaining its core dynamics. Whereas the ‘embedded neoliberalism’ literature downplays the role of the government as a producer, the ‘state capitalism’ literature, as applied to Turkey, overrates the extent to which this country has moved away from neoliberalism. The concept ‘neoliberal statism’ (which puts the emphasis on the consent-generating and political aspects of the new economy) better captures the AKP’s path. Megaproject-driven growth and popular consent, however, are restricted by vulnerabilities that also afflict neoliberal statism as a broader growth strategy.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-04-05T11:56:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221086284
       
  • Capital, Capitalism and Health

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      Authors: Raju J Das
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The Covid-19 pandemic has contributed to increased scholarly attention to an important ‘human need’: good health. This article is about the relation between workers’ health and capitalist production, as Marx examines it in his magnum opus. While Marx’s main focus in Capital Volume 1 is on the production of surplus value by workers and its appropriation by capitalists, he does provide insights into how capitalism ruins the health of workers themselves, although these insights are scattered. In this article, I systematically re-articulate and analyse Marx’s thoughts about workers’ health in relation to some of the key-categories of his political economy: the value of labour power relative to wages; employment precarity; long working day; hidden abode of production; capitalists’ despotic control over workers; and the capitalist transformation of nature. I briefly relate Marx’s ideas about workers’ health from Capital Volume 1 to some contemporary research on the social dimensions of health. I also show that Marx’s explicit ideas about workers’ health, which are my main focus, point to a broader approach to the topic that is only implicit in his thinking. I draw out some practical implications of this approach.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-28T09:14:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221083503
      Issue No: Vol. 1 (2022)
       
  • Failing to Plan Is Planning to Fail: Toward an Expanded Notion of
           Democratically Planned Postcapitalism

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      Authors: Christoph Sorg
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      With the advent of digitalization, the more techno-optimist among critics of capitalism have articulated new calls for post-work and post-scarcity economics made possible by new advances in information and communication technology. Quite recently, some of this debate shifted for calls for digital-democratic planning to replace market-based allocation. This article will trace the lineages of this shift and present these new calls for digitally enabled and democratic planning. I will then argue that much of the discussion focuses on capitalism’s laws of economic motion, while rendering less visible capitalism’s social, political, and ecological ‘conditions of possibility’. To remedy this shortcoming I will ask how these fit into the recent debate and suggest avenues to extend the discussion of democratic planning in that way. Concretely, I will discuss features of a postcapitalist mode of reproduction that abolishes capital’s subordination of non-waged and waged care work. The following part will focus on both planning’s need to calculate ecological externalities and consequently determine sustainable and egalitarian paths for social and technological development on a world scale. The last section will elaborate on the ‘democratic’ in ‘democratic planning’ in terms of planning’s decision-making, multi-scalar politics, and politics of cultural recognition.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-17T10:03:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221081058
       
  • V. I. Lenin on Alienation

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      Authors: Joe Pateman
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      According to an old legend, Vladimir Lenin, the founder of Soviet Marxism, overlooked Karl Marx’s theory of alienation. For Marxist humanists, this theory underlies the emancipatory thrust of Marx’s thought, and since, in their view, Lenin’s acolytes ignored alienation, communist regimes failed to empower the workers. Considering these claims, this article challenges the legend that Lenin himself neglected Marx’s theory of alienation. It argues that this theory was central to Lenin’s Marxism. In fact, Lenin was among the first to discover the concept in Marx’s work, although he also analysed the concept independently. Like Marx, Lenin criticised capitalist alienation and defined communism as a non-alienated society. After the October Revolution, however, Lenin struggled to realise this goal. Responding to a failed European socialist revolution, a brutal civil war, a deadly famine and widespread cultural backwardness, Lenin made concessions to alienation. Nevertheless, Lenin’s legacy provides an important insight into alienation today.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-08T01:06:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221080552
       
  • Political Imaginations of Community Kitchens in Sweden

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      Authors: Markus Lundström
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Whereas the sociology of food has drawn attention to differences between corporate and alternative foodways, the political imaginations underpinning the latter are often overlooked. This article distinguishes between different political imaginations of the community kitchen, a set of practices characterised by collective preparation and redistribution of food. The analysis builds on ethnographic and archive material in Sweden to outline how the folkkök (people’s kitchen) was once an institutional practice to address urban food insecurity, soon outsourced as altruistic soup kitchens, and then regenerated a century later by the anarchist movement. By distinguishing between altruistic and anarchistic imaginations in this analysis, the article adds another layer to the critical sociological study of alternative foodways.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-03T11:37:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221077604
       
  • Redistributive Solidarity' Exploring the Utopian Potential of
           Unconditional Basic Income

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      Authors: Linea M. Petersen, Sine N. Just, Emil Husted
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Using unconditional basic income (UBI) as its empirical prism, this article offers new impetus to the foundational debate within critical theory as to whether and how redistribution and recognition can relate productively to each other. We explore the possibility of redistributive solidarity, arguing that unconditional and universal redistribution may be a means of furthering the recognition of different subjectivities that are not solely defined by their productive relations of labor. Seeing such redistributive solidarity as a potential but not necessary outcome of UBI, we develop a typology of existing UBI experiments that divide these according to whether they seek to affirm or transform the current social order based on principles of growth or degrowth. Surveying these four types of UBI, we find that the envisioned form of economic redistribution shapes the potential for social recognition. While the relationship is one of utopian potential rather than causal necessity, UBI may indeed enable redistributive solidarity.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-03-02T04:45:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221080364
       
  • Canon Fodder and the Intimacy of Dialogues

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      Authors: Freeden Blume Oeur
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Michael Burawoy’s 2021 essay, ‘Decolonizing Sociology: The Significance of W.E.B. Du Bois’, forges dialogues between the scholar denied and established theorists with the aim of reconstructing the sociological canon. My commentary situates the author’s essay and his own Du Boisian turn in a long career dedicated to reflexive science and recomposing theory. I reflect on the seemingly innocuous notion of a dialogue itself: its implications for sociological theory and practice, and how it supports decolonial efforts. Thinking with Toni Morrison, Hazel Carby, Lisa Lowe, and others, I offer a sketch of a decolonial methodology—what I call a Du Boisian shadowplay—that brings into view the intimate dimensions of imperialism. Ultimately, such a feminist methodology reconstructs dialogues that reflect on researcher standpoints and nested imperial histories; and in the face of today’s social crises, nurtures dialogues that are animated by an ethic of love.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T10:14:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221077095
       
  • Fictionalized Violence and Criminality: Re-evaluating the Burakumin of
           Japan

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      Authors: Hideo Aoki
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-22T10:38:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221079729
       
  • Politics, Crisis, and the Canon: A Commentary on Michael Burawoy’s
           ‘Decolonizing Sociology: The Significance of W.E.B. Du Bois’

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      Authors: Jordanna Matlon
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-22T10:35:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221075694
       
  • The Post-Soviet School of Critical Marxism (PSSCM): Particular
           Characteristics, Main Tendencies, and Its Place in the System of Marxist
           Studies in Post-Soviet Russia

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      Authors: Olga Barashkova
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The author characterizes the main stages in the rise of the Post-Soviet School of Critical Marxism (PSSCM) and highlights its most important features, distinguishing it from other tendencies of Marxist thought in Russia. The latter include the orthodox version of Marxism, the social democratic tendency, and the ‘Russophile’ tendency. In contrast to these trends, the PSSCM is oriented toward elaboration of a dialectical materialist methodology; toward development of creative Soviet and world traditions in the study of social alienation and de-alienation; toward the critical use of Marx and his followers’ achievements with the aim of developing the main elements of the ‘Capital’ of the 21st century; and toward studying the prospects for the future ‘realm of freedom’ (Marx) as the dialectical sublation not only of capitalism, but also of the entire system of relations of social alienation in the context of facing the contemporary global problems. A feature of the article is its extensive bibliography of works by Russian Marxists.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-22T10:30:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221077069
       
  • Book Review: How the Word Is Passed

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      Authors: Marcus L. Smith
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-22T10:27:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221078890
       
  • Post-Soviet Capitalism in Russia and Digital Revolution

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      Authors: Ruslan Dzarasov, Viktoria Gritsenko
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The article examines characteristics of digitalization in the Russian economy in its connection with the semi-peripheral position of Russia. The reasons for the lack of efficiency of Russian digitalization and its uneven development in various economy sectors are explained. According to the authors, the root causes of this state of affairs can be seen even in the patterns of the degeneration and disintegration of the Soviet Union, when the features of rent-seeking behavior of the ruling elite were first identified. The article presents the results of a study into the needs for information resources in the sectors of the Russian economy (in comparison with the group of reference countries), which reflect the decline in those in industry and, on the contrary, the concentration in the research and development sector. The authors believe that these data confirm the conclusion about the selective and generally insufficient character of digitalization.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-22T10:23:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211073887
       
  • Culture in the Space of Late Capitalism: The Artist and the Market

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      Authors: Lyudmila Bulavka-Buzgalina
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Taking as the main objects of study cultural expanse, artistic creativity and viewing it through the prism of socio-philosophical problems, the author describes the increasing subordination of culture to the market and capital as the evolution of modern society goes ahead, and sets out the reasons for this development. This subordination becomes most intensive as a result of the expansion of the total market for simulacra that is, of the system that is becoming dominant in the world during the 21st century. The market becomes total to the extent that not only the economy, this process transforms co-creativity of people into alienated market relations.The opposite aspect, that of dealienation, co-creativity and unalienated dialogue (Batishchev, Bakhtin) comprises the innate essence of culture, and through preserving the world-wide unity of culture, acts as an alternative to the growing alienation.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-14T10:10:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211073356
       
  • Socio-Economic Inequality and Quality of Life in Russia

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      Authors: Michael Voeykov, Galina Anisimova
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The article deals with the social aspects of economic inequality in society. Special attention is paid to non-monetary indicators of social stratification of Russian society. It substantiates the conclusion that economic inequality in Russian society has reached a critical line fraught with serious social threats.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-14T10:05:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211065322
       
  • Society of Trauma as a Third Modality of Development (Debatable Problems
           

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      Authors: Zhan Toshchenko
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The article makes an attempt to prove that along with the recognized concepts of the development of civilization—evolution and revolution—at the present time, it is necessary to talk about such a modality as a society of trauma. At present, 53 countries out of 192 members of the United Nations have been stagnating and recessing for many years, which manifested itself in the disorganization of the national economy, in political instability, in the growth of poverty, and social tension. Particular attention is paid to Russia, which can be attributed as traumatized society. The reasons for the formation of a society of trauma in Russia, its main features are analyzed: disproportions of the national economy, growth of social inequality, and attempts to implement new forms of class struggle. In conclusion, proposals are formulated for getting out of the traumatized state of society.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-05T05:00:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211064927
       
  • Socialisation vs the Market: The Peculiarities of Russian Capitalism

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      Authors: Andrey Kolganov
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The author shows the changes that the system of commodity relations is undergoing in the early 21st century. These changes are seeing the market take on an all-encompassing character, and we are witnessing a comprehensive manipulation of market actors by corporate capital. The present-day market is limited and undermined not only by state regulation but also by a process of socialisation, which represents the totality of transitional relationships and institutions. Having characterised this new quality of the relations of the market, the author demonstrates the specific nature of these processes in contemporary Russia, where the most modern forms of market relations and the most archaic are being propagated simultaneously. The green shoots of socialisation are characterised by the contradiction between the retention of a number of the achievements of the preceding system, and the development of shadow state regulation and ‘manual control’.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-04T12:55:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211065605
       
  • Capital of the 21st Century: From the Proletariat and Bourgeoisie to the
           Precariat and the Oligarchic-Bureaucratic Nomenklatura'

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      Authors: Aleksandr Buzgalin
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The article presents the research on the social and class structure of modern society from the positions of the Post-Soviet School of Critical Marxism. It is shown that late capitalism is characterised by the active formation of inter-class and intra-class layers. The article reveals the contradictions of the ‘creative class’. The ‘creative class’ is divided into (1) the people who are employed in the creatosphere and give rise to the phenomena of culture and the creative qualities of human beings and (2) those who ‘creatively’ produce useless goods. Then it is further divided into people employed in the (1) public and (2) commercial sectors. The author introduces the term ‘the socialiat’ to characterise the public-sector workers who comprise a protoclass within the creative class, shows the core and periphery of it, and provide the analysis of the precariat as the alter ego of the socialiat.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-04T12:36:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211072802
       
  • Book review: Rethinking Alternatives with Marx: Economy, Ecology and
           Migration

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      Authors: Babak Amini
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-04T12:13:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221074083
       
  • To Kill and to Die: On the Joys and Sorrows of Juvenile Drug Dealers in
           Bahia, Brazil

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      Authors: Peter Anton Zoettl
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article discusses the life and death of juvenile drug dealers in the state of Bahia, Brazil, where the drug business has become omnipresent and a growing number of youths from the urban periphery are taking up a career with one of the country’s many drug gangs. The price most of them pay for their economic success as traffickers is high: they are repeatedly imprisoned under harsh conditions, suffer severe physical violence and, at times, die at young age. Drawing on the narratives of juveniles from Bahia and the writings of Bataille and Baudrillard, the youths’ approach to life is discussed as a knowingly illusory attempt to regain their sovereignty within the boundaries of consumer capitalism. It is argued that their death is not a blow of fate, but rather the premeditated consequence of their acquisition of consumer-citizenship ‘on credit’ and, ultimately, their refusal to constitute Brazil’s modern precariat.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-04T12:11:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211073500
       
  • Conspiracies and Restorative Violence in American Culture

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      Authors: George Lundskow
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      From the earliest days of the British North American colonies, violence permeates American society. At the political-economic level, violence established and expanded the nation through slavery and military conquest. At the inter-personal level, people chose violence to resolve disputes, and for entertainment. The one consistent element has been the ‘masterless men’, white males who feel that whiteness and divinely endowed liberty entitle them to more than they currently have in property, employment, or status. Endowed with the right of self-determination and cultural reinforcement for feelings of inherent superiority, they have embraced fantastical conspiracies and restorative violence as personal gratification and cultural terror management whenever they feel that perceived social inferiors are succeeding beyond their appropriate social position, especially through military service, economic entrepreneurship, and election victory. Conspiracy and violent fantasy promise to restore racial-masculine hierarchy from an allegedly ideal past to fulfill God’s divine purpose for the United States.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-02T07:08:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211073703
       
  • Conspiracy Theories and the Manufacture of Dissent: QAnon, the ‘Big
           Lie’, Covid-19, and the Rise of Rightwing Propaganda

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      Authors: Anthony R. DiMaggio
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper examines the impact of partisanship, rightwing media, and social media on attitudes about contemporary conspiracy theories. Mainstream scholarly views that ‘both sides’ of the political aisle indulge routinely in such theories are challenged. I adopt a Gramscian hegemonic framework that examines rising rightwing conspiracy theories as a manifestation of mass false consciousness in service of a political-economic system that serves upper-class interests. Issues examined include the QAnon movement, ‘big lie’ voter fraud conspiracism, and Covid-19 conspiracy theories, and the way they related to partisanship, rightwing media, and social media. I provide evidence that Republican partisanship, rightwing media consumption, and social media consumption are all significant statistical predictors of acceptance of modern conspiracy theories.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-29T10:26:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211073669
       
  • News, Nations, and Power Relations: How Neoliberal Media Reproduce a
           Hierarchical World Order

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      Authors: Saif Shahin
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article adopts a poststructural approach to examine the relationship between the news media and international relations. It compares 15 years of international aid coverage from two donor nations, the United States and Britain, and two recipient nations, India and Pakistan, to understand the types of identities news media construct for a nation in relation to other nations. Despite their differences, the news discourse in all four nations has a neoliberal orientation. Moreover, neoliberalism underpins a hierarchical structure of relations that privileges some nations as superior and makes other nations willing participants in their own subordination. While scholars of press–state relations regard newsmaking as epiphenomenal to foreign policymaking, this article argues that newsmaking and policymaking are mutually constitutive social phenomena: both draw from and, in turn, reproduce a shared conception of national identity vis-à-vis other nations. In doing so, the article illustrates the productive power of news media in international relations.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T10:59:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211072455
       
  • Marketization in Crisis: The Political Economy of COVID-19 and the
           Unmaking of Public Transport in Stockholm

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      Authors: Alexander Paulsson, Till Koglin
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      While measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 disturbed both global and local markets, some commentators also argued that the pandemic could be seen as the beginning of the end of neoliberalism. Although neoliberal reforms have come under pressure, little is known about the implications of COVID-19 in or across specific sectors. Scaling down the rich theoretical–historical debates about neoliberalism to the regional level, we study the impact of COVID-19 on the marketized public transport system in Stockholm, Sweden. During COVID-19, ridership dropped as did ticket revenues, which put the market under operational and financial distress. Drawing on a discussion of the norms and techniques of marketization, we probe how the contracted bus operators responded to the pandemic, how they tried to save the market from collapsing, and whether the measures taken suggest an organized move away from neoliberal policies. Adding to recent debates of COVID-19 and neoliberalism’s longevity, we conclude that although the norms underpinning marketization remained unquestioned, the techniques were partly re-evaluated in the midst of the global crisis as a way to protect the established neoliberal policies from falling apart.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T10:55:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211069862
       
  • The Nexus of QAnon and COVID-19: Legitimation Crisis and Epistemic Crisis

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      Authors: Jeremiah Morelock, Felipe Ziotti Narita
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we analyze the role of conspiracy theories, especially the spread of QAnon during the COVID-19 pandemics, in the legitimation crisis and epistemic crisis in contemporary democracies. We discuss Habermas’ theory of legitimation crisis and the potential for reactionary movements in times of such crisis, as well as Hofstadter’s description of the paranoid style in political culture. We explain the notion of ‘epistemic crisis’ as theorized by Larry Laudan and discussed recently in relation to social media. We discuss anti-intellectualism in Hofstadter’s terms, and explain its connection with populism. Finally, we explain how all of this comes to bear on the contemporary proliferation of conspiracy theory, using QAnon and the COVID crisis as our point of reference, and examples from the United States and Brazil to illustrate our points. QAnon fueled COVID-19 conspiracy theories, and COVID-19 conspiracy theories rocketed QAnon to a place of major influence.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-24T12:23:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211069614
       
  • Soviet and Post-Soviet Marxism: Braving the Challenges of the
           Technological Revolution

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      Authors: Gleb Maslov
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The article is devoted to the study of the Soviet and post-Soviet Marxists’ views on the problem of technical and economic transformations. The stages in the development of Soviet thought in this matter are systematized, and the potential of applying the authors’ key ideas in the context of the challenges brought in by modern technological shifts is shown. With regard to the period after the collapse of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), the emphasis is on the developments of researchers belonging to the post-Soviet school of critical Marxism, as well as colleagues acting in an active dialogue with this focus area. What is emphasized is the high potential of the Marxist tendency in further studies of the contradictions of the economic system caused by technological transformations.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-15T10:31:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211063596
       
  • Overcoming and Penalizing Precarity: Narratives of Drug Personalities
           Arrested in the Philippine War on Drugs

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      Authors: Filomin C. Gutierrez
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The article problematizes state penality as a mechanism of repression of precarious workers through a war on drugs in the Philippines. The narratives of 27 arrested ‘drug personalities’ in Metro Manila tell of how methamphetamine energizes bodies and motivates minds for productive work. Bidding to be classified as willing and able workers and family men, the study’s participants orient to a moral stratification that pits the ‘moral versus immoral’ and the ‘hardworking versus lazy’. Qualifying their drug use as strategic and calculated, they uphold the neoliberal values of individual choice and accountability. Their support for the anti-drug campaign stems from their recognition of a drug problem and the socioemotional toll of the dysfunctions of living in the slums. While trade liberalization facilitates methamphetamine inflow, a war on drugs fuels an authoritarian populism. As the state reaffirms symbolic mission to protect its citizens, it blames precarity to a problem population.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-08T06:30:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211070236
       
  • Berserk!: Anger and the Charismatic Populism of Donald Trump

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      Authors: Paul Joosse, Dominik Zelinsky
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores the role anger plays in charismatic movements. Although scholars have long recognized the importance of emotions to the etiology of charisma, they tend to focus on mutual affection among leaders and followers, paying less attention to how anger—and particularly its subspecies, ressentiment—patterns charismatic power. Drawing on literature from political science, populism research, and the cultural sociology of charisma, we argue that ressentiment, which is associated with self-disvalue and an invidious need to blame outsiders, is key to theorizing the emotional energy that charisma delivers to revolutionary upheaval. The Weberian source for the intervention is his lesser known concept of ‘berserk-charisma’. Reorienting the focus of charisma research to account for its aggressive, ‘outward’ dimension has the benefit of drawing us closer to the vision Weber had for its social-historical relevance. We demonstrate our insights using the case of charismatic/populist support for Trump.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T05:48:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211063131
       
  • Book review: Sandinista Narratives: Religion, Sandinismo, and Emotions in
           the Making of the Nicaraguan Insurrection and Revolution by Jean-Pierre
           Reed

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      Authors: Alberto E. Nickerson
      First page: 533
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-14T10:07:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221074084
       
  • Book review: The Tyranny of Merit: What’s Become of the Common
           Good'

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      Authors: Makmor Tumin
      First page: 535
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-04T12:37:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221074418
       
  • Book Review: Aspects of the New Right-Wing Extremism

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      Authors: Anthony Albanese
      First page: 538
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-04T12:12:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221074082
       
  • Book Review: Marx, Women and Capitalist Social Reproduction: Marxist
           Feminist Essays

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      Authors: Tom Mayer
      First page: 539
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T11:02:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205221074737
       
  • Post-Soviet Russia as a Product of Half-Disintegration of the USSR: Facts
           and Interpretation

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      Authors: David Epstein
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The article shows the interconnection in the development of social and economic institutes of the USSR and post-soviet Russia and that on the post-Soviet space and in the Russian Federation a system of the semi-peripheral oligarchic bureaucratic capitalism has occurred, of which an economic stagnation is typical. The author proposes a review of the statistical data of three post-soviet evolution stages (1992–1998, 1999–2007, from 2008 until now), the causes of the economic decline of the 1990s, with accentuating the degradation of the technological basis and growing social contradictions, negative economic, and demographic consequences. The causes of negative evolution of Russia’s economy and society are shown. The answer is given to the questions: (1) what social forces were behind the reforms in the USSR and what social forces took over the power after the USSR vanished and (2) why Russia became a dependent, semi-peripheral part of the global economic system.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-12-28T10:46:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211064517
       
  • Education in Post-Soviet Russia: Marketisation, Financialisation and
           Bureacratisation – The Case of Universities

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      Authors: Natalia Yakovleva
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Since the dissolution of the Soviet Union, market relations and institutions have begun vigorously penetrating not only the fields of production and services, but also the social sphere. In this text, the author reveals the contradictions implicit in the transformations that over 30 years have occurred in post-Soviet Russia in the field of education and that have seen the total marketisation of this area. As an example, the article examines Russian universities. The process of marketisation of university education has taken the direct forms of the establishment of private universities and the introduction of paid tuition in state universities, and also of changes to the administrative structures of universities, to the content of instruction programmes, and to assessment of the quality of the education received by students as well as of the outcomes of the activity both of university teachers and of the institutions as a whole.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-12-28T10:42:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211064507
       
  • Indigenous Knowledge and the Social Construction of Patriarchy: The Case
           of the Bukusu of Kenya

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      Authors: Abu Bakarr Bah, Margaret Nasambu Barasa
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article is an ethnographic study on the Bukusu number system and the connections between Indigenous knowledge and patriarchy. It examines the ways patriarchy is embedded in everyday knowledge through a number system that has deep gender hierarchy symbolisms. The findings show strong connection between everyday knowledge and social norms that define the status of men and women. While this article is centered on Bukusu society in Kenya, it is premised on the understanding that patriarchy is a pervasive social problem that goes beyond Indigenous societies as evident in the feminist critiques of contemporary societies. Just as Durkheim traced the genesis of society to the simplest forms of rules associated with totemic beliefs, this article also points to the roots of patriarchy in Indigenous society so as to draw attention to the variety of ways in which patriarchy is manifested. By incorporating feminist critiques of patriarchy, it shows conceptual connections between the blatant manifestation of patriarchy in Indigenous societies and the latent, albeit oppressive, manifestations of patriarchy in modern societies. Overall, the article provides deep conceptual insights into the intersection of knowledge systems and patriarchy.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-12-28T09:41:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211063842
       
  • QAnon—Religious Roots, Religious Responses

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      Authors: Sarah Louise MacMillen, Timothy Rush
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Conspiracy theories are not new to religion, nor an exclusively modern phenomenon. But they take on more destructive and wide-ranging impact with modern communication technologies. Looking at the root psychosocial mechanisms of conspiracy theories, we argue that they frame ideas, history, and culture through the cognitive mindscape of special, ‘hidden knowledge’. They also serve as a unifying theory of conflict and narration of history. The COVID epidemic has strained the economic and political system. Although it may be a matter of perception for Q-followers, a sense of precarity is enhanced by QAnon, thus unleashing and mustering an awakening for such extremist paranoid discourse of ressentiment. This parallels the cognitive mindscape of ‘the Great Replacement’. Prior to election 2020, QAnon’s base had been growing in Evangelical communities. Its presence continues to be felt.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-12-27T11:12:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211063565
       
  • Neoliberal Fatigue: The Effects of Private Refugee Sponsorship on
           Canadians’ Political Consciousness

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      Authors: Emine Fidan Elcioglu
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Private sponsorship has become a primary way that refugees access resettlement to Canada. Key in this program are the private Canadians who volunteer their money, time, and labor to sponsor and support refugees. Drawing on 25 interviews, this article examines the insights that these privileged citizens of the global north gain as they help refugees struggling with the marginalizing consequences of neoliberal austerity in their new hostland. While sponsors learn about the challenges facing working-class racialized newcomers (otherwise obscured to sponsors by their racial, class, and citizenship privileges), the program robs sponsors of the time and mental bandwidth to reflect on the structural nature of these challenges. Consequently, sponsors rarely understand refugees’ struggles as public troubles necessitating broader intervention, including modest policy reform. I call this cognitive outcome neoliberal fatigue. I conclude by discussing how this fatigue thwarts social change and reinforces neoliberal capitalism.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-12-16T11:47:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211064924
       
  • Politization in Labor Conflict: Analyzing the Demands of
           Post-Authoritarian Chilean Strikes

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      Authors: Rodrigo M. Medel, Diego Velásquez, Domingo Pérez
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      By examining the demands of labor strikes in the private sector, this article claims that Chilean trade unions have experienced a politization process from the transition to democracy to our days (1990–2019). Assuming a Marxist perspective on the labor process, we propose operationalizing politization into three levels based on the nature of demands: (1) remunerative, (2) related to work conditions, and (3) related to the organization of the labor process. The study regards these three levels as a latent variable ranging from less to more control over the productive process, but, also, as a continuum ranging from more legal demands to more illegal demands according to Chilean labor regulation. The results show an increase of politized demands (i.e. more control and less legality) through the years. This case study sheds light on the consequences of a rigid and ineffective regulation and on the necessity to rethink politics in the workplace.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-12-15T10:56:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211063235
       
  • The January 6 Insurrection: Historical and Global Contexts

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      Authors: Kevin B. Anderson
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The 6 January 2021, Trumpist insurrection is in continuity with centuries of white mob violence in the United States, going back to the thwarted 1861 attempt to attack the Capitol in order to overturn Lincoln’s election. At the same, time Trumpism as a modern phenomenon also exhibits links and affinities to contemporary global neofascist and rightwing populist movements. Although small towns and rural areas were heavily represented among the participants on 6 January, analysts need—in the spirit of Marx—to avoid the Lassallean trap of writing off rural populations as uniformly conservative. In this sense, we need to grasp the pervasive racism at the root of Trumpism and its analogues without falling into a view of rural areas as monolithic.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-12-14T08:39:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211058210
       
  • The Two Faces of the ‘Global Right’: Revolutionary Conservatives and
           National-Conservatives

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      Authors: Mihai Varga, Aron Buzogány
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Studies of the Global Right usually trace its intellectual underpinnings to the revolutionary conservative New Right and its ideas claiming to defend an ‘ethno-pluralist’ European identity from the multiculturalist threat of a ‘Great Replacement’ through immigration. A second lineage, which we refer to as ‘national-conservative’, is less explored and is more concerned with threats to moral order and the loss of moral bearing due to liberalism’s relativism. These two intellectual lineages, and corresponding political alignments, engender different political projects of the Global Right, which is not that coherent as it seems. Taking a long-term historical-ideational perspective that underlines the power of ideologies as templates, we argue that a closer look at the different intellectual traditions of the Global Right can help explain the contrasting political preferences for socio-economic action, institution-building and transnational cooperation.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-12-09T12:08:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211057020
       
  • Resisting a postcolonial construction of historical trauma and healing:
           Critical discourse analysis of public apologies in Canada

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      Authors: Eunjung Lee, Marjorie Johnstone
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The contemporary discourse around historical trauma and healing is site for debate and resistance in public spheres. Guided by critical scholars in language and power as well as post-and settler colonialism, this study analyzes texts and contexts of two public apologies in Canada – Chinese head tax, and residential schools for Indigenous children – to examine how historical trauma and healing were understood, and by doing so how the subject and object were re/constructed to maintain or resist social (dis)orders – postcolonial racial orders – in the past and the present of Canada. Findings included: (1) a split and temporal distance between the wrong past and the benevolent present with governments constructing themselves as the good subject reifying a sincere fiction of a liberal, benevolent, and just white-nation; (2) no acknowledgement of the cause of historical trauma, namely colonial governing; (3) ongoing construction of the other racialized population as victims/burdens/lesser citizens to current Canada; and (4) the explicit demand to collective forgetting of the past/historical trauma as current healing and inclusion. We discuss social responsibilities when historical wounds continue to leave injuries and the risk of perpetuating systemic violence to people with whom we currently share the nation all of us call home.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-12-06T01:10:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211052326
       
  • On the Job, Off the Books: Organizing Against Worker Misclassification in
           the Neoliberal Era

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      Authors: Michael R. Slone, Timothy Black, Alicia Smith-Tran
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Worker misclassification is a form of precarious employment in which employers illegally designate their employees as ‘independent contractors’ to cut labor costs. Non-standard employment arrangements and the emergence of the misclassification problem are expressions of neoliberal economic reform and attendant shifts in managerial strategy. Although scholars and government statisticians have documented the prevalence of worker misclassification, extant research on labor-organizing campaigns in response to this practice is lacking. This paper presents case studies of two successful organizing campaigns against worker misclassification: (1) a United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America (UBCJA) effort in the Northeastern construction industry and (2) a Teamsters campaign focused on the West Coast port trucking industry. Both campaigns employ similar frames highlighting competition, free markets, and the necessity of industrial change to achieve these ideals. We conclude with a discussion of the prospects and limitations of these organizing strategies given the countervailing political and economic headwinds posed by neoliberal restructuring.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-12-03T11:23:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211058039
       
  • Deconstructing the Blackface Minstrel Show, (Re)constructing African
           American Identity: the Case of Olio by Tyehimba Jess

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      Authors: Juyan Zhang, Wei Lu
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-11-29T10:05:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211052616
       
  • Neo-populist Fables: The Other World of A.V. Chayanov

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      Authors: Tom Brass
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The political importance of Chayanov transcends his own time and space, influencing as it has done – and continues to do – both the debate about rural development in Third World countries and – more broadly – resurgent agrarian populist interpretations in academia and elsewhere. Less well known, but epistemologically as revealing of his politics, are his non-economic writings, particularly his contributions to the Gothic literary genre. Examined here, therefore, are three stories written pseudonymously by Chayanov, each of which is structured by the same discourse. All were composed over a short period just after the Bolsheviks took power in Russia, and reveal as a sub-text the political divergence and concomitant struggle between neo-populist and Bolshevik versions of societal development.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-11-29T09:59:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211049271
       
  • Exit-With-Autonomy or Autonomy-Without-Exit' Divergent Political
           Trajectories in Rojava and the Kurdish Regional Government

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      Authors: Spencer Louis Potiker
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper argues that sociological analysis of social movements has undertheorized non/anti-state social movements. It is argued that an alternative modality of resistance to that of movements seeking reform through the state or the capture of state power through revolution is to exit the world-system and set up parallel structures of governance and production. A conjunctural inter-regional comparison is taken up in order to map the inter-scalar and historical causal factors that led to exit-with-autonomy in Syrian Kurdistan (Rojava) and autonomy-without-exit in Iraqi Kurdistan (Kurdish Regional Government). The paper shows that in order to exit the world-system social movement actors in Rojava used strategic loyalty bargains and political voice at specific historical conjunctures in order to maintain their movement and seize on non-state political opportunities. These same non-state political opportunities were not available for the social movement actors hoping to exit the world-system in the Kurdish Regional Government.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-11-29T09:59:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211048547
       
  • Race and 21st Century Minority Pulitzer Poets

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      Authors: Hong Zeng, Chengjian Li
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-11-29T09:59:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211052611
       
  • Politics of Recognition, Elimination and Settler-Colonialism

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      Authors: Emile Badarin
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article cross-examines the external and internal dimensions of settler-colonial politics of recognition. In settler-colonialism, recognition represents another medium for the elimination of the natives, whose existence is considered as a source of threat, uncertainty and curtailed settler sovereignty. Settler sovereign statehood is contingent on the reengineering of the land–population relationship in the conquered territory. The settler-colonial politics of recognition seeks to institutionalise particular patterns of values that ultimately embody the logic of elimination at the normative level in an attempt to disrupt the natives’ relationship with their land. This article critically interrogates Israel’s politics of recognition and demonstrates how this politics is applied to establish internal and external normative scaffolding to normalise and legitimise the settler desire for sovereignty and invulnerability. Israel’s recognition politics dovetails with sources of sovereignty – territory and population – and evokes previous vulnerabilities and victimhood to elicit a sense of urgency and moral validation.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-11-25T08:29:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211058452
       
  • On Marxism and Feminism: On Divergences and Commonalities

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      Authors: Jean-Pierre Reed, Carlos Garrido
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-11-11T06:35:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211057111
       
  • The Perfect Storm: A Subcultural Analysis of the QAnon Movement

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      Authors: Christopher T. Conner, Nicholas MacMurray
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we examine the social phenomenon known as ‘QAnon’. While QAnon is typically thought of as an exclusively online cultural phenomenon, and thus easily dismissed, it has played a significant role in promoting physical acts of violence—including multiple murders and the attack on the United States Capital on 6 January 2021. Utilizing a qualitative analysis of 300 hours of QAnon-related content, we argue that the widespread beliefs held by QAnon supporters were only possible due to the confluence of feelings of distrust in government and other public officials, purveyors of QAnon that profited in the movement’s success, and a populist digital media environment in which extremist ideas are housed and promoted. We conclude by asking if this is a phenomenon created by greater connectivity, or if this is a byproduct of late-stage capitalism in which social relations continue to be atomized.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-11-09T08:45:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211055863
       
  • After a Global Platform Leaves: Understanding the Heterogeneity of Gig
           Workers through Capital Mobility

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      Authors: Youngrong Lee
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      We know a great deal about global capital mobility in traditional industries, such as manufacturing, but very little about emerging capital mobility in the gig economy. Using the case of Canadian Foodora, a multinational platform that left Canada in 2020, I situate global capital mobility in the local labour market. Drawing upon interview data with former Foodora couriers and ethnographic data collected from a gig workers’ union, I investigate the social, economic and political subjectivities of gig workers activated by a global platform’s capital mobility. My findings reveal unexpected parallel effects caused by capital mobility in the gig economy and traditional industries. My research highlights how heterogeneity is salient for understanding divergent worker subjectivities. The economic and social impacts upon financially dependent gig workers and the emotional connections of devoted and organized gig workers challenge the dominant discourse that gig workers are simply part-timers and hence free from work commitments.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-11-05T11:07:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211055912
       
  • Illusion and Non-Identity Thinking in Nietzsche’s Critical Theory

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      Authors: Vasilis Grollios
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The paper attempts to bring to the fore the radical character of Nietzsche’s critical theory. It argues that behind Nietzsche’s consideration of suffering lies both a critique of one-dimensional mass culture and fetishism, and a theory of alienation that is much closer to Marx’s critique of alienation in capitalism than is usually believed. Uniquely, it will also support the idea that Nietzsche holds a theory of a dialectics between content and form, that is of non-identity thinking, very similar to that of the first generation of the Frankfurt School, and will attempt to connect it to an attempt to doubt the core values sustaining capitalism.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-11-02T10:24:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211056354
       
  • Land, Body, Language: Corporeal Poetics of Reclaiming in Natalie
           Diaz’s Postcolonial Love

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      Authors: Hong Zeng
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-10-28T05:41:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211052622
       
  • Importance of “the Social”: The Divergent Informal Careers of
           Chinese Internal Migrants

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      Authors: Thomas Peng
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      When investigating unregulated, unprotected work situations, the precarious work literature focuses on the degradation of work quality, whereas the informal sector literature emphasizes entrepreneurship and mobility. Neither of them, however, pays enough attention to how particular jobs are matched and how career paths evolve. Studying Chinese rural migrants’ informal careers, this research finds three strikingly different career paths. The “precariats” rely on peers to survive career disruptions, but the responsibility to support others leads to a new crisis. The “entrepreneurs” rely on their relatively resourceful families to start small businesses in a highly competitive and precarious market. The “guild” relies on hometown networks to share career information and reduce competition. This research hence draws a more optimistic picture than the precarious work literature as upward career opportunities do exist. Nonetheless, the picture is not as optimistic as the informal sector literature suggests because these opportunities are socially yet unevenly distributed.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-10-28T05:40:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211051784
       
  • Breaking the ‘Tradition’: Race, Violence, and Gender in The
           Tradition

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      Authors: Yuqun Fu
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-10-27T10:19:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211052621
       
  • Trauma and AIDS Metaphor in Peter Balakian’s Ozone Journal

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      Authors: Wenwen Du, Hong Zeng
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-10-27T05:28:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211052609
       
  • Gregory Pardlo’s Digest Seen Through Bonilla-Silva’s Criticism
           of Color-Blind Racism

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      Authors: Li He
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-10-26T07:44:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211052676
       
  • Semiotics of Exile in Photography, Intersectional Racism and Epistemic
           Violence in Natasha Trethewey

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      Authors: Hong Zeng, Azam Sarwar
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-10-25T10:41:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211052608
       
  • Victim or Perpetrator' Social Psychology of Racial Violence and
           Massacre in Philip Shultz’s Works

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      Authors: Hong Zeng
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-10-25T10:41:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211052606
       
  • Early Irish Immigrants as the Marginal Men in Moy Sand and Gravel

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      Authors: Chengjian Li, Ning Guan
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-10-25T10:41:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211052620
       
  • Beyond the Hegemony of Neoliberal Ideas: Ideational Diversity and Policy
           Variegation in the Neoliberal State

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      Authors: Asa Maron
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Sociologists commonly adopt a bifurcated understanding of the neoliberal state, showing how neoliberalism’s advance coincides with the growing authority of specific actors and ideas inside the bureaucratic state as others’ authority declines. This article complicates this view by probing the dynamics of non-neoliberal action inside the state, demonstrating the ways even demoted state actors can strategically muster power resources to forward distinct policy agendas. Taking a long-term perspective on social policy developments since the early 2000s, this article reviews the case of Israel, where neoliberal policies' new hegemony and adverse outcomes triggered counter-actions inside the state, ultimately leading to policy change. Paying particular attention to the role of ideas, this article argues that by rearticulating their policy mission to align with market conventions, non-neoliberal actors were able to persuade neoliberal actors to support their policy proposals, succeeding to advance creative policy alternatives under hostile political conditions. Highlighting this strategic capacity and ideational resilience and acumen in adapting to neoliberal critique reveals how demoted state actors can manage to sustain entrenched organizational goals and institutional motivations even as they help ease the adaptation of their historical mission to the neoliberal zeitgeist.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-10-25T10:41:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211052328
       
  • Democracy and Capitalism in the Interregnum: Trump’s Failed
           Self-Coup and After

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      Authors: Robert J. Antonio
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper addresses Trump’s failed self-coup, its authoritarian backwash, and threats to democracy. It analyzes his handling of the coronavirus pandemic, which contributed to his 2020 election loss and deepened the political polarization that led to the January 6 Capitol insurrection. The essay also discusses how the forty-year acceleration of economic inequality and sociopolitical de-democratization generated a legitimacy crisis of the hegemonic, neoliberal regime that opened way for Trumpist ethnoracial nationalism. The Trump presidency and pandemic increased the intensity of the political-economic contradictions and transparency of the attenuated relationship of democracy and capitalism. In the consequent “interregnum,” fundamental threats to democratic electoral institutions persist, yet a clear, realistic vision of an alternative democratic regime and the political bloc to bring it into being have yet to be forged. The fate of American democracy rides on overcoming the remarkable denial and normalization of the Trump coup attempt and on forging new safeguards for electoral institutions. Preventing a recurrence, however, requires a progressive transformation of Trumpism’s de-democratized seedbed – neoliberal capitalism.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-10-11T10:19:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211049499
       
  • Extractivism and Labour Control: Reflections of Turkey’s ‘Coal Rush’
           in Local Labour Regimes

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      Authors: Coşku Çelik
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This study analyses labour processes and local labour control strategies in the extractive industries and regions as the reflections of state-capital-labour-nature relations. I argue that, for the analysis of labour control in extractive industries, there is a need to pay attention to (i) the significance of the natural resource for global capital accumulation processes and for the development policies of the state; (ii) the formation of the local labour market through proletarianization of rural population and other means of labour supply; (iii) the organization of work considering both natural limits (such as geological structure of the basin) and workforce composition; and (iv) the use of local political, institutional and community dynamics. Drawing upon the fieldwork carried out in Soma Coal Basin, this paper shows how Turkey’s coal rush shapes local labour control strategies.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-10-03T08:48:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211046287
       
  • One of the Good Ones: Rhetorical Maneuvers of Whiteness

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      Authors: Watoii Rabii
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on the literature on white habitus, colorblindness, diversity ideology, and happy talk, I argue that rhetorical maneuvers are key aspects of white habitus that allow whites to construct a non-racist self by drawing on colorblind discourses. To explore how white habitus influences interview dynamics when the respondent and interviewer are of a different race, I conducted 48 interviews with whites from rural and urban areas of the Greater Buffalo Area. Specifically, I examine the relationship between white habitus, a non-racist presentation of self, and rhetorical maneuvers that whites deploy when talking about race and immigration. I also introduce two new frames of colorblindness: differentiation and civility. The civility frame conflates friendliness and civility with anti-racism and is used as evidence that everything is fine. The differentiation frame attempts to draw distinctions between themselves (“non-racist white people”) and other whites (“bad apples”).
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-09-28T04:28:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211046658
       
  • Epistemic media and critical knowledge about the self: Thinking about
           algorithms with Habermas

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      Authors: Eran Fisher
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the ontology of personal knowledge that algorithms on digital media create by locating it on two axes: historical and theoretical. Digital platforms continue a long history of epistemic media—media forms and practices, which not only communicate knowledge, but also create knowledge. As epistemic media allowed a new way to know the world, they also facilitated a new way of knowing the self. This historical perspective also underscores a key difference of digital platforms from previous epistemic media: their exclusion of self-reflection from the creation of knowledge about the self. To evaluate the ramifications of that omission, I use Habermas’s theory of knowledge, which distinguishes critical knowledge from other types of knowledge, and sees it as corresponding with a human interest in emancipation. Critical knowledge about the self, as exemplified by psychoanalysis, must involve self-reflection. As the self gains critical knowledge, deciphering the conditions under which positivist and hermeneutic knowledges are valid, it is also able to transform them and expand its realm of freedom, or subjectivity. As digital media subverts this process by demoting self-reflection, it also undermines subjectivity.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-09-22T07:01:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211044193
       
  • Financialization and income inequality: bringing class struggle back in

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      Authors: Yair Kaldor
      First page: 381
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Financialization and rising income inequality are two of the most pronounced economic developments of recent decades, and there is increasing evidence that these trends are somehow related. However, explanations of this link are still limited, and pay little attention to workers themselves. As a result, the impact of financialization on income inequality appears at most as an unfortunate side-effect. This article takes a different approach by investigating both financialization and income inequality from within the historical development of the class struggle in the United States economy. It shows that the economic problems of the 1970s that provided the impetus for financialization were closely related to the escalating conflicts between labor and capital, in which the state served as an increasingly important terrain of struggle. Viewed from this perspective, rising income inequality appears less as an unexpected outcome of financialization and more as its very raison d’etre.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-07-07T06:37:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211029359
       
  • The Policy Road to Socialism

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      Authors: David Calnitsky
      First page: 397
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      In the standard formulation, the Marxist theory of the state implies that socialism requires revolution: Reformist social policy generates capital flight and capital flight undermines reform. I show that this mechanism, while plausible, turns out to have little empirical merit. State theory correctly points to an “accumulation” function whereby capitalist states depend on revenue and must therefore worry about the reforms that undermine profitability. But this accumulation function has been overwhelmed, historically, by a more powerful “legitimation” function: Popular social expenditures in rich capitalist democracies tend to grow and only rarely decline, even during the so-called neoliberal period. This article considers both sides of this debate. First, I propose (and predict) a path to socialism by way of mushrooming social policy. And second, I argue that if revolution is the only hope for socialism, then socialism is off the table; the revolution must be betrayed.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-08-08T11:05:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211031624
       
  • Social Integrative Enterprises and the Construction of an Impaired
           Lumpenproletariat – a Swedish Case Study

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      Authors: Christian Maravelias
      First page: 423
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper accounts for a study of the joint ambitions of the Swedish Public employment office and social enterprises to integrate jobseekers with impairments in the labor market. The number of jobseekers with impairments has increased in western labor markets. The Swedish labor market is a particular case in point. Why' I use critical disability studies in combination with Marxist studies on immaterial labor to develop the following answer: An increasing number of jobseekers are diagnosed as impaired, not because their bodily constitution makes them unfit to handle manual labor, but because their socio-cultural characteristics make them unfit to handle immaterial forms of labor. Furthermore, I show how the diagnosis of these jobseekers as impaired does not lead to that they are also considered disabled. On the contrary, they are considered to have a particular, bio-medically defined fit and ability when it comes to handling simple, manual and low paid forms of work. Hereby, I argue that they are made up as a bio-medically defined “lumpenproletariat”.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T12:30:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211033892
       
  • Europeanisation, Devolution and Popular Sovereignty: On the Politics of
           State Transformation in Scottish Nationalism

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      Authors: James Foley
      First page: 437
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      This research examines the interacting role of processes of state transformation – namely, devolution and Europeanisation – in the development of Scottish nationalism. It draws on the concept of ‘member statehood’, examining how relationships within nation states have been transformed by the European dynamic. Superficially, Scotland seems to contradict central aspects of this theory: the main citizen mobilising response to Brexit has been in Scotland and aimed precisely at restoring a notional Scottish popular sovereignty by re- joining the EU. However, an analysis of Scottish political development reveals a more complex picture putting state transformation theories in a more sympathetic light. Scottish independence emerges as a complex, contradictory response to post-neoliberalism and the crisis of member-statehood. While Europeanism has proved a useful tool for competing forces in Scotland, it has been refracted through problems of a ‘democratic deficit’ and claims for the ‘restoration’ of sovereignty appealing to disenchanted voters.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-09-06T02:11:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211040548
       
  • Constructing Conflict: The Politics of Job Creation Policy, Precarious
           Work, and Citizenship in South Africa’s Construction Industry

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      Authors: Ben Scully, Thabiso Moyo
      First page: 459
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      The paper examines the politics of state job creation policy in South Africa. We focus on the construction industry, which is a major sector for job creation policy, especially through a large scale public works programme. We argue that, while the creation of jobs is framed by government as a path towards dignity and social inclusion for poor and unemployed citizens, the precarious reality of low-wage work in the construction industry undermines the potential pro-social effects of wage employment. Beneficiaries of job creation policy often experience frustration and alienation, and the construction sites on which they work are often marked by conflict and disruption. We describe two different forms that this conflict takes, on the one hand demanding wage work as a citizenship right, on the other eschewing generalized citizenship claims in favour of particularistic and exclusionary demands for jobs based on localized identities. These seemingly contradictory but intertwined types of conflict show the complexity of the relationship between state job creation and citizenship rights in an industry and an economy defined by precarious forms of employment.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-08-08T11:05:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211035560
       
  • The White Right: A Gendered Look at the Links Between “Victim”
           Ideology and Anti-Black Lives Matter Sentiments in the Era of Trump

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      Authors: Deena A Isom, Hunter M Boehme, Deanna Cann, Amber Wilson
      First page: 475
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Employing a racialized gendered lens, we explore the perceptions of status threat and victimhood among a sample of White Americans following the 2016 presidential election. Specifically, we draw upon such theoretical and empirical work to frame our analyses of the associations between perceptions of a white “victim” ideology and anti-Black Lives Matter (BLM) sentiments and how such associations may be conditioned by support for Trump and holding patriarchal gender normative beliefs. We propose that the BLM movement may be perceived as a “threat” to many White Americans. Furthermore, we believe Whites’ anti-BLM sentiments will be enhanced by support for Trump, given his racist, misogynistic, xenophobic, and oppressive tendencies. Moreover, we believe that these associations will differ based on gender and beliefs in patriarchal gender norms, as White men and women are likely to feel status threat in varied ways. Mix support for our propositions and complex gendered differences are revealed. Implications are discussed.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T12:29:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211020396
       
  • Walls, Cracks and Change: The Challenges and Opportunities of Critically
           Engaged Research Within Current Academic and Refugee Research Structures

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      Authors: Maria Charlotte Rast
      First page: 501
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Many consider academic research an important means to address societal inequality of marginalized groups, such as refugees. However, transformative research arguably requires critically engaged practices that consider and transform dominant exclusive structures permeating both society and knowledge production. This paper discusses challenges and opportunities of such research practices, especially given power and (neoliberal) politics around knowledge production within Dutch academic and refugee research structures. Based on 14 researchers’ narratives, the results reveal how critically engaged refugee research is challenged by its marginalized position, academic pressures and culture as well as the recently emerged ‘refugee research business’. However, the paper also uncovers various ways in which researchers manoeuvre within challenging and facilitating structures by operating outside or in the margins of academic structures, making use of facilitating spaces and strategically employing dominant discourses. Finally, researchers arguably transform academic structures by challenging dominant research paradigms and transforming the institution of academics itself.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-08-16T09:46:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211034227
       
  • Place Attachment and Alienation from Place: Cultural Displacement in
           Gentrifying Ethnic Enclaves

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      Authors: Steven Tuttle
      First page: 517
      Abstract: Critical Sociology, Ahead of Print.
      Commercial gentrification often accompanies residential gentrification. Both processes contribute to the real or perceived threat of displacement for longtime residents of ethnic enclaves experiencing gentrification. Cultural displacement is a related concern among residents who may experience a declining sense of ownership, control, or belonging as newer residents and commercial establishments move into their communities. Yet, other longtime residents experience an increased sense of safety as their neighborhoods gentrify and they may appreciate the new amenities gentrification brings. I highlight the symbolic significance of local businesses in gentrifying neighborhoods and identify two different patterns of longtime residents experiencing their communities as something alien to them—a phenomenon I call alienation from place. Alienation from place may be a product of social and cultural displacement or may be alleviated by changes to a neighborhood accompanying gentrification processes, a posteriori alienation from place and a priori alienation from place, respectively.
      Citation: Critical Sociology
      PubDate: 2021-07-29T03:22:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08969205211029363
       
 
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