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Library Management
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.412
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 1300  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0143-5124 - ISSN (Online) 1758-7921
Published by Emerald Homepage  [364 journals]
  • Mobile phone library service: seat management system based on WeChat

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      Authors: Yan Liu, Hui Ye, Hua Sun
      Abstract: This paper proposes a systematic method to manage students to use limited seat resources in Chinese university libraries, with the aid of mobile phone app, at the same time, its use is being investigated. Use mixed research methods, quantitative and qualitative research. Through observation, questionnaire and interview to achieve research purpose. The survey was conducted in the library of Nanjing agricultural university. The result shows system can offer convenient, accurate, more personalized, mobility service to each user. Actual average seat usage rate is over 51.7% in a day, most of users are satisfied with the seat management system, students' satisfaction degree are 94.8%. It is also an extension of mobile phone library service. Seat management system innovate traditional people-oriented service mode of study room into smart, readers can browse usage information of seats anytime and anywhere, get what they want, service become fast and convenient. In period of COVID-19, the seat system also plays an important role, it is easy for librarians to control the number of students to enter, the trajectory of readers in the library can be tracked and the possible epidemic risk can be accurately prevented and controlled.
      Citation: Library Management
      PubDate: 2021-06-03
      DOI: 10.1108/LM-09-2020-0132
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Transforming a university library into a learning organisation

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      Authors: Clare Thorpe
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to discuss the strategies to promote a culture of professional learning within an Australian academic library. As the COVID-19 experience has shown new and evolving roles require skills, knowledge and abilities that current library employees may not have trained for. One framework which supports continuous professional development and employee motivation is the concept of a learning organisation, where staff across all levels of the library acknowledge the value of continuous learning and autonomously engage in activities to keep their skills up to date and relevant. The article is a case study of a three-year period of interventions and outcomes in an Australian academic library. The strategies discussed provide insights for library managers and leaders about how organisational change can be incrementally embedded through clarity of purpose, aligned leadership, transparent processes, self-determination and social learning. The case study examines a single institution. The paper provides practical strategies and examples from the case study of one university library which has successful embedded workplace learning as a regular and accepted part of staff routines.
      Citation: Library Management
      PubDate: 2021-05-03
      DOI: 10.1108/LM-01-2021-0003
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Migrating to a shared Library Management System: evaluation from the
           perspective of librarians and lessons learned

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      Authors: Dimitrios Kouis, Konstantinos Kyprianos, Foteini Efthymiou, Alexandros Koulouris, Antonia Karabela
      Abstract: The purpose of this article is to investigate certain aspects, problems and benefits from the migration to a shared Library Management System (LMS). A review of the literature and a quantitative survey was conducted, based on a structured questionnaire, with a response rate of 44.7%. Among the crucial issues that should be taken seriously into consideration when transiting into a new and shared LMS, are the audit of the data quality before migration, the employees' training design and the composition of the LMS central support team. The benefits of a shared LMS are mainly effectiveness in terms of libraries' budgets and time for the employees' day-to-day work. The survey presented in this article evaluates the merits of a shared LMS and contributes innovative aspects to the existing bibliography by investigating issues and problems that arose during the transition. This way, the professionals involved in similar initiatives will benefit by avoiding possible mistakes and drawbacks when implementing such a project.
      Citation: Library Management
      PubDate: 2021-05-03
      DOI: 10.1108/LM-12-2020-0177
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Demystifying teaching, learning and research through institutional
           repositories in higher learning institutions in Kenya

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      Authors: Lucy Jelagat Sang, Cephas Odini, Justus Wamukoya
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to provide an analysis of ways in which teaching, learning and research can be demystified in higher institutions of learning (HILs). Over the last decade, HILs around the world have faced various transformations to adapt to new opportunities for knowledge dissemination and utilization. Many benefits are gained from implementation of the platform including visibility, status and increased reputation. Despite the high uptake of institutional repositories (IRs) to guide teaching, learning and research of higher institutions learning's digital resources more effectively, little has been written on how IRs can be used for effective teaching, learning and research in higher institutions of learning. Using analytical method, this paper analysed and presented various thematical issues on IRs in relation to its efficacy, while proposing solutions for its sustainability. The paper found that most universities have embraced IRs as an option for increasing their visibility, status and researchers' relevance in the knowledge world. It is the conclusion of the study that IRs are currently recognized as an essential infrastructure to respond to the higher institutions of learning challenges in the digital world. This paper provides higher institutions of learning an opportunity to prepare their IRs to demystify teaching, learning and research. Since IRs will make it possible to access variety of information at any time whenever required. Knowledge accessibility and utilization bring about social change in the society. Little has been documented on how IRs can be used for effective teaching, teaching, learning and research in HILs. This paper provides an analysis of ways in which teaching, learning and research can be demystified in these institutions. Thus, it contributes new knowledge on demystifying teaching, learning and research through IRs in HILs.
      Citation: Library Management
      PubDate: 2021-03-25
      DOI: 10.1108/LM-06-2020-0094
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Echoes down the corridor. Experiences and perspectives of library and
           information science education (LISE) during COVID-19 through an African
           lens

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      Authors: Dennis N. Ocholla
      Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in enormous challenges, but also presented opportunities that have notable implications for the future. The aim of this paper is to explore and discuss the experiences, perspectives, challenges and opportunities of Library and Information Science Educators (LISE) during the pandemic. The aim is articulated in the following three research questions: How is the COVID-19 pandemic experienced by LISE and in research' What are the perceptions formed during the period' And what are the challenges and opportunities' This is an interpretivist qualitative study informed by disaster management theories. The study involved the content analysis of existing literature with a focus on COVID-19 and higher education, particularly LISE, in conjunction with an open-ended email questionnaire that was sent to selected LIS educators/faculty/staff from major LIS Schools from eight sub-Saharan African countries. The author used personal experiences and observation to supplement the data and the interpretation. Results show more similarities than differences in how the COVID-19 pandemic is experienced and perceived, as well as the challenges and opportunities that it brings to the sector. As a whole, political factors are most pronounced, meaning that administration and decision-making need more attention in the sector. Also notable is that opportunities are mostly linked to technological factors, which will determine the “new normal” for LISE in the future. Almost all the narratives focused on the middle level of (during) the disaster life cycle, which is understandable as the complete cycle of the disaster is yet to come, likely when COVID-19 ceases to be a threat. The sample was small, as related studies focus more on COVID-19 and higher education, with hardly any focusing on LISE. The COVID-19 pandemic has not ended, so the disaster management life cycle cannot be fully exploited. Furthermore, the author’s categorization of responses within PEST was largely judgmental. New research, teaching and learning developmental paths have been created for LISE. The study provides practical reflection on the effects of COVID-19 on the sector and HEIs that can inform discourse and responses to the pandemic. The study explores a new research domain in LISE and due to limited research in the domain brings together important voices/narratives – based on their experiences – of LIS educators in Africa on the research area. Further, it proposes the future of LISE under COVID-19 within the 4IR framework.
      Citation: Library Management
      PubDate: 2021-03-19
      DOI: 10.1108/LM-02-2021-0016
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • A secondary analysis of the library profession’s self-reported
           competence and comfort in working with patrons with disabilities

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      Authors: JJ Pionke
      Abstract: This article presents a secondary analysis of previously published data in order to drive discussion of the library profession’s current state of preparedness in working with patrons with disabilities. This article used a secondary analysis of survey data that have been previously published to determine what the continuum of data said about the current state of preparedness in the profession when working with people with disabilities. A comparison of the data from both surveys reveals that there are not only gaps in library graduate school education related to disability and accessibility but also that those gaps are not being addressed through professional development and staff training after students enter the workforce. This was a secondary analysis of data, so no new data could be added. There was also no representation from library graduate school administration. An awareness is built that there needs to be more instruction for library graduate students and library employees on topics related to disability, accessibility and assistive technologies. The topic has never been studied before in this kind of continuum of data, and the use of the secondary analysis of data with the library and information science profession is exceedingly rare.
      Citation: Library Management
      PubDate: 2021-03-09
      DOI: 10.1108/LM-10-2020-0153
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • COVID-19 pandemic and role of libraries

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      Authors: Kanwal Ameen
      Abstract: The purpose was to address the role of libraries in the worst-case scenario, with specific reference of developing countries like Pakistan. The paper is based on the author's observations, readings, and personal communications with colleagues The paper provides a viewpoint on how a developing country like Pakistan has been dealing with the situation and highlights the opportunities provided by this unusual situation. It highlights that various stakeholders have realized the need to bridge the digital divide in order to meet future challenges. The paper is limited generally to developing countries and specifically to Pakistan. It establishes the dire need for innovative approaches in library services to meet the seen and unforeseen challenges. If suggestions are considered, then the libraries may be in a better position to serve under challenging circumstances. This is an original work written to address the worst-case scenario of a developing country.
      Citation: Library Management
      PubDate: 2021-02-24
      DOI: 10.1108/LM-01-2021-0008
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Public views on a new library project: a content analysis 2014–2019

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      Authors: Jingzhen Xie, Lili Sun
      Abstract: This study aims to investigate how the local residents viewed a new public library project in Macao through the analysis of newspaper articles published in 2014–2019 and how these views have changed the decision-makers in selecting a different site for the new library. Content analysis was used to analyze public views. 569 newspaper articles on the new library project published in local major newspapers from January 2014 to August 2019 were coded and analyzed. Percentage agreement for the two coders and Cohen's Kappa were used to calculate the inter-rater reliability. The top 5 factors discussed in the newspaper articles were the general decision-making process (38.65%), location (18.20%), selection of the Old Court Building as the new library site (15.07%), budget (13.5%) and new library services (6.85%). The local residents tended to raise questions on the high cost, the appropriateness of the selected library site, the preservation of the local heritage buildings, and the role that the government should play in this project. This study only collected and analyzed the data from the articles published in the major newspapers in Macao. Other types of media from sources such as Facebook were not included in this study. Articles containing similar information but from different newspapers were all counted as individual entries for data collection. The voices/options were not divided by groups. For further analysis, the articles could be separated by voices from politicians, librarians and other special interest groups. The chosen categories in this study were based on Voyant Tools and the authors' interpretation/focus of the research question. The categories could be subdivided for further study. For example, the overall support of the project could be broken into full support, support with some minor reservations, support with major reservations, etc. And some articles currently in the neutral category with some degrees of support might fit into one of the above new sub-categories. The case carries new references for any communities embarking on similar projects.
      Citation: Library Management
      PubDate: 2021-02-16
      DOI: 10.1108/LM-10-2020-0137
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • The coronavirus pandemic in the Caribbean academic library: Jamaica's
           initial interpretation of strengths, biggest impact, lessons and plans

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      Authors: Sasekea Yoneka Harris
      Abstract: This paper examined the impact of the novel coronavirus pandemic (known as COVID-19) on Jamaican academic libraries, during the first six months, with an emphasis on revealed library strengths, biggest impact, lessons learned and plans for library business continuity. The local academic libraries in higher education in Jamaica (also referred to in this paper as university libraries) were surveyed. The coronavirus pandemic revealed strengths in the areas of staffing and library modality and had the biggest impact on the latter. Lessons were learned in preparedness, communication, documentation, collaboration, staffing, library modality, and infrastructure/systems, which together shaped plans for library business re-opening/continuity. This paper captures the initial response of Jamaican Academic Libraries (JAL) to the first six months of the COVID-19 pandemic. Information on COVID-19 is rapidly evolving, and the preliminary initial response of Jamaica is neither the final nor complete response to the pandemic. As such, a follow-up survey of months 7–12 would be useful. Also, a survey of all English-speaking Caribbean academic libraries would be of value to library evidence and practice. The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed a gap in the literature on library disaster management in general but also specifically on pandemic preparedness and management, and library business continuity during a pandemic. Using JAL' response, this paper proposes: “A Pandemic Preparedness Business Continuity Planning Checklist for Jamaican Academic Libraries”, which can be adopted/adapted in other Caribbean/developing country academic libraries, as well as other library types in Jamaica, which currently look to the understudied university libraries for leadership. This paper is the first scholarly paper on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on university libraries in the Jamaican / English-speaking Caribbean, with a focus on revealed strengths, biggest impact, lessons learned, plans for library business re-opening/continuity. As the scholarly literature on pandemic management in Caribbean academic libraries is non-existent, this paper seeks to fill this gap, albeit incrementally. Additionally, the findings can inform the Latin America and Caribbean section of international library papers on COVID-19 impact on academic libraries globally.
      Citation: Library Management
      PubDate: 2021-02-16
      DOI: 10.1108/LM-10-2020-0149
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Embedding an information literacy course into a learning management
           system: a case study

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      Authors: Janine Lockhart
      Abstract: This article outlines how an existing information literacy (IL) course was developed and embedded into a Learning Management System (LMS) with the aim of creating a blended learning environment for the course. It outlines how the platform was chosen, choice of learning design (LD) approaches, tools and processes used, Open Educational Resources (OERs) incorporated, the choice of Creative Commons (CC) licensing, branding, usage options and formats of materials. A mixed-method approach was used in conducting this research. The online course was piloted in 2017 with two groups of students who completed an online questionnaire to provide their evaluation and feedback. The results showed a very positive evaluation by the students, which shows that the university is on the correct path with embedding IL into a learner management system. The author could not have the second face-to-face class with group 1 as was intended due to the student unrest at the university during this time. Also, with the disruption to the academic programme, the author had less feedback from students than expected; however, the 20% response rate was sufficient to inform the author’s future developments. The flexibility (not a one size fits all) in usage was relevant and necessary to accommodate a number of student needs and socio-economic factors. This article adds value to the academic project by showing how IL courses can successfully be embedded within an LMS, student preferences and socio-economic factors to be considered in a South African context.
      Citation: Library Management
      PubDate: 2021-02-12
      DOI: 10.1108/LM-09-2020-0129
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Covid-19 impact on the Caribbean academic library: Jamaica's preliminary
           response to people, place, product and services

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      Authors: Sasekea Yoneka Harris
      Abstract: This paper examined the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on people, place, product and services in Jamaican academic libraries. It also compares the Jamaican academic library’s COVID-19 experience with US academic library’s COVID-19 preliminary experience. The local academic libraries in higher education in Jamaica (also referred to in this paper as university libraries) were surveyed. Government mandates, university mandates and the absence of a vaccine influenced academic library response. The measures implemented, though unplanned and developed on-the-go, constituted a behavioural change model (BCM). COVID-19 has had a positive-negative impact on library people, place, product and services and has created a new normal for Jamaican academic libraries. This paper captures the preliminary response of Jamaican academic libraries to the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on library people, place, product and services. As such, a follow-up survey on changes, challenges, strengths, impact, lessons and plans would be a useful complement to this paper. As COVID-19 information is rapidly evolving, this preliminary response of Jamaica is neither the final nor complete response to the pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed a gap in the literature on disaster management generally and pandemic management in particular, and on the management of health disasters in academic libraries; this paper seeks to fill this gap, albeit incrementally, through Jamaica's preliminary response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper gives voice to the Caribbean academic library’s COVID-19 experience, through the voice of Jamaica. It is the first scholarly paper on the impact of COVID-19 on university libraries in the Jamaican / English-speaking Caribbean, and so presents the elements of the BCM implemented by Jamaica, which provides an important guide to Caribbean academic library leaders. The findings can also inform the Latin American and Caribbean section of international library papers on COVID-19 impact on academic libraries globally.
      Citation: Library Management
      PubDate: 2021-02-10
      DOI: 10.1108/LM-10-2020-0144
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Influence of satisfaction and loyalty on Net Promoter Score (NPS) in
           academic libraries in Indonesia

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      Authors: Dyah Puspitasari Srirahayu, Esti Putri Anugrah, Khoirotun Layyinah
      Abstract: This study aims to determine the NPS score of state academic libraries users in Indonesia, the relationship between user loyalty and NPS scores and the relationship between user satisfaction with NPS. The method used in this research is quantitative explanatory method, which surveyed the relationship between satisfaction, loyalty and NPS variables based on the development of previous studies and existing theories. The population in this study were students visiting the state university library in Surabaya, Indonesia, namely Library A, Library B, Library C and Library D. The total number of samples taken was 200 divided equally to each of the universities, with 50 respondents respectively. Data collection was done with a questionnaire. The Result shows that NPS value for academic library in Indonesia was 8. (1) The probability value of satisfaction with NPS is 0.18 (greater than 0.01) so H1 is rejected, meaning that satisfaction has no significant effect on NPS, (2) The probability value of satisfaction with loyalty is 
      Citation: Library Management
      PubDate: 2021-02-09
      DOI: 10.1108/LM-06-2020-0090
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Culture wars, libraries and the BBC

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      Authors: Bob Usherwood, Margaret Usherwood
      Abstract: Public libraries and public service broadcasters are threatened by political developments in the UK and USA. They are targets in a divisive culture war waged by ideological organisations that disseminate misleading and false information about social and political matters on line, on screen and in print. The purpose of this paper is to alert information professionals to this issue and suggests that, although they should not engage in this war, they must be prepared to use their professional expertise to identify and correct unreliable material. Further, they should cooperate with other true information organisations to expose the fallacious sources that endanger democracy. The authors analysed material from academic texts and papers, professional journals, serious contemporary journalism, political manifestoes, Internet blogs and items from the BBC sound archive to illustrate the history, size and nature of the problem and to suggest how it might be dealt with. This documentary analysis was based on the belief that information professionals are not the only people examining and concerned about this issue. It therefore included material from a wide range of other disciplines, including psychology, medicine and politics. There is evidence that populist movements from the political right dislike information organisations and have historically, through misinformation and misrepresentation, persuaded working class citizens that they are being exploited by an elite. Public libraries and the BBC are highly trusted organisations, but much of the British public goes to sources it trusts least, such as tabloid newspapers, for information on politics and society. Librarians and BBC broadcasters demonstrated their value during the COVID-19 pandemic, but they need to engage with other professional groups to fully understand what is happening and counteract the threats it presents to our democracy. The paper deals with a significant current issue that needs to be considered urgently by practitioners, academics and policy makers. It includes practical examples and suggestions demonstrating how information workers have and can help their users identify and use trusted and accurate information sources and perhaps be made aware of editorial bias.
      Citation: Library Management
      PubDate: 2021-01-21
      DOI: 10.1108/LM-12-2020-0175
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • It will all be over by Christmas

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      Authors: Christine Mackenzie
      Abstract: We can slip into a dystopic future and despair, or we can show how libraries can help create a better, more sustainable world. The United Nations 2030 Agenda and Sustainable Development Goals are just as relevant as ever and provide a framework for action. This article considers the events shaping the world in 2020 and explores the impact on libraries. Three examples of new libraries in The Netherlands show to the world what libraries are and can be. They reinterpret the mission of public libraries and encourage us to hold to and champion our values of access to information and knowledge, literacy, learning and innovation. The views are my own and do not represent an official IFLA view.
      Citation: Library Management
      PubDate: 2021-01-05
      DOI: 10.1108/LM-07-2020-0106
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Library Management

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