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Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.681
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 1281  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0961-0006 - ISSN (Online) 1741-6477
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • A study of university law students’ self-perceived digital
           competences

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      Authors: Konstantina Martzoukou, Petros Kostagiolas, Charilaos Lavranos, Thorsten Lauterbach, Crystal Fulton
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The concept of digital competences incorporates the effective use of constantly-changing digital tools and media for learning and performing digital tasks, digital behaviours (such as online communication, teamwork, ethical sharing of information), as well as digital mindsets that value lifelong digital learning and development. The current pandemic crisis has accelerated the need to diagnose and understand more systematically Higher Education students’ digital competences and the way in which they shape academic performance and outcomes. This empirical study explores the digital competences of students, studying in Law related courses, by means of a self-assessment survey tool, which has been previously tested with information and library science students, and was developed to study students’ technology mastery (i.e. the abilities, competences, capabilities and skills required for using digital technology, media and tools) and their digital citizenship mindsets (consisting of attitudes and behaviours necessary to develop as a critical, reflective and lifelong learners). The study found age demographic differences, which presented significant correlations pointing to the presence of diverse levels of competences in the student group. Correlation statistics of the survey data demonstrated that students’ prior everyday participation as a digital citizen was connected to a number of important academic skills, such as the ability to identify information in different contexts, students’ digital learning and development, their digital abilities to complete academic work, their information literacy skills and their skills around managing their digital wellbeing and identity. Focus groups data with academics revealed that they valued the development of students’ digital competences for the purposes of learning, while studying at university and placed less emphasis on digital citizenship skills. These academics also considered the value of digital platforms and tools (the focus on ‘ICT Proficiency’) to be more relevant for academic study than digital citizenship mindsets.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-09-30T10:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211048004
       
  • Knowledge of students of the exceptions and limitations clause in
           copyright administration in academic libraries in Ghana

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      Authors: Theresa L. Adu, Thomas B. Van der Walt
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Copyright exceptions and limitations, which allow information consumers the right to use copyrighted materials without necessarily obtaining permission from or payment to the rightsholder, promote advances in the arts and sciences. Poor knowledge of copyright laws results in improper use of copyrighted materials. However, the extent to which academic library users in Ghana know about the exceptions and limitations, as well as their understanding of permissible use of information in the Copyright Act 690, 2005 of Ghana are not known. The sequential mixed methods approach was employed to collect data from 530 postgraduate students from two public and two private universities in Ghana to assess their knowledge of copyright exceptions and limitations, as well as their understanding of permissible use of information in Copyright Act 690, 2005 whilst using the services of their libraries. The study shows that students were poorly knowledgeable about the various applications of the exceptions and limitations clause in the copyright laws of Ghana: students were either indifferent (i.e. ‘neutral’), or ‘disagree’, and ‘strongly disagree’ on whether the Copyright Act 690, 2005 had clauses on exceptions and limitations on various uses of information such as for ‘Private copying’, for ‘Quotations’ or ‘For the benefit of persons with disability’. Over 50% of respondents were not sure that the copyright laws of Ghana had provisions for permissible use of information. Age and gender of respondent significantly influenced these responses: older students 46 years and above, and females, were more knowledgeable compared to younger students and males respectively about exceptions and limitations for ‘Private copying’, and ‘For the benefit of people with disability’ in the copyright laws of Ghana. Policymakers in Ghana should therefore adopt youth- and gender-focus strategies in copyright education for efficient administration of copyright laws in academic libraries.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-09-30T10:25:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211048003
       
  • Unveiling the research pattern and trends in library service quality
           studies: A meta-narrative review

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      Authors: Priya Vaidya, Basharat Ahmad Malik, P.M. Naushad Ali
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      ‘Service Quality’ and its influence in Library and Information Science discipline are spectacular when studied intensively. In this study, researchers adopted the Realist and Meta-narrative Evidence Syntheses: Evolving Standards review method and introduced a novel Initialization, Conceptualization, Actualisation) (ICA) framework for meta-narrative studies. This method would act as a boon particularly to the existing methods of conducting meta-narrative studies in social sciences in general and library sciences in particular. A total of 49 research articles were selected from Scopus and Web of Science (WoS) databases, covering a span of 5 years, that is, 2015–2019, published in the domain of library service quality. An extensive in-depth analysis of selected publications was carried out under seven categories (i.e. library, library services, quality, ServQUAL, LibQUAL+, user satisfaction and users’ expectations), which were generated using the VOS-Viewer software and ‘Review Tags’ (manually generated using OneNote). The seven categories further identify a total of 27 sub-categories. The quantitative findings revealed that all the 49 reviewed publications were published in 27 journals. All the journals have been indexed in the Scopus database, whereas 15 journals containing the remaining 22 publications are indexed in both WoS and Scopus databases. This study unfolds a transverse trend in library service quality. It would be beneficial for the library managers to sustain libraries’ service quality and set a benchmark in the said field.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-09-08T10:00:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211042928
       
  • Book review: Catherine D’Ignazio and Lauren F. Klein, Data feminism

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      Authors: Marc Kosciejew
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-09-04T05:42:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211042662
       
  • Comparison of U.S. 4-year and community college librarians’ perspectives
           on competencies, challenges, and educational preparation for the
           instructional role

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      Authors: Ting Wang, Brady D. Lund, Michael Widdersheim, Brendan Fay
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study is to explore and compare community (2-year) college librarians’ perceptions of their competencies, challenges, and educational preparation with those of librarians at 4-year colleges. Researchers created survey questions based on previous studies and distributed the survey through online mailing lists. The survey results indicated that community college instructional librarians’ responses were generally not statistically significantly different from 4-year university librarians in terms of what skills, traits, and educational needs were most prevalent. From the perspective of career challenges, community college instructional librarians cited marketing and changing perceptions/needs of content area faculty, while the librarians at 4-year universities cited burnout and class overload. These differences reveal the substantial challenge of preparing instructional librarians according to the types of libraries and instructional approaches.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-09-03T10:57:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211042661
       
  • Monitoring, browsing and being aware – Keeping abreast and staying
           updated with professional information in Swedish regional libraries

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      Authors: Ola Pilerot
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      A substantial part of the work conducted by librarians at Swedish regional libraries concerns staying alert and informed in ways that allow for continuous development of the kind of knowledge and abilities that are required for doing a qualified job, but this part of the work is elusive and hard to identify. This paper presents an empirical study that elucidates this specific kind of work of keeping abreast and updated with professional information. Empirical data were produced through interviews and logbooks with 10 members of staff at 4 regional libraries in Sweden. The data were analysed by employing Marcia Bates’ model of different information-seeking modes. The results of the study show that the activity in focus is seamlessly intertwined with other work activities and enacted in a variety of ways that are adapted after other work tasks (than the information seeking in itself) and dependent on individual preferences and routines. Since there is a certain conception of this activity as something that should be carried out in a certain systematic way and since it is something that one as a librarian ought to be good at, it is furthermore often associated with a normative dimension that provokes a sense of guilt among the study participants.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-09-03T10:56:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211042925
       
  • A study of emerging trends in digital preservation literature: An analysis
           of journal articles presented in course syllabi

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      Authors: Angela P. Murillo, Ayoung Yoon
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The field of digital preservation education is evolving due to the rapid developments in the digital preservation field, and as educators and researchers respond to these developments. One way to understand trends in education is through the examination of course syllabi and through the assigned course readings, as instructors often utilize and integrate core and seminal literature in these courses. This study aims to understand the emerging topics and trends in digital preservation education through the examination of these course readings. This study examines these topics and trends through an analysis of the literature assigned digital preservation courses at North American ALA (American Library Association)-accredited Master’s in Library and Information Science programs through bibliometric analysis, topic modeling, and visual analysis of the citation data.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-09-02T05:42:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620967714
       
  • Information poverty predictors among Ahvazi citizens; Investigating some
           cases

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      Authors: Abdol Hossein Farajpahlou, Mansoor Koohi Rostami, Kiomarth Beshlideh, Neda Pourkhalil
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The present study aimed to investigate the most important information poverty predictors among Ahvazi citizens. This applied and correlational-descriptive study employed structural equation modeling to analyze the data. The information poverty scale and the standard questionnaires of social participation, social exclusion, technophobia, and economic capital were used to collect the data. On the next step, their reliability and validity were confirmed through using Cronbach’s alpha and confirmatory factor analysis. The study population consisted of individuals aged 15 and above living in Ahvaz. Furthermore, the subjects were selected using a multistage random sampling technique, where 520 questionnaires were collected. The results showed a significant relationship among some factors like information poverty and education, gender, social exclusion, social participation, and ultimately, economic capital. However, the relationship between technophobia and information poverty has not been confirmed. Information poverty is a multidimensional-multifactorial phenomenon, associated with diverse factors. Due to the fact that, the relationship between variables and information poverty was confirmed; we need to minimize material poverty and social exclusion, paying attention to the educational system, and increasing social participation in society in order to reduce information poverty. This phenomenon can be in contact with information-related infrastructures, increasing the number of libraries and their resources, strengthening Internet access, and teaching information literacy. Moreover, several factors can exacerbate information poverty, some of which has been addressed in this study.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-23T05:13:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211036729
       
  • Book review: Margaret Weaver and Leo Appleton, Bold minds: Library
           leadership in a time of disruption

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      Authors: Claire Sewell
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-20T11:58:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211040551
       
  • Future uncertainties for preserving tweets: Peoples’ perceptions in
           Japan

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      Authors: Ryo Shiozaki
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Social media content includes an unprecedented number of personal documents reflecting our time. Few countries or regions have established legal grounds for securing long-term access to these documents, while paper-based publications have been exhaustively accumulated under legal deposit systems. However, archiving social media through national libraries, as a sort of state intervention, could bring about chilling effects on free speech in unexpected ways. The article aims to present empirical data of public concerns concerning social media content, focusing on Twitter’s public tweets archived by third parties, through two questionnaire surveys involving university students (Research I) and the public (Research II). The surveys were designed based on three settings: researchers, organisations to which the respondents belong and the National Diet Library in Japan. Consequently, approximately 30% and 47% of the respondents in Research I (n = 197) and II (n = 728), respectively, disagreed with any hypothetical scenario. An ordered logistic analysis to reveal the inter-relations of variables suggests the existence of other factors; thus, neither variables related to Twitter/Internet use nor demographic variables influenced people’s perceptions of the archival issue. While protecting privacy rights and copyrights was the primary reason for disagreements regarding third-party archival of tweets, many respondents intuitively displayed a negative reaction without any specific reason. Those who question its value and feel uncomfortable with an authoritative intervention were also identified. To nurture acceptant attitudes, advocating the archival of personal documents and adopting more restrictive archival procedures like taking down posts and anonymisation, public debates on the intervention of public bodies and demonstration of archival values should be considered.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-16T10:40:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211037392
       
  • Exploring barriers and possible actions suggested in rural libraries for
           information society: Perspectives from library practitioners in Malaysia

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      Authors: Norshila Shaifuddin, Wan Satirah Wan Mohd Saman, Mad Khir Johari Abdullah Sani, Halida Yu
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to explore the barriers when developing information societies and to suggest possible actions for rural libraries to participate in information societies, tailored to the needs of Malaysian rural libraries. This study employed a three-round Delphi technique; including a face-to- face interview in the first round, followed by two rounds of close-ended survey questions presented in a Likert-type scale format distributed to a selected group of leaders with experience in rural library planning and strategies. It reveals how funding, library infrastructures, information communication technology, local content resources, and human resources adversely affected rural libraries in the development of an information society. Based on the recommendation elicited for the five categories, this study suggests possible actions that provide practical guidance on the actions to be taken by the rural libraries in developing an information society.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-13T01:41:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211036737
       
  • Latvian public libraries as a resource, cooperation partner and initiator
           

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      Authors: Kristine Kine, Agnese Davidsone
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study is to explore the involvement of public library librarians in improving media literacy and promoting civic participation in Latvia. Within the framework of this research, 15 semi-structured interviews with librarians of public libraries were conducted. The main findings indicate that librarians can strengthen information consumption skills by providing lifelong learning opportunities for all members of society. However, several problematic aspects emerge, among them are the lack of methodological materials specifically for library use, difficulty in reaching audiences who need media literacy training and insufficient media literacy skills among librarians themselves. The librarians in the study stated that more up-to-date knowledge of media literacy is required, as technological developments have changed the criteria by which we evaluate information. Libraries also engage in building civil competence, mainly by facilitating different forms of civic participation and ensuring equal access to infrastructure and library resources. Librarians themselves consider libraries to promote local community awareness and strengthen its identity, thus perpetuating a democratic society. Libraries also promote a sense of responsibility towards the community in members of society by organizing events and organizing volunteer work. Therefore, there is the need for public libraries to become more visible in the local communities as promoters of civic participation, engage more in the communities’ life. This requires librarians to take a more active role, and their participation in community events and partnership building. Librarians’ own media literacy and pedagogical skills need to be continuously improved.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-12T10:17:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211036736
       
  • Students’ frequency of access to school library materials in
           transformative times

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      Authors: Rita Reinsel Soulen, Lara Tedrow
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic triggered many school and school library closures, resulting in shifts to online and/or hybrid instruction and limited school library access. This survey of parents of PreK–12 students (aged 2–18 years) investigated students’ frequency of access to school library materials prior to (T1), during (T2), and predicted after (T3) the pandemic (n = 230). Demographics such as age, gender, race, and ethnicity and other factors such as household income, community type, geographic location, type of school, school environment, and number of books in home were collected. Frequency of access to school library materials was compared at T1, T2, and T3 by demographic and other factors. Results demonstrate that frequency of access to school library materials differed significantly between time points. Repeated-measures analysis of variance showed a significant difference between T1 and T2 and between T2 and T3 but not between T1 and T3. Significant interactions were found for age and frequency of access over time, with age group 6–10 years showing the most change. Significant differences were found for all three types of school environment, with face-to-face students showing less disruption in their access than online and hybrid students. Students’ frequency of access to school library materials was negatively influenced by closures and limited access, with the expectation of a return to similar frequency of access on resumption of normal operations. Given the strong associations between access to school library resources and academic performance, these results suggest student learning may have suffered during these closures.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-10T10:07:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211037721
       
  • Examining the information seeking and sharing activities in a virtual
           community of librarians

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      Authors: Franklin Gyamfi Agyemang
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The study examines the information exchange activities among librarians when communicating in a virtual community. Specifically, the study explores the kind of information librarians seek or share in a virtual community. The study also explores how librarians react to the shared or sought-for information in a virtual community. This study was carried out on 50 librarians in community of practice on a WhatsApp platform. Netnography as a research design was used in this study. Data were analysed using thematic content analysis techniques. The findings show that librarians share information that encourage and support one another. The findings also show that librarians share and seek related information on career and institutional work, thought-provoking information and personality quotes. In reaction to the shared information, librarians peruse shared information for their authenticity. Librarians share appreciative messages in reaction to the sharing of important and educative information. In the situation of misinformation or where suspicious information is shared, librarians counter the shared information in reaction by posting messages cautioning librarians to beware of scam.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-07T10:19:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211037389
       
  • Building and enhancing library services: Patrons’ awareness of, and
           engagement with social media in academic libraries in Ghana

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      Authors: Monica Mensah, Omwoyo Bosire Onyancha
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study sought to examine academic libraries’ patrons’ level of awareness of, and engagement with social media in the use of academic libraries services in Ghana. The study employed the cross-sectional survey whereby quantitative data were collected from a total of 417 respondents, who consisted of students and library staff from public, private and technical universities in Ghana. Findings indicated that the academic libraries have adopted and used a number of social media applications, with Facebook and instant messaging as the most popular and frequently used platforms, for the provision and access to library services and resources as well as for contacting the academic libraries. However, the level of awareness, extent of use, as well as the level of engagement with the platforms was low as social media tools adopted by the libraries were not prevalent among the library patrons. Recommendations and conclusions based on the research findings are offered in the paper. This study uses a cross-sectional survey, with the data being collected at a specific point in time. However, due to rapid technological change and trends, future research studies could consider longitudinal studies to investigate the adoption and use of social media in academic libraries across time and environment. The analysis of social media use for academic library services from both the library staff and library patrons’ perspectives will inform decisions on how to improve the use of such platforms for effective and efficient library services delivery and access.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-07T10:17:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211036738
       
  • Scattering of journals cited in legal theses and dissertations

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      Authors: Siviwe Bangani, Michiel Moll
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The study employed bibliometrics methods to analyse the scattering of 596 journals cited in legal master’s theses and doctoral dissertations in three South African law schools from 2014 to 2018. In addition, the study included an analysis of the extent of citation of different sources and examined the effect of use of non-legal journals by law students. It was found that students used 449.2 documents on average in writing a doctoral dissertation and 110.9 references per master’s thesis. Journals received more citations than any other document formats although 16 master’s theses were completed without citing a single journal. Generally, the journals cited in legal theses and dissertations conform to Bradford’s Law but they differ in their level of conformity by law school. There was a high degree of overlaps between Zone 1 journals in the three law schools. All journals in the core lists were available in all the law schools which was attributed to the strength of collections in these schools. The results support the application of bibliometric analyses to legal master’s theses and doctoral dissertations to make collection development decisions. In making those decisions, however, law librarians would have to look beyond the Zone 1 journals of their own institution for wider access. These results also serve as a caution to law librarians to look beyond the traditional law journals in de/selecting journals, as some of the non-legal journals in this study made it to the core list of cited periodicals. Furthermore, this study points to the strength of library collections in the top law school libraries in the country.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-07T10:15:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211036725
       
  • Application of graph theory in the library domain—Building a faceted
           framework based on a literature review

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      Authors: Andreas Lüschow
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Based on a literature review, we present a framework for structuring the application of graph theory in the library domain. Our goal is to provide both researchers and libraries with a standard tool to classify scientific work, at the same time allowing for the identification of previously underrepresented areas where future research might be productive. To achieve this, we compile graph theoretical approaches from the literature to consolidate the components of our framework on a solid basis. The extendable framework consists of multiple facets grouped into five categories whose elements can be arbitrarily combined. Libraries can benefit from these facets by using them as a point of reference for the (meta)data they offer. Further work on formally defining the framework’s categories as well as on integration of other graph-related research areas not discussed in this article (e.g. knowledge graphs) would be desirable and helpful in the future.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T05:46:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211036734
       
  • A study on researcher use behavior changes since Covid-19

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      Authors: Younghee Noh
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      In December 2019, Covid-19 virus spread from Wuhan, China, to the rest of the world and had profound impact on politics, economy, society, and culture as well as significant effect on libraries and information utilization. This study aimed to propose future directions for library service by analyzing information use behavior of researchers and deriving the requirements through a survey method. As a result, it was initially identified that the data types and search paths used by researchers have changed to using electronic or online resources. Second, it was difficult to access and acquire certain data only available offline along with difficulty in searching and selecting data suitable for the purpose of research, difficulty in grasping the material, and technical problems such as usage method, search, and information use environment were identified. Third, after Covid-19, there has been a change in demand for services people need from libraries. Including the expansion of budget support for securing digital content, free provision of e-books and e-journals for a limited time by publishers, free provision of paid educational content for a certain period, and temporary copyright agreement for works, libraries were required to make efforts to secure information resources available online in response to Covid-19.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-08-03T09:22:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211033893
       
  • Graphic novels through the lens of Goodreads reviews: Artistic, textual,
           or blend of both'

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      Authors: Lala Hajibayova, Mallory McCorkhill
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, a textual analysis of the linguistic characteristics of Goodreads user-generated reviews associated with popular graphic novels revealed reviewers’ rich evaluations of both textual and visual characteristics of the novels as well as the embodied orientation of the reviewers’ narrations, wherein positive emotions associated with the reading experience dominated. Overall, the blend of users’ unique perceptions of textual and visual characteristics of graphic novels contributes to the genre’s vivid representation and discoverability. The machine analysis of user-generated reviews revealed a high rate of function words, pronouns, and auxiliary verbs, which may suggest reviewers’ social orientation. This high rate of function words and the overall positive tone of the reviews may also be interpreted as reviewers’ attempts to promote their reviews and influence others’ reading choices.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-07-26T04:39:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211033898
       
  • ‘More Product, Less Process’ (MPLP): An early printed book
           project

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      Authors: Karen Attar
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This article addresses the challenge to make printed hidden collections known quickly without sacrificing ultimate quality. It takes as its starting point the archival mantra ‘More product, less process’ and explores its application to printed books, mindful of projects in the United States to catalogue 19th- and 20th-century printed books quickly and cheaply with the help of OCLC. A problem is lack of time or managerial inclination ever to return to ‘quick and dirty’ imports. This article is a case study concerning a collection of 18th-century English imprints, the Graveley Parish Library, at Senate House Library, University of London. Faced with the need to provide metadata as quickly as possible for digitisation purposes, Senate House Library decided, in contrast to its normal treatment of early printed books, to download records from the English Short Title Catalogue and amend them only very minimally before releasing them for public view, and to do this work from catalogue cards rather than the books themselves. The article describes the Graveley Parish collection, the project method’s rationale, and the advantages and disadvantages of sourcing the English Short Title Catalogue for metadata. It discusses the drawbacks of retrospective conversion (cataloguing from cards, not books): insufficient detail in some cases to identify the relevant book, and ignorance of the copy-specific elements of books which can constitute the main research interest. The method is compared against cataloguing similar books from photocopies of title pages, and retrospective conversion using English Short Title Catalogue is compared against retrospective conversion of early printed Continental books from cards using Library Hub Discover or OCLC. The control groups show our method’s effectiveness. The project succeeded by producing records fast that fulfilled their immediate purpose and simultaneously would obviously require revisiting. The uniform nature of the collection enabled the saving of time through global changes.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-06-29T05:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211026739
       
  • Taxes for public libraries: Arguments about library district management
           from the perspective of residents

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      Authors: Issei Suzuki, Masanori Koizumi
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Economic pressure on public library budgets has risen since the late-20th century as government funding has declined. Under increasing financial pressure, creating a procedure for how public libraries can provide fulfilling services to residents is one of the essential issues in public library management. As a result, library districts are receiving much attention as a management model in response to financial deterioration of public sectors in the United States. Library districts are special-purpose local governments that have a tax levy and bond authority for library management. Recent studies have demonstrated that library districts’ revenues are more stable over the long term than those of other legal bases, such as general-purpose local governments and non-profit organizations in the United States. However, it is not easy to form a library district because it involves a tax increase for residents. Nevertheless, the number of library districts has increased since the late-20th century. Why do voters allow a tax levy for library management' In this study, we examined the opinions of residents through a qualitative content analysis, using the voters’ pamphlets distributed to residents at the time of the referendum for forming the library district. Specifically, we analyzed opinions of both voters in favor and opposed to creating a library district and identified their preferences. Our research results showed that residents held a common understanding of the significance of public libraries in the community. The debate revolved around how much burden the residents were willing to accept to provide library services.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-06-25T10:43:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211026727
       
  • Teachers’ perceived information literacy self-efficacy

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      Authors: Miri Shonfeld, Noa Aharony, Noa Nadel-Kritz
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this research was to examine the factors that might correlate with variables that may explain teachers’ perceptions of their information literacy self-efficacy level. The study was conducted among 101 teachers during the 2018 academic year. It used the following questionnaires: information literacy self-efficacy level, being a digital newcomer/native, personality variables taken from the Big Five model, mastery of computer applications, personal characteristics, and participation in a digital program. Researchers used a quantitative methodology. Findings present a correlation between teachers’ perceptions of their information literacy self-efficacy level and openness to experience and neuroticism, teachers’ level of digital skills, and teachers’ participation in a digital program. We propose that the ministry of education should focus on developing pre-service teachers’ and teachers’ information literacy skills, thus enhancing their information literacy self-efficacy.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-06-25T10:42:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211026950
       
  • The role of the library within school-level literacy policies and plans in
           Australia and the United Kingdom

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      Authors: Margaret K. Merga
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Libraries are valuable resources that schools can draw upon to enhance their students’ literacy outcomes. However, the role of libraries in supporting student literacy attainment and maintenance may be poorly understood in schools. To determine if libraries are a valued literacy resource within schools, investigation of their incorporation into school-level literacy policies and plans was warranted. Literacy policies and plans from Australia and the United Kingdom were examined using a hybrid content analysis approach to explore if libraries are commonly featured in school literacy policies and plans. Analysis also identified the kinds of libraries that were mentioned, and the roles that libraries play in these documents. Only 34.3% of Australian documents mentioned a library, with UK documents far more likely to include them (74.3%). UK documents were more likely to mention school libraries, classroom libraries, public libraries, mobile libraries, online libraries and book swap areas, while parent libraries were only mentioned in Australian documents. Analysis of roles of libraries found mentions of borrowing and literature exposure; access to a well-resourced facility; reading for pleasure; reading for assessment; environment; research, information literacy and library skills; external expertise, resourcing and outreach; and literacy and literature instruction. UK documents were more likely to include these roles than their Australian counterparts.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-06-19T07:11:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211022410
       
  • How to reconnect different small worlds: Deconstructing the past that
           divides, pursuing a future that unites

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      Authors: Abdul Rohman
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Violence associated with religion is prevalent globally. Informed by the concept of small world, in which people learn about beliefs and values to judge what information is relevant to them, this study investigates how information sharing helps a religiously polarized society depolarize after a series of violence. Based on 54 interviews and participant observations in Ambon, Indonesia, this study found that, after the violence ended, deconstructing fear of the other religious community conditioned the Ambonese to rethink the relevance of living in the small world. As one community managed to meaningfully interact with the other, opportunities for exchanging views and rebuilding relationships emerged. Re-establishing common values enabled the disparate communities to unite as a society for the sake of their collective future. These findings broadly offer insights as to how to reconcile differences in competing small worlds, especially where religion is an imminent threat to social cohesion.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-06-12T08:36:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211022406
       
  • Exploring students’ attitudes toward university e-textbooks:
           Experiences, expectations, and preferences

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      Authors: Shiao-Feng Su
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Universities have been proactively exploring e-textbooks to resolve the issue of high textbook prices. The study examined students’ attitudes toward using e-textbooks through a questionnaire survey of 324 randomly sampled students from eight universities. The analysis highlighted students’ expectations from a library in terms of textbook provision and the preferred format, their intentions and behaviors toward the textbook purchase, perceived equitable discounts in price and ideal preview mechanisms offered by e-textbooks, assessment of e-textbooks, assessment of features in terms of usefulness and practicality, and the extrinsic and intrinsic motivators of adopting e-textbooks. Students in the West and East are similar in expecting libraries to underwrite their textbook access. The students prefer e-textbook over print for the library collection, but vice versa for individually owned textbooks. In the fast-growing virtual learning environment, direct library provision of e-textbooks has become essential, particularly during the pandemic and probably post-pandemic era. Big-screen mobile devices, such as laptops and tablets, are students’ most preferred options for reading e-textbooks. The students perceived e-textbooks as not yet mature and expected improvement. They also lack confidence in their self-control ability to read e-textbooks without distraction in the Internet environment. The findings suggest the design of motivator type of engagement features may focus on individual attainment.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-06-12T08:35:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211020096
       
  • ‘Talk to them like they’re people’: A cross-cultural comparison of
           teen-centred approaches in public library services

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      Authors: Ella Ornstein, Peter H. Reid
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this research is to observe and analyse cross-cultural examples of public libraries with strong teen services, to identify key elements of practice and approach that enable these libraries’ successful and impactful interactions with teenagers. A particular focus is placed on factors that are a matter of mind-set rather than of specific facilities, to offer these as transferable lessons that can be applied widely, including by smaller libraries and those with fewer resources. A comparative case study was conducted at two locations selected as examples of strong teen services in their respective regions: Lava and TioTretton in Sweden and Tompkins County Public Library in the United States. Data were collected via interviews, observation and document analysis. Key factors identified as contributing to successful, teen-centred services include providing a space, no matter how small, that is solely for teens, where they can experience a sense of ownership and belonging; according teens the same respect as any other library visitor; creating a space that is comfortable and actively signals that everyone is welcome; letting teens take the lead, with staff following their interests and serving as facilitators for their projects; creating flexibility in spaces and programming; employing staff who have varied expertise and genuinely enjoy working with young people; mingling and interacting with visitors; and continually re-evaluating and improving practices.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-06-12T08:35:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211020090
       
  • Relegating expertise: The outward and inward positioning of librarians in
           information literacy education

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      Authors: Alison Hicks, Annemaree Lloyd
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Previous research has demonstrated that professional narratives reference discourses that shape the practice of information literacy within higher education. This article uses discourse analysis method to identify how information literacy discourses construct and position teaching librarians within higher education. Texts analysed include four recent English-language models of information literacy and 16 textbooks. Analysis suggests the existence of two distinct narratives related to the role, expertise and professional practice of teaching librarians. In the outward-facing narrative librarian work is typically absent from guidelines for practice. In contrast, book introductions, which constitute the inward-facing narrative, centre professional librarians yet simultaneously position them as incompetent, or as lacking the skills and understandings that they need to be effective in this setting. These narratives constitute a form of othering that threatens professional practice at a time when the professionalisation of librarianship is being drawn into question. This article represents the second in a research programme that interrogates the epistemological premises and discourses of information literacy within higher education.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-06-07T06:07:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211020104
       
  • Information seeking behaviors of environmental journalists

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      Authors: Stacy Gilbert, Philip B. White, Kathryn Tallman
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Journalists and librarians share a common goal of providing information to the public, yet very little is known about how journalists’ information seeking behavior intersects with libraries. This case study seeks to understand the information seeking behavior of environmental journalists by investigating how their information needs intersect with the library and how their information seeking behavior changed over the course of their 9-month fellowship at the University of Colorado Boulder. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven environmental journalists at the beginning and end of their fellowship, while an open coding approach was used to identify themes. Generally, study participants conducted research by (1) identifying a story idea and conducting a preliminary search, (2) expanding their knowledge on the topic through scientific articles and interviews with experts, (3) conducting field research, and (4) completing research when information is redundant and they are confident with their knowledge. This process, and their growing feelings of confidence as they conducted research, were similar to, but not exactly, Kuhlthau’s Information Search Process model. Their interactions with the library were mostly limited to accessing books and articles. Overall, there was little change in the participants’ information seeking behavior, possibly due to limited time to learn new resources, reliance on preexisting research habits, professional competence, and lack of awareness of library services (e.g. librarians, workshops, and public academic library access). An understanding of journalists’ information seeking behavior can help librarians conduct instruction and outreach efforts that address journalists’ information needs.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-06-02T07:53:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211020081
       
  • Agriculture-based community engagement in rural libraries

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      Authors: Vandana Singh, Bharat Mehra, Everett Scott Sikes
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Community engagement in rural libraries receives little focus and is an overlooked area of research. In this article, we report exemplars of agriculture-based community engagement in rural and Southern and Central Appalachian region of the United States. An online survey of rural library professionals demonstrates the positive impact of agriculture-based engagement activities on the overall community-engagement initiatives in this region. This article synthesizes eight distinct agriculture-based initiatives with many subprojects, lists an inventory of stakeholders involved in agriculture-based community-engagement initiatives, and highlights the challenges faced by the rural libraries. Three successful examples, namely, seed library, community gardens, and farmers’ market initiatives, are presented with details to help other libraries adopt these successful community-engagement initiatives. The results show that rural libraries are very creative with their limited resources and they hit many areas of impact in the community through their community-engagement activities.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-05-31T11:15:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211015788
       
  • The expanding circles of information behavior and human–computer
           interaction

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      Authors: Tim Gorichanaz, Sukrit Venkatagiri
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the historical expansion and convergence of the fields of information behavior and human–computer interaction, primarily in terms of the philosophy underlying each field. Information behavior grew out of research in library service provision in the early 1900s, and human–computer interaction grew out of computer science and human factors engineering in the 1960s. While these two fields have had different origins, purposes, and discourses, in recent decades, they have begun to converge. In this article, we map this convergence and consider implications for the future of the information field. We conceptualize their scholarly paradigms as expanding circles, and we show that the circles of information behavior and human–computer interaction are expanding in terms of ontology, epistemology, and axiology—and moreover, they are beginning to overlap substantially. While the two fields continue to be largely separate in terms of scholarly discourses, we suggest that much could be gained by explicitly acknowledging their shared components. Some suggestions for this are discussed, and these are connected to the ongoing iSchool Movement.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-05-24T08:31:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211015782
       
  • How are academic libraries in Spanish-speaking Latin America responding to
           new models of scholarly communication and predatory publishing'

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      Authors: Jairo Buitrago Ciro
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The topic of predatory publishing and ways to combat it is garnering considerable attention in many parts of the developed world, where academic librarians are emerging as leaders in this regard. However, less is known about how this phenomenon is playing out in developing regions, including Spanish-speaking Latin America. This study presents the results of a survey of 104 academic librarians in this region, along with follow-up interviews with seven respondents. The findings reveal that scholarly publishing literacy in general, and predatory publishing in particular, currently has low visibility in this part of the world, although there is growing recognition of and increasing concern about the issue. Although there is some debate about whether scholarly publishing literacy should be the sole responsibility of the library, many participants agree that the library has a role to play. Moreover, while most of the librarians who participated perceive that they have a solid knowledge of open access, they are less confident in their understanding of predatory practices and are seeking to increase their skills and knowledge in this regard to better support researchers at their institutions. To address this shortcoming, academic librarians in the region have expressed an interest in receiving training and in participating in international collaborations with other libraries that have already developed resources or programming in this area.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-05-24T08:27:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211016533
       
  • Information and information resources in COVID-19: Awareness, control, and
           prevention

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      Authors: Mohammadhiwa Abdekhoda, Fatemeh Ranjbaran, Asghar Sattari
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the role of information and information resources in the awareness, control, and prevention of COVID-19. This study was a descriptive-analytical survey in which 450 participants were selected for the study. The data collection instrument was a researcher-made questionnaire. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data through SPSS. The findings show that a wide range of mass media has become well known as information resources for COVID-19. Other findings indicate a significant statistical difference in the rate of using information resources during COVID-19 based on age and gender; however, this difference is not significant regarding the reliability of information resources with regard to age and gender. Health information has an undisputable role in the prevention and control of pandemic diseases such as COVID-19. Providing accurate, reliable, and evidence-based information in a timely manner for the use of resources and information channels related to COVID-19 can be a fast and low-cost strategic approach in confronting this disease.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-05-21T03:38:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211016519
       
  • Academicians’ awareness, attitude, and use of open access during the
           COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Yigit Emrah Turgut, Alper Aslan, Nuran Varlı Denizalp
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this research is to reveal academics’ awareness, attitude, and use of open access. In line with the research purpose, the survey research design is adopted. This research consists 151 academics from 12 basic research areas; eight of them being Professor Dr, 17 being Associate Professor Dr, 49 being Doctor Lecturer, and 77 being Research Assistant or Lecturer. A questionnaire consisting of 19 open access and five demographic information questions was used for the data collection tool. The research results show that 75% of the academics have open access awareness and that their awareness is generally created by information that they obtain through the Internet and their friends. In addition, most of the academics indicate that their awareness of open access has increased during the pandemic period. When considering the level of academics’ use of open access, it is found that 75% of the academics use articles in open access journals for their own research and 51% of the academics do not publish any articles in open access journals.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-05-18T06:59:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211016509
       
  • The relationship between social responsibility and public libraries
           accountability: The mediating role of professional ethics and
           conscientiousness

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      Authors: Nima Soltani-Nejad, Marzieh Jahanshahi, Mohammad Karim Saberi, Nasim Ansari, Nayereh Zarei-Maram
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Public libraries are powerful social institutions whose services have a positive contribution to civil society. As one of the most important and most visited social institutions, such libraries are responsible to the community. Promoting social responsibility in public libraries requires addressing issues such as librarians’ accountability, professional ethics, and conscientiousness. Accordingly, this study strives to address this research gap by examining the relationship between organizational social responsibility and accountability perceived by staff in public libraries. Based on theoretical foundations, librarians’ professional ethics and conscientiousness were considered as mediating variables. Quantitative research method was used for this study and six hypothesized relationships were formulated to develop a conceptual model. Study data were collected through a questionnaire. Data obtained from 362 librarians of Iranian public libraries were analyzed running SPSS software and Smart PLS 3.0. The results revealed that perceived social responsibility of public libraries directly contributes to their perceived responsiveness. Furthermore, the implementation of social responsibility by public libraries reinforces the professional ethics and conscientiousness of librarians. As a result, the professional ethics and conscientiousness will lead to improving the accountability of public libraries. Accordingly, this study can help public library administrators, policymakers, and librarians to develop more comprehensive strategies for providing services to citizens by focusing on their social responsibilities, thereby establishing their place in society.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-05-17T07:11:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211014260
       
  • Correlatives of business students’ perceived information literacy
           self-efficacy in the digital information environment

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      Authors: Muhammad Asif Naveed, Madiha Mahmood
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Self-efficacy toward information literacy is and has been demonstrated as an essential and fundamental key for academic performance and lifelong learning of students at all levels. This research reported the results of a cross-sectional survey carried out to investigate the correlatives of information literacy self-efficacy among business students at the University of Management and Technology, Lahore. The questionnaire contained an Information Literacy Self-Efficacy Scale, which along with sociodemographic and academic variables was utilized for collecting data from 350 students. The survey participants were recruited through a convenient sampling procedure due to accessibility issues and time limitations. The data were analyzed by applying both descriptive and inferential statistics using SPSS. The results revealed that the business students had high self-efficacy for basic information literacy skills and low self-efficacy for advanced-level information literacy skills. Age, study program, study stage, proficiency for computer, and English language appeared to be the correlatives of students’ information literacy self-efficacy. The pragmatic insights generated in this research might be used as a guide by university librarians, especially those who are engaged in information literacy instructions for designing a need-based and student-centered curriculum for information literacy instruction programs.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-05-14T07:12:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211014277
       
  • A study on the relationship between library service and digital competence

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      Authors: Younghee Noh, Hyun-Jin Hong
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study measures the digital competence required by the fourth industrial revolution era and intends to disclose the correlation of such competence and the use of library programs and services. For this, a survey targeting the citizens was conducted. As a result, library service had critical influence on hardware ability and knowledge, software ability and knowledge, network ability and knowledge, and Internet ability and knowledge. The service provided at the library also had influence on computer and economic life, social development and issue, attitude toward computer, as well as ethical aspect. The implication found from such study results is that the citizens’ digital competence could grow with heightened quality and quantity of library services. As mentioned above, various cultural and educational programs including mutual loan service and e-book service contribute to the improvement of the citizens’ computer application, formation of positive attitude to society, and ethical awareness, as to which the nation and library should make careful development of service and program, notwithstanding investment budget in consideration of such correlation. Likewise, higher library visit rate represented high participation rate in various offline services offered by the library just as well as other online services, which can be used at the comfort of one’s home. The respective study results indicate that it is an utmost importance to seek plans to attract users to come to the library. It is critical to expand the role of library by continuously identifying people’s needs and desire for the library’s role and function, and to provide appropriate space and instrument for them to have various community activities at the library.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-04-27T12:14:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211008962
       
  • Evolution of institutional repositories: Managing institutional research
           output to remove the gap of academic elitism

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      Authors: Saimah Bashir, Sumeer Gul, Shazia Bashir, Nahida Tun Nisa, Shabir Ahmad Ganaie
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The article tries to highlight the evolution and conceptual framework of institutional repositories and their impact on the academic and scholarly circles in terms of better visibility, wider audience and earlier communication of research. The characteristics associated with the institutional repositories are also highlighted, which makes them stand out from the crowd in the family of open access scholarly platforms. The study is based on the examination and evaluation of the articles published across various peer-reviewed journals showcasing numerous dimensions of institutional repositories, ranging from their evolution to open scholarly acceptance. A preliminary search on institutional repositories was carried through two well-renowned indexing/abstracting databases of peer-reviewed literature, Clarivate Analytic’s, Web of Science and Elsevier’s Scopus. Search terms like institutional repositories, institutional research output, open access repositories, green open access, open access, open access publishing, open access initiatives, digital libraries, directory of open access repositories, open DOAR and scholarly communication were run across the databases for article retrieval, and the relevant studies were extracted accordingly. To make the study more comprehensive and current, the studies citing the retrieved articles were also consulted. The study reveals that the benefits associated with institutional repositories are manifold. They recounter users with the information which was otherwise unavailable due to the reasons ranging from the non-availability of supplementary information (like unpublished reports and working papers, multimedia and audiovisual items, learning objects, other special item types, bibliographic references, datasets, lecture notes and so forth) to the paywall/subscription models adopted by commercial channels of scholarly communication. Furthermore, the social, research and technological factors tend to be the main motivating factors for their wider acceptance by the scholarly community at global, national, organizational, and individual levels. They enhance the preservation of institutional research output with increased viewership and prestige apart from achieving a potential research impact. They, in a real sense, have abrogated the unilateral assault orchestrated by the commercial publishers on the author community by democratizing their scholarly voices via open and barrierless scholarly platforms. They are the future of the academic output of an institution/author as they perform successfully within the constitutional boundaries of scholarly and academic publishing, thus safeguarding the rights and claims of every academic actor. Given the importance of institutional repositories for a more democratic, barrierless and impactful information communication, they are for sure going beyond various scholarly circles by breaking the traditional and rigid walls of scholarly endeavours. The study presents a useful overview of the progression of the institutional repositories, their intended purpose and how they serve to fill the gaps in scholarly publishing and meet the needs of the wider academic community. The article summarizes in one place a concise overview of the use and impact of institutional repositories. The study is also an eye-opener for scholars interested in the research in the field of institutional repositories.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-04-26T09:04:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211009592
       
  • An empirical study of research ethics and their role in psychologists’
           data sharing intentions using consequentialism theory of ethics

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      Authors: Youngseek Kim
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study is to examine how different ethical dimensions of egoism, utilitarianism, and deontology all help in the formation of psychologists’ research ethics for data sharing, and how the research ethics eventually affect psychologists making decisions regarding whether to engage in data sharing. This research utilized consequentialism theory of ethics as its theoretical framework to develop its research model of psychologists’ data sharing as mediated by research ethics. It conducted an online survey with psychologists in US academic institutions and collected a total of 362 valid responses. Then, it employed the structural equation modeling technique to evaluate the research model and related hypotheses of psychologists’ data sharing intentions as mediated by the profession’s research ethics. This research found that perceived career benefit, perceived community benefit, and norm of data sharing all significantly contribute to the formation of psychologists’ research ethics for data sharing, and then these research ethics, along with perceived community benefit and norm of data sharing, significantly influence psychologists’ data sharing intentions. This study suggests that the consequentialism theory of ethics nicely explains psychologists’ formation of their research ethics for data sharing and their decision to engage in data sharing. The study also suggests that research communities can better promote researchers’ data sharing behaviors by stimulating their research ethics through different ethical dimensions, including egoism (career benefit), utilitarianism (community benefit), and deontology (norm of data sharing).
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-04-22T05:01:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211008967
       
  • Prison libraries serving the ‘whole person’: A qualitative
           study

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      Authors: Shreya Mishra, Manosi Chaudhuri, Ajoy Kumar Dey, Rishi Tiwari, Rupali Singh
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Incarceration is a traumatic life experience for both convicted and non-convicted individuals and life in prison is not easy to get through. However, prison administrations often establish different avenues for the prisoners to help them navigate through their incarceration. One such avenue is prison libraries. This study explores the influence of the prison library in the lives of eight incarcerated individuals, in the state of Uttar Pradesh, India. The study is based on the concept of the ‘whole person librarianship’ while using a phenomenological approach. The analysis resulted in the emergence of three broad themes: ‘Coming to term with incarceration’, ‘Library, a ray of hope’ and ‘Reinventing self through books’. The study expands our understanding of how the prison library can be a place that reduces stress and increases positive mental health by serving the ‘whole person’. Furthermore, it reduces stress and anxiety related to the state of liminality created by incarceration and gives inmates a purpose beyond prison. Thus, it helps them in making meaning of their situation, being mindful of themselves and their surroundings, healing them in the process, and supports their well-being. The findings suggest that books help the inmates to navigate their lives during incarceration.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-04-22T04:55:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211008956
       
  • “Books, physical spaces, rules, people”: A holistic analysis of young
           Chinese children’s perceptions of public libraries

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      Authors: Pianran Wang, Jianhua Xu, Brian W. Sturm, Qi Kang, Yingying Wu
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Young children’s perceptions of library services are often ignored when providing library services to this group. In order to reveal young children’s perceptions, grounded theory technique was used to analyze the interview data from 92 young Chinese children. The authors first proposed an integrated model of young children’s perceptions of Chinese public libraries, including the elements of books, physical spaces, rules, and people. Subsequently, the model is compared to the adult experts’ perspectives, revealing that young children could perceive all the experts’ proposed services and functions. Besides, they could perceive rules in libraries. Furthermore, young children were able to convert the abstract library classification index system to perceptible clues. The findings could be used to improve library services to accurately conform to young children’s perspectives.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-04-12T11:48:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211007197
       
  • Video or perish' An analysis of video abstract author guidelines

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      Authors: Jianxin Liu
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This article reports on an analysis of author guidelines to examine the influence of academic publishers and journals over the video abstract as an emerging genre. The data consist of author guidelines from a Spanish journal index and were analyzed based on a two-layered multimodal analysis adapted from the Genre and Multimodality model. The layout layer concerns the organizational features of author guidelines, while the thematic layer focuses on the content themes. The analysis shows that the selected author guidelines do not share many commonalities as expected; rather, they display miscellaneous features, even in technological specifications where standardization should be the norm. The analysis indicates that academic publishers and other stakeholders should shoulder greater responsibilities such as quality assurance in transitioning to multimodal spaces.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-04-12T11:38:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211006774
       
  • Open access journal publishing in the business disciplines: A closer look
           at the low uptake and discipline-specific considerations

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      Authors: Mikael Laakso, Bo-Christer Björk
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The Internet has enabled efficient electronic publishing of scholarly journals and Open Access business models. Recent studies have shown that adoption of Open Access journals has been uneven across scholarly disciplines, where the business and economics disciplines in particular seem to lag behind all other fields of research. Through bibliometric analysis of journals indexed in Scopus, we find the share of articles in Open Access journals in business, management, and accounting to be only 6%. We further studied the Open Access availability of articles published during 2014–2019 in journals included in the Financial Times 50 journal list (19,969 articles in total). None of the journals are full Open Access, but 8% of the articles are individually open and for a further 35% earlier manuscript versions are available openly on the web. The results suggest that the low adoption rate of Open Access journals in the business fields is a side-effect of evaluation practices emphasizing publishing in journals included, in particular, ranking lists, creating disincentives for business model innovation, and barriers for new entrants among journals. Currently, most business school research has to be made Open Access through other ways than through full Open Access journals, and libraries play an important role in facilitating this in a sustainable way.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-04-12T11:30:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211006769
       
  • Assessing the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals in
           academic libraries

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      Authors: Clare Thorpe, Lyndelle Gunton
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The United Nation’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development identifies 17 goals as a shared blueprint for peace, prosperity, people and the planet. Australian academic libraries have started documenting and planning how academic libraries contribute to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including the identification of assessment frameworks and key performance indicators. In 2019, the University of Southern Queensland (USQ) Library stepped through an exercise of understanding how our day-to-day work and annual planning targets mapped to the SDGs. The article is a case study. The authors outline how an academic library’s services, projects and action plans were mapped to the SDGs and how the mapping exercise was communicated to the community. The article will situate this activity among the broader approaches being taken by the Australian library community, including the 2030 stretch targets for Australian libraries. USQ Library staff found that existing services, collections and projects correlated to eight of the 17 SDGs. Activities were mapped to these eight goals and reported to senior executive of the University. The mapping exercise increased the awareness of library staff about the broader cultural and societal implications of their roles. The communication strategy led to conversations that increased university leaders’ awareness of the SDGs and the value and impact of USQ Library in improving access to information as well as the library’s role in transforming the lives of USQ students and community. By undertaking an exercise to map collections, services and projects to the SDGs, USQ Library has been able to demonstrate how their knowledge and information infrastructures which enable student achievement and research excellence. The SDGs can be used by university libraries as a benchmarking tool and as a challenge to set stretch targets aligned with the United Nation’s 2030 agenda.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-04-09T07:25:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211005528
       
  • Reading practices of Spanish-speaking readers in the United States and
           Canada

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      Authors: Keren Dali
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on a subset of data from a larger survey study of immigrant and migrant Spanish-speaking readers in the United States and Canada, this article explores their pre-immigration reading histories; the role of reading in their lives and personal identities; specific day-to-day characteristics of their reading behaviors, including the frequency and places of reading; and the sources of information that readers use to select their new reads. This study places reading practices in the context of readers’ migration experiences and pressures of adjustment and resettlement. Supported by the review of reading practices in selected countries of origin and by the analysis of the Spanish-speaking communities in the diaspora, this article contributes to the body of knowledge about immigrant and migrant readers. By so doing, it begins to address the gap in knowledge about Spanish-speaking readerships. This gap exists despite the extensive previously published research on Hispanic and Latinx library users, which has focused on their information-seeking behaviors, use of public libraries, language learning programming, and collection development in the Spanish language, without touching on reading practices. It is hoped that this study will contribute to more culturally sensitive reader services in libraries and a better understanding of Spanish-speaking community members by librarians in all types of libraries.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-03-23T11:50:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000621996412
       
  • Towards developing library and information science practicum supervision
           competency framework

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      Authors: Arif Khan
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this article is to discuss competencies required for practicum supervision within the field of library and information science (LIS) education. In doing so, this study attempts to propose Practicum Supervision Competencies Framework for professionals working in libraries and similar information organisations. The study aims to contribute to the body of knowledge on supervision of experiential learning programmes such as practicum and internships in the field of library and information science. Constructivist Grounded Theory approach was used for collection and analysis of data. Qualitative data was collected through semi-structured interviews with 43 participants that included library and information science professionals and students. Using constant comparative method, suggested in the Constructivist Grounded Theory literature, the components of the framework were developed and then validated and strengthened through the literature on competencies for library and information science professionals. Qualitative data analysis software NVivo 12 pro was used to support coding, category development and constant comparison methods in the data analysis process. Results of this study propose a framework for library and information science practicum supervision competencies and signify its importance for the academia and industry. The proposed framework is composed of five distinct but interrelated components, that is, Interactive, Management, Pedagogical, Professional and Technology which are important for practicum supervision in the field of LIS. The study also discusses empirical insights about the significance of research on practicum supervision within the field of library and information science as a distinct area. Practical implication of research encompasses several dimensions: methodological, theoretical, managerial and academic. For example, the framework should attempt to help better understand gaps between potential and actual competencies required by practicum supervisors in the field of library and information science. Research results may lack generalisability because of the chosen research method. However, researchers in other regions of the world are encouraged to test the proposed framework further.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-03-12T04:15:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000621997533
       
  • Young children’s information-seeking practices in center-based
           childcare

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      Authors: Sarah Barriage
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Many children in the USA spend a significant amount of time in center-based childcare. However, research has yet to explore their information practices in this setting. This study investigates young children’s perceptions of the concept of information and their own information-seeking practices within the context of their day care classroom. The participants included 13 children between three and five years of age. Data was collected using participant observation, semi-structured interviews, child-led photo tours, and photo-elicitation interviews. The findings indicate that the children did not perceive the concept of information in a manner consistent with adult understandings of the term, and that they engaged in information-seeking related to finding out new things on their own, through interactions with others, and through classroom resources, activities, and routines. The findings have implications for both researchers and practitioners working with young children.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-03-08T08:48:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620962164
       
  • Modeling the process of personal digital archiving through ubiquitous and
           desktop devices: A systematic review

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      Authors: Irfan Ali, Nosheen Fatima Warraich
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study is to explore Personal Digital Archiving, and its practices, reasons, and challenges in desktop and in ubiquitous environment such as desktop computers, laptops, mobile phones or smartphones, tablets, and cloud services. Moreover, it is also aimed to develop a model of Personal Digital Archiving process for desktop and ubiquitous devices. This study used Preferred Reporting Items for the Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis guidelines for searching and devising, and inclusion and exclusion criteria. The Search was conducted from selected repositories, databases, and core journals, potentially containing studies related with Personal Digital Archiving. Consequently, 21 studies were included through identification, screening, eligibility, and inclusion of studies process. It was found that people used multiple devices such as mobile phones or smartphones along with other devices. It was established that people had also used cloud services with different devices including computers and smartphones or tablets for Personal Digital Archiving. Five major categories of individuals’ Personal Digital Archiving practices, that is, backup, replication or duplication, reorganizing and updating, cleaning or removing, and migration of information were found. Moreover, emotional motives, technological causes, alternative access, easy retrieval, and task completion were the reasons to adopt Personal Digital Archiving. On the basis of findings of selected studies, researchers developed a four steps model of Personal Digital Archiving process, consisting of initiation, identification, action, and evaluation constructs. Personal Digital Archiving challenges were also identified such as the individuals had to face through the use of desktop and ubiquitous devices including technical, fragmented and overloaded information, lack of training and expertise, and psychological and miscellaneous challenges. Personal Digital Archiving process model is based on the extracted data from studies published worldwide, and it is useful for both desktop and ubiquitous devices with reference to Personal Information Management context. The findings of the study will be helpful for software designers and android application developers to design and develop users’ centered Personal Information Management software.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-03-05T07:44:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000621996410
       
  • Book review: Kathy Peiss, Information hunters

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      Authors: Charles Oppenheim
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-03-02T10:45:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000621997020
       
  • Cultural sustainability: A perspective from independent libraries in the
           United Kingdom and the United States

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      Authors: Kirsten Loach, Jennifer Rowley
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      As organisations that collect and maintain cultural artefacts, independent libraries make important contributions to cultural sustainability. Surfacing and elaborating on these contributions has the potential to establish their value to wider sustainable development agendas. However, sustainability policy and research across the gallery, library, archive and museum sectors tends to focus on environmental, social and economic concerns. The small number of studies that do consider cultural sustainability tend to focus on the role of galleries, libraries, archives and museums in heritage preservation, without consideration of their role in sustaining culture through the three other key areas of preserving and promoting cultural identity, cultural diversity and cultural vitality. In addition, previous studies do not consider the role of culture in enabling sustainability at an organisational level. Complementing previous research on the relationship between museums and cultural sustainability (conducted in Australia, Cyprus and Romania), this study seeks to expand understanding of the relationship between galleries, libraries, archives and museums and cultural sustainability in the context of the independent library sectors in the United Kingdom and the United States. Semi-structured interviews conducted with professionals from independent libraries in both countries employed a card-based game method to explore the key areas of cultural sustainability in which their organisations can contribute. Interviews also explored the challenges associated with achieving organisational sustainability, together with the organisational values that impact the sustainability of independent libraries. The research identifies a series of supportive and conflicting relationships between the contributions that independent libraries make to each of the four key areas of cultural sustainability, as well as the organisational values that can inhibit or assist organisational sustainability. Resulting in a framework to assist in the management of internal organisational sustainability and contributions to external cultural sustainability agendas in independent libraries, it provides a new perspective to support understanding of the relationship between galleries, libraries, archives and museums and cultural sustainability.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-03-02T10:42:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000621992824
       
  • The use and promotion of adapted books in Norwegian public libraries

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      Authors: Gerd Berget
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Public libraries offer a large selection of books. For many library users, one of the highlights of the library visit is to explore this collection in search of interesting books that will provide enriching literary experiences. For some people, however, mainstream books might not be motivating to read, for instance, due to reading impairments, language challenges or inaccessible content. Consequently, most libraries also hold a collection of ‘special books’. In Norway, one example of such a collection is the books developed by the association Books for Everyone. This article explores the organization and promotion of adapted books in Norwegian libraries and is based on two datasets. The first dataset comprises the complete production by Books for Everyone, consisting of 232 titles. These books were examined to get an overview of the material commonly found in Norwegian public libraries, with a focus on the allocation of adaptation types and target groups. This dataset showed a diverse collection of books in six different categories. The majority was in the category ‘Easy to Read’, targeted at a broad variety of user groups. The second dataset consisted of survey data from 178 libraries regarding their organization and promotion of the Books for Everyone collection. The data revealed differences in how public libraries utilize these books, due to, for instance, a lack of knowledge about adapted books and potential target groups. Moreover, for many libraries, these books were regarded as ‘special books’ and were consequently not included in exhibitions or book talks. It may be necessary to pay more attention towards adapted literature in the library community and provide more knowledge about this literature among librarians. The overall purpose of this article is to provide some advice to librarians and other practitioners on how to deal with adapted books in a public library context.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-03-02T10:35:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000621996422
       
  • Use of reference management software among postgraduate students in Greece

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      Authors: Ilias Nitsos, Afrodite Malliari, Rodopi Chamouroudi
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The use of reference management software in the context of academic work and research is the main subject of this study. The study focuses on the extent to which postgraduate students at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, one of the largest Greek universities, make use of – or avoid using – reference management software tools to organize their bibliographic databases and to automate the process of creating references and citations. The study also tries to find out which are the key factors for their choices and whether certain background characteristics affect their behavior. It should be mentioned that no previous studies have been conducted in Greece regarding the use of reference management software in the academic environment. An online questionnaire was sent to the postgraduate students at the University and a result set of 545 responses was collected and analyzed. The majority (almost two-thirds) of the respondents identified themselves as non-users and one-third identified themselves as reference management software users. Among the latter, Mendeley was found to be the software used by more than two-thirds of the users and was followed by EndNote and Zotero. It is worth mentioning that Mendeley is the software officially recommended by the University’s central library to its users but most of the students (more than 60%) were not aware of this fact. In terms of background characteristics, the analysis revealed, among other things, statistically significant relationships between degree level, student discipline and preferences, reference management software features, and potential future use of reference management software.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-03-02T10:30:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000621996413
       
  • Limitations to success in academic data reference support

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      Authors: Jenny McBurney, Alicia Kubas
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      As secondary data become increasingly integrated into research and coursework across a widening variety of fields and disciplines, data reference is gaining traction as a major area of library research support. To examine the current landscape of data reference, we distributed a survey via regional and international library listservs asking librarians about their experiences and opinions related to their data reference work. For this paper, the full collected dataset was limited to only academic librarians who answer at least one data reference question per month in order to identify the unique needs of respondents doing reference work in academic institutions, with the ultimate goal of improving our own work as academic librarians at our institution. We used a grounded theory approach to analyze the qualitative survey response data, and supplemented this analysis with descriptive statistics and chi-square tests for the quantitative responses. Through this analysis, we identify a theoretical framework consisting of three themes relating to limitations to success where librarians must advocate for change in order to maintain and improve high-quality data reference work in the academic sphere: (1) technology and resource limitations, such as substandard database interfaces; (2) institutional limitations, such as insufficient staff time or resources dedicated to data reference; and (3) personal limitations, such as a lack of data skills. While librarians have varying levels of influence over each of these three areas, identifying and targeting these categories can help librarians and other data professionals focus resources and build cases for additional support from their library and campus administrators.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-03-02T10:18:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000621995530
       
  • Revisiting the High John experiment through a contemporary lens

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      Authors: Laurier L. Cress
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      In 1967, the University of Maryland’s School of Library and Information Services created a public library in Prince George’s County, Maryland, named the High John Experiment, to give Librarianship and Information Science students experience serving disadvantaged communities and to discover new methods to better serve these communities. From the creation of High John to the present day, University of Maryland publications and unaffiliated works credit High John as a groundbreaking experiment that propelled interests in diversity and inclusion in public libraries. High John’s creators published a 73 paged report for the United States’ Office of Education, accompanied by published articles, that confirms a violation of ethics toward the community High John served. The community was not involved in the implementation or planning of the library and many of the services and materials the library offered were based on prejudiced assumptions instead of community input or research. Although High John garnered supporters, the validity and ethicality behind High John’s intent and methods were called into question during the experiment. The controversy led to debates within the field that resulted in conversations about Librarianship and Information Science pedagogy and appropriate methods in outreach and community engagement for disadvantaged communities. Now that the passionately fueled debates on High John have ceased, the experiment is a distant memory. Although this experiment led to debates about diversity, inclusion, and equity in information access within the United States, this experiment is relevant to information readers on a global scale. Because Librarianship and Information Science has a history rooted in elitism and oppression worldwide, High John warrants further exposure and examination from a diverse pool of contemporary perspectives. Through the application of modern community outreach and engagement practices, this article builds on a critical historical analysis of the experiment and argues High John failed in its mission and violated the community’s trust that it purported to serve.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-02-26T08:11:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000621996430
       
  • The information-gathering practice of liberal professionals in a workplace
           setting: More than just seeking information

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      Authors: Yosef Solomon, Jenny Bronstein
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Existing models of the information behaviour of various liberal professionals, especially lawyers, lack currentness. They do not adequately represent the full scope of how these professionals de facto attain information in their occupation. Without clarity about the contemporary information-gathering practice of liberal professionals in a workplace setting, scholars, technology entrepreneurs and policy makers might be relying on partial or outdated grounds, and the ability of the information specialists to provide an effective service for their patrons might also be hindered. With a focus on legal professionals, as they have experienced noteworthy changes in their occupation, purposive sampling was applied, and 20 semi-structured interviews were conducted with practising lawyers in Israel. Participants were nationwide and ranged over 30 different areas of legal practice, with a fair diversity of other professionals and personal traits achieved. The content analysis revealed four distinctive forms in which lawyers in Israel gather information within the contemporary legal practice: (a) self-executed information-seeking, (b) mediated acquisition of information, (c) information discovery and (d) combined information-gathering – which in all compile 10 different habitual strategies of gathering information in their professional work. Finally, the study suggests a revised, integrative and inclusive model that provides a more accurate and profound understanding of legal professionals’ information-gathering practice. This comprehensive and current framework may serve as an insightful guide for understanding other information-rich liberal professions.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-02-18T11:23:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000621992810
       
  • Personal information management through ubiquitous devices: Students’
           mobile self-efficacy and PIM practices

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      Authors: Irfan Ali, Nosheen Fatima Warraich
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to explore personal information management (PIM) practices of undergraduate university students on ubiquitous devices such as mobile phones. The purpose was to investigate the relationship between mobile self-efficacy and mobile-based PIM practices of the respondentsin terms of finding/re-finding, keeping and organizing information. This study was the offspring of a PhD project. The quantitative research design was used to conduct this study. Structured questionnaire was used to collect data from undergraduate students Regression analysis was applied to investigate the relationship between mobile self-efficacy and their mobile based PIM practices. The findings revealed that undergraduate students search, browse, and scan information through mobile phones. They used keywords, searched from recently opened file, and from send item to find/re-find information. They save their personal information in folders, use mobile applications, and take screen shot of information to keep it for future use. Current study reported “Sharing as keeping ‘as a new phenomenon in mobile based personal information keeping (ubiquitous environment). This study also reported ‘Ubiquity’ as an emerging trend in PIM among young generation. Study found positive correlations between mobile self-efficacy and mobile based PIM. Current study developed a model of mobile self-efficacy and PIM. Based on new phenomena “sharing as keeping’ (which occurred in current study), a model “mobile based personal information keeping” may be developed. This study helps software developers of smartphones to develop mobile phone applications according to users’ needs. This study provides better understanding of PIM model (finding/re-finding, keeping and organizing information) through ubiquitous devices (smart phones). Although studies have been conducted to know the impact or relationship between mobile self-efficacy and PIM, but no comprehensive study has been conducted to explore the relationship between mobile self-efficacy and the holistic picture of mobile based PIM (finding/re-finding, keeping, and organizing information) especially in developing countries like Pakistan.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-02-16T09:39:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000621992821
       
  • “I actually got my first job through my ex-colleague”:
           Employment-related information seeking behavior of Bangladeshi immigrants
           in Canada

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      Authors: Nafiz Zaman Shuva
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores the employment-related information seeking behaviour of Bangladeshi immigrants in Canada. Using a mixed-methods approach, the study conducted semi-structured interviews with 60 Bangladeshi immigrants in Ontario, Canada, and obtained 205 survey responses. The study highlights the centrality of employment-related settlement among Bangladeshi immigrants in Ontario and reports many immigrants not being able to utilize their education and skills after arrival in Canada. The results show that Bangladeshi immigrants utilize various information sources for their employment in Canada, including friends and professional colleagues, online searchers, and settlement agencies. Although Bangladeshi immigrants utilized a large array of information sources for meeting their employment-related information needs, many interview participants emphasized that the employment-related benefits they received was because of their access to friends and professional colleagues in Canada. The survey results echoed the interview findings. The cross-tabulation results on post-arrival information sources and occupation status as well as first job information sources and occupational status in Canada show a significant association among the use of the information source “friends and professional colleagues in Canada” and immigrants’ occupational status. The study highlights the benefits of professional colleagues among immigrants in employment-related settlement contexts. It also reports the challenges faced by many immigrant professionals related to employment-related settlement because of the lack of access to their professional friends and colleagues in Canada. The author urges the Federal Government of Canada, provincial governments, and settlement agencies working with newcomers to offer services that would connect highly skilled immigrants with their professional networks in Canada, in order to get proper guidance related to obtaining a professional job or alternative career. The author calls for further studies on employment-related information seeking by immigrants to better understand the role information plays in their settlement in a new country.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-02-15T10:40:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000621992806
       
  • Measuring the educational value of comic books from the school
           librarians’ perspective: A region-wide quantitative study in Taiwan

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      Authors: Patrick Lo, Ya-Pin Lyu, Joyce Chao-chen Chen, Jui-Lien Lu, Andrew J. Stark
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Comic books and their characters are an integral part of popular culture. However, comic books, as educational material, still remain controversial in certain education systems, as this medium is regarded by some as sheer entertainment – thereby hindering students’ motivation to seek out other more formal, text-based literature to read. For this study, a region-wide questionnaire survey was sent out to explore school librarians’ perceptions and attitudes towards the educational value of comic books in Taiwan. A total of 789 responses were collected for this questionnaire survey study. The regression model was used to identify the causal relationship between different genres of comic books and students’ voluntary reading and learning incentives in the context of the school library. Findings from this study suggest that comic books (1) carry the potential to attract more students to visit the school library after class, (2) facilitate students’ reading comprehension skills and (3) foster students’ interest in voluntary reading. Because of this medium’s visual-based and serialised narrative approach to storytelling, findings of this study also suggest that comic books could function as a reading motivational tool, particularly useful in helping their students learn about the subjects of History and Science.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-01-21T10:24:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620983430
       
  • Adult large print collections in the United States: An exploratory survey

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      Authors: Holly S. Hebert, Cara Huwieler
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      What is the status of adult large print collections in public libraries across the United States' This nationwide survey explored adult large print collections, methods of collection development, librarian views of adult large print users, and the services surrounding these users. Responses were collected from all 50 states, from rural to urban settings, standalone to library systems, and all sizes of adult large print collections. Overall, adult large print collections continue to be a vital collection utilized by public libraries in their services to older adults.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-01-13T06:26:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620985921
       
  • Information needs of breast cancer patients and how educational status
           influence their information needs in Ghana

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      Authors: Benedicta Boadi, George Tesilimi Banji, Patrick Adzobu, Stephen Okyere
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Health information literacy plays a critical role in self-management practices among patients living with chronic health conditions. However, there are limited studies on information needs among breast cancer patients in Ghana. This paper therefore investigated the information needs of women living with breast cancer in Ghana and how educational status influenced their information needs. The study was conducted in two health facilities in Accra, Ghana (37 Military Hospital and Sweden Ghana Medical Centre). A total of 75 breast cancer patients were conveniently selected from the two health facilities for the study. The instrument used to elicit relevant data for this study was a questionnaire using the survey design. Data was analysed descriptively. The findings of the study revealed that the information needs of the breast cancer patients investigated were centred mainly around treatment and management information and less around preventive information. The patients also ranked diagnostic information as their highest need, followed by physical care information, treatment information, psychosocial information and disease-specific information in that order. Patients with higher education reported higher information need on all the five domains compared to those with lower education. The study therefore recommended that management of health facilities make health information literacy an integral component of their treatment and management of breast cancer.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-01-06T10:54:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620981611
       
  • Search evolution for ease and speed: A call to action for what’s
           been lost

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      Authors: Virginia M. Tucker, Sylvia L. Edwards
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years, leading website search engines have abandoned vital search features supporting complex information needs, evolving instead for the marketplace and for users seeking speedy answers to easy questions. The consequences are troubling, for researchers and for information science educators, with concerns ranging from the very relevance of search results and the unknowing of what is missing, to the novice searcher’s waning ability to frame potent queries and to learn ways to refine results. We report on a grounded theory study of search experiences of information professionals and graduate students (n = 20) that contributes a holistic understanding of web searching, using its findings both to frame what is lacking in the design evolution of search engines for complex information needs and to outline a way forward. One goal of the study was to evaluate an established model of web searching, called Net Lenses, a theoretical framework shown to be highly relevant during the study’s grounded theory secondary literature review. The original Net Lenses research used phenomenography to identify variation in the web search experiences of university students (n = 41), evidencing four categories according to the characteristics of searcher awareness, approach to learning, response to obstacles and search outcomes. This study validated the model and led to an expanded version, Net Lenses 2.0, with five categories of search experience, reflecting the complex information needs of more advanced searchers. This resultant Net Lenses 2.0 model is discussed with its implications for search engine design, for advanced searchers and also for learning-to-search modes, much needed by searchers seeking to develop their abilities. The study’s implications coalesce in a call to action for more inclusive search interface design, and an agenda is put forth for how information researchers, educators and literacy advocates can move forward in their intersecting domains.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2021-01-04T11:09:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0961000620980827
       
 
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