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Journal Cover Library & Information Science Research
  [SJR: 1.629]   [H-I: 41]   [1185 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0740-8188
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3089 journals]
  • The effects of inquiry-based information literacy instruction on memory
           and comprehension: A longitudinal study
    • Authors: Lin Ching Chen; Tsai-Wei Huang; Yaw-Huei Chen
      Pages: 256 - 266
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 4
      Author(s): Lin Ching Chen, Tsai-Wei Huang, Yaw-Huei Chen
      How information literacy instruction affects students' learning has been a concern for many librarians and teachers. This study examines the effects of six-year integrated information literacy instruction on elementary students' memory and comprehension of subject content through inquiry learning and also focuses on the moderating factor of students' academic achievement levels. The subjects were 75 students participating in the study from the time when they entered elementary school. The school adopted information literacy instruction and integrated it into various subject areas using the framework of inquiry learning, for example, the Super3 and Big6 models. A total of 11 inquiry learning projects were implemented from Grade 1 through Grade 6. The results showed that inquiry-based integrated information literacy instruction helps students memorize facts and apply new concepts in the subject content. In general, the progress level in comprehension was higher than in memory learning for the six-year integrated information literacy instruction. Regardless of students' prior academic achievement levels, if they devoted their efforts to inquiry processes, their fact memorization and conceptual understanding of subject content improved. Low-achieving students displayed the most progression in both memory and comprehension learning, compared to their medium- and high-achieving peers. This study underscores the importance of information literacy instruction in students' learning.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T19:02:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.11.003
       
  • Caregivers' beliefs about library visits: A theory-based study of
           formative research
    • Authors: Hanna Schmidt; Kyra Hamilton
      Pages: 267 - 275
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 4
      Author(s): Hanna Schmidt, Kyra Hamilton
      Currently, no research has systematically investigated the beliefs underpinning caregivers' intentions to visit public libraries with their young children. Drawing from the theory of planned behaviour, this study adopted a three-phase program of formative research to examine the decision making processes of parents and carers with young children living in a low socio-economic area. Phase 1 identified seven behavioural, five normative, and ten control beliefs as modal salient beliefs held by parents and carers. Phase 2 identified a variety of key behavioural, normative, and control beliefs as significant predictors of intention to visit the library with their young child. Phase 3 elicited the reasons underpinning these key beliefs guiding parents' and carers' intentions, identifying 34 reasons that could be used in messages to promote library visits. The results provide useful information that intervention designers, councils, and library services can use to encourage library use among parents and carers with young children.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T19:02:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.11.002
       
  • Don't they teach that in high school' Examining the high school to
           college information literacy gap
    • Authors: Laura Saunders; Jenny Severyn; Jes Caron
      Pages: 276 - 283
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 4
      Author(s): Laura Saunders, Jenny Severyn, Jes Caron
      College librarians express concern over incoming students' information literacy skills and lack of skills preparing them for college-level research. However, it is unclear whether information literacy skills are not being taught at the high school level, whether they are not being retained or transferred as students move on to college, or whether there is a disconnect between the skills taught in high school and those expected of incoming college students. This study explores these questions through a set of parallel surveys sent to a national sample of high school and college librarians. Findings suggest that high school and college librarians agree on the importance of most skills though they vary in their emphasis on their importance, and that information literacy skills are being taught in high school but do not seem to transfer to college. The paper concludes with suggestions for increased communication and collaboration to bridge the high school to college transition.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T19:02:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.11.006
       
  • Research methods: What's in the name'
    • Authors: Heting Chu; Qing Ke
      Pages: 284 - 294
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 4
      Author(s): Heting Chu, Qing Ke
      Research methods are applied in all kinds of studies, though no consensus exists regarding what constitutes a research method and how research methods should be categorized. Over 1900 research articles were obtained from three major journals published between 2001 and 2010 in library and information science (LIS). Each selected article was coded using a schema of research methods developed in this study. The coded data, along with related publications, were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. This exploration shows that research methods comprise data collection techniques (e.g., interview, observation) and data analysis techniques (e.g., qualitative, quantitative). Research methods should perhaps be categorized by data collection technique, as it makes more sense than if research methods are labeled as qualitative or quantitative. This study is one of the many efforts to facilitate a better understanding of research methods in LIS and help scholars make more informed decisions about research method selection in their endeavors. Its implications can be extended to LIS research education, training, and advocacy. Because research methods themselves are not discipline-specific, researchers beyond the LIS field would benefit from this study as well.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T19:02:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.11.001
       
  • Ethical perspectives on data and software sharing in the sciences: A
           research agenda
    • Authors: Peter T. Darch; Emily J.M. Knox
      Pages: 295 - 302
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 4
      Author(s): Peter T. Darch, Emily J.M. Knox
      Data and software are critical components of scientific work. Increased data and software sharing promises many benefits for science. Many stakeholders are building infrastructure and implementing policies to promote sharing. However, sharing remains rare in practice. Attention must be paid to researchers' ethical perspectives on sharing to fully realize the promise of sharing and promote greater circulation of data and software and better uptake of infrastructure for data and software curation. This research presents an agenda for researching these perspectives, including characterizing and accounting for researchers' perspectives; examining how these perspectives shape decisions related to data and software sharing; and understanding how and why differences in perspectives arise and are contested, negotiated, and resolved in multidisciplinary scientific collaboration. This agenda will enable stakeholders to identify and resolve differences in ethical perspectives, and develop policies, infrastructures, and education that support existing ethical perspectives, and cultivate better ethical practices.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T19:02:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.11.008
       
  • A multimodal critical discourse analysis of anti-vaccination information
           on Facebook
    • Authors: Jinxuan Ma; Lynne Stahl
      Pages: 303 - 310
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 4
      Author(s): Jinxuan Ma, Lynne Stahl
      In light of recent outbreaks of measles and other vaccine-preventable diseases, childhood vaccination has been the subject of significant attention and controversy. Much information seeking and debates about vaccines take place on social media, yet the effects of information context-specific factors on parental information seeking and sharing and information source assessment remain unknown. Through the lenses of reductionist thinking and cognitive authority, this study employed a multimodal critical discourse analysis approach to analyze the textual and graphic information within a public anti-vaccine Facebook group. Findings show that parental information seeking and sharing worked to create an isolated, sentimentalized information context favoring immediacy and emotional impact over scientific research and statistical evidence. Because participants shared fundamental beliefs and goals around vaccines, group members held cognitive authority despite the lack of expertise or evidentiary support in their postings. This controversial information-based movement poses challenges and opportunities for library outreach and information provision.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T19:02:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.11.005
       
  • Emotional design application to evaluate user impressions of library
           information desks
    • Authors: Carmina Cortés-Villalba; Isidoro Gil-Leiva; Miguel Ángel Artacho-Ramírez
      Pages: 311 - 318
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 4
      Author(s): Carmina Cortés-Villalba, Isidoro Gil-Leiva, Miguel Ángel Artacho-Ramírez
      To evaluate the quality of service it is critical to know the concepts on which such evaluations are made from the user point of view. Differential semantics was applied in an emotional design framework to identify these concepts, or dimensions, and an equation was devised to discover the influence they have in the acceptance of a service by users. Some 53 users evaluated the tangible elements of 28 library information desks. Five latent concepts emerged from the analysis: modern, welcoming, professional, simple, and accessible. The most influential concepts influencing willingness to interact at library information desks were, in descending order, modernity, professionalism, welcoming environment, and accessibility. Finally, a comparative semantic profile was developed to explore the perception differences between the most and the least desirable information desks. Understanding the concepts that users consider when evaluating information desks and the influence of those concepts on user behavior can help designers improve overall service quality impressions.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T19:02:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.11.004
       
  • Spatial variation in accessibility of libraries in Hong Kong
    • Authors: Yingqi Guo; Chee Hon Chan; Paul S.F. Yip
      Pages: 319 - 329
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 4
      Author(s): Yingqi Guo, Chee Hon Chan, Paul S.F. Yip
      Libraries play a significant role in supplying educational and cultural services. They are important public spaces that can contribute to creating social equality by providing unlimited access to information and public spaces for the community. In this research both the traditional measures (supply-to-demand ratio and straight distance) and advanced measures (population-weighted average nearest network distance and population-weighted average two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) score) are used to assess spatial inequity in the distribution of libraries throughout Hong Kong. How accessibility has been changed after the introduction of two strategies for improvement (community and mobile libraries) is also examined, as are spatial demographic and socioeconomic characteristics associated with library provision. The results indicate that there is a substantial heterogeneity of library provision in Hong Kong. Community and mobile libraries have significantly improved the library provision in several areas, although spatial inequality remains. Areas with demographic and socioeconomic groups with lower accessibility to library services were further identified. Data at multiple geographical scales were used, and consistent findings were obtained, confirming the robustness of the results.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T19:02:02Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.11.007
       
  • Equitable access: Information seeking behavior, information needs, and
           necessary library accommodations for transgender patrons
    • Authors: Aubri A. Drake; Arlene Bielefield
      Pages: 160 - 168
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 3
      Author(s): Aubri A. Drake, Arlene Bielefield
      This study highlights the unique accommodations integral to welcoming transgender library patrons. Research shows transgender people have unique needs which differ from lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer (LGBQ) individuals, and experience substantial barriers to obtaining quality library service. Most studies in the past exploring the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender library users focused exclusively on LGBQ users. This study surveyed adult transgender individuals (n =102) with an online questionnaire. The majority of participants were white, designated female at birth, and under 40years old. Survey respondents needed libraries to make accommodations for them to feel safe (p <0.001). The top 5 accommodations needed were recent transgender literature, gender identity or expression as part of library nondiscrimination policy, gender neutral, single-stall bathrooms where a key did not need to be requested, recent LGBQ literature), and an established remote process for name change.

      PubDate: 2017-07-24T11:29:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.06.002
       
  • Displacement or complementarity' Assessing the relationship between
           social media and public library usage in the U.S., South Korea, and
           Singapore
    • Authors: Sei-Ching Joanna Sin; Nahyun Kwon
      Pages: 169 - 179
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 3
      Author(s): Sei-Ching Joanna Sin, Nahyun Kwon
      The relevancy of public libraries is often called into question, with some saying that library services have been or will be displaced by, among other things, new media such as social media. This study tested this displacement hypothesis with survey data collected from three nations (the U.S.: N =879; South Korea: N =700; and Singapore: N =987). Ordinal regressions were used to investigate the relationship between the use of social media and nine public library services, taking into account individual demographic differences. The results show that for all three nations, social media use has significant complementary relationships with all nine library services examined. Computer and information literacy training showed the largest effect size. However, signs of displacement effects were observed in the odds ratio statistics, particularly among daily social media users and in reference services, library visits, and time spent in the library, suggesting that where displacement is concerned, these areas warrant extra attention.

      PubDate: 2017-08-03T18:18:35Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.07.002
       
  • Urban exploration: Secrecy and information creation and sharing in a hobby
           context
    • Authors: Crystal Fulton
      Pages: 189 - 198
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 3
      Author(s): Crystal Fulton
      Urban exploration is a hobby that involves visiting and capturing visual images of urban infrastructure often no longer used, including sewers, towers, factories, and military instalments. Hobbyists then frequently share their visual content via social media sites. The urban explorer's multi-layered construction of content offers an important opportunity to understand how people create information and share experiences and content in a hobby context. Data were gathered through face-to-face interviews with 17 urban explorers from Ireland and the United Kingdom and an analysis of urban explorers' digital presence. Results suggest that urban explorers believe their hobby serves both personal and civic purposes. Urban explorers' creative hobby behaviors further lead them to secretive information behaviors.

      PubDate: 2017-09-02T19:12:21Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.07.003
       
  • Observing preschool storytime practices in Aotearoa New Zealand's urban
           public libraries
    • Authors: Anne Goulding; John Dickie; Mary Jane Shuker
      Pages: 199 - 212
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 3
      Author(s): Anne Goulding, John Dickie, Mary Jane Shuker
      This study explores how preschool storytimes in public libraries in Aotearoa New Zealand incorporate practices which have been identified as beneficial for children's early literacy skills. The results of observations of storytimes in four public library services are reported, focusing on whether they included activities that foster six key literacy skills: print motivation; phonological awareness; vocabulary; narrative skills; print awareness and print concepts; and letter awareness. The results indicate that the storytimes observed focused strongly on techniques to increase children's print motivation, and other skills, such as the development of letter awareness, did not feature as frequently. It is suggested that the librarians leading the sessions were wary of introducing more formal instructional elements into the storytimes because they felt it might detract from the main aim of the sessions, which was to encourage children to enjoy books and reading.

      PubDate: 2017-08-03T18:18:35Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.07.005
       
  • A clickstream data analysis of Chinese academic library OPAC users'
           information behavior
    • Authors: Tingting Jiang; Yu Chi; Huiqin Gao
      Pages: 213 - 223
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 3
      Author(s): Tingting Jiang, Yu Chi, Huiqin Gao
      Chinese academic libraries have been devoting great effort into introducing next-generation online public access catalogs (OPACs) in order to provide a better user experience. However, there is a lack of empirical research on their usage. In this study, a transaction log file from a typical next-generation OPAC, the Wuhan University Library OPAC, formed the basis for an investigation of users' information behavior, using a clickstream data analysis framework. The 26,732,368 clickstream records in the original log file were cleaned, parsed, coded, then analyzed at the footprint, movement, and pathway levels. The results showed that the users relied heavily on the single-box simple search interface, seldom involved themselves in an exploratory search process, and preferred page navigation over search refinement when interacting with search results. The OPAC was used as a lookup tool to locate known academic resources and as a personal information management tool to utilize basic library services, instead of as a discovery tool as intended.

      PubDate: 2017-08-03T18:18:35Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.07.004
       
  • Social scientists' data reuse behaviors: Exploring the roles of
           attitudinal beliefs, attitudes, norms, and data repositories
    • Authors: Ayoung Yoon; Youngseek Kim
      Pages: 224 - 233
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 3
      Author(s): Ayoung Yoon, Youngseek Kim
      Many disciplines within the social sciences have a dynamic culture of sharing and reusing data. Because social science data differ from data in the hard sciences, it is necessary to explicitly examine social science data reuse. This study explores the data reuse behaviors of social scientists in order to better understand both the factors that influence those social scientists' intentions to reuse data and the extent to which those factors influence actual data reuse. Using an integrated theoretical model developed from the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and the technology acceptance model (TAM), this study provides a broad explanation of the relationships among factors influencing social scientists' data reuse. A total of 292 survey responses were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Findings suggest that social scientists' data reuse intentions are directly influenced by the subjective norm of data reuse, attitudes toward data reuse, and perceived effort involved in data reuse. Attitude toward data reuse mediated social scientists' intentions to reuse data, leading to the indirect influence of the perceived usefulness and perceived concern of data reuse, as well as the indirect influence of the subjective norm of data reuse. Finally, the availability of a data repository indirectly influenced social scientists' intentions to reuse data by reducing the perceived effort involved.

      PubDate: 2017-08-03T18:18:35Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.07.008
       
  • Vision, innovation, and leadership in research libraries
    • Authors: Ronald C. Jantz
      Pages: 234 - 241
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 3
      Author(s): Ronald C. Jantz
      This study examined the relationship of research library visions, as embodied in a publicly posted vision statement, and the innovativeness of the library. The literature on organizational vision is abundant and generally reveals a positive relationship between vision, visionary leadership, and a variety of organizational factors. Many researchers state that a vision, communicated throughout the organization, is a critical element of organizational success and those entities without a vision are “stumbling in the dark”. In this study, library professionals rated each research library vision statement based on established attributes and it was found that the resulting vision statement score was positively and significantly related to the innovativeness of the library.

      PubDate: 2017-08-03T18:18:35Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.07.006
       
  • New wine in new bottles
    • Authors: Candy Schwartz
      Pages: 242 - 243
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 3
      Author(s): Candy Schwartz


      PubDate: 2017-08-03T18:18:35Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.07.009
       
  • Toward collaborator selection and determination of data ownership and
           publication authorship in research collaborations
    • Authors: Besiki Stvilia; Charles C. Hinnant; Shuheng Wu; Adam Worrall; Dong Joon Lee; Kathleen Burnett; Gary Burnett; Michelle M. Kazmer; Paul F. Marty
      Pages: 85 - 97
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Besiki Stvilia, Charles C. Hinnant, Shuheng Wu, Adam Worrall, Dong Joon Lee, Kathleen Burnett, Gary Burnett, Michelle M. Kazmer, Paul F. Marty
      This study examined factors that might affect researchers' willingness to collaborate with a specific researcher and the priorities given to those factors. In addition, it investigated how researchers determined the ownership of collaborative project data and how they determined the order of authorship on collaborative publications in condensed matter physics. In general, researchers rated their intrinsic motivations the highest, such as the quality of ideas a potential collaborator might have and their satisfaction with a past collaboration, followed by their extrinsic motivations, such as the complementary knowledge, skills, or resources the collaborator could provide. In addition, researchers who had a greater number of collaborative projects and researchers who had served as a project PI or co-PI valued the deep-level, personality-related characteristics of a collaborator higher than did those who had not. Younger researchers were more risk averse and more concerned with a collaborator's reputation and the possible cost of a collaboration decision. Additionally, younger researchers indicated more often than older researchers that they did not know whether their project teams followed any rules or norms or engaged in negotiation to determine the order of authorship on collaborative publications.

      PubDate: 2017-04-18T04:40:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.03.004
       
  • Visual research in LIS: Complementary and alternative methods
    • Authors: Angela Pollak
      Pages: 98 - 106
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Angela Pollak


      PubDate: 2017-04-18T04:40:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.04.002
       
  • Caregivers' perceptions of emergent literacy programming in public
           libraries in relation to the National Research Councils' guidelines on
           quality environments for children
    • Authors: Laura K. Clark
      Pages: 107 - 115
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Laura K. Clark


      PubDate: 2017-04-18T04:40:56Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.04.001
       
  • The peritextual literacy framework: Using the functions of peritext to
           support critical thinking
    • Authors: Melissa Gross; Don Latham
      Pages: 116 - 123
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Melissa Gross, Don Latham


      PubDate: 2017-04-25T04:50:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.03.006
       
  • How academic librarians experience evidence-based practice: A grounded
           theory model
    • Authors: Faye Miller; Helen Partridge; Christine Bruce; Christine Yates; Alisa Howlett
      Pages: 124 - 130
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Faye Miller, Helen Partridge, Christine Bruce, Christine Yates, Alisa Howlett


      PubDate: 2017-04-25T04:50:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.04.003
       
  • Place, community and information behavior: Spatially oriented information
           seeking zones and information source preferences
    • Authors: Amelia N. Gibson; Samantha Kaplan
      Pages: 131 - 139
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Amelia N. Gibson, Samantha Kaplan


      PubDate: 2017-04-25T04:50:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.03.001
       
  • Research agenda for social and collaborative information seeking
    • Authors: Chirag Shah; Rob Capra; Preben Hansen
      Pages: 140 - 146
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Chirag Shah, Rob Capra, Preben Hansen
      Scholars in diverse fields of inquiry have identified the need to expand individual-based information seeking and behavior models and systems to incorporate social as well as collaborative dimensions. However, the research areas of Social Information Seeking (SIS) and Collaborative Information Seeking (CIS) have been largely disconnected from one another despite a few notable attempts to study them under one umbrella. Researchers in these communities have recently realized the value of bringing SIS and CIS together for two main reasons: often it is impossible to separate social and collaborative dimensions in a project; and by considering these two aspects of information seeking, we may be able to support human information behavior in ways not previously possible. A brief synthesis of work in the domains of SIS and CIS is presented here. Then, an integrated view is presented to consider Social and Collaborative Information Seeking (SCIS) as an intersection and extension of SIS and CIS. Benefits of this approach are discussed and the integrated view is used as the basis to present a research agenda that outlines opportunities and challenges unique to SCIS.

      PubDate: 2017-04-25T04:50:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.03.005
       
  • Editorial: Before you submit your manuscript
    • Authors: Candy Schwartz
      Pages: 147 - 148
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Candy Schwartz


      PubDate: 2017-04-25T04:50:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.04.004
       
  • Information world mapping: A participatory arts-based elicitation method
           for information behavior interviews
    • Authors: Devon Greyson; Heather O'Brien; Jean Shoveller
      Pages: 149 - 157
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2
      Author(s): Devon Greyson, Heather O'Brien, Jean Shoveller


      PubDate: 2017-05-02T08:36:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.03.003
       
  • Auto-hermeneutics: A phenomenological approach to information experience
    • Authors: Tim Gorichanaz
      Pages: 1 - 7
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Tim Gorichanaz
      The need for methodologically rigorous approaches to the study of human experience in LIS has emerged in recent years. Auto-hermeneutics is a research approach that offers a systematic way to study one’s own experiences with information, allowing investigators to explore yet-undocumented contexts, setting precedents for further work in these areas and ultimately deepening our understanding of information experiences. This articulation of auto-hermeneutics is based on the phenomenological method of Heidegger and draws principles from systematic self-observation and interpretative phenomenological analysis. Similarities and differences among auto-hermeneutics and other automethodologies are discussed, along with guidelines for assessing auto-hermeneutic research. Finally, an example of an auto-hermeneutic study illustrates the unique contributions this approach affords.

      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.001
       
  • Auto-hermeneutics: A phenomenological approach to information experience
    • Authors: Tim Gorichanaz
      Pages: 1 - 7
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Tim Gorichanaz
      The need for methodologically rigorous approaches to the study of human experience in LIS has emerged in recent years. Auto-hermeneutics is a research approach that offers a systematic way to study one’s own experiences with information, allowing investigators to explore yet-undocumented contexts, setting precedents for further work in these areas and ultimately deepening our understanding of information experiences. This articulation of auto-hermeneutics is based on the phenomenological method of Heidegger and draws principles from systematic self-observation and interpretative phenomenological analysis. Similarities and differences among auto-hermeneutics and other automethodologies are discussed, along with guidelines for assessing auto-hermeneutic research. Finally, an example of an auto-hermeneutic study illustrates the unique contributions this approach affords.

      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.001
       
  • Comparative study of characteristics of authors between open access and
           non-open access journals in library and information science
    • Authors: Yu-Wei Chang
      Pages: 8 - 15
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Yu-Wei Chang


      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.002
       
  • Comparative study of characteristics of authors between open access and
           non-open access journals in library and information science
    • Authors: Yu-Wei Chang
      Pages: 8 - 15
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Yu-Wei Chang


      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.002
       
  • Marginalia in the digital age: Are digital reading devices meeting the
           needs of today's readers?
    • Authors: Melanie Ramdarshan Bold; Kiri L. Wagstaff
      Pages: 16 - 22
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Melanie Ramdarshan Bold, Kiri L. Wagstaff
      For centuries, readers have added marginal commentary to books for a variety of personal and public purposes. Historians have mined the marginalia of important historical figures to observe their sometimes raw, immediate responses to texts. Now, reading and annotation practices are changing with the migration of content to electronic books. A survey of reader attitudes and behavior related to marginalia for print and electronic books reveals that the majority of readers write in their books and want e-readers to support this feature. However, many readers report that annotating electronic books is too difficult, time-consuming, or awkward with current technology. In addition, the way readers annotate books depends on whether they are reading for pleasure or for work or education. These findings can guide the development of future devices to better satisfy reader needs.

      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.004
       
  • Marginalia in the digital age: Are digital reading devices meeting the
           needs of today's readers?
    • Authors: Melanie Ramdarshan Bold; Kiri L. Wagstaff
      Pages: 16 - 22
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Melanie Ramdarshan Bold, Kiri L. Wagstaff
      For centuries, readers have added marginal commentary to books for a variety of personal and public purposes. Historians have mined the marginalia of important historical figures to observe their sometimes raw, immediate responses to texts. Now, reading and annotation practices are changing with the migration of content to electronic books. A survey of reader attitudes and behavior related to marginalia for print and electronic books reveals that the majority of readers write in their books and want e-readers to support this feature. However, many readers report that annotating electronic books is too difficult, time-consuming, or awkward with current technology. In addition, the way readers annotate books depends on whether they are reading for pleasure or for work or education. These findings can guide the development of future devices to better satisfy reader needs.

      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.004
       
  • A communication system approach to the problem of public library
           legitimacy
    • Authors: Michael M. Widdersheim; Masanori Koizumi
      Pages: 23 - 33
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Michael M. Widdersheim, Masanori Koizumi
      Public library systems intersect with both public and private spheres of social life, but how they negotiate public legitimacy and private influence remains a mystery. To better understand this problem, this study adopts a communication system approach. Using qualitative content analysis, this study examines data from three US public library systems. This study analyzes how private actors communicate with and through public library systems by parsing the signals into components: transmitter, receiver, medium, and message. The resulting signals form two dimensions: the Public Sphere dimension, where private actors govern, legitimate, and use the library, and the Private Sphere dimension, where private actors exchange personal services and exert economic power. A view of public and private signals in interaction reveals how public legitimacy is threatened and how public library systems can mitigate these threats. This study reveals how public/private conflicts in public libraries arise and how they might be resolved.

      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.003
       
  • A communication system approach to the problem of public library
           legitimacy
    • Authors: Michael M. Widdersheim; Masanori Koizumi
      Pages: 23 - 33
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Michael M. Widdersheim, Masanori Koizumi
      Public library systems intersect with both public and private spheres of social life, but how they negotiate public legitimacy and private influence remains a mystery. To better understand this problem, this study adopts a communication system approach. Using qualitative content analysis, this study examines data from three US public library systems. This study analyzes how private actors communicate with and through public library systems by parsing the signals into components: transmitter, receiver, medium, and message. The resulting signals form two dimensions: the Public Sphere dimension, where private actors govern, legitimate, and use the library, and the Private Sphere dimension, where private actors exchange personal services and exert economic power. A view of public and private signals in interaction reveals how public legitimacy is threatened and how public library systems can mitigate these threats. This study reveals how public/private conflicts in public libraries arise and how they might be resolved.

      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.003
       
  • Contributing to social capital: An investigation of Asian immigrants' use
           of public library services
    • Authors: Safirotu Khoir; Jia Tina Du; Robert M. Davison; Andy Koronios
      Pages: 34 - 45
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Safirotu Khoir, Jia Tina Du, Robert M. Davison, Andy Koronios


      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.005
       
  • Contributing to social capital: An investigation of Asian immigrants' use
           of public library services
    • Authors: Safirotu Khoir; Jia Tina Du; Robert M. Davison; Andy Koronios
      Pages: 34 - 45
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Safirotu Khoir, Jia Tina Du, Robert M. Davison, Andy Koronios


      PubDate: 2017-01-27T11:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.005
       
  • Incorporating technology in children's storytime: Cultural-historical
           activity theory as a means of reconciling contradictions
    • Authors: Hui-Yun Sung
      Pages: 46 - 52
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Hui-Yun Sung


      PubDate: 2017-02-02T04:59:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.007
       
  • Studying information behavior of image users: An overview of research
           methodology in LIS literature, 2004–2015
    • Authors: Krystyna K. Matusiak
      Pages: 53 - 60
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Krystyna K. Matusiak


      PubDate: 2017-02-02T04:59:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.008
       
  • Library and information science research, then and now
    • Authors: Candy Schwartz
      Pages: 61 - 62
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Candy Schwartz


      PubDate: 2017-02-09T03:28:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.010
       
  • An examination of social and informational support behavior codes on the
           Internet: The case of online health communities
    • Authors: Jenny Bronstein
      Pages: 63 - 68
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Jenny Bronstein


      PubDate: 2017-02-09T03:28:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.006
       
  • Evaluation components of information literacy in undergraduate students in
           Slovenia: An experimental study
    • Authors: Zdenka Petermanec; Urban Šebjan
      Pages: 69 - 75
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 1
      Author(s): Zdenka Petermanec, Urban Šebjan


      PubDate: 2017-02-09T03:28:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.lisr.2017.01.009
       
  • Cover 2 - Editorial Board/Barcode
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 4


      PubDate: 2017-12-11T19:02:02Z
       
  • Acknowledgments and News
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 4


      PubDate: 2017-10-26T08:43:12Z
       
  • Cover 2 - Editorial Board/Barcode
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 3


      PubDate: 2017-09-02T19:12:21Z
       
  • Research in the Archival Multiverse, A.J. Gilliland, S. McKemmish, A.J.
           Lau (Eds.). Monash University Publishing, Clayton, Australia (2017)
    • Authors: Katherine Wisser
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 3
      Author(s): Katherine M. Wisser


      PubDate: 2017-07-12T10:21:55Z
       
  • Cover 2 - Editorial Board/Barcode
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Library & Information Science Research, Volume 39, Issue 2


      PubDate: 2017-05-28T09:49:18Z
       
 
 
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