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Journal Cover Journal of Pediatrics
  [SJR: 1.849]   [H-I: 163]   [187 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0022-3476
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3089 journals]
  • Combination immune-based therapy for chronic ITP
    • Authors: William Ferguson
      First page: 1
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 191
      Author(s): William Ferguson


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.019
      Issue No: Vol. 191 (2017)
       
  • Put down that smartphone and read to me!
    • Authors: Paul G. Fisher
      Pages: 1 - 2
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 191
      Author(s): Paul G. Fisher


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.020
      Issue No: Vol. 191 (2017)
       
  • Chronic pulmonary insufficiency of prematurity: definitions matter
    • Authors: Raye-Ann deRegnier
      First page: 2
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 191
      Author(s): Raye-Ann deRegnier


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.021
      Issue No: Vol. 191 (2017)
       
  • Sex in journals
    • Authors: Thomas R. Welch
      Pages: 2 - 3
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 191
      Author(s): Thomas R. Welch


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.022
      Issue No: Vol. 191 (2017)
       
  • Congenital diaphragmatic hernia: is the heart the problem'
    • Authors: Robin H. Steinhorn
      First page: 3
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 191
      Author(s): Robin H. Steinhorn


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.023
      Issue No: Vol. 191 (2017)
       
  • Dosing wisely: caffeine and the preterm infant
    • Authors: Raye-Ann deRegnier
      First page: 3
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 191
      Author(s): Raye-Ann deRegnier


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.024
      Issue No: Vol. 191 (2017)
       
  • Recruitment and Retention: Recommendations from the Association of Medical
           School Pediatric Department Chairs Education Committee and the Council on
           Medical Student Education in Pediatrics Task Force on Community Preceptors
           
    • Authors: Lisa E. Leggio; Michael S. Ryan; Chris B. Peltier; Julia Belkowitz; Michael A. Barone; Julie Story Byerley; Archana Chatterjee; Kenneth T. Nakamura; Jerold M. Stirling; Gerard P. Rabalais
      Pages: 4 - 5.e1
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 191
      Author(s): Lisa E. Leggio, Michael S. Ryan, Chris B. Peltier, Julia Belkowitz, Michael A. Barone, Julie Story Byerley, Archana Chatterjee, Kenneth T. Nakamura, Jerold M. Stirling, Gerard P. Rabalais


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.08.043
      Issue No: Vol. 191 (2017)
       
  • Probiotics for Colic—Is the Gut Responsible for Infant Crying After
           All'
    • Authors: Valerie Sung; Michael D. Cabana
      Pages: 6 - 8
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 191
      Author(s): Valerie Sung, Michael D. Cabana


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.09.010
      Issue No: Vol. 191 (2017)
       
  • Epilepsy by Any Other Name Would (Not!) Smell as Sweet
    • Authors: Carl E. Stafstrom
      Pages: 8 - 9
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 191
      Author(s): Carl E. Stafstrom


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.09.005
      Issue No: Vol. 191 (2017)
       
  • Genetic Testing in Children with Recurrent and Chronic Pancreatitis
    • Authors: David S. Vitale; Maisam Abu-El-Haija
      Pages: 10 - 11
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 191
      Author(s): David S. Vitale, Maisam Abu-El-Haija


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.09.028
      Issue No: Vol. 191 (2017)
       
  • Can We Cure Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia'
    • Authors: Bernard Thébaud; Stella Kourembanas
      Pages: 12 - 14
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 191
      Author(s): Bernard Thébaud, Stella Kourembanas


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.07.028
      Issue No: Vol. 191 (2017)
       
  • Chronic Pulmonary Insufficiency of Prematurity: Developing Optimal
           Endpoints for Drug Development
    • Authors: Robin Steinhorn; Jonathan M. Davis; Wolfgang Göpel; Alan Jobe; Steven Abman; Matthew Laughon; Eduardo Bancalari; Judy Aschner; Roberta Ballard; Anne Greenough; Linda Storari; Merran Thomson; Ronald L. Ariagno; Laura Fabbri; Mark A. Turner
      Pages: 15 - 21.e1
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 191
      Author(s): Robin Steinhorn, Jonathan M. Davis, Wolfgang Göpel, Alan Jobe, Steven Abman, Matthew Laughon, Eduardo Bancalari, Judy Aschner, Roberta Ballard, Anne Greenough, Linda Storari, Merran Thomson, Ronald L. Ariagno, Laura Fabbri, Mark A. Turner


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.08.006
      Issue No: Vol. 191 (2017)
       
  • A Randomized Clinical Trial of Umbilical Cord Milking vs Delayed Cord
           Clamping in Preterm Infants: Neurodevelopmental Outcomes at 22-26 Months
           of Corrected Age
    • Authors: Anup Katheria; Donna Garey; Giang Truong; Natacha Akshoomoff; Jane Steen; Mauricio Maldonado; Debra Poeltler; Mary Jane Harbert; Yvonne E. Vaucher; Neil Finer
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Anup Katheria, Donna Garey, Giang Truong, Natacha Akshoomoff, Jane Steen, Mauricio Maldonado, Debra Poeltler, Mary Jane Harbert, Yvonne E. Vaucher, Neil Finer
      Objective To compare the effect of umbilical cord milking vs delayed cord clamping (DCC) on neurodevelopmental and health outcomes in very preterm infants at 22-26 months of corrected age. Study design Neurodevelopmental outcomes at 2 years of age were assessed using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, third edition, and a standardized neurologic examination. Data regarding pulmonary morbidities, neurosensory impairments, and hospitalizations were obtained by parental interview. Intention-to-treat was used for primary analyses. Results Of the 197 infants enrolled in the original study there were 15 deaths, 5 in the umbilical cord milking group and 10 in DCC group. Of the remaining infants, 135 (74%) were assessed at 22-26 months of corrected age. Demographics in umbilical cord milking (n = 70) and DCC (n = 65) groups were similar. Infants randomized to umbilical cord milking at birth had significantly higher cognitive and language composite scores, and were less likely to have a cognitive composite score of <85 (4% vs 15%; P = .04). Motor function was similar in both groups. There were no differences in the incidences of mild or moderate to severe neurodevelopmental impairment, hearing or visual impairments, pulmonary morbidities, or rehospitalizations between the 2 groups. Conclusions Infants randomized to umbilical cord milking had higher language and cognitive scores compared with those randomized to DCC. There was no difference in rates of mild or moderate to severe neurodevelopmental impairment. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT01434732.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.037
       
  • Periconception Exposure to Air Pollution and Risk of Congenital
           Malformations
    • Authors: Sheng Ren; Erin Haynes; Eric Hall; Monir Hossain; Aimin Chen; Louis Muglia; Long Lu; Emily DeFranco
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Sheng Ren, Erin Haynes, Eric Hall, Monir Hossain, Aimin Chen, Louis Muglia, Long Lu, Emily DeFranco
      Objective To evaluate the association between increased exposure to airborne fine particulate matter (PM2.5) during the periconception period with risk of congenital anomalies. Study design Using birth certificate data from the Ohio Department of Health (2006-2010) and PM2.5 data from the US Environmental Protection Agency's 57 monitoring stations located throughout Ohio, the geographic coordinates of the mother's residence for each birth were linked to the nearest PM2.5 monitoring station and monthly exposure averages were calculated. The association between congenital anomalies and increased PM2.5 levels was estimated, with adjustment for coexistent risk factors. Results After adjustment for coexisting risk factors, exposure to increased levels of PM2.5 in the air during the periconception period was modestly associated with risk of congenital anomalies. Compared with other periconception exposure windows, increased exposure during the 1 month before conception was associated with the highest risk increase at lesser distances from monitoring stations. The strongest influences of PM2.5 on individual malformations were found with abdominal wall defects and hypospadias, especially during the 1-month preconception. Conclusions Increased exposure to PM2.5 in the periconception period is associated with some modest risk increases for congenital malformations. The most susceptible time of exposure appears to be the 1 month before and after conception. Although the increased risk with PM2.5 exposure is modest, the potential impact on a population basis is noteworthy because all pregnant women have some degree of exposure.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.09.076
       
  • Language Dysfunction in Pediatric Epilepsy
    • Authors: Fiona M. Baumer; Aaron L. Cardon; Brenda E. Porter
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Fiona M. Baumer, Aaron L. Cardon, Brenda E. Porter


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.031
       
  • Origins and Predictors of Friendships in 6- to 8-Year-Old Children Born at
           Neonatal Risk
    • Authors: Katharina M. Heuser; Julia Jaekel; Dieter Wolke
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Katharina M. Heuser, Julia Jaekel, Dieter Wolke
      Objective To test effects of gestational age (GA), early social experiences, and child characteristics on children's friendships and perceived peer acceptance. Study design As part of the prospective Bavarian Longitudinal Study (1147 children, 25-41 weeks GA), children's friendships (eg, number of friends, frequency of meeting friends) and perceived peer acceptance were assessed before school entry (6 years of age) and in second grade (8 years of age) using child and parent reports. The parent–infant relationship was evaluated during the 5 months after birth. Child characteristics (ie, height, motor impairment, cognitive ability, behavioral problems) were measured at 6 years of age. Multiple regressions estimated effects of GA, parent–infant relationship, and child characteristics. Results Overall, children with higher GA had more friends, spent more time with friends, and were more accepted by peers at 6 years of age. Better parent–infant relationships, higher cognitive abilities, and fewer motor and behavioral problems predicted more friendships and higher peer acceptance after adjusting for sex, socioeconomic status, multiples, siblings, and special schooling. Across all GA groups, number of friends (child report: mean change, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.57-1.96) and peer acceptance (child report: mean change, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.09-0.19; parent report: mean change, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.11-0.17) increased with age, but the increase in number of friends was higher among preterm children (ie, interaction effect age*GA group: P = .034). Conclusions Our results provide evidence of a dose–response effect of low GA on children's friendships and perceived peer acceptance. Improvements in early parenting and motor, cognitive, and behavioral development may facilitate friendships and peer acceptance for all children across the gestation spectrum.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.09.072
       
  • Race Effects of Inhaled Nitric Oxide in Preterm Infants: An Individual
           Participant Data Meta-Analysis
    • Authors: Lisa M. Askie; Lucy C. Davies; Michael D. Schreiber; Anna Maria Hibbs; Philip L. Ballard; Roberta A. Ballard
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Lisa M. Askie, Lucy C. Davies, Michael D. Schreiber, Anna Maria Hibbs, Philip L. Ballard, Roberta A. Ballard
      Objective To assess whether inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) improves survival without bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) for preterm African American infants. Study design An individual participant data meta-analysis was conducted, including 3 randomized, placebo-controlled trials that enrolled infants born at  <34 weeks of gestation receiving respiratory support, had at least 15% (or a minimum of 10 infants in each trial arm) of African American race, and used a starting iNO of >5  parts per million with the intention to treat for 7 days minimum. The primary outcome was a composite of death or BPD. Secondary outcomes included death before discharge, postnatal steroid use, gross pulmonary air leak, pulmonary hemorrhage, measures of respiratory support, and duration of hospital stay. Results Compared with other races, African American infants had a significant reduction in the composite outcome of death or BPD with iNO treatment: 49% treated vs 63% controls (relative risk, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.65-0.91; P = .003; interaction P = .016). There were no differences between racial groups for death. There was also a significant difference between races (interaction P = .023) of iNO treatment for BPD in survivors, with the greatest effect in African American infants (P = .005). There was no difference between racial groups in the use of postnatal steroids, pulmonary air leak, pulmonary hemorrhage, or other measures of respiratory support. Conclusion iNO therapy should be considered for preterm African American infants at high risk for BPD. iNO to prevent BPD in African Americans may represent an example of a racially customized therapy for infants.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.004
       
  • Gastric Emptying Time, Esophageal pH-Impedance Parameters, Quality of
           Life, and Gastrointestinal Comorbidity in Obese Children and Adolescents
    • Authors: Paolo Quitadamo; Letizia Zenzeri; Enza Mozzillo; Irene Cuccurullo; Alba Rocco; Adriana Franzese; Gerardo Nardone; Annamaria Staiano
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Paolo Quitadamo, Letizia Zenzeri, Enza Mozzillo, Irene Cuccurullo, Alba Rocco, Adriana Franzese, Gerardo Nardone, Annamaria Staiano
      Objectives To provide further evidence regarding the relationship between obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children, through the use of 13C-octanoic acid breath test for gastric emptying time (GET) assessment and esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance pH-testing (MII-pH). Study design Obese children aged 4-17 years completed a questionnaire investigating reflux symptoms, the presence of functional gastrointestinal disorders, and quality of life. A subgroup of obese patients with and without GERD symptoms were asked to undergo 13C-octanoic acid breath test. Symptomatic patients were also required to undergo MII-pH. Age- and sex- matched asymptomatic nonobese children were enrolled as a comparison group. Results Of 113 enrolled patients, 44 (38.9%) reported reflux symptoms; 22 of the 44 underwent MII-pH. Their mean reflux index was 14.6%, and their mean number of daily reflux episodes was 51.8. The mean T½ GET of symptomatic was 107.6 minutes vs 116.5 minutes in asymptomatic obese children. Healthy nonobese children had a mean T½ GET of 100.1 minutes. The mean GET of symptomatic obese patients having >70 daily reflux events was 121.8 vs 87.6 minutes of patients with <70 daily reflux events (P <.05). Both symptomatic and asymptomatic obese patients had a worse quality of life than nonobese (P = 0.003 and P = 0.0002, respectively); a narrow waist circumference was directly related to GET (P = 0.01). Conclusions A high percentage of obese children and adolescents experience GERD symptoms. GET was directly related to the narrow waist circumference of obese children with GERD and was significantly delayed in obese children with increased reflux events. Both symptomatic and asymptomatic obese patients had a worse quality of life compared with nonobese healthy patients.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.039
       
  • Bilateral Pulmonary Sequestration in a Preterm Infant
    • Authors: Fabian von Scheidt; Andreas Eicken; Tobias Wowra; Horst Brunner; Christian Apitz
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Fabian von Scheidt, Andreas Eicken, Tobias Wowra, Horst Brunner, Christian Apitz


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.069
       
  • Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Pediatric Liver Transplant Recipients:
           Carotid and Aorta Intima-Media Thickness and Their Predictors
    • Authors: Emily R. Perito; Andrew Phelps; Tabitha Vase; Vickie A. Feldstein; Robert H. Lustig; Philip Rosenthal
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Emily R. Perito, Andrew Phelps, Tabitha Vase, Vickie A. Feldstein, Robert H. Lustig, Philip Rosenthal
      Objective To investigate prevalence and predictors of cardiovascular risk in pediatric liver transplant recipients using noninvasive markers of subclinical atherosclerosis: carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and aorta intima-media thickness (aIMT). Study design Cross-sectional study of 88 pediatric liver transplant recipients. The cIMT and aIMT were measured by ultrasound imaging using standardized protocol. Results Participants were 15.4 ± 4.8 years of age, and 11.2 ± 5.6 years post-transplantation. The cIMT and aIMT were both higher in males than females. In analyses adjusted for sex, age, and height, the cIMT was higher in subjects transplanted for chronic/cirrhotic liver disease and lower in subjects on cyclosporine (n = 9) than tacrolimus (n = 71). The cIMT was not associated with rejection history or current corticosteroid use. The cIMT increased with increasing diastolic blood pressure and triglycerides. The aIMT (n = 83) also increased with age, and its rate of increase post-transplant varied by age at transplantation. In adjusted analyses, aIMT was higher in subjects with glucose intolerance. In analysis of patients ≤20 years of age for whom blood pressure percentiles could be calculated (n = 66), aIMT increased with increasing diastolic blood pressure percentile (0.010 mm per 5-percentile; 95% CI, 0.000-0.021; P = 0.05). Neither the cIMT nor the aIMT was associated with obesity, systolic hypertension, or other dyslipidemia at study visit. Conclusion Measures of long-term cardiovascular risk were associated with conditions that are more common in pediatric liver transplant recipients than nontransplanted peers, namely, diastolic hypertension and glucose intolerance. Larger, longitudinal studies are warranted to investigate whether cIMT could be useful for stratifying these patients' cardiovascular risk—and potential need for proactive intervention—during long-term follow-up.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.006
       
  • Gut Transit in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Is Not Impaired: A Study
           Utilizing Wireless Motility Capsules
    • Authors: Dror Kraus; Brenda Wong; Shengyong Hu; Ajay Kaul
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Dror Kraus, Brenda Wong, Shengyong Hu, Ajay Kaul
      We examined gut transit in 7 young adults (18-24 years of age) with Duchenne muscular dystrophy using wireless motility capsules. Total and segmental gut transit times were normal in essentially all patients. Our study using a validated tool suggests normal transit constipation as the pathophysiologic basis for constipation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.063
       
  • Antenatal Consultations at Extreme Prematurity: A Systematic Review of
           Parent Communication Needs
    • Authors: Ashraf Kharrat; Gregory P. Moore; Stéphanie Beckett; Stuart G. Nicholls; Margaret Sampson; Thierry Daboval
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Ashraf Kharrat, Gregory P. Moore, Stéphanie Beckett, Stuart G. Nicholls, Margaret Sampson, Thierry Daboval
      Objective To synthesize and describe parental expectations on how healthcare professionals should interact with them during a peripartum, antenatal consultation for extremely preterm infants. Study design For this systematic literature review with textual narrative synthesis, we included studies that explored parental perspectives regarding the antenatal consultation for an extremely preterm infant. Electronic searches of Medline, CINAHL, PsycInfo, and Embase were conducted, along with a search of the grey literature. Quality appraisal was conducted using the guide by Walsh and Downe. Two independent reviewers reviewed 783 titles, of which 130 abstracts then 40 full-text articles were reviewed. Final data abstraction includes 19 studies. We predetermined 6 topics of interest (setting, timing, preferred healthcare professional, information, resources, and parents–physician interaction) to facilitate thematic analysis. Results In consideration of the variability of parents' specific desires, six predetermined topics and additional overarching themes such as perception of support, degree of understanding, hope, spirituality, and decision-making influences emerged. Studies suggest the quality of the antenatal consultation is not purely about information content, but also the manner in which it is provided. Limitations include thematic analysis that can potentially lead to the exclusion of important nuances. Relevant studies may have been missed if published outside the healthcare literature. Conclusions The findings may inform clinical practice guidelines. This paper includes suggested strategies related to parents' perspectives that may facilitate communication during antenatal consultation for an extremely preterm infant. These strategies may also support parental engagement and satisfaction.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.067
       
  • Intrauterine and Early Postnatal Exposure to Particulate Air Pollution and
           Kawasaki Disease: A Nationwide Longitudinal Survey in Japan
    • Authors: Takashi Yorifuji; Hirokazu Tsukahara; Saori Kashima; Hiroyuki Doi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Takashi Yorifuji, Hirokazu Tsukahara, Saori Kashima, Hiroyuki Doi
      Objectives To examine the effects of prenatal and postnatal exposure to particulate matter on Kawasaki disease (KD) occurrence, using data from a nationwide population-based longitudinal survey in Japan that began in 2010. Study design Prenatal and postnatal suspended particulate matter concentrations were obtained at municipality level and assigned to participants based on their municipality of birth. We analyzed data from 30 367 participants with data on either exposure period. We used hospital admission for KD from 6 to 30 months of age as the main outcome of interest. We conducted a multilevel logistic regression analysis, adjusting for individual and municipality-level variables. Results Children who were exposed to higher levels of suspended particulate matter, in particular during pregnancy, were more likely to be hospitalized for KD. The ORs for ≥25 µg/m3 exposure compared with <20 µg/m3 exposure were 1.59 (95% CI 1.06, 2.38) for prenatal exposure and 1.41 (0.82, 2.41) for postnatal exposure. Prenatal exposure during mid-to-late gestation seemed to be more relevant for the increased risk. Conclusions Early life exposure to particulate air pollution, in particular during pregnancy, is associated with an increased risk of KD hospital admission in early childhood in a nationally representative sample in Japan.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.012
       
  • One-Year Outcome for Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia: Results From the
           French National Register
    • Authors: François Barrière; Fabrice Michel; Anderson D. Loundou; Virginie Fouquet; Elsa Kermorvant; Sébastien Blanc; Elisabeth Carricaburu; Amélie Desrumaux; Odile Pidoux; Alexis Arnaud; Nicolas Berte; Thierry Blanc; Frederic Lavrand; Guillaume Levard; Isabelle Rayet; Sylvain Samperiz; Anne Schneider; Marie-Odile Marcoux; Norbert Winer; Yann Chaussy; Valérie Datin-Dorriere; Quentin Ballouhey; Aurélien Binet; Charles Muszynski; Jean Breaud; Armelle Garenne; Laurent Storme; Julia Boubnova
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): François Barrière, Fabrice Michel, Anderson D. Loundou, Virginie Fouquet, Elsa Kermorvant, Sébastien Blanc, Elisabeth Carricaburu, Amélie Desrumaux, Odile Pidoux, Alexis Arnaud, Nicolas Berte, Thierry Blanc, Frederic Lavrand, Guillaume Levard, Isabelle Rayet, Sylvain Samperiz, Anne Schneider, Marie-Odile Marcoux, Norbert Winer, Yann Chaussy, Valérie Datin-Dorriere, Quentin Ballouhey, Aurélien Binet, Charles Muszynski, Jean Breaud, Armelle Garenne, Laurent Storme, Julia Boubnova
      Objective To evaluate the status of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) management in France and to assess predictors of adverse outcomes. Study design We reviewed the first-year outcome of all cases of CDH reported to the French National Register in 2011. Results A total of 158 cases were included. Of these, 83% (131) were prenatally diagnosed, with a mortality rate of 39% (44 of 112) for live born infants with a known outcome at hospital discharge. Mortality increased to 47% (60 of 128) including those with termination of pregnancy and fetal loss. This contrasts with the 7% (2 of 27) mortality rate of the patients diagnosed postnatally (P = .002). Mortality worsened with 1 prenatal marker of CDH severity (OR 3.38 [1.30-8.83] P = .013) and worsened further with 2 markers (OR 20.64 [5.29-80.62] P < .001). Classic postnatal risk factors of mortality such as side of hernia (nonleft P = .001), prematurity (P < .001), low birth weight (P = .002), and size of the defect (P < .001) were confirmed. Of the 141 live births (114 prenatal and 27 postnatal diagnosis) with known outcomes, 93 (67%) survived to hospital discharge, 68 (60%) with a prenatal diagnosis and 25 (93%) with a postnatal diagnosis. The median time to hospital discharge was 34 days (IQR, 19.25-62). Of these survivors, 71 (76%) were followed up for 1 year. Conclusions Despite advances in management of CDH, mortality was high and associated with prenatal risk factors. Postnatally, severe persistent pulmonary hypertension was difficult to predict and presented persistent challenges in management.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.09.074
       
  • Clinical Indices Can Standardize and Monitor Pediatric Care: A Novel
           Mechanism to Improve Quality and Safety
    • Authors: Wallace Crandall; J. Terrance Davis; Jennifer Dotson; Charles Elmaraghy; Mike Fetzer; Don Hayes; Edwin Horwitz; Amy Kogon; Randal Olshefski; Hiren Patel; Richard J. Brilli
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Wallace Crandall, J. Terrance Davis, Jennifer Dotson, Charles Elmaraghy, Mike Fetzer, Don Hayes, Edwin Horwitz, Amy Kogon, Randal Olshefski, Hiren Patel, Richard J. Brilli
      Objective The Cancer Care Index (CCI), a single metric that sums the number of undesirable patient events in a given time frame (either preventable harm events or missed opportunities to provide optimal care), resulted in a 42% improvement in performance. Our objective was to test the index concept in other service lines to determine whether similar performance improvement occurred. Study design Care indices were developed and introduced in 3 additional service lines: Nephrology (Chronic Kidney Disease Care Index; CKDCI), Pulmonology (Lung Transplantation Care Index; LTCI), and Otolaryngology (Tracheostomy Care Index; TCI). After reaching agreement on specific harms to be avoided and elements of optimal care that should be reliably delivered, these items were compiled into indices that were updated monthly. Reports included each element individually and the total for all elements. Baseline performance was calculated retrospectively for the previous year. Results Significant improvement in performance occurred in each program following implementation of the clinical indices. The CKDCI was decreased by 63.2% (P < .001), the LTCI was decreased by 89.5% (P < .001), and the TCI was decreased by 53.0% (P < .001). Surveyed staff indicated satisfaction with use of the metric. Conclusions Clinical indices are useful for evaluating and managing the overall reliability of a program's ability to deliver optimal care, and are associated with improved clinical performance and satisfaction by service line staff when incorporated into a program's operation.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.09.073
       
  • Stenotic Lesions and the Maximum Diameter of Coronary Artery Aneurysms in
           Kawasaki Disease
    • Authors: Etsuko Tsuda; Nobuyuki Tsujii; Yohsuke Hayama
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Etsuko Tsuda, Nobuyuki Tsujii, Yohsuke Hayama
      Objectives To determine the prevalence of subsequent stenotic lesions based on the maximum diameter of the largest coronary artery aneurysm in patients with Kawasaki disease and the threshold value of coronary artery diameter associated with risk of developing stenotic lesion. Study design There were 214 patients (160 males) who had at least 1 aneurysm in a selective coronary angiogram (CAG) done <100 days after the onset of Kawasaki disease were studied. We measured the maximal coronary artery aneurysm diameter in 3 major branches in the initial CAGs. Branches were classified into 3 groups according to their maximal coronary artery aneurysm diameter: large, ≥8.0 mm; medium, ≥6.0 mm but <8.0 mm; and small, <6.0 mm. Subsequent CAGs were performed in the late follow-up period. We investigated the stenotic lesion in the follow-up CAGs, and evaluated the prevalence of stenotic lesion in each group based on body surface area (BSA) by the Kaplan-Meier method. Localized stenosis of ≥25% and complete occlusion were included as stenotic lesion in this study. We also determined the cutoff point for stenotic lesion. Results The median interval from the initial CAGs to the latest CAG was 8 years, with a maximum of 32 years. For a BSA of <0.50 m2, the 20-year prevalence of large and medium stenotic lesions was 78% (n = 62; 95% CI, 63-89) and 81% (n = 40; 95% CI, 63-89), respectively. For a BSA of ≥0.50 m2, large and medium stenotic lesions were 82% (n = 75; 95% CI, 67-91) and 40% (n = 56; 95% CI, 20-64), respectively (P < .0001). Conclusion The cutoff points of the coronary artery diameter within the first 100 days after the onset of Kawasaki disease leading to a stenotic lesion in the late period, were a diameter of ≥6.1 mm with a BSA of <0.50 m2 and a diameter of ≥8.0 mm with a BSA of ≥0.50 m2. Those cutoff points would have corresponded with a Z score of at least 10 on 2-dimensional echocardiography. Careful follow-up and antithrombotic therapy should be provided to patients who meet these criteria.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.09.077
       
  • Coming to Terms with Cardiovascular Morbidity after Early Term Birth
    • Authors: Susan W. Denfield; S. Kristen Sexson Tejtel
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Susan W. Denfield, S. Kristen Sexson Tejtel


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.11.009
       
  • Improvement of Outcomes for Children with Down Syndrome
    • Authors: Marilyn J. Bull
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Marilyn J. Bull


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.11.014
       
  • Prolonged Time Lag to Final Diagnosis of Fragile X Syndrome
    • Authors: Lidia V. Gabis; Oded Hochberg; Odelia Leon Attia; Yonit Banet-Levi; Dana Topf; Shahar Shefer
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Lidia V. Gabis, Oded Hochberg, Odelia Leon Attia, Yonit Banet-Levi, Dana Topf, Shahar Shefer
      Objective To evaluate the diagnostic process in children ultimately diagnosed with fragile X syndrome (FXS), with an emphasis on the time lag between initial presentation and on diagnosis in female vs male children. Study design Interviews were conducted with 89 families of children with a final diagnosis of FXS and assessment of time intervals between initial presentation and confirmed molecular diagnosis. Results Screening of 117 patients (25 female patients) from the 89 families revealed that less than 20% of patients obtained a diagnosis within the first year of seeking medical attention. Mean age at the time of initial presentation was 12.3 months in male patients and 23 months in female patients, while definitive diagnosis of FXS was made at a mean of 4 and 9 years, respectively. Presenting symptoms of developmental delays were recognized by 72% of parents, and 84% had another child with FXS before the index case diagnosis. Average age of diagnosis for children with FXS born since 2007 was significantly lower at 31.9 months, compared with 69.5 months for children born before 2007. Conclusions Although FXS is a significant and prevalent cause of disability in children, it is underdiagnosed and diagnosed late, especially in female patients. In every male and female patient presenting with developmental delay or autism, FXS should be considered. Dysmorphic physical features may not be present in infancy, and the absence of those features cannot exclude a diagnosis of FXS.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.008
       
  • Development of Late Circadian Preference: Sleep Timing From Childhood to
           Late Adolescence
    • Authors: Liisa Kuula; Anu-Katriina Pesonen; Ilona Merikanto; Michael Gradisar; Jari Lahti; Kati Heinonen; Eero Kajantie; Katri Räikkönen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Liisa Kuula, Anu-Katriina Pesonen, Ilona Merikanto, Michael Gradisar, Jari Lahti, Kati Heinonen, Eero Kajantie, Katri Räikkönen
      Objectives To assess differences relating to circadian preference in objectively measured sleep patterns from childhood to adolescence over a 9-year period. We hypothesized there is developmental continuity in sleep timing and duration according to circadian preference. Study design Young participants (N = 111, 65% girls) from a community-based birth cohort underwent sleep actigraphy at mean ages 8.1 (SD = 0.3), 12.3 (SD = 0.5), and 16.9 (SD = 0.1) years. A short version of Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire was administered in late adolescence. At each follow-up, sleep midpoint, duration, wake after sleep onset, sleep efficiency, and weekend catch-up sleep were compared between those reporting morning, intermediate, and evening preferences in late adolescence. Results Mixed model analyses indicated that sleep timing was significantly earlier among morning types compared with evening types at all ages (P values < .04). The mean differences in sleep midpoint between morning and evening types increased from a mean of 19 minutes (age 8), 36 minutes (age 12), to 89 minutes (age 17). The largest change occurred from age 12 to 17 years. Sleep duration, wake after sleep onset, sleep efficiency, and catch-up sleep did not differ according to circadian preference. Conclusions This study found significant continuity in sleep timing from childhood to adolescence over 9 years, indicating that late circadian preference reported in late adolescence begins to manifest in middle childhood. Further studies are needed to establish whether sleep timing has its origins at an even earlier age.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.068
       
  • Sleep-Disordered Breathing among Newborns with Myelomeningocele
    • Authors: Renée A. Shellhaas; Payal V. Kenia; Fauziya Hassan; John D.E. Barks; Niko Kaciroti; Ronald D. Chervin
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Renée A. Shellhaas, Payal V. Kenia, Fauziya Hassan, John D.E. Barks, Niko Kaciroti, Ronald D. Chervin
      In a matched cohort study, we report that the apnea-hypopnea index is significantly higher in neonates with myelomeningocele (34 ± 22) compared with age-matched controls (19 ± 11; P = .021). Assessment of newborns with myelomeningocele for sleep-disordered breathing may facilitate early treatment; the impact on long-term neurodevelopment is unknown.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.070
       
  • PHACE Syndrome—before and after Propranolol Therapy
    • Authors: Sigrid C. Disse; Michael Zemlin; Cornelia Mueller; Sascha Meyer
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Sigrid C. Disse, Michael Zemlin, Cornelia Mueller, Sascha Meyer


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.043
       
  • Proinflammatory Diets during Pregnancy and Neonatal Adiposity in the
           Healthy Start Study
    • Authors: Brianna F. Moore; Katherine A. Sauder; Anne P. Starling; James R. Hébert; Nitin Shivappa; Brandy M. Ringham; Deborah H. Glueck; Dana Dabelea
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Brianna F. Moore, Katherine A. Sauder, Anne P. Starling, James R. Hébert, Nitin Shivappa, Brandy M. Ringham, Deborah H. Glueck, Dana Dabelea
      Objective To evaluate the association between dietary inflammatory index (DII) scores during pregnancy and neonatal adiposity. Study design The analysis included 1078 mother–neonate pairs in Healthy Start, a prospective prebirth cohort. Diet was assessed using repeated 24-hour dietary recalls. DII scores were obtained by summing nutrient intakes, which were standardized to global means and multiplied by inflammatory effect scores. Air displacement plethysmography measured fat mass and fat-free mass within 72 hours of birth. Linear and logistic models evaluated the associations of DII scores with birth weight, fat mass, fat-free mass, and percent fat mass, and with categorical outcomes of small- and large-for-gestational age. We tested for interactions with prepregnancy BMI and gestational weight gain. Results The interaction between prepregnancy BMI and DII was statistically significant for birth weight, neonatal fat mass, and neonatal percent fat mass. Among neonates born to obese women, each 1-unit increase in DII was associated with increased birth weight (53 g; 95% CI, 20, 87), fat mass (20 g; 95% CI, 7-33), and percent fat mass (0.5%; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8). No interaction was detected for small- and large-for-gestational age. Each 1-unit increase in DII score was associated a 40% increase in odds of a large-for-gestational age neonate (1.4; 95% CI, 1.0-2.0; P = .04), but not a small-for-gestational age neonate (1.0; 95% CI, 0.8-1.2; P = .80). There was no evidence of an interaction with gestational weight gain. Conclusions Our findings support the hypothesis that an increased inflammatory milieu during pregnancy may be a risk factor for neonatal adiposity. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02273297

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.030
       
  • Characteristics and Outcomes of Pediatric Heart Failure-Related Emergency
           Department Visits in the United States: A Population-Based Study
    • Authors: Erika J. Mejia; Matthew J. O'Connor; Kimberly Y. Lin; Lihai Song; Heather Griffis; Christopher E. Mascio; Pirouz Shamszad; Aaron Donoghue; Chitra Ravishankar; Robert E. Shaddy; Joseph W. Rossano
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Erika J. Mejia, Matthew J. O'Connor, Kimberly Y. Lin, Lihai Song, Heather Griffis, Christopher E. Mascio, Pirouz Shamszad, Aaron Donoghue, Chitra Ravishankar, Robert E. Shaddy, Joseph W. Rossano
      Objectives To describe the frequency, characteristics, and outcomes of heart failure-related emergency department (ED) visits in pediatric patients. We aimed to test the hypothesis that these visits are associated with higher admission rates, mortality, and resource utilization. Study design A retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample for 2010 of patients ≤18 years of age was performed to describe ED visits with and without heart failure. Cases were identified using International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes and assessed for factors associated with admission, mortality, and resource utilization. Results Among 28.6 million pediatric visits to the ED, there were 5971 (0.02%) heart failure-related cases. Heart failure-related ED patients were significantly more likely to be admitted (59.8% vs 4.01%; OR 35.3, 95% CI 31.5-39.7). Among heart failure-related visits, admission was more common in patients with congenital heart disease (OR 5.0, 95% CI 3.3-7.4) and in those with comorbidities including respiratory failure (OR 78.3, 95% CI 10.4-591) and renal failure (OR 7.9, 95% CI 1.7-36.3). Heart failure-related cases admitted to the hospital had a higher likelihood of death than nonheart failure-related cases (5.9% vs 0.32%, P < .001). Factors associated with mortality included respiratory failure (OR 4.5, 95% CI 2.2-9.2) and renal failure (OR 7.8, 95% CI 2.9-20.7). Heart failure-related ED visits were more expensive than nonheart failure-related ED visits ($1460 [IQR $861-2038] vs $778 [IQR $442-1375] [P < .01].) Conclusions Heart failure-related visits represent a minority of pediatric ED visits but are associated with increased hospital admission and resource utilization.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.009
       
  • Reply
    • Authors: Sanjay Chawla; Girija Natarajan Marie Gantz Seetha Shankaran Waldemar Carlo
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Sanjay Chawla, Girija Natarajan, Marie G. Gantz, Seetha Shankaran, Waldemar A. Carlo


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
       
  • Fertility Preservation in Pediatric Subspecialties: A Pilot Needs
           Assessment Beyond Oncology
    • Authors: Branavan Vakeesan; Danielle R. Weidman; Anne Marie Maloney; Lisa Allen; Armando J. Lorenzo; Abha A. Gupta
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Branavan Vakeesan, Danielle R. Weidman, Anne Marie Maloney, Lisa Allen, Armando J. Lorenzo, Abha A. Gupta
      Physicians from 6 non-oncology pediatric subspecialties were surveyed about fertility preservation (FP) to assess education/service needs. Almost all (96%; 25 of 26) reported having patients at risk of infertility; however, only 58% (15 of 26) had discussed FP with patients' families. Most subspecialists (92%; 23 of 25) would like access to an FP program. Our data support exploring the expansion of FP programs beyond oncology.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.072
       
  • A Novel In Situ Simulation Intervention Used to Mitigate an Outbreak of
           Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Neonatal Intensive Care
           Unit
    • Authors: Kathleen Gibbs; Samuel DeMaria; Scarlett McKinsey; Andrea Fede; Anne Harrington; Deborah Hutchison; Carol Torchen; Adam Levine; Andrew Goldberg
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Kathleen Gibbs, Samuel DeMaria, Scarlett McKinsey, Andrea Fede, Anne Harrington, Deborah Hutchison, Carol Torchen, Adam Levine, Andrew Goldberg
      Objective To describe the successful implementation of an in situ simulation program to diagnose and correct latent safety threats in a level 4 neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to mitigate a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak. Study design An investigational report describes a simulation intervention that occurred during a 4-month MRSA outbreak in a single-center, 46-bed, newly renovated level 4 NICU. The simulation program was developed for all NICU providers in which they were exposed to a 30-minute in situ human simulation intervention that included education, evaluation, and debriefing to resolve perceived or observed latent safety threats. The primary study outcome was improved hand hygiene compliance and an enhanced estimate of the culture of safety during a 6-month period. Results A total of 99 healthcare providers including physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, and environmental service workers completed the course. Before the simulation intervention, there were 18 patients colonized or infected with a single MRSA clone; after the intervention, there were no new episodes of colonization or infection. Conclusions An in situ, simulation-based intervention can counter threats to patient safety related to workflow and lapses in infection control practices and improve patient outcomes.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.040
       
  • Burden of Poor Health Conditions and Quality of Life in 656 Children with
           Primary Immunodeficiency
    • Authors: Vincent Barlogis; Nizar Mahlaoui; Pascal Auquier; Fanny Fouyssac; Isabelle Pellier; Camille Vercasson; Maya Allouche; Carolina Brito De Azevedo; Despina Moshous; Bénédicte Neven; Marlène Pasquet; Eric Jeziorski; Nathalie Aladjidi; Caroline Thomas; Virginie Gandemer; Françoise Mazingue; Capucine Picard; Stéphane Blanche; Gérard Michel; Alain Fischer
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Vincent Barlogis, Nizar Mahlaoui, Pascal Auquier, Fanny Fouyssac, Isabelle Pellier, Camille Vercasson, Maya Allouche, Carolina Brito De Azevedo, Despina Moshous, Bénédicte Neven, Marlène Pasquet, Eric Jeziorski, Nathalie Aladjidi, Caroline Thomas, Virginie Gandemer, Françoise Mazingue, Capucine Picard, Stéphane Blanche, Gérard Michel, Alain Fischer
      Objective To gain insight into how primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) affect children's health status and quality of life. Study design The French Reference Center for PIDs conducted a prospective multicenter cohort that enrolled participants who met all criteria: patients included in the French Reference Center for PIDs registry, children younger than18 years, and living in France. Participants were asked to complete both a health questionnaire and a health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) questionnaire. A severity score was assigned to each health condition: grade 1 (mild) to grade 4 (life-threatening). HR-QoL in children was compared with age- and sex-matched French norms. Results Among 1047 eligible children, 656 were included in the study, and 117 had undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; 40% experienced at least one grade 4 condition, and 83% experienced at least one grade 3 or 4 condition. Compared with the French norms, children with PID scored significantly lower for most HR-QoL domains. Low HR-QoL scores were associated strongly with burden of poor conditions. Conclusions Our results quantify the magnitude of conditions in children with PID and demonstrate that the deleterious health effects borne by patients already are evident in childhood. These results emphasize the need to closely monitor this vulnerable population and establish multidisciplinary healthcare teams from childhood. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02868333 and EudraCT 2012-A0033-35.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.029
       
  • Papular Purpuric Gloves and Socks Syndrome because of a Mycoplasma
           Infection
    • Authors: Willemijn Kappers; Greet Stevens; Peggy Bruynseels; Machiel van den Akker
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Willemijn Kappers, Greet Stevens, Peggy Bruynseels, Machiel van den Akker


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.050
       
  • Childhood Corporal Punishment and Future Perpetration of Physical Dating
           Violence
    • Authors: Jeff R. Temple; Hye Jeong Choi; Tyson Reuter; David Wolfe; Catherine A. Taylor; Sheri Madigan; Lauren E. Scott
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Jeff R. Temple, Hye Jeong Choi, Tyson Reuter, David Wolfe, Catherine A. Taylor, Sheri Madigan, Lauren E. Scott
      Objective To test whether experiencing childhood corporal punishment is linked to later perpetration of dating violence. Study design Young adults (n = 758; 61% female; mean age of 20 years), originally recruited for a longitudinal study as 9th- and 10th-grade Texas high school students, were asked about their childhood experiences with corporal punishment and physical abuse, as well as current experiences with dating violence. A path model was used to determine whether childhood corporal punishment was related to recent perpetration of physical dating violence, while controlling for childhood physical abuse, age, sex, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Results In all, 19% of participants (n = 134) reported physical dating violence perpetration and 68% reported experiencing corporal punishment as children (n = 498). Analysis showed a significant positive association between corporal punishment and physical perpetration of dating violence (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.07-1.59). Even after controlling for sex, ethnicity, age, parental education, and child physical abuse, childhood corporal punishment was associated significantly with physical dating violence perpetration (aOR 1.29, 95% CI 1.02-1.62). Conclusions The finding that childhood corporal punishment was associated with perpetration of young adult physical dating violence, even after controlling for several demographic variables and childhood physical abuse, adds to the growing literature demonstrating deleterious outcomes associated with corporal punishment.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.10.028
       
  • Altered Cerebral Perfusion in Infants Born Preterm Compared with Infants
           Born Full Term
    • Authors: Marine Bouyssi-Kobar; Jonathan Murnick; Marie Brossard-Racine; Taeun Chang; Eman Mahdi; Marni Jacobs; Catherine Limperopoulos
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics
      Author(s): Marine Bouyssi-Kobar, Jonathan Murnick, Marie Brossard-Racine, Taeun Chang, Eman Mahdi, Marni Jacobs, Catherine Limperopoulos
      Objectives To compare regional cerebral cortical blood flow (CBF) in infants born very preterm at term-equivalent age (TEA) and healthy newborns born full term and to examine the impact of clinical risk factors on CBF in the cohort born preterm. Study design This prospective, cross-sectional study included infants born very preterm (gestational age at birth <32 weeks; birth weight <1500 g) and healthy infants born full term. Using noninvasive 3T arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging, we quantified regional CBF in the cerebral cortex: sensorimotor/auditory/visual cortex, superior medial/dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC)/posterior cingulate cortex, insula, and lateral posterior parietal cortex, as well as in the brainstem, and deep gray matter. Analyses were performed controlling for sex, gestational age, and age at magnetic resonance imaging. Results We studied 202 infants: 98 born preterm and 104 born full term at TEA. Infants born preterm demonstrated greater global CBF (β = 9.03; P < .0001) and greater absolute regional CBF in all brain regions except the insula. Relative CBF in the insula, ACC and auditory cortex were decreased significantly in infants born preterm compared with their peers born at full term (P < .0001; P = .026; P = .036, respectively). In addition, the presence of parenchymal brain injury correlated with lower global and regional CBF (insula, ACC, sensorimotor, auditory, and visual cortices) whereas the need for cardiac vasopressor support correlated with lower regional CBF in the insula and visual cortex. Conclusions Altered regional cortical CBF in infants born very preterm at TEA may reflect early brain dysmaturation despite the absence of cerebral cortical injury. Furthermore, specific cerebral cortical areas may be vulnerable to early hemodynamic instability and parenchymal brain injury.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2017.09.083
       
  • Information for Readers
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Journal of Pediatrics, Volume 191


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T03:08:36Z
       
 
 
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