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Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.681
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 1129  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0961-0006 - ISSN (Online) 1741-6477
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • The airing of grievances: A look at complaint behavior in library reddit

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      Authors: Yue Ming, Miriam L. Matteson
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Social media platforms have been adapted into society in various ways during last two decades. Few studies have examined social media content from the perspective of the individual library professional, and in particular, from librarians’ social media posts about their work. This research explores social media complaints from library professionals to reveal insights into the areas of concern related to libraries as expressed in an informal, discursive style. Reddit data from three library subReddits was collected through a Python script. A total of 272 complaint posts with enough information were coded manually. A computational tool, Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC), was also used to extract linguistic characteristics of each post. The majority of the sources of the complaint posts came from librarians (86.76%). The top five categories of the target of the complaints were patrons (27.94%), the poster’s organization (20.22%), the poster’s supervisor (11.03%), the library field (11.03%), and the poster’s coworkers (10.29%). The top four topics of the complaint posts were patron behavior (21.69%), negative work environment (16.18%), job expectations (11.76%), and service expectations (10.66%). Organizations should put into place mechanisms and processes through which employees may share their concerns and exercise their voice, with no retribution, to solve workplace problems.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2023-01-24T08:16:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221149428
       
  • Ethnic differences in utilization of online health information sources: A
           test of the social inequality hypotheses

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      Authors: Dennis Rosenberg
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The goal of the current study was to understand ethnic differences in use of online health information sources. Social stratification and social diversification hypotheses were used as study’s theoretical framework. The data were obtained from the 2017 Israel Social Survey (N = 2166). Multinomial and logistic regression techniques were used for the multivariate analysis. The results suggest that Israeli Arab respondents were less likely than Israeli-born Jewish respondents to seek health information using the Health Funds’ call centers or websites, other websites, and to utilize any number of the online health information sources. The findings provide a strong support for the social stratification hypothesis. The findings imply that members of minority population should be more encouraged to use (public) online health information sources as a means of taking greater responsibility for their health as well as for the health of their communities.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2023-01-16T11:00:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221146843
       
  • Status of open access scholarly journal publishing in Pakistan

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      Authors: Muhammad Zahid Raza, Muhammad Rafiq, Saira Hanif Saroya
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Open access (OA) scholarly journal publishing is a recently emerged phenomenon of scholarly publishing in Pakistan. This study has been designed to find out the current status of open access (OA) scholarly journal publishing in Pakistan. A quantitative research method was used to evaluate the contents of the websites of 329 Pakistani journals on a checklist of 12 items. OA publishing paradigm has emerged in Pakistan as a majority (90%) of Pakistani scholarly journals are following the OA publishing paradigm. More than two-thirds (69%) of journals are following the Diamond OA model, followed by Gold OA (26%) and Crowdfunding OA (3%). The majority (97%) of journals belongs to the Y (the lowest) category of journals and the majority (97%) of journals do not have an impact factor. Indexing in Scopus and Web of Science is 24 (16%) and 20 (13%), respectively. Average article processing charges (APCs) per article in Sciences and Social Sciences journals of Pakistan are 46 $ and 90 $, respectively. In terms of ranking, Pakistani journals are in the stage of infancy. The present study is the first comprehensive exploration to explore the current status of OA scholarly journal publishing in Pakistan. This study may help to come up with recommendations to strengthen the credibility of OA journals in Pakistan. This study may be generalized to developing countries that have similar circumstances to Pakistan.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2023-01-16T05:05:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221146301
       
  • The indexing policy in the practices of Brazilian institutional
           repositories: A diagnostic study from the perception of managers and
           indexers

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      Authors: Mariângela Spotti Lopes Fujita, Roberta Cristina Dal’Evedove Tartarotti, Paula Regina Dal’Evedove, Jéssica Cristina Panuto
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Institutional repositories aim to gather, treat and disseminate information resources produced in a given institution. The adoption of an indexing policy aims to improve information retrieval by the user community of the institutional repository, by proposing elements that standardize the practices of librarians who work in subject cataloging. The objective of the research is to analyze the perception of managers and indexers of Brazilian institutional repositories about the indexing policy for information organization and representation, with the specific objectives of performing a compared evaluation of elements and variables (characteristics, processes, and instruments) of the indexing policy regarding indexing and retrieval, discussion of vocabulary control procedures, and obtaining an overview focusing on the perception of the need for an indexing policy in Brazilian institutional repositories. Semi-structured interviews were applied to nine participants from eight institutional repositories to investigate the requirements, elements and variables of the indexing policy in the practice of managers and librarians of institutional repositories. The results reveal the need for improvements in the practices of the analyzed institutional repositories regarding the activities of subject cataloging, standardization of subject metadata, and vocabulary control, queries, and in carrying out tests or trials for continuous evaluation of indexing and information retrieval with users. The study also revealed that this scenario can be more positive if institutional repositories adopt an indexing policy for the practices they perform in repositories to be understood by managers and librarians as a tool to improve information retrieval.La política de indización en las prácticas de los repositorios institucionales brasileños: un estudio de diagnóstico desde la percepción de gestores e indexadores
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2023-01-16T04:58:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221145544
       
  • Social inclusion of refugees and asylum seekers: The role of public
           libraries in the Lisbon Metropolitan Area

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      Authors: Sofia Serra, Jorge Revez
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Social inclusion of refugees and asylum seekers includes addressing their information needs. This research seeks to examine the role of public libraries in this process through the analysis of public librarians’ perceptions. Based on the constructivist paradigm, the case study method, and the semi-directive interview survey technique, 16 public municipal libraries in the Lisbon Metropolitan Area (Portugal) are studied. The results highlight that these libraries do not identify forced migrants as their users. Still, they consider that the information needs and behaviors and the use of libraries by these communities are similar to those of economic migrants, with emphasis on the relevance of free access to the internet, foreign language resources, Portuguese language and digital literacy courses, and help to interact with online platforms. The gaps include the existence of few Portuguese courses for foreigners, a limited practice in assisting with job and housing searches, promoting health literacy, and inclusive collaboration with schools, as well as space, financial, and human resources constraints. To overcome these difficulties, librarians emphasize the motivation to fulfill the inclusive social mission of the public library, the universal accessibility and informal environment of the library, and its action to promote social cohesion and social capital. The respondents consider that the mission of public libraries is adjusted to the goal of social inclusion of forced migrants, but that there is room for improvement in the training of librarians. This research points to the need for more initiative-taking public library collaboration with existing inclusion networks. In conclusion, we seek to alert to the urgency of the involvement of Portuguese public libraries in the social inclusion of forced migrants, which will also contribute to their institutional legitimization.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T11:47:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221146549
       
  • Information culture of university administration: Making personnel
           bureaucracy a professional bureaucracy

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      Authors: Marek Deja
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This paper aims to diagnose the information culture of the university administration. Although university administrative work is commonly associated with bureaucracy, it is a bureaucracy of people in which employees demonstrate a set of competitive group information behavior focused on knowledge sharing and information use in day-to-day tasks. A group of 345 respondents, representing office staff from three institutions in Poland, answered the survey related to information culture. The research framework included 16 information behaviors, grouped by four levels of information and knowledge management and four types of information culture. The results were examined using statistical packages to perform the Kruskal-Wallis H test, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient, and ordinal/linear regression analysis. Professional Bureaucracy culture is the dominant characteristic of the information behavior of university administrations, but its functioning is supported by three parallel information cultures included in the research model. The main limitation of the study is that it covers only lower-level employees’ information practices. The applied scale, based on professional stratification within the university administration, is highly sensitive regarding different institutional contexts covered in the information culture diagnosis. To support the development of Professional Bureaucracy, it is necessary to support internal openness of behavior (socialization), internalization of knowledge, and external networking.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T11:45:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221145931
       
  • Autism and disability sessions at state conferences for school librarians

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      Authors: Amelia Anderson, Selena J. Layden
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      With 1 in 44 children in the United States meeting the criteria for an autism diagnosis , it is likely that most, if not all, school librarians will have some contact with a student with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). One potential avenue for such education is through professional development opportunities such as state library conferences, in which school librarians share information with one another in forums such as breakout and poster sessions, while also attending keynote and sponsored presentations. To expand upon previous research related to training of school librarians in the area of ASD, this content analysis examines state library conference programs to determine if information is being shared through such conferences about autism and disability. Conferences from nine states, over a 5-year period, were analyzed for key terms related to autism and disability. Findings reveal few opportunities for school librarians to learn about autism and disability through sessions presented at state conferences, despite a previously established interest and need.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2023-01-06T08:47:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221142314
       
  • The role of identity moderators and perceived degree of identity
           separation in librarian professional identity development

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      Authors: Cameron M. Pierson
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This paper examines in-depth processes of librarian professional identity negotiations impacting practitioners’ perception of, affiliation with, and behaviour within the profession. It outlines three key themes which moderate librarian professional identity and introduces the Relational States of Librarian Professional Identity, outlining variations of individual affiliation with the profession. This paper also offers a theoretical framework of identity negotiations with theoretical propositions relating to librarian professional identity development. Forty semi-structed interviews were conducted with practicing public librarians throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. Interviews were analysed with an inductive approach. NVivo was used to code and query interview data. Findings demonstrate identity negotiations as grounded in perceptions of profession through meaning ascribed to the profession and its manifestations (professional associations, etc.), respectively; and perceptions of practice as related to organisational/institutional contexts. Six theoretical propositions are offered detailing the relationship of the three themes moderating librarian professional identity and the Relational States of Librarian Professional Identity to this identity and its negotiations.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2023-01-06T08:43:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221142311
       
  • Representational work and ‘reverse order’ essentialism: Digitisation
           of local information in Thailand and Bhabha’s Third Space

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      Authors: Veronica Johansson, Pussadee Nonthacumjane
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The Local Information Working Group (LIWG) of Thailand’s provincial university libraries holds main responsibility for digitising Thai local information (LI), a resource that shares many characteristics with what in other contexts is described as Indigenous and local knowledge (ILK). This study therefore explores how the digitisation activities of the LIWG correlate with claims of culturally responsive and responsible ILK representation, and how this work can be understood through the perspective of Bhabha’s Third Space. The study is based on interviews with 23 LIWG members, collected in 2016–2017. A guided, qualitative content analysis focused on uncovering themes of digitisation tools and methods with Third Space relevance as supporting or hindering essentialism, fixity and hybridity in LI representations. The findings illustrate that whereas the digitisation itself, field studies, language choices and outreach activities offer certain Third Space potential, this is underdeveloped and largely circumstantial. Third Space potentials are further likely to be restricted or hindered by uneven distribution of internet access, digital literacy, standard Thai proficiency and university/academic library accessibility among the Thai public in general and LI holders in particular. Overall, marginalised groups are excluded, and LI holders are positioned as passive contributors and recipients of digitised LI, suggesting a reversed sort of ‘self-essentialism’ on behalf of the dominant culture. In conclusion, two aspects in particular require further attention for libraries engaging with digitisation of ILK types of resources: the inclusion of national, societal level participation into participatory approaches; and the incorporation of functionalities for user interaction, holistic knowledge representation, multiple languages and cultural protocols into ICT for representation and use. The study provides a unique application of Third Space as analytical perspective on library digitisation of LI/ILK types of resources. Methodologically, the study is case specific, limited to a cross-section in time, and to data from interview accounts of LIWG members.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-12-29T01:10:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221143100
       
  • Shaping local information in Thailand: Hidden contradictions in the
           digitisation activities of the Provincial University Library Network
           (PULINET)

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      Authors: Pussadee Nonthacumjane, Veronica Johansson
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Local information (LI) in Thailand covers resources related to Indigenous and local knowledge (ILK), and cultural heritage. Thailand’s provincial universities have the national responsibility of digitising LI, enforced through the Provincial University Library Network’s (PULINET’s) Local Information Working Group (LIWG). The aim of this study is to explore how the LIWG’s digitisation activities contribute to the shaping of LI as national concern and resource. Empirical data come from interviews with 23 LIWG professionals in 2016–2017. A qualitative content analysis is performed within an overall activity theory framework with emphasis on overt and unobtrosive manifestations of contradictions through a combination of Engeström’s and Blackler’s typologies. The results show that primary contradictions exist in the form of incompatible conceptions of LI between individual group members and the group’s consensus-oriented LI definition. Secondary contradictions emerge as incongruences between group members’ general conceptions of LI, and specific digitisation activities of the LIWG. In general, LI is conceptualised as dynamic, situated, collective, culture-nature integrated resources with strong applied-use value, in line with international ILK definitions and agendas. The actual LIWG activities, however, circumscribe this conception through a restricted focus on formal regional delimitations; prominent objects; societally desirable expressions; and an academic/research framing. Overall, the findings illustrate that the LIWG’s activities contribute to shape LI as a tool for national social and cultural unity that exclude marginalised groups and societally undesirable LI expressions. In these activities, the primary and secondary types of contradictions are hidden and counteracted, rather than used as constructive opportunities for learning, change, and development. The study provides a unique, internationally framed, perspective on LI and related digitisation activities in Thailand. Methodologically, the study is case specific, limited to a cross-section in time and to data from interview accounts of LIWG members.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-12-29T01:10:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221143101
       
  • Information literacy, well-being, and rural older adults in a pandemic

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      Authors: Brady D Lund, Ting Wang
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Many older adults residing in rural communities faced particularly damaging consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic crisis. Given the impact of the pandemic on the ability to rely on traditional forms of information (i.e. interpersonal communication), reliance on digital technology and other non-traditional sources of information grew. Those who lacked the information literacy, defined in this study as the ability to find and evaluate the reliability of information to address an information need, may have faced psychologically damaging consequences caused by the proliferation of misinformation and information poverty. Informed by an ecological understanding of human information behavior, this paper reports on the findings of a study of rural older adults’ information literacy skills and sense of well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic crisis. A mail survey, based on concepts from psychology and information science and question wordings adapted from the 2021 Health and Retirement Survey and Jones-Jang et al.’s study of literacies and fake news, was distributed in the summer of 2021 to older adults living in rural Kansas. About 206 valid responses to the survey were received. These were analyzed using correlation and regression testing. The findings indicate a significant relationship between information literacy skills and one’s overall sense of well-being. Personal (age, gender, health, life control), economic (employment, finances), and social-relational resources (social engagement, relationship quality) all were shown to relate positively to information literacy skills. These findings provide definition to our understanding of the importance of information literacy in modern understandings of psychological well-being.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-12-22T09:11:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221142032
       
  • Impediments to and readiness for Linked Data application in libraries:
           Pakistani information professionals’ perspective

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      Authors: Nosheen Fatima Warraich, Abebe Rorissa
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Findings revealed that there is little evidence that exists of the implementation of LD technologies by libraries in developing countries. This study aims to examine the willingness of information professionals along with their perceived barriers to the implementation of LD technologies in Pakistani libraries. Data was collected from Pakistani librarians in an online questionnaire survey. There is broad interest and willingness to implement Linked Data technologies in Pakistani libraries while perceptions of the presence of barriers remain. Participants are willing to explore and learn more about LD technologies as well as advocate and promote the adoption of these technologies. They also want to attend events about LD technologies and their applications in libraries. Though they identified the existence of different potential barriers that have to do with themselves (e.g. lack of awareness of basic LD concepts), their institutions/libraries (e.g. they lack best practices regarding applications of LD in libraries), and the technology itself (e.g. new, complex, costly). These dynamics have implications for LD applications in libraries, especially those in developing countries. The current study is a valuable addition to the literature as no study has been conducted regarding the willingness to adopt LD in libraries and barriers to its implementation. Findings regarding barriers to implementation would helpful for policymakers and IT experts consider these challenges and work to minimize these challenges for the implementation of LD in Libraries.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-12-22T09:05:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221141690
       
  • Defining artificial intelligence for librarians

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      Authors: Andrew M. Cox, Suvodeep Mazumdar
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of the paper is to define Artificial Intelligence (AI) for librarians by examining general definitions of AI, analysing the umbrella of technologies that make up AI, defining types of use case by area of library operation, and then reflecting on the implications for the profession, including from an equality, diversity and inclusion perspective. The paper is a conceptual piece based on an exploratory literature review, targeting librarians interested in AI from a strategic rather than a technical perspective. Five distinct types of use cases of AI are identified for libraries, each with its own underlying drivers and barriers, and skills demands. They are applications in library back-end processes, in library services, through the creation of communities of data scientists, in data and AI literacy and in user management. Each of the different applications has its own drivers and barriers. It is hard to anticipate the impact on professional work but as information environment becomes more complex it is likely that librarians will continue to have a very important role, especially given AI’s dependence on data. However, there could be some negative impacts on equality, diversity and inclusion if AI skills are not spread widely.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-12-22T09:00:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221142029
       
  • Collaborative technology practices in social science early career
           scholarly research workflows

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      Authors: Sharon Ince, Christopher Hoadley, Paul Kirschner
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Supporting scholarship as it is practiced by scholars depends on having tools which match the workflows of those scholars as they conduct research. Collaboration is an essential part of research and can occur through the stages of the research process. For early career scholars, work tends to be solo as they work on their dissertation. However, there is some evidence that their work does not occur in isolation. This is a qualitative study of early career scholars’ collaborative scholarly research workflows. It examines the role of collaboration in early career scholarly workflows, the types of tools used for collaboration, whether these tools support or hinder, and how collaborative tools support information practices and scholarly knowledge. Collaborative technology practices are seen throughout workflows and in some cases enable or hinder collaboration. There is not a strong interconnection between tools to support the scholarly workflow. This study identifies which tools are used for scholarly collaboration and the gap in functionality of tools for scholarship.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-12-22T08:56:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221140124
       
  • A New Lifecycle Model Enabling Optimal Digital Curation

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      Authors: Hea Lim Rhee
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study recognizes the international need for a broadly applicable lifecycle model to facilitate efficient and systematic digital curation. Consequently, it has developed a generic digital curation lifecycle model, titled the d-KISTI model. This model was developed by applying content analysis and thematic coding to data collected through a two-year review of relevant literature, existing conceptual lifecycle models, and empirical investigations of KISTI’s digital curation practice. It was then refined further through consultations with many international digital curation experts. The d-KISTI model presents actions and their relationships with one another that have gone previously unacknowledged in the DCC curation lifecycle model and other existing curation models. These actions and relationships, which are articulated at length within the study, reflect the rapidly changing nature of the global digital curation landscape and offer more representative curation activities to information organizations. Moreover, through its investigation and analysis of KISTI’s digital curation practices, this study contributes to existing literature on digital curation in Korea. Ultimately, the d-KISTI model seeks to optimize digital curation strategies and practices, both within Korea and internationally, and, moreover, hopes to serve as a foundational touchstone for future studies on digital curation.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-12-15T10:18:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221125956
       
  • Are library staff autonomous' The influence of routines and the
           development of workarounds

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      Authors: Darin Freeburg, Katie Klein
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      As knowledge workers, library staff are assumed to be highly autonomous, meaning that they are in control of how work is done. Yet, this work is heavily influenced by the expectations of others, and the expectation to take control can pressure staff to overwork. In this qualitative study, 13 public library staff members engaged in think-alouds (TAs) and semi-structured interviews (SSIs) aimed at uncovering potential misalignments between a staff member’s own prescriptive expectations for library work and the expectations of management, customers, colleagues, and technological and material artifacts. Findings suggest that public library staff have several expectations for how work will be done and, at times, want the freedom to control work in ways that match these expectations. They devise and implement defiance workarounds aimed at reinforcing their own expectations in the face of conflicting expectations from other system actors. Yet, autonomy is a multifaceted concept that goes beyond the mere need for control and, sometimes, giving up control meant that other needs were fulfilled. This study advances research on the nature of workplace autonomy and the active role of workers in its expression. This study also has implications for library management, as it suggests important considerations for shared autonomy and workplace relationships, as well as the need to engage in efforts aimed at shifting problematic expectations in the library work system.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-12-14T11:04:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221140902
       
  • In plain sight: School librarian practices within infrastructures for
           learning

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      Authors: Ulrika Centerwall
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study explored how school librarian practices are resources that can support teaching and learning at schools in Sweden. The empirical material was produced through 22 semi-structured interviews with ‘best practice’ awarded librarians at 14 Swedish secondary and upper-secondary schools. The theoretical framework consisted of a practice theory approach coupled with analytical concepts from information infrastructure studies. The findings highlighted how teachers and librarians collaborate closely in schools with designated best practice libraries. Members of both professions collaborated in teaching and interdisciplinary projects and were supported by management teams at the schools under study. However, the librarians expressed a disconnect between themselves and the teachers and leaders of the school. This disconnect was evidenced by a lack of planning practices and classroom teaching, impelling the librarians to advocate continuously for better awareness and visibility of their practices. The article offers insights into school librarian practices at sites that function simultaneously as both workplaces for professionals with multiple competencies and educational settings for students.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-12-14T10:58:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221140881
       
  • Data preservation practices for enhancing agricultural research data usage
           among agricultural researchers in Tanzania

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      Authors: Nolasko Victory Mwinami, Frankwell W. Dulle, Wulystan Pius Mtega
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The objective of this study was to investigate the role of research data preservation for enhanced data usage among agricultural researchers in Tanzania. Specifically, the study aimed to examine the data preservation methods used by agriculture researchers, find out how long agriculture researchers preserve their agriculture research data, and determine factors that influence agriculture researchers on their choice of data preservation methods for use. The study employed a cross-sectional research design. The study employed both qualitative and quantitative approaches. A survey was conducted to collect data in 11 research institutions. A simple random sampling technique was used to select 204 respondents from the study area while purposive sampling techniques were used to select 11 agriculture research institutions including 10 Tanzanian Agricultural Research Institution (TARI) centers, and Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA). Also, 12 respondents were selected purposively for an in-depth interview as key informants. The study adopted Data Curation Centre (DCC) Lifecycle Model to explain data preservation process. Findings indicated that a majority of more than 90% of researchers preferred to preserve their data using different storage devices such as field notebooks, computers, and institutional libraries. Moreover, findings indicated that about 74% of agricultural researchers preferred to preserve their data for more than 6 years after the end of the project. Findings also indicated factors that influence researchers in the choice of data preservation methods to be easy to reach, cost-effective storage devices, support to use the devices, adequate infrastructure for data preservation, and reliable power supply. It can be concluded that there is yet a great role of research data preservation in enhancing data usage among researchers in Tanzania. It is recommended that the government should establish an agricultural research data bank to guarantee permanent availability of data at all times when needed.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-12-09T06:53:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221138110
       
  • Proposing a New Combined Indicator for Measuring Search Engine Performance
           and Evaluating Google, Yahoo, DuckDuckGo, and Bing Search Engines based on
           Combined Indicator

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      Authors: Azadeh Hajian Hoseinabadi, Mehrdad CheshmehSohrabi
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study has developed a combined indicator to evaluate the performance of different search engines. Documentary analysis, survey, and evaluative methods are employed in the present study. The research was conducted in two stages. First, a combined indicator was designed to measure search engines. To this end, 72 criteria for measuring the performance of search engines were identified, out of which 22 criteria were selected. Accordingly, 10 criteria were selected in six general classes through a survey of subject matter experts. Validation of our proposed combined indicator was obtained by Delphi method and using the opinions of experts in the fields of information science and information system. Second, web search engines were evaluated based on the proposed combined indicator. The statistical population of this part of the research consisted of two categories: (1) general web search engines, and (2) general subjects. The sample size of the first category contained four search engines Yahoo, Google, DuckDuckGo, and Bing, and the second category involved 40 search terms under 10 general categories. The results showed that the combined indicator had six general criteria: (1) relevance, (2) ranking, (3) novelty ratio, (4) coverage ratio, (5) ratio of unrelated documents, and (6) proportion of duplication hits. According to this indicator, Google is at the top, followed by Bing. This study proposes a new indicator for evaluating search engine performance, which can measure the efficiency of search engines. Therefore, its use to measure the performance of search engines is recommended to researchers and search engine developers.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-12-08T08:57:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221138579
       
  • Caring for the community: An academically based community service course
           in LIS

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      Authors: Kung Jin Lee, YooJung Kim, Wendy Roldan, Jin Ha Lee, Jason C. Yip
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The field of Library and Information Science (LIS) has historically struggled to connect theory and practice in its graduate education, specifically when it comes to building partnerships with diverse stakeholders in public library communities. One possible technique for bridging the gap of stakeholder experiences is academically based community service (ABCS) courses. ABCS courses attempt to directly focus on research-practitioner partnerships to solve real-world problems by involving the community to democratically co-design the curriculum. In this paper, we present a reflective case study of an ABCS course on integrating participatory design methods to co-design new digital learning activities for youth in an urban public library. By conducting 10 co-design sessions and 26 semi-structured interviews, we examined a partnership between a university and a library, and how this ABCS course impacted different stakeholder participation. Our findings highlight how ABCS courses require systematic structural endeavors from higher education and care between all stakeholders within a library setting. This work contributes to a growing body of work that calls for more courses in LIS education with greater civic and democratic engagement between graduate students, university partners, and library stakeholders.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-12-01T07:21:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221132276
       
  • The multilingual children’s library as physical and metaphorical
           ‘space’ within the community: Practical and emotional considerations

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      Authors: Sabine Little, Rebecca Murray
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Following the establishment of a multilingual children’s library section in Sheffield, England, this paper explores logistical and emotional considerations concerning the set-up and running of the library, and its role within the community. Adopting a case study approach, data are derived from book stock and borrowing statistics, feedback from multiple events (including multilingual storytelling and story writing events, and a reading scheme), as well as a library staff and a parent focus group. Data were analysed thematically according to logistical and emotional concerns, with subthemes – such as borrowing patterns, identity, belonging and physical and metaphorical ‘space’ being identified within the data. The research highlights shortcomings in cataloguing facilities, and in the way in which ‘successes’ are measured in library management and research, while adding significantly to our understanding of the contribution multilingual resources and events in public libraries makes to a community’s sense of identity and belonging. The notion of real and metaphorical ‘space’ for multilingualism as part of library provision forms a vital addition to the way libraries might consider their roles in diverse societies.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-11-22T02:02:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221133837
       
  • Knowledge hiding in the academia: Individual and social factors predicting
           knowledge hiding behaviour of undergraduates of a Nigerian university

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      Authors: Funmilola O Omotayo, Aderonke O Akintibubo
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the knowledge hiding behaviour (KHB) of undergraduates of a university in southwestern, Nigeria, as well as the individual and social factors influencing their knowledge hiding behaviour. The study adopted the descriptive survey design. Random sampling was used to select 390 undergraduates across the faculties of the university. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Findings revealed that the undergraduates engaged in knowledge hiding. The study also identified the various methods the students used to hide knowledge, among which are pretense of lack of knowledge, avoiding interactive classes, reading alone and unwillingness to release lecture notes, among others. The results show that the individual factors (distrust and psychological ownership), as well as the social factors (negative or lack of mutual reciprocity, lack of social interaction and lack of social identification), predicted the KHB of the students. The study concluded that the undergraduates engaged in knowledge hiding in so many ways and for many reasons. The individual factors of the students, as well as the social factors surrounding them, predicted their KHB. The study made some recommendations for research and practice.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-11-22T01:59:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221133564
       
  • Exploring the early manifestation of information poverty in young children

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      Authors: Frances Breslin Davda, Steven Buchanan
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Information poverty is widely recognised as having a negative impact upon peoples’ health and wellbeing, and socioeconomic prosperity; however, whilst an issue of significant societal concern evidenced across a wide variety of adult groups and socioeconomic contexts, no studies have been previously undertaken with children. This appears a significant oversight given that many children across the globe are considered multi-dimensionally poor. This study thus sought to explore the possibility of information poverty amongst children. One hundred fifty-six children (aged 6–8) from five UK primary schools participated in a series of practical exercises exploring their information behaviours, and 34 parents and teachers were interviewed to provide further insights. Finding’s evidence self-protective information behaviours and unmet information needs amongst children aged 6–8; both characteristics of an impoverished information state. Whilst much can be explained in developmental terms (i.e. in relation to child age and emergent literacies), much can also be explained in information poverty terms encompassing issues of both information access and use. Notably, approximately half of our child participants considered themselves to be, in general, unsuccessful information seekers; and contrasts with the views of our adult participants who majority believed that children are, in general, successful information seekers. This paper provides the first evidence of information poverty in young children, and provides further insights into the role of parents in supporting their children’s information needs and shaping their developing information behaviours, with parental mediation of child media use appearing particularly problematic. Enduring inequalities in information access are also highlighted. Beyond call for further global research, a public communication campaign to increase awareness of child information poverty and contributory factors is recommended as an immediate priority.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-11-22T01:55:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221131078
       
  • Trends in genre analysis articles on scientific abstract structures: A
           Quantitative content analysis

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      Authors: Çağdaş Çapkın
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Genre analysis is a methodologically prominent approach to segmenting a scientific abstract into discourse units. Genre analysis studies on scientific abstract structures have valuable outputs not only for secondary information services, including bibliographic databases and online services but also for scientific communication and library and information science (LIS) education. However, trends of research on this topic have not been investigated yet. This study identifies research trends and reveals knowledge gaps and research opportunities in genre analysis articles on scientific abstracts. For this purpose, Web of Science and Scopus databases were searched to identify the articles. According to the study selection criteria, 75 articles were included in the quantitative content analysis. It was found that the most frequently studied genres were research articles (73.3%), proceedings (%12), and thesis/dissertations (8%). The sample size of the corpus ranged from 5 to 4214 abstracts (M = 223.8, MD = 94, SD = 523.8). The authors most frequently cited for abstract genre models were Hyland, Swales, and Santos, respectively. In 18.7% of articles, at least one of the abstract standards was cited. Approximately, two-thirds of the articles were comparative. Languages (44.7%), disciplines (25.5%), genres, and native/non-native authors (8.5%) were compared most frequently. English was the most frequently studied language, both individual (72.4%) and comparatively (25.9%). The results of this study suggest that the LIS community, as well as applied linguistics, can seize the opportunity to address gaps in academic genres, disciplines, and languages. In addition, future studies are expected to have generalizable results to assist the scientific communication and LIS communities.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-11-07T09:12:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221132274
       
  • A longitudinal comparison of public libraries’ posting activities on
           Twitter in April of 3 years, pre-, during, and post-COVID-19

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      Authors: Youngok Choi, Sung Un Kim
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of the study was to observe how public libraries’ communication on Twitter has been changed before, during, and after the COVID-19 outbreak. A total of 40 active, public library Twitter accounts were used for data collection and analysis. The tweets examined were a combination of original tweets (n = 2623) and retweets (n = 666) posted from other Twitter accounts on the public libraries’ Twitter feeds. A content analysis scheme was used to analyze topical aspects of the tweets. The study found that public libraries were more active in communicating information on social media during the COVID-19 lockdown period. Promoting library events/programs, communicating library operations to patrons, and highlighting library resources for literacy are common in public libraries’ Twitter communication throughout the 3 years period. The study also observed strong associations between the content types of posts and the contextual aspects of the libraries, including an emergency situation such as the COVID-19 lockdown, the size of the population served by the library, and the state in which the library was located. In other words, the study provides evidence that public libraries use different communication strategies on Twitter depending on factors such as community emergencies, service population size, or geographic location. The results of this study illustrate that through social media usage, public libraries demonstrate their competence as public agencies in managing their services, as well as their commitment to the core value of information access and service provision to users, even in the face of unprecedented crises.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-11-07T09:02:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221128981
       
  • Researching Finnish library responses to Covid-19 digital literacy
           challenges through the employment of reflective practice

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      Authors: Berenice Rivera-Macias, Biddy Casselden
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Social distancing restrictions due to the Covid-19 pandemic were declared in Finland in March 2020. Libraries followed Government recommendations resulting in limited library service delivery across a variety of sectors. This research investigates challenges experienced by public, special and academic libraries in the Helsinki metropolitan area focussing on library staff reflections of digital literacy services offered during the pandemic. A multiple case study, with an emergent mixed methods research design was utilised. All data was gathered online due to Covid-19 restrictions: Quantitative data originated from an online survey of library staff; library websites were also audited. Qualitative data originated from semi-structured interviews. Triangulation of the data enabled a clear understanding of digital literacy challenges and responses. Overall, the mixed methods design and the data collection techniques, encouraged reflection upon experience, which in return informed a rich picture of the multiple case study. Results demonstrated that digital literacy challenges existed, particularly related to reaching library customers requiring digital support. Finnish libraries did not differentiate information literacy from digital literacy, as both were perceived as part of library service. Library staffs’ reflections corroborated similar research, for example, the impact of teleworking, on technology use and social aspects of working from home. Recommendations include undertaking further research on special libraries and promoting reflective practice as a mechanism for better understanding the views of library staff.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-11-05T12:05:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221130781
       
  • Staff perspectives of providing prison library services in the United
           Kingdom

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      Authors: Jayne Finlay
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Prison library staff play a central role in supporting prisoners with their educational, informational, recreational and cultural needs during incarceration. Their role is unique within the wider library profession, as they require both expertise in library and information management as well as the skills and knowledge required to operate in a prison environment. There has been little research exploring the experiences and perspectives of library staff who manage and deliver prison library services in the United Kingdom (UK). This paper addresses this gap in knowledge and seeks to amplify the voices of those working in an often overlooked profession. Findings are drawn from the first phase of a broader doctoral study which explored prisoner engagement with library services. A mixed-methods approach was taken, combining both a questionnaire and follow-up interviews with prison library staff across the UK. The questionnaire received 31 responses from library staff and 10 respondents participated in a follow-up interview. Findings offer a contemporary overview of the management and delivery of prison library services in the UK and underline common themes and concerns among prison library professionals, namely the implications of dual management, the impact of the unique social context in which they work and the importance of communication and liaison in providing effective library services. The paper concludes with recommendations for combatting the professional isolation felt by those working in this sector and for the promotion of prison library services both within and outside the prison.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T10:30:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221133834
       
  • Impacts of covid-19 pandemic in the Brazilian research scenario on
           misinformation: Analysis of publications from information science journals
           

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      Authors: Stella Schwanz Dias de Assis, Meri Nadia Marques Gerlin
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The objective of identifying the scenario of the spread of misinformation in the second decade of the present century permeates the analysis of the work of the scientific community supported by technological, educational, and social demands. This issue has become even more relevant in a context of COIVID-19 pandemic. In this article, we investigate the most relevant research themes connected with misinformation addressed in Brazilian research in the field of information science, as well as data on the number of publications per analyzed journal, per year, main keywords, in addition to crossing different data collected in order to better understand this scenario, and the impact of the Pandemic on research about disinformation. This study used descriptive research in compliance with the proposed objective and bibliographic research as a procedural methodology, therefore, aimed at surveying articles in Brazilian journals on Information Science and areas of knowledge such as Library Science, Communication, and Journalism. We collected paper published in 28 Brazilian Journals of Information Science, with results between 2015 and 2021, giving a total of 114 papers. We have identified a number of core topics that are most frequent, allowing for an organization into thematic categories and subcategories. We understand that this phenomenon is not new and characteristic only of contemporary society, but must be investigated in light of recent facts that have driven the publicity of research on the subject. Allied to the misinformation scenario in the last decade, we registered the occurrence of events related to the infodemic and the pandemic responsible for changing the direction of politics, economy, health, and education worldwide.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-11-01T10:25:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221133565
       
  • Key features of digital library management system (DLMS) for developing
           digital libraries: An investigation from LIS practitioners in Pakistan

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      Authors: Shakeel Ahmad Khan, Khurram Shahzad
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The main objectives of the study were to identify key features of the digital library management system (DLMS) for developing and managing digital libraries, to reveal the satisfaction level of the library professionals in using digital library management system, and the problems being encountered in using these systems. The current study was quantitative in nature as quantitative measures were applied through a survey research strategy. Keeping in view the nature of the study, a purposive sampling technique was used to collect data from the target librarians who had been involved in operating digital library systems for building digital libraries in their respective libraries. Descriptive and inferential statistical tests were used to analyze the data. Findings revealed that in most of the university libraries in Pakistan, free and open source software (FOSS) had been implemented. DSpace was the most widely used software by library professionals in Pakistan. Key features of the digital library software included a user-friendly interface, customization, reliability and security, use of metadata standards (Dublin Core), web-based, advanced searching, consultancy and technical support, sharing e-books to devices (mobile, tabs), full-text searching, use of Boolean operators, and access control. The study recommended that library professionals of universities should be careful in planning library digitization and they should consider the above features before implementing any digital library software in their libraries.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-10-28T01:05:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221127033
       
  • Academic libraries’ contribution to gender equality in a
           patriarchal, femicidal society

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      Authors: Siviwe Bangani
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Women by virtue of their being are confronted with many challenges. This is particularly the case in South Africa where gender-based violence, women abuse and femicide are pervasive. This study sought to highlight the contribution of academic libraries in South Africa to SDG 5 on gender equality through Community Engagement (CE) initiatives. The study followed a multi-methods qualitative approach and online interviews with 20 heads of public university libraries, and focus group discussions with 33 Librarians in eight focus groups were its data collection methods. Findings showed that academic libraries in the country contribute to SDG 5 through visits and donations to safe houses and prisons, Take a Girl Child to Work initiative, providing internship opportunities to females, collection and donation of sanitary towels in schools, and panel discussions, visits and displays that tackle women’s issues. These results affirm the contribution of academic libraries to the SDGs through CE. CE can be adopted in academic libraries to provide direct contribution to the SDGs that are not always associated with their traditional teaching, learning and research support role.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-10-27T01:03:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221127023
       
  • The relationship between the development level of American public
           libraries and the output of science and engineering publications

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      Authors: Yangyang Jiang, Jia He, Bo Jin, Jiahe Jiang
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores the exact relationship between the development level of American public libraries and the output of science and engineering publications. We use the sample data from 1996 to 2019 to build a time series model, and analyze the long-term equilibrium, short-term correlation and Granger causality relationships between them with stationarity test, cointegration test, Granger causality test, and impulse response function. The results suggest that there are a long-term equilibrium relationship and a bidirectional Granger causality between them. The two interact and promote each other. The impact of the development level of American public libraries on the output of science and engineering publications can be seen in fewer time periods, while the impact of the output of science and engineering publications on the development level of American public libraries take more time periods to show.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-10-18T11:37:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221127030
       
  • Overlay journals: A study of the current landscape

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      Authors: Antti Mikael Rousi, Mikael Laakso
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Overlay journals are characterised by their articles being published on open access repositories, often already starting in their initial preprint form as a prerequisite for submission to the journal prior to initiating the peer-review process. In this study we aimed to identify currently active overlay journals and examine their characteristics. We utilised an explorative web search and contacted key service providers for additional information. The final sample consisted of 34 overlay journals. While the results show that new overlay journals have been actively established within recent years, the current presence of overlay journals remains diminutive compared to the overall number of open access journals. Most overlay journals publish articles in natural sciences, mathematics or computer sciences, and are commonly published by groups of academics rather than formal organisations. They may also rank highly within the traditional journal citation metrics. None of the investigated journals required fees from authors, which is likely related to the cost-effective aspects of the overlay publishing model. Both the growth in adoption of open access preprint repositories and researchers’ willingness to publish in overlay journals will determine the model’s wider impact on scholarly publishing.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-10-17T11:58:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221125208
       
  • A perspective on computational research support programs in the library:
           More than 20 years of data from Stanford University Libraries

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      Authors: Evan Muzzall, Vijoy Abraham, Ron Nakao
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Presentation of data is a major component to academic research. However, programming languages, computational tools, and methods for exploring and analyzing data can be time consuming and frustrating to learn and finding help with these stages of the broader research process can be daunting. In this work, we highlight the impacts that computational research support programs housed in library contexts can have for fulfilling gaps in student, staff, and faculty research needs. The archival history of one such organization, Software and Services for Data Science (SSDS) in the Stanford University Cecil H. Green Library, is used to outline challenges faced by social sciences and humanities researchers from the 1980s to the present day. To compliment this history, participation metrics from consulting services (1999–2021) and workshops (2000–2021) are presented along with updated workshop participant feedback forms (n = 99) and further illustrate the profound impacts that these services can have for helping researchers succeed. Consulting and workshop metrics indicate that SSDS has supported at least 27,031 researchers between 1999 and 2021 (average of more than 1175 per year). A t-test on the feedback form data indicates that participant knowledge in workshops statistically significantly increased more than one scale point from workshop start to completion. Results also indicate that despite our successes, many past challenges continue to present barriers regardless of exponential advances in computing, teaching, and learning—specifically around learning to access data and learning the software and tools to use it. We hope that our story helps other institutions understand how indispensable computational research support is within the library.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-10-17T11:48:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221124619
       
  • The value of digital and physical library services in UK public libraries
           and why they are not interchangeable

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      Authors: Ian Ruthven, Elaine Robinson, David McMenemy
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study reports on a series of focus groups of UK public library users to understand how the forced closure of UK libraries caused by the COVID pandemic and the increased use of replacement digital services affected their library use. We specifically focus on digital exclusion and whether this increased as the result of physical library services being inaccessible. We show that although digital exclusion did increase as the result of library closures, digital exclusion was not the best way to characterise our participants’ experiences and digital choices was a more suitable concept. We show how public library users adapted to library closures, how they coped with these closures, and how they intend to use library services in the future. Our participants reported different patterns of use of digital and physical library services, had different experiences of these two modes of library service, and described their value in different terms. We explore what they valued in physical and digital services and show how simple arguments that digital services can replace physical ones do not match the experiences or wishes of those who use these services.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-10-05T06:17:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221127027
       
  • Characteristics of correction practice and its citation in library and
           information science journals

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      Authors: Siluo Yang, Heyu Diao, Yifan Zou, Aoxia Xiao
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The correction practice of scientific publications is usually used to correct publication errors by issuing correction notices, and it is less explored compared to retraction practice. The aim of this study is to present an overview of correction practice and to explore the citation situation of correction notices in library and information science (LIS) journals, using 720 correction notices in the Web of Science from 2001–2020. Through bibliometrics and content analysis, we found the correcting rate of LIS was relatively low. The main types of corrected errors occurred in authorship, figure or table, references, etc. Most corrected errors were trivial or minor. The citation situation of correction notices was more complex than expected and could be classified into five types. It was relatively rare to cite both the corrected paper and correction notice in a standardized manner. The remaining four types of citation were unreasonable, which could influence citation practice and reduce the citations of corrected papers. We concluded that the appearance of the correction notice had affected the citation of the corrected papers to some extent, and researchers and databases needed to pay attention to this problem. We also provided some suggestions for improving correction practice.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-10-01T09:03:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221124623
       
  • To pre-filter, or not to pre-filter, that is the query: A multi-campus big
           data study

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      Authors: Heather L. Cribbs, Gabriel J. Gardner
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Library discovery platforms, which provide searchable user interfaces as their front-facing layer, aggregate tremendous amounts of metadata from multiple data streams describing a wide variety of print and electronic resources. Complicating the matter further, resources may differ in availability or delivery time depending not only on their media but also upon the source of the data stream describing them. How should libraries structure end users’ options for searching discovery platforms in light of the many options available' This study used a nonexperimental design and quantitative methods to analyze users’ revealed preferences for query type in twenty-four academic libraries in a data set containing metadata, sans queries, for over 64 million searches. Libraries studied were all located in California, used the same discovery layer software, and served similar user and faculty constituencies; however, the number of query types and pre-filtering options available differed between institutions. Results show that, when users were presented with the choice between search options, most conducted simple, more broad searches rather than complex and specific searches. When search options were highly constrained by the default choice architecture, but complex searches were possible, few users opted out of the default simple search. Implications for usability of discovery layers and the motivations of librarians in choice architecture are nontrivial and are discussed. The desires of librarians and “power user” faculty must be balanced with the fact that most users are novices and users of all abilities are largely habituated to commercial search products which emphasize post-search results filtering.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-09-29T06:48:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221124609
       
  • What’s in a book exchange: Examining contents in relation to steward
           intentions, geography, and public library collections

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      Authors: Andrew Mckenna-Foster, Hanna Roseen
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      In the last decade, book exchanges, most prominently those registered with the Little Free Library® network, have attracted the interest of researchers and media alike. Very little is known about what types of books are available in these book exchanges and how their collections compare to those in public libraries. To address this gap in knowledge, we selected a random sample of 42 Little Free Libraries across eight Seattle neighborhoods to inventory their contents. We interviewed the stewards about their stocking and weeding practices. Our inventory shows that most of the books available in Little Free Libraries are children’s, mystery, suspense, self-help/health, and scifi/fantasy books published in the last 10–30 years. Neighborhoods in our sample ranged in socioeconomic and racial diversity measures, but there were no significant differences in LFL contents related to those measures. We also compared our inventory to the collections of nearby public library branches and found Little Free Libraries offer a complementary rather than competitive selection scenario: books in LFLs are generally older, with a lesser proportion of children’s books and higher proportion of fiction books.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-09-29T06:38:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221124336
       
  • Growth, subject areas, and application of research methods in user
           studies: A content analysis of articles produced by Pakistani authors

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      Authors: Ahsan Ullah, Kanwal Ameen
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Information science profession is concerned with information user and every development in this field has been designed to make it easier for the user to access documents or information. The current study examined user studies to provide understanding about the users, growth in user studies, topics, and methods of user studies. A content analysis method has been adopted and empirical research articles produced by Pakistani authors during the period 2001–2016 have been examined. Out of 518 empirical articles, 185 user studies were selected for examining users, subject and methods. Growth in user studies research was lower from the period 2001 to 2008 but number of studies increased significantly after 2008. Dominant majority of user studies collected data from educational institutions. Academicians and students were the most frequently studied users. Bureaucrats, judges, and other officials have not been examined for elicitation of their needs in spite of the fact that libraries have been established with government departments and courts. In respect of research areas of user studies, information needs and seeking behavior, use and skills of internet and social media, use of electronic resources and satisfaction of users with library services constitute 90% of user studies research. With respect to use of research methodology, quantitative approach (78%) is popular in user studies followed by mixed methods (10%), qualitative (8%), and multimethod (4%). More than one method is used in 14% user studies research. In case of frequency of research methods, questionnaire (72%) is the dominant method followed by interview (14%). The current study is unique because it identified popular topics and methods in user studies research.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-09-21T04:54:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221124626
       
  • Measuring serendipity with altmetrics and randomness

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      Authors: Andreas Nishikawa-Pacher
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Many discussions on serendipitous research discovery stress its unfortunate immeasurability. This unobservability may be due to paradoxes that arise out of the usual conceptualizations of serendipity, such as “accidental” versus “goal-oriented” discovery, or “useful” versus “useless” finds. Departing from a different distinction drawn from information theory—bibliometric redundancy and bibliometric variety—this paper argues otherwise: Serendipity is measurable, namely with the help of altmetrics, but only if the condition of highest bibliometric variety, or randomness, obtains. Randomness means that the publication is recommended without any biases of citation counts, journal impact, publication year, author reputation, semantic proximity, etc. Thus, serendipity must be at play in a measurable way if a paper is recommended randomly, and if users react to that recommendation (observable via altmetrics). A possible design for a serendipity-measuring device would be a Twitter bot that regularly recommends a random scientific publication from a huge corpus to capture the user interactions via altmetrics. Other than its implications for the concept of serendipity, this paper also contributes to a better understanding of altmetrics’ use cases: not only do altmetrics serve the measurement of impact, the facilitation of impact, and the facilitation of serendipity, but also the measurement of serendipity.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-09-21T04:48:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221124338
       
  • Public libraries and crisis management: Iranian public libraries and the
           dust crisis

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      Authors: Shahnaz khademizadeh, Dalal Y. Albudaiwi, Håkon Larsen, Zeinab Mohammadi, Abdul Hossein Farajpahlou
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Dust crisis is one of the most important environmental problems caused by climate change and drought during the last three decades in some parts of Iran, especially in its eastern and western borders. The present study is a qualitative semi-structured interview study of 11 managers and employees of public libraries in the Iranian provinces of Ilam, Khuzestan, Kurdistan, and Kermanshah. In the article, we document that public libraries can take major steps to better manage community needs arising from disasters and emergencies. The findings show that public libraries can take on educational, cultural, executive, and informative roles in the pre-crisis stage, executive and informative roles in the during-crisis stage, and executive and documentation roles in the post-crisis stage. Based on the results, a conceptual model is constructed, showing the role of Iranian public libraries in dealing with the dust crisis as a rotational process. In order to improve the role of public libraries in society, it is necessary that library managers and employees take appropriate measures in the three stages of pre-crisis, during-crisis, and post-crisis.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-08-24T12:23:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221116898
       
  • Effect of evidence-based information management and practice training on
           librarians’ critical thinking: A randomized educational trial

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      Authors: Sima Esmaeilzad, Vahideh Zarea Gavgani, Atefeh Zarei, Seyed Ali Akbar Familrouhany
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Critical thinking is one of the most important elements in making the right decision in every profession. Evidence based practice shows potential to empower the critical thinking skills of practitioners. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of evidence-based information management and practice (EBIMP) training course on the promotion of medical librarians’ critical thinking. This study is a randomized double-blind educational trial in the form of a parallel trial. A sample of 60 librarians were recruited nationwide in the study through the volunteer enrollment to the evidence-based information management and practice training course. Intervention group received a 10-module virtual course focusing on evidence-based information management. But the control group received a basic course of evidence-based medicine. The courses were delivered through virtual learning system and data was collected through California Standard Critical Thinking Skills Questionnaire Form B (CCTST). Data were analyzed with Covariance Analysis (ANCOVA), Chi-square (χ²), Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Levin tests, and t-test, using SPSS 25. The findings showed that the critical thinking skills of participants after training of the information management and evidence-based practice (EBIMP) had significant improvement in the intervention group compared with the control group regarding the “inference” (4.86 ± 1.94 vs 4.20 ± 1.32), “assessment” (7.90 ± 1.77 vs 5.90 ± 1.70), “Inductive reasoning” (8.67 ± 2.32 vs 6.37 ± 1.87), “deductive reasoning” (6.47 ± 2.04 vs 5.77 ± 1.97) subskills. Education of evidence-based information practice could be effective in promotion of critical thinking skills of medical librarians. This study suggests evidence-based information practice to be added to the curriculum of medical library and information science fields.Trial registration: This study was registered with number 9000.1v1 in Registry of Efficacy and Effectiveness Studies (REES).
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-08-08T10:34:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221114648
       
  • Playful stories: Exploring the use of dramatic play in storytimes

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      Authors: Kathleen Campana, Jacqueline Kociubuk, Kayla Hlad
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Research in early childhood development widely supports play as a vital learning mechanism for young children. Consequently, many libraries are beginning to embrace play as an intentional strategy for meeting targeted early learning outcomes. However, sufficient research on how play can be incorporated into storytimes to support children’s early development has yet to be conducted. This study begins to address this need by exploring how two other informal learning environments—a museum and a zoo—use educator-led dramatic play experiences in storytimes with the goal of understanding how libraries might be able to incorporate dramatic play experiences in their storytimes to create a more in-depth playful learning experience. To elucidate the nature of the museum and zoo’s educator-led dramatic play experiences, this study explored (1) characteristics of their educator-led dramatic play experiences, and (2) the learning behaviors that children were exhibiting while participating in the dramatic play. The results revealed that the educator-led dramatic play episodes in both environments consisted of one long, immersive oral story with other types of play interspersed within the larger story structure. The data also revealed that the children were exhibiting many different types of learning behaviors while participating in the dramatic play experiences. Based on these findings, implications, and recommendations are provided for libraries around designing and using dramatic play in their storytimes to help transform the traditional library storytime structure into a more in-depth playful learning experience.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T10:29:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221111570
       
  • Librarians self-efficacy in ICT-based library operations and services: A
           survey of librarians working in libraries of Aligarh Muslim University
           Library System

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      Authors: Mohammad Nazim, Shamim Aktar Munshi, Mohammad Ashar
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to determine the level of ICT self-efficacy among librarians working in the Libraries of Aligarh Muslim University Library System (AMULS). A structured questionnaire was used to conduct a quantitative survey. One of the researchers visited the Maulana Azad Library, Faculty and College Libraries, Departmental and Seminar Libraries, and School Libraries and distributed the questionnaire to librarians. On the other hand, librarians of the AMU regional centers’ libraries were contacted through email to complete the survey form. Of the 123 questionnaires distributed to the librarians, 102 questionnaires were received with an 82.9% response rate. Librarians mostly view ICT as having a positive impact on library operations and services. The majority of librarians are skilled in using basic ICT applications. However, they lack the necessary skills to manage ICT-based library operations and services. Inadequate ICT application training and a lack of ICT infrastructure were cited as significant barriers to librarians obtaining ICT skills. This is the first study to examine ICT self-efficacy among librarians in an Indian university. Its findings could aid in the development of strategies for integrating new technologies into libraries.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T10:27:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221111199
       
  • Defending and refuting information sources rhetorically: The case of
           COVID-19 vaccination

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      Authors: Reijo Savolainen
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This investigation compares how COVID-19 vaccination supporters and refusers make use of rhetorical strategies to judge the credibility of information sources in online discussion. To this end, the Aristotelian tripartite approach to rhetoric, that is, ethos, pathos and logos was utilized. The empirical findings draw on the analysis of 2257 posts submitted to Suomi24—a Finnish online discussion in May—October 2021. The findings indicate that both vaccine supporters and vaccine refusers mainly drew on the pathos- and ethos-related rhetorical strategies such as appeal to blameworthiness and ad hominem arguments while judging the credibility of information sources. Coronavirus vaccination appeared to be a highly contested topic giving rise to polarized debates, deep mistrust and mutual accusations between opposing parties. The rhetorical strategies were used to attack opponents’ views on the credibility of information sources, rather than making attempts to create mutual understanding of their value for arguments used in online discussion.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T10:26:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221111196
       
  • What are the options for library and information studies education reform
           in addressing racial inequity in the library profession in the UK'

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      Authors: Charles Inskip
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This work explores international research into library and information studies (LIS) education as part of the diversity, equity, inclusion and access (DEIA) agenda and identifies options for LIS education reform in addressing racial inequity in the library profession in the UK. The paper sets out the UK legal, higher education and LIS education contexts, focussing on the role of the professional association, accreditation and the curriculum, and the library and information workforce, and highlights current practices in DEIA in the UK. Using a methodology drawn from bibliometric approaches, a set of academic and professional articles related to DEIA and the LIS curriculum are analysed and nine interpretative repertoires are then identified and discussed. Four core mature repertoires concentrate on the professional association, the university, LIS faculty and the curriculum. These core clusters are surrounded by emerging repertoires which are more recent and more critical. Each repertoire is discussed, referring to key sources and authors to present a picture of trends and complexity in recent (2000–2022) literature on the topic. The aim of this work is to provide a detailed view of existing practice in LIS education relating to DEIA. LIS schools are a vital part of the professional pathway: without a qualification there is no profession, and university students are more-often-than-not drawn from the more privileged and wealthier sectors of society. It is recommended that LIS schools recruit students and faculty who reflect communities and develop the abilities of students to serve the communities they may or may not reflect. These are categorized into clusters, in an attempt to inform LIS education reform in the UK.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-07-29T05:29:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221114483
       
  • The provision of smart service at academic libraries and associated
           challenges

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      Authors: Faten Hamad, Maha Al-Fadel, Hussam Fakhouri
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Technological advancement has forced academic libraries to change their traditional services by adopting emerging technologies to respond to the changing information needs of their users, who are now more technologically inclined and prefer remote and timely access to scholarly information. Smart technologies are the recent trend in academic libraries. Smart technologies have the potential to enhance academic library services provision and also support the distance learning environment, especially now as higher education embraces online and distance learning. Therefore, it is essential to investigate the level of implementation of smart services at academic libraries and the challenges they face in developing and/or providing smart services. A questionnaire was developed to collect the required data from library staff (N = 340) at academic libraries in Jordan, where (246) responded and completed the questionnaire. The results indicate a moderate level of implementation of smart services at academic libraries in Jordan (M = 3.12). The result also shows that the challenges facing the libraries to implement and offer smart services was also moderate (M = 3.57). Resistance to change was the main challenge libraries face in their attempt to embrace smart technology to offer smart services. Also, privacy and confidentiality appeared to be one of the top rated challenges libraries have to deal with when planning for smart services deployment. Moreover, financial-related issues, such as poor infrastructure and staff training were among the main challenges librarians face to develop/offer smart services. Most importantly, challenges negatively affect the level of smart services at academic libraries in Jordan. This paper provides insights for academic librarians and decision-makers in planning for the provision of smart services at their libraries. It highlights the main challenges that might hinder the implementation and provision of smart services.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-07-29T05:25:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221114173
       
  • The perceived value of book borrowing services is stationary in the time
           of Covid-19: Empirical evidence from the Municipal Library in Prague

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      Authors: Jan Stejskal, David Zapletal, Viktor Prokop
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Public libraries represent a specific sector of public service provision, where library management is limited in its ability to influence consumers’ perceptions of the value of borrowed books. This study expands previous research on consumers’ perceived value and its measurement and focuses on the nature of the data examined, which has not yet received much attention. We fill this research gap and examine whether the perceived value of book borrowing services remains stationary over time by considering a sample of readers from the Municipal Library in Prague, Czech Republic. Moreover, we analyse whether the Covid-19 pandemic has affected the perceived value of book borrowing services. Our results contribute to the discussion an important finding that consumers’ perceptions of book borrowing services are stable and do not change over time. Interestingly, we also find that the Covid-19 pandemic has not led to a change in consumers’ perceived value. This study thus creates both theoretical and practical contributions and leads to the definition of several practical implications for managers of (public) library organisations.JEL L86, H39, H44
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-07-25T08:32:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221113919
       
  • Digital curation and open-source software in LAM-related publications

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      Authors: Dominik Mirosław Piotrowski, Paweł Marzec
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The changing conditions in which LAM institutions operate require constant monitoring of the development of solutions dedicated to different forms of their activities. This article aims at an analysis of the literature related to LAM institutions on open-source software used in digital curation. The undertaken research was an attempt to check the interest in this issue in publications registered in the BASE multi-search database. The research material collected during library searches was analysed using simple bibliometric methods. Based on literature analysis, this paper indicates a growing interest in digital curation in LAM institutions in the context of open-source software. The first publications on this subject recorded in the BASE database date back to 2005. Since then, the number of different publication types has been growing steadily, including in particular conference proceedings and journal articles. An increasing number of authors interested in digital curation associated with many institutions from around the world has also been recorded. The analysis of the material also allowed us to identify various applications available under open-source licences. The article provides an opportunity to look at the changes occurring in the analysed body of literature. It presents leading authors publishing works related to digital curation. It also identifies the most popular software described over 16 years. It provides a comprehensive description of topics and the structure of literature on open-source software used in digital curation. The described analysis results can be a contribution to in-depth research and a set of solutions for practitioners.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-07-23T11:15:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221113372
       
  • Social impact of mobile libraries on rural children in Taiwan: A
           qualitative content analysis

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      Authors: Hui-Yun Sung, Marianne Bamkin
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Equity of information access regardless of age, gender, origin or background is a guiding principle in library-related policies. It is generally considered that public libraries were founded in order to alleviate social injustice. Their use has enabled individual free access to information, stimulating an informed citizenship and aiding social inclusion. A lack of access to information in rural areas has been recognised as an urgent need which should be tackled globally. The purpose of this study is to examine whether children’s mobile libraries in remote rural areas of Taiwan enhance social impact as an exemplar for similar regions globally. The design of the study adopted a qualitative strategy with generalised findings in order to capitalise on the exploratory, open-ended nature of social inclusion-related issues. It sought to understand how participants perceived the social impact of mobile libraries on children in rural areas, based on their lived experiences. Purposive sampling identified 23 participants from six public library authorities using the criteria of places visited, frequency and longevity of that service. Qualitative interviews with participants were audio recorded, transcribed and in some cases translated. Coding emerged from the analysis of sample interviews and qualitative content analysis was used. Four areas of social impact were identified: Reading development, community connection, social space, equality of opportunity. It was found that mobile libraries have a social impact on children in rural areas, enabling equity of information access and enhancing reading motivations. The children felt valued allowing them to contribute as members of society. No previous research has examined the lived experience of children in rural Taiwan. Different cultural expectations means that assumptions made from research conducted in the UK or America may not apply. This research has filled the gap of validated information about children’s library services, rural mobile libraries and their social impact in non-western countries.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-07-19T11:40:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221113373
       
  • Google Scholar or University Digital Libraries: A comparison of student
           perceptions and intention to use

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      Authors: Faiz Abdullah A Alotaibi, Frances Johnson, Jennifer Rowley
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Google Scholar has become an important search platform for students in higher education, and, as such, can be regarded as a competitor to university libraries. Previous research has explored students’ intention to use Google Scholar (GS) and University Digital Libraries (UDLs), but there is a lack of comparative studies that explore students’ preferences between these two platforms. Therefore, this study seeks to explore the search behaviour of a select group of users, international postgraduate students and more specifically compares the factors that influence their use of Google Scholar and University Digital Libraries (UDLs). A questionnaire-based survey, based on the factors in the UTAUT model (unified theory of acceptance and use of technology) was conducted to collect data on acceptance and use of technology of GS and UDL’s respectively. Data was collected from 400 international postgraduate students studying in the United Kingdom. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to establish the contextual influencing factors, whilst structural equation modelling examined the predicted model. The results suggest some differences between the influence of various factors between the UDL dataset and the GS datasets. They suggest that social influence (SI) did not affect behavioural intention (BI) for either data set, but that for the UDL dataset, effort expectancy did not affect BI, whereas for the GS dataset facilitating conditions did not influence BI. The approach taken in this study further facilitates research into the use of search tools to progress beyond ease of use as a main driver and to explore the relationship between internal and external influences of use. Recommendations for further research are suggested and the value of the insights gained for UDLs and their provision and support for all students is discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-07-14T05:33:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221111197
       
  • A study on the discussion on Library 5.0 and the generation of Library 1.0
           to Library 5.0

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      Authors: Younghee Noh
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      In order for libraries to survive as necessary institutions in the era of the fourth Industrial Revolution, new strategies and directions must be sought by closely analyzing key trends and challenges. This study attempted to organize Library models 1.0 through 5.0 by comprehensively analyzing the core trends surrounding the library, that is, the advent of the fourth Industrial Revolution era; the promotion of the Korean version of the New Deal policy; and Gartner’s global IT trend. To this end, major references discussing Web 5.0 and Library 5.0 in Web 1.0 and Library 1.0 and all related documents (e.g. Google Scholar, EbscoHost, LISA, etc.) were analyzed. Key and representative keywords forming the Library 5.0 model were derived, and based on this, the substance of each version of the library model was presented.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-07-14T05:31:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221106183
       
  • Global perspective on digital preservation policy: A systematic review

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      Authors: Rafiq Ahmad, Muhammad Rafiq
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Policy provides a roadmap for actions to be taken in any task. It plays an important role in successful implementation of any program. Similarly, the presence of policy also plays a key role in implementation of digital preservation program. The organizations having such policy hold an edge for carrying out their digital preservation activities in an organized manner. This paper provides an explicit overview regarding preparedness of libraries and other organizations across the world in terms of availability of policies for digital preservation. The paper also attempts to map the data geographically. The empirical studies were reviewed systematically, and the extracted data was synthesized for producing meaningful insight about this phenomenon. The meta-analysis affirms that libraries and other organizations seem to have realization about importance of policies for implementation of digital preservation program. Although some studies highlight the availability of digital preservation policies in a good number of organizations yet, as a whole, most of the studies point out passive organizational attitude toward the development of such policies. The data mapping affirms that the studies conducted worldwide and North American region show a satisfactory situation in terms of availability of digital preservation policies. However, the studies conducted in European countries, African region, China, and New Zealand identify a gap regarding presence of such policies.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-07-11T09:18:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221111572
       
  • Metrics employed in the evaluation of research productivity: A systematic
           literature review

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      Authors: Namita Mahapatra, Jyotshna Sahoo
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The present paper makes a systematic review of 131 articles on research productivity basing upon a model developed by Denyer and Tranfield. The current review paper analyzed the quantitative and qualitative dimensions of the sample literature in the field of research productivity. The quantitative analysis incorporates the chronological distribution of articles, keyword wise distribution, form wise distribution, discipline wise distribution, publisher wise distribution, data sources used in the articles, most prolific journals of the publications and qualitative dimensions studied are top-cited articles and all the metrices used in these articles. The paper is based upon literature retrieved from Scopus bibliographic database and other online databases like Emerald, Taylor & Francis, Google Scholar, JSTOR, ProQuest, and EBSCO for full-text articles. It was revealed that there is significant growth in the number of articles during the fourth decade (2011–2020) whereas the highest numbers of citations (1530) have been received during the third decade from 2001 to 2010. Journal articles appeared to be the predominant source of information. A wide range of metrices found to be used in the sample literature to analyze the research productivity namely basic metrics, metrics dealing with growth, collaboration and metrics at institute level and author level metrics. It will serve as a reference tool to the scholars and practitioners in the field who will be acquainted with the publications on research productivity as well as various metrices, laws of bibliometrics, statistical tools, used in the articles.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-07-11T09:16:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221104798
       
  • Patterns and conversational structure of knowledge sharing on Ebola virus
           disease among healthcare practitioners: Observations from a pilot study

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      Authors: Ebelechukwu Gloria Igwe, Wole Michael Olatokun
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This pilot study was designed to determine the conversational structure on Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), pattern of knowledge sharing and knowledge sharing behaviour of healthcare practitioners (HCP) on Medscape online network. The study was guided by Conversation Theory, and deployed a retrospective document/content analysis research design. Ninety-two comments from healthcare practitioners including 16 EVD newsposts out of 37 EVD news were randomly extracted from the network between 2014 and 2018. Extracted data were analysed using NVivo and Microsoft Excel applications. An EVD knowledge taxonomy was developed from the content mapping of EVD topics posted on the network. Results from the pilot study revealed that news on EVD were mostly on EVD outbreak management at the peak period of EVD outbreak in 2014. Also, the HCPs mostly engaged in knowledge sharing on issues relating to EVD risk. Findings revealed that the entire (37) newsposts were of interest to HCPs and they responded to 16 newsposts. There were three active and influential HCPs on the network. The novelty of this study stems from its focus on conversation patterns of HCP on online knowledge sharing using the variables of Conversation theory to examine their knowledge sharing behaviours. The outcome of the study could serve as a model for other studies on other trending viral diseases such as Coronavirus, Lassa Fever, Monkey pox, etc. This study thus recommends replicate analysis in the main study with a larger data set with further findings using network analysis and other statistical tools to examine the conversational structure on EVD and pattern of knowledge sharing among the HCPs.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-07-05T09:50:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221106180
       
  • Influence of publication on university ranking: Citation, collaboration,
           and level of interdisciplinary research

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      Authors: Hongjun Li, Zhijun Yin
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The rank of a university has been widely perceived as a reputation measure that is often determined based on the comprehensive overview of various factors. Among the factors, publication is imperative and carries a significant weight in almost every university ranking system around the globe. To reveal how publication may influence university ranking, we investigated the 2020 US News Best Global Universities Ranking results and analyzed different publication related criteria, including discipline coverage, publication productivity, research impact, level of interdisciplinary research, and degree of research collaboration. Shannon index and Field-Weighted Citation Impact (FWCI) index were calculated to compare universities at four levels (i.e. top50, top100, top200, and top500). Results showed that the top50 universities cover nearly all majority disciplines, at least half of which rank among the global top 10%. Top50 universities are also featured with high publication numbers, high-impact factors, and broad network for international collaboration. The top200 universities showed a relatively longer history of carrying out high level of interdisciplinary research compared to the universities belonged to the remaining category in which interdisciplinary research was mostly started less than a decade. More than two-thirds of surveyed universities with Shannon index above 2.5 and Field-Weighted Citation Impact (FWCI) above 1.5 shows that interdisciplinary research promotes the quality of publication. Universities small in size and focused on specific academic themes can earn top ranking spots based on their extraordinary academic performance, but the current ranking method results in more favor of the large comprehensive universities. In seeking for higher-ranking within the top200 category, in addition to expanding in campus size, increasing the number of academic programs, and encouraging more publications, university decision makers should value the efforts to develop leading academic disciplines, enable broad international collaborations, and promote new interdisciplinary programs.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T07:15:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221106178
       
  • Research output and visibility of librarians: Are social media influencers
           or distractors'

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      Authors: Adebowale Jeremy Adetayo
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The study examined the influence of social media use on research output and visibility of librarians in university libraries in southwestern, Nigeria. A descriptive survey research approach was utilised in the study. The population consisted of 363 librarians from all of southwestern Nigeria’s university libraries. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The findings revealed that librarians produce a high level of research output but their research visibility is low. The use of social media significantly positively influenced the research output and visibility of librarians. The study concluded that the use of social media can improve librarians’ research output and visibility, and thus recommends that more effort be made to expand the use of social media such as Yahoo, ResearchGate, Zotero, ORCID and LinkedIn, as well as greater awareness of social bookmarking tools such as Bibsonomy.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T07:09:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221106177
       
  • Librarians’ competencies for implementing embedded librarianship in
           university libraries

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      Authors: Carren Mushi, Kelefa Mwantimwa, Evans Wema
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The present study examines the extent of academic librarians’ teaching, research, communication, and interpersonal skills; key competencies required for the successful implementation of embedded librarianship in Tanzania. A mixed research approach, integrating both qualitative and quantitative approaches, was deployed to guide the collection of data from 166 librarians and 6 directors. Whereas cross-section survey questionnaires were used to collect data from librarians from six university libraries. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were used to collect data from directors. Regarding statistical analysis, descriptive statistics were performed to derive frequencies and percentages from quantitative data collected. The qualitative data were analyzed thematically and presented in narrative form. The findings suggest that librarians’ teaching skills and their knowledge of the research cycle are inadequate, while their communication and interpersonal skills are sufficient to allow them to effectively embed their services in their users’ (researchers, students, and teaching staff) activities. To effectively adopt embedded librarianship, the authors recommend the allocation of adequate funds to support diverse external and in-house training, the development of harmonized library and information science (LIS) curriculum, and the use of social media to interact with users.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T07:07:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221104809
       
  • Open research data: A case study into institutional and infrastructural
           arrangements to stimulate open research data sharing and reuse

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      Authors: Thijmen van Gend, Anneke Zuiderwijk
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates which combination of institutional and infrastructural arrangements positively impact research data sharing and reuse in a specific case. We conducted a qualitative case study of the institutional and infrastructural arrangements implemented at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. In the examined case, it was fundamental to change the mindset of researchers and to make them aware of the benefits of sharing data. Therefore, arrangements should be designed bottom-up and used as a “carrot” rather than as a “stick.” Moreover, support offered to researchers should cover at least legal, financial, administrative, and practical issues of research data management and should be informal in nature. Previous research describes generic institutional and infrastructural instruments that can stimulate open research data sharing and reuse. This study is among the first to analyze what and how infrastructural and institutional arrangements work in a particular context. It provides the basis for other scholars to study such arrangements in different contexts. Open data policymakers, universities, and open data infrastructure providers can use our findings to stimulate data sharing and reuse in practice, adapted to the contextual situation. Our study focused on a single case and a particular part of the university. We recommend repeating this research in other contexts, that is, at other universities, faculties, and involving other research data infrastructure providers.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T11:16:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221101200
       
  • Insights from a cultural-historical HE library makerspace case study on
           the potential for academic libraries to lead on supporting ethical-making
           underpinned by ‘Critical Material Literacy’

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      Authors: Robert Curry
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the tensions and contradictions in the potential success of maker-learning in Higher Education (HE) as supported in academic library makerspaces. Insights are formed from an in-depth, Cultural-Historical Activity Theory framed case study on a well-established North American HE academic library-based makerspace service. Lessons are drawn from the organisational tensions that emerged as challenges in its development. Participants were from the library service, students and academics from different disciplines that make significant use of the library makerspace. The ‘relational agency’ and ‘common knowledge’ of academic librarians in bringing together academic and student perspectives on the utility of maker-learning is found to be key. Maker-learning is observed to be an intertwined embodied/haptic, social/dialogic and rational/critical expansive cross-disciplinary system in a Zone of Proximal Development. Evidence of attempts to address the themes of inclusivity, diversity and sustainability to achieve ethical-maker-learning outcomes are discussed and developed. The article then expands on Ratto’s Critical Maker pedagogy utilised by the case study library service. I conclude with the proposal of a potentially transformative new concept for supporting cross-disciplinary maker-learning systems, ‘Critical Material Literacy’ (CML), whereby technical and material awareness connects with progressive concerns for people and the planet. This new theoretical concept is designed to start proactively addressing the key case study themes, with academic librarians becoming critical agents in creating ethical-maker knowledge hubs.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T11:38:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221104796
       
  • Exploring librarians’ intentions to collaborate in research: A model
           integrating the Theory of Planned Behavior and Social Exchange Theory

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      Authors: Peng Xia, Xie Yangwei, Xiong Zequan, Yang Li
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      While many studies have attempted to understand librarians’ academic engagement (e.g. publication), there is a dearth of knowledge about the determinants of the research collaboration behavior of librarians, especially in Chinese libraries. This study focused on Chinese academic librarians and investigated factors that affect their intentions to engage in research collaboration based on a conceptual framework integrating the Theory of Planned Behavior and Social Exchange Theory. A survey containing 318 respondents was used to evaluate the research model by partial least square based structural equation modeling. The results showed that the integrative model could explain 53% of the variance of academic librarians’ intentions to collaborate. The findings revealed that attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavior control, and perceived benefits showed significant direct influence on Chinese academic librarians’ collaborative intentions. Perceived positive consequences (benefits, relationships, and reputation) in research collaboration had indirect effects on academic librarians’ intentions through attitude. Meanwhile, there were significant differences existing in path coefficients for librarians with different disciplinary backgrounds, professional ranks, and research projects. This study contributes to the existing literature by empirically studying factors that impact Chinese librarians’ intention to research collaboration and examining the intrinsic relations among these factors. It helps the universities’ managers and librarians finding ways to boost factors in supporting the research collaboration.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T11:33:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221104259
       
  • “For me, it is an intellectual freedom issue”: Drag storytimes,
           neutrality, and ALA core values

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      Authors: Shannon M. Oltmann, Vanessa Kitzie, Sarah Barriage
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Drag storytimes are increasingly popular programing events in which drag performers lead storytime in public libraries or other settings; they have been both popular and contentious. In this study, we utilized data from a national survey of 458 library staff and 26 subsequent interviews to investigate connections between drag storytime, intellectual freedom, neutrality, and other core librarianship values. The data was analyzed inductively and several key themes emerged: hosting drag storytimes is an intellectual freedom stance; various perspectives on the American Library Association stance in support of drag storytimes; connections to other core values; emphasizing diversity to serve one’s community; and contesting the neutrality of libraries. We found difficult-to-reconcile stances of “presenting all sides” and “taking a side,” but we suggest a way forward by focusing on the outcome of collective self-governance (based on core values of intellectual freedom and democracy).
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T12:22:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221100853
       
  • How to measure service quality, customer satisfaction and loyalty of
           public library users: Application of library customer satisfaction index
           (LCSI) lite model

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      Authors: Dong-Geun Oh
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study develops a simplified Library Customer Satisfaction Index (LCSI Lite) for public libraries. Using data collected from questionnaires administered at four public libraries in South Korea, structural equation modeling was used to measure the scores. The suggested model was confirmed to have good acceptable fit, and that three dimensions of service quality (library personnel, library resources and user services, and facilities and equipment) influenced loyalty via customer satisfaction. After successful factor analysis and reliability testing, three items for library personnel, four for library resources and user services, two for facilities and equipment, two for customer satisfaction, and two for loyalty were analyzed. Means of each item in service quality were over 3.77, and those in satisfaction and loyalty were over 4.00. Direct and indirect effects of the dimensions of service quality were analyzed, with the effect of satisfaction on loyalty. LCSI Lite scores for the libraries as a whole (73.90 out of 100) and for each library were calculated using suggested formula. Finally, research and managerial implications, some recommendations and suggestions for further research, limitations, and conclusions were presented.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T04:26:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221101193
       
  • Not like riding a bike: How public libraries facilitate older people’s
           digital inclusion during the Covid-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Biddy Casselden
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The UK digital divide, whereby sections of society have limited use of digital technology, results in unequal access to information, knowledge, goods and services. The Covid-19 pandemic has exacerbated the push to a digital world, and this has challenged people who suffer digital exclusion, including older people, who are more likely to lack digital skills and understanding. Public libraries play a key role in tackling digital exclusion, providing digital skills training and support, and access to equipment and Wi-Fi thereby enhancing the social inclusion of marginalised groups. During the Covid-19 pandemic innovative solutions were piloted to help tackle digital exclusion and social isolation despite closure of face-to-face library interventions, particularly during lockdowns. This article explores evaluation of the Housing Plus Pilot, providing remote digital skills training and support to older people living in sheltered housing in Newcastle upon Tyne during 2021, delivered through partnership between Your Homes Newcastle, and Newcastle City Libraries. A qualitative case study approach examined a small sample of older people’s perceptions regarding the success of the pilot, and their digital literacy before and after training using semi-structured interviews via telephone. Findings showed that the pilot enabled older people to gain the necessary digital knowledge and skills required to boost confidence in becoming digitally literate citizens. Tackling digital fears and enabling them to reinforce learning through the provision of their own tablet, and free access to Wi-Fi in their sheltered housing provided a springboard for digital behaviour change. Use of a social setting in sheltered housing not only kept older people safe during socially distanced times, but also provided a supportive environment in which to learn and practice skills, together with a step-by-step training approach that focussed on the individual, which was wellsuited to this demographic.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T01:33:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221101898
       
  • Information disruptions and disruptive information sources in the practice
           of law: Obstacles in gathering information, through an Israeli lens

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      Authors: Yosef Solomon
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Lawyers must provide their clients with competent legal services and professional representation. However, in many cases, lawyers find it difficult to attain the necessary information to resolve legal concerns under their inquiry. Disruptive sources of information and faulty information are understudied features of professional information behavior, especially in the information-rich legal profession. The current research aims to explore these complexities and promote a fuller and more realistic understanding of the information-gathering practices of legal practitioners. Israel was chosen as a case since it upholds a thriving and active legal sector. Data was collected through in-depth, semi-structured interviews with a purposive nationwide sampling of 25 practising lawyers in Israel, covering together over thirty different fields of legal practice with a fair diversity of other personal and professional attributes. The findings portray accessibility, content, and usability disruptions in lawyers’ information practices, as well as accentuate seven troublesome information sources in their use during legal work and their distinctive aspects of disruption. This study provides important insights regarding legal professionals’ erroneous information engagement and experience and reveals some of its inherent drawbacks; hence, supporting a more rounded understanding of the role of information in professional work behavior. Hopefully, the presented concepts and insights could also benefit other service-oriented information workers.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T11:36:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221097975
       
  • The effect of visual multimedia instructions against fake news spread: A
           quasi-experimental study with Nigerian students

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      Authors: Oberiri Destiny Apuke, Bahiyah Omar, Elif Asude Tunca, Celestine Verlumun Gever
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the effect of visual multimedia instructions (guided by literacy concepts) as an intervention strategy for improving fake news knowledge, detection skills and curtailing the tendency to share fake news. We used the inoculation theory, message interpretation process (MIP) theory and cognitive theory of multimedia learning to provide a useful explanation for the interventions of literacy concept. Our study made use of 470 participants divided into two groups, comprising the control group, n = 235 and the treatment group, n = 235. After the experiment, we found that participants in the visual multimedia experimental group demonstrated a higher knowledge of fake news, better ability to detect fake news and shared more accurate news articles, compared to their counterparts who were instructed in a non-multimedia setting. We focused only on university students from one institution in Nigeria. Thus, we encourage future studies to extend beyond the student population.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T02:17:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221096477
       
  • The individual characteristics, organizational characteristics and
           research productivity of early career LIS researchers in China’s
           mainland: A crisp set qualitative comparative analysis (csQCA)

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      Authors: Zhihong Huang, Qianjin Zong, Yuqing Xie
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      There existed discrimination, including gender discrimination, first degree discrimination, etc., when assessing the future research productivity of PhD graduates in recruitment in China’s mainland. Were PhD students who did not possess certain conditions (e.g. first degree receiving from a non-key university) unable to achieve high research productivity after graduation' Previous studies focused on the “net effects” of individual and organizational characteristics on research productivity by using quantitative methods (e.g. regression analysis). However, researchers’ research productivity might be due to the interactions of multiple factors rather than a single factor. This study aimed to analyze the effects of the combined conditions (interactions) of individual and organizational characteristics on the research productivity of early career library and information science (LIS) researchers under the context of employment discrimination in the academic job market of China’s mainland. Early career LIS researchers who graduated from China’s mainland universities/institutions between 2011 and 2015 were selected as the sample (n = 62). csQCA was employed to analyze the data. The results revealed that the effects of a single condition did not directly contribute to the occurrence of high research productivity. There were two combinations of conditions that could contribute to the high research productivity of early career LIS researchers. The first combination that contributed to the high research productivity of an early career LIS researcher was receiving his or her bachelor’s degree from a key university, publishing higher than the median number of articles indexed by Web of Science core collections (WOS) during their PhD and working in a key university after PhD graduation. The second combination was being male, publishing more than the median number of articles indexed by the WOS and the local core journals index during their PhD, and working at a key university after PhD graduation.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T01:06:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221097406
       
  • Public library events with spaces and collections: Case analysis of the
           Helsinki Central Library Oodi

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      Authors: Tomoya Igarashi, Momoka Watanabe, Yumi Tomita, Yuki Sugeno, Motoko Yamagishi, Masanori Koizumi
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      In recent years, programmes and events have become one of the major services of public libraries. This study aimed to provide a comprehensive and detailed investigation of the types of programmes and events that occur in modern public libraries that provide new services, in addition to traditional services such as book lending. The Helsinki Central Library Oodi (Finland) was used as a case study and data posted on their webpage was collected for analysis. In Finland, as per the Library Act of 2017, public libraries are encouraged to hold programmes and events. Accordingly, various programmes and events are held at Oodi. A total of 1,330 events (excluding duplicates) took place between 13 August 2019 and 31 October 2020 and were coded using the open coding method and grouped into categories. Oodi provided users with many types of learning and experience opportunities through programmes and events, aiming to eliminate social disparities and ensure equality among citizens. Many programmes and events were held to provide citizens with a place for social interaction and dialogue, creating connections among them. The library’s traditional resource, that is, its collection, was central to many programmes and events. Even during the COVID-19 pandemic, the library has been contributing to the community by holding programmes and events online. This study is the first to comprehensively elucidate the contents of programmes and events held in a modern public library, which is expected to contribute to the further dissemination and development of these types of programmes and events. Furthermore, this study promotes research on specific programmes and events and encourage discussion regarding the linkages between events.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T01:03:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221097405
       
  • Purposive and non-purposive information behaviour on Instagram

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      Authors: Madeleine Marcella-Hood, Rita Marcella
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      User information behaviour on Instagram was explored via 274 responses to an online survey. Instagram is recognised as a powerful visual platform and consistently reports high engagement statistics across its variety of users. Research on Instagram to date has focussed on marketing communications theory, in particular its production of influencers as a new type of celebrity and source. The authors undertook an exploratory study to examine user interaction with the platform from the perspective of information behaviour research. The survey sought data relating to the rich body of information behaviour theory, particularly in relation to the needs or motivations underpinning information seeking, preferred sources of information and criteria for their evaluation, trust of Instagram creators and purposive and non-purposive engagement with information. An evolutionary model of information behaviour on Instagram is proposed, which draws on previous studies of information behaviour. The credibility of information on Instagram was a key theme in the survey findings, with respondents varying in the degree to which they trusted information on the platform and adopting complex, time-consuming and sometimes conflicting strategies to fact check where they felt reliability was important; future research exploring this further is recommended, to help understand the role and motivations of the information seeker in this process. The research also reveals a heightened blurring in comprehension surrounding the concepts of information and opinion amongst users and academics.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T05:48:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221097974
       
  • A mapping review of literature on Blockchain usage by libraries:
           Challenges and opportunities

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      Authors: Muhammad Safdar, Saima Qutab, Farasat Shafi Ullah, Nadeem Siddique, Muhammad Ajmal Khan
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The Library and Information Science (LIS) community has started discussing some possible uses of Blockchain (BC) technologies in solving library-related problems and increasing the overall efficiency of libraries. This study aimed to systematically collect and review the relevant literature to comprehend the scope of BC for libraries, its benefits, as well as the challenges, and implications related to its use. The authors explored six reputed databases (Web of Science, Scopus, LISTA (Library, Information Science and Technology Abstracts), LISA (Library and Information Science Abstracts), IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers), and Google Scholar) to conduct this review. This study was conducted using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. After the final data extraction, 21 documents were considered eligible for the systematic review. A systematic review of the selected works indicated that the usage of BC in libraries ranged from record-keeping to processing payments and ensuring security and transparency. Some of the opportunities that can be hunted from BC were the elimination of corruption, enhanced security, improved efficiency of services, and better time management. Literature also indicated that a lack of awareness of technology, unskilled staff, and financial constraints could impede the adoption of BC by libraries. It is hoped that this study would provide a holistic overview of BC technologies for libraries, thus improving the effectiveness of the decision-makers. This study is first that collected (systematically) and reviewed the literature on BC usage in libraries. The review will help educational institutions and library professionals understand the usage, challenges, and benefits of BC for libraries.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T09:59:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221090225
       
  • Infocommunicative literacy: Conceptual structure and applications

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      Authors: Jussara Borges
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The objective of this article is to contribute to the theoretical and applied development of the area of Information Literacy, considering prominent changes in the informational environment, such as the culture of participation, constant connectivity, and the emergence of content generated by artificial intelligence. It is an environment that demands information literacy, but also the ability to interact and relate: communication literacy. This article situates infocommunicative literacy theoretically, articulating the three main bases that support this study: Information Literacy, New Media Literacy (NML), and Metaliteracy. From the systematization of these concepts, a conceptual structure accompanied by application propositions is suggested.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-07T03:23:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221093792
       
  • Delivering services in the new normal: Recording the experiences of UK
           public library staff during the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Elaine Robinson, Ian Ruthven, David McMenemy
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This paper reports the results of a survey undertaken in December 2021 and January 2022 related to public library staff in the United Kingdom and their experiences of COVID-19, exploring the lockdowns that were enabled, the subsequent re-openings, their mental health and their views for the future of the service post-COVID-19. Over 200 responses were received, and the findings indicate a range of views. The importance of the library as a community resource is evident in the comments from staff, and their observations of patrons on library re-openings. Findings also indicate concern for the future of the library service, and fear that new technologies like e-books may be seen as adequate replacements for the traditional library service. Findings also indicate staff face stress and mental health issues in terms of dealing with patrons while the virus remains highly prevalent.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-07T03:19:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221093371
       
  • Using current research information systems to investigate data acquisition
           and data sharing practices of computer scientists

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      Authors: Antti Mikael Rousi
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Without sufficient information about research data practices occurring in a particular research organisation, there is a risk of mismatching research data service efforts with the needs of its researchers. This study describes how data acquiring and data sharing occurring within a particular research organisation can be investigated by using current research information system publication data. The case study organisation’s current research information system was used to identify the sample of investigated articles. A sample of 193 journal articles published by researchers in the computer science department of the case study’s university during 2019 were extracted for scrutiny from the current research information system. For these 193 articles, a classification of the main study types was developed to accommodate the multidisciplinary nature of the case department’s research agenda. Furthermore, a coding framework was developed to capture the key elements of data acquiring and data sharing. The articles representing life sciences and computational research relatively frequently reused open data, whereas data acquisition of experimental research, human interaction studies and human intervention studies often relied on collecting original data. Data sharing also differed between the computationally intensive study types of life sciences and computational research and the study types relying on collection of original data. Research data were not available for reuse in only a minority of life science (n = 2; 7%) and computational research (n = 15; 14%) studies. The study types of experimental research, human interaction studies and human intervention studies less frequently made their data available for reuse. The findings suggest that research organisations representing computer sciences may include different subfields that have their own cultures of data sharing. This study demonstrates that analyses of publications listed in current research information systems provide detailed descriptions how the affiliated researchers acquire and share research data.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-07T03:11:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221093049
       
  • Leveraging information literacy: Mapping the conceptual influence and
           appropriation of information literacy in other disciplinary landscapes

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      Authors: Alison Hicks, Pam McKinney, Charlie Inskip, Geoff Walton, Annemaree Lloyd
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Information literacy forms a key concept within Library and Information Science, where it forms the focus of scholarship, conferences, journals and teaching librarian practice, alike. However, little is known about how other fields and disciplines have employed these outputs within their own research and practice. This paper examines how the concept of information literacy has been leveraged into the discourses of non-Library and Information Science disciplinary landscapes. This is achieved through a qualitative mapping of five different fields and disciplines, including Higher Education, Management and Business, Public Health, Nursing and Psychology, to identify how information literacy terminology, definitions, theories and frameworks have travelled across scholarly and practice boundaries to become appropriated into other disciplinary landscapes. The aim of this collaborative work is to develop an indicative rather than an exhaustive understanding of what travels within information literacy research and practice and to strengthen the Library and Information Science narrative on the impact of information literacy activities.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T03:37:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221090677
       
  • Exploring COVID-19 research papers published on journals in the field of
           LIS

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      Authors: Eun-Ja Shin, Guiohk Lee
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      As the COVID-19 pandemic prevails, research related to COVID-19 has spread beyond medicine, health science, and biology to almost all academic fields. Library and information science is one of the most active fields that publish COVID-19-related research papers. This study examined 696 research papers related to COVID-19 whose journal being categorized as “information science & library science” by Web of Science. The result of bibliometric analysis showed that the publications were active and on the rise. Most papers were published in English and produced in the United States. According to the keyword clustering map produced by semantic network analysis, two fields, bibliometrics and health communication, were publishing research papers related to COVID-19 most actively. Moreover, the most productive journal was a library and information science journal focusing on health informatics. Additionally, a tendency was found that researchers preferred to publish on journals with high impact factors. Compared with non-COVID-19-related research papers, there was a significant decrease of “time for acceptance” of COVID-19-related papers, and the proportion of open access was relatively high. Confronting the global crisis of COVID-19, the library and information science field also made efforts and challenges to resolve the slow peer-review, delayed publishing, and high paywalls, which have been recognized as a “chronic diseases” of the academic publishing ecosystem. It is expected that these endeavors can serve as a turning point to reconsider and innovate the traditional research-publishing lifecycle.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T03:30:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221090676
       
  • Health information seeking and sharing behavior of young adults on social
           media in Pakistan

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      Authors: Amara Malik, Talat Islam, Mahmood Ahmad, Khalid Mahmood
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Social media such as Facebook, YouTube, WhatsApp, and Twitter have radically enhanced the public access to health information. Still, studies have unexplored the factors that contribute toward such behaviors especially in developing countries. Therefore, this study identifies the factors that contribute to the likelihood of young adults’ health information seeking and sharing on social media. Specifically, drawing upon health belief model (HBM), the study attempts to understand how health belief and e-Health literacy affects health information seeking and sharing on social media. The study collected data from 413 young adults through Google Forms on a random basis. The results generated applying structural equation modeling confirmed that HBM related factors such as perceived susceptibility, perceived severity and perceived benefits positively while perceived barriers negatively influence young adults’ health information seeking and sharing intentions on social media. Furthermore, e-Health literacy was positively associated with health information seeking and sharing intentions on social media. This study is amongst a first few studies in the context of developing world to investigate the young adults’ intentions of seeking and sharing health information on social media based on HBM.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T03:25:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221090228
       
  • Assessing the perceived research competencies of academic librarians in
           Pakistan: Implications for work performance

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      Authors: Amara Malik, Arslan Sheikh, Khalid Mahmood
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to investigate the research experience, perceived research capabilities, and role of LIS education in reading and doing research. It further explores their preferred educational activities to learn research skills and the impact of research competencies on their work performance. An online survey was conducted through a questionnaire and the data were collected from the librarians working in academic libraries in Pakistan. The findings revealed that a majority of the academic librarians wrote either journal article/s or presented their research in conferences. With regard to research competencies, academic librarians indicated their high confidence in performing discrete steps involved in a research project. However, the participants noted their lack of confidence in knowing which statistical test(s) to run and how to code qualitative data to identify themes and sub-themes. The study also revealed that Library Information Science (LIS) qualification more adequately trained academic librarians to read about rather than conduct research. Academic librarians considered continuing education programs (i.e. workshops, seminars, sessions, and attending conferences) as an effective delivery mode for learning research methods. The research competencies of the participants also came out as a positive predictor of work performance. The study suggests that academic libraries, LIS schools, and other organizations, should be keenly aware of librarians’ research learning needs and facilitate them by creating a supportive environment for learning and applying research knowledge.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T03:20:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221090222
       
  • Librarians’ support in improving health literacy: A systematic
           literature review

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      Authors: Evgenia Vassilakaki, Valentini Moniarou-Papaconstaninou
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The last couple of decades health literacy has gained significant momentum among the issues listed as priority within the public health sphere. In addition, the advances of Information and Communications Technology, the adoption of digital technology to perform basic tasks in our daily lives and thus the re-orientation of health care has led to the introduction of e-health literacy and digital health literacy. Hence, different groups of users needs to develop and acquire the additional digital skills and competences to search, retrieve, access and use health information. This study aims to review the literature concerning librarians’ involvement in health literacy that published between 2010 and 2020 using the principles of systematic literature review. Specifically, search terms such as “health literacy,” “information professional/s,” “librarian/s,” and “library” were run on ACM Digital Library, Scopus, Library, Information Science and Technology Abstracts (LISTA), Library and Information Science Abstracts (LISA), Citeseer, Google Scholar, e-prints in Library and Information Science (e-LiS), Digital Library of Information Science and Technology (DLIST), PubMed and Science Direct. The searches were performed during October–November 2020 and were repeated in January–February 2021; and after considering a series of inclusion and exclusion criteria 57 peer-reviewed papers were considered. Six broad areas of interest emerged through a thorough analysis of the identified, relevant literature namely “role of librarians in relation to health literacy development,” “user studies related to health literacy,” “health literacy programs,” “health literacy and LIS education,” “ health literacy initiatives” and “tools used by librarians in health literacy projects.” Main findings showcase that libraries as secure and trusted places can play a key role in developing and promoting health literacy to different groups; new job titles emerge for librarians (consumer health librarian, health information services librarians, health literacy librarian); whereas collaboration is a key element for developing and offering health literacy training programs to diverse group of users as well as the public.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T10:21:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221093794
       
  • Starting from ‘scratch’: Building young people’s digital skills
           through a coding club collaboration with rural public libraries

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      Authors: Wayne Kelly, Brian McGrath, Danielle Hubbard
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      While digital infrastructure is clearly a critical factor in addressing the digital divide for rural society, it is only one component in realising the benefits of information and communication technology (ICT). It is increasingly acknowledged that citizens, governments, and businesses need to develop skills and motivations to use technologies. It is also recognised that young people and their rural communities are among those who gain the least from opportunities to engage in and benefit from an ever-evolving digital society. As with other areas of rural development, local community institutions and actors assume their own leadership in developing initiatives to overcome challenges and advance digital literacy and in this regard, public libraries have led and continue to hold considerable potential to champion this area. This article reports on the experiences of a 14-month community-based collaborative research project with public libraries engaged in a process of developing coding clubs for children and youth in rural Manitoba, Canada. Our research sets out to answer the questions: first, whether it is viable for public libraries to cultivate advanced digital skills among rural youth and contribute to bridging the rural-urban digital divide by running coding clubs following the CoderDojo model' And second, what are the critical conditions to ensure the success of public library coding clubs' In examining some of the experiences encountered in adopting the coding club as a model of digital literacy building, we discuss wider themes for rural public libraries interested in advancing digital literacy building within their communities.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T09:48:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221090953
       
  • Publishing international library and information science journals: The
           changing landscape

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      Authors: Eungi Kim
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to examine the publication trends of Scimago Journal & Country Rank (SJR)-indexed library and information science (LIS) journals by examining publication share growth by country and region. For this study, we used LIS journals indexed in the SJR in 2000, 2010, and 2020. The results showed that the most frequent publishers of SJR-indexed LIS journals are large commercial publishers. The top three publishers since 2000 were Taylor & Francis, Emerald, and Springer Nature, despite their publication share among SJR-indexed journals declining since this period. The top three countries in journal publishing were the United States, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands. As the large commercial publishers have established themselves in these countries, the publication shares of these countries have also declined slightly because of the slowing growth rate of their publishers. Similarly, publication shares in both Northern America and Western Europe have declined slightly since 2000. However, the large commercial publishers, based mainly in the United Kingdom and the United States, are likely to take the lead in publishing SJR-indexed international LIS journals over the next decade. The results suggest that publishers from non-Western countries will need to publish significantly more international LIS journals indexed in the major databases to achieve a significant publication share. In conclusion, more innovative ways to support journals published in non-Western countries are needed in order to meet the essential selection criteria of the Scopus and Web of Science journal indexes.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T11:12:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221090958
       
  • Users’ search performance prediction in cross-device search

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      Authors: Dan Wu, Jing Dong, Fang Yuan, Lei Cheng
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Users’ search performance indicates the effectiveness and success with which users’ information needs are met, which is calculated based on the relevance judgment by users themselves. This study proposed to explore the prediction of users’ search performance in the context of cross-device search. A user experiment was performed to collect users’ relevance judgments and search behaviors in cross-device search. Based on users’ relevance judgments, users’ search performance was evaluated by calculating the percentage of valid clicks, effective search time, nDCG@n, and satisfaction. A simple linear regression model was adopted to train the prediction model. The final results showed that a combination of users’ search performance in pre-switch sessions and their search behavior in post-switch sessions can attain the best prediction accuracy. Important features to predict users’ search performance in cross-device search shed light on improving search systems to aid users in completing the task efficiently.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T11:10:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221090956
       
  • Civic activity of librarians versus social engagement and individual
           social capital

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      Authors: Maja Wojciechowska
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      It is currently acknowledged that, apart from theoretical knowledge and professional competencies, the right attitude and engagement of librarians are important in order for libraries, in their role of local community keystones, to engage in various services beyond the traditional provision of information, such as social animation and engagement or civic education. The paper presents the results of research on the civic activity (civic attitude) of librarians versus their social engagement (social attitude) and level of individual social capital. Surveys conducted in 20 countries of the world confirm that civic activity is linked to the social activity of librarians and a high level of their individual social capital. This means that libraries may actively participate in promoting the civil society and engage in the social integration of local communities.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T11:07:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221090954
       
  • Factors influencing the citation behavior of Pakistani novice LIS
           researchers

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      Authors: Nosheen Fatima Warraich, Irfan Ali, Muzammil Tahira, Shahzada Nadeem Raza
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to understand the citation behavior of LIS research graduates in terms of their citation practices, citation motivation with the perceived quality and trustworthiness of cited sources. The paper endeavors to gain an insight into their citation behavior to gender, age, qualification, and publications. An online questionnaire survey was conducted in July 2020 to collect data from researchers who have been studying or completed their research degrees from the Institute of Information Management, University of the Punjab, Lahore-Pakistan. Data showed that almost half of the researchers published articles in journals. They preferred to cite: the most recent sources, articles written by reputable authors, highly cited sources, and articles which contain high-quality references. Researchers were motivated to cite open access and impact factor journals. There was no significant relationship between gender and any of the variables of citation behavior. However, only qualification affected the citation motivation of novice researchers. The findings may guide the policymakers about fund allocation to research projects.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T11:06:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221090675
       
  • A systematized review on data librarianship literature: Current services,
           challenges, skills, and motivational factors

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      Authors: Murtaza Ashiq, Nosheen Fatima Warraich
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Data librarianship is becoming more common as a means of developing and integrating data-driven library services. Consequently, the academic and research libraries’ traditional role in providing information support and training has been expanded to include support in all aspects of the research lifecycle. Hence, this study systematically reviews the data librarianship literature focusing on current data librarianship services, challenges, skills, and motivational factors. A systematic review was conducted following the PRISMA guidelines. A comprehensive search strategy was formulated to extract maximum relevant results. The bibliographic data were retrieved from the Scopus, Web of Science, Library, Information Science and Technology Abstracts (LISTA), and Library and Information Science Abstracts (LISA). Finally, 27 studies that fulfill the criteria were included in this study. The findings revealed that two main factors that contribute to the success or failure in this emerging data librarianship roles are skills, knowledge, and expertise; and limited support and advocacy from library leadership and higher authorities. One is on the part of library professionals who can develop the required skills, knowledge, and expertise and the other is on the part of library leadership. The library professionals are hesitant to embrace this new role due to non-additional benefits, no relevant job description, and lacking leadership support. Overall, the findings revealed that the data librarianship scope is dynamic and has been expanded, albeit the progress is slow. The theoretical, practical, policy, and social implications described that the data librarianship services tend to be improved, and the relevant skills, knowledge, and expertise should be developed. The policy initiatives need to be taken, improved, and expanded to advance technical services related to data librarianship.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T11:37:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221083675
       
  • The relationship between motivational factors and librarians’
           professional development (PD): A systematic review

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      Authors: Khurram Shahzad, Shakeel Ahmad Khan
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The main objectives of the study were to examine the motivational factors influencing professional development activities, to find out the relation between motivation and librarians’ professional development, and to identify challenges in the implementation of professional development activities. The study followed the “Preferred Reporting Items for the Systematic Review and Meta-analysis” (PRISMA) guidelines as the methodology of the instant study. Different searching methods and techniques were applied to find and locate the relevant literature to meet the set objectives of the study. The data were gathered from different databases, research repositories, federated tools, and core journals of the field. Twenty-four key studies were included after four steps known as identification, screening, eligibility, and inclusion. The findings of the study revealed that five major categories of motivational factors known as IT advancements, active leadership, the role of library associations, personal interest, and institutional support influenced the professional development of library professionals. Satisfaction, facilities, rewards, work atmosphere, and autonomy were the key categories of motivation that encouraged information professionals to build professional expertise to implement innovative services for facilitating the end-users. Practical solutions attained through study-findings will guide the policymakers, decision-makers, and institutional heads to devise such strategies that might encourage library professionals to strengthen their knowledge and skills for developing smart library services.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-06T01:17:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221083685
       
  • Digital platform for open and equitable sharing of scholarly knowledge in
           India

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      Authors: Moumita Koley, Suryesh K. Namdeo, Bhattacharjee Suchiradipta, Nabil Ahmad Afifi
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The academic publishing model is very inequitable currently – most commercial publishers demand exorbitant prices for access to journal articles, either through subscription or article processing charges. In this digital era, when publishing costs are negligible, and the peer review process is voluntary, it is unreasonable to have such high access barriers. In this article, we have explored the idea of an accessible and equitable knowledge dissemination platform using next-generation technologies and emerging models in publication to challenge the commercial publishers’ oligopoly in knowledge dissemination. Some of the upcoming practices, open peer review systems, transparent research data practices, and finally leveraging the advancements in digital technologies in publishing can be effective in creating efficient, transparent and cost-effective publishing systems. Encouraged by these recent developments, we have explored the possibilities of launching a digital publishing platform in India. We have analysed the existing open-source technologies like Open Journal System (OJS) and compared them with proprietary models like Editorial Manager to understand the gaps in both and explored avenues to conceive a cost-effective digital publishing platform. We hope that the open-access digital publishing platform will help the Indian journals upgrade their publishing systems up to the international standard, if not better, and help researchers explore a non-commercial avenue to publish open access articles.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-06T01:15:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221083678
       
  • Users’ needs and expectations of immersive learning spaces in an
           academic library: A survey

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      Authors: Qiandong Zhu, Xiaozhen Xie
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This research aims to investigate users’ space requirements, facilities, equipment, environmental needs, management services, and food services in immersive learning space. Descriptive statistical analysis is used to study the degree of users’ demand on spatial factors of different dimensions. The influence of identity and gender on the spatial needs is measured through t-test and one-way analysis of variance. The study found that in terms of space requirements, users are inclined to choose private and quiet seats; in terms of facilities and equipment, the higher the user’s academic status, the correspondingly higher requirements for some space facilities and equipment. Users attach great importance to the environmental elements of the immersive learning space, especially the cleanliness, lighting, acoustic environment, and temperature. Users also hope to use the online reservation services and increase the open time of the library. Although the main purpose of the immersive learning space is to learn, users hope to get food services. According to the research results, suggestions for the improvement of library spaces are put forward: adding special areas for doctoral candidate and faculty community, enhancing space planning, building better online services, building a 24-hour open learning space, and seting up a dining area outside the library.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-03-18T11:14:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221081844
       
  • Capturing computational thinking in public libraries: An examination of
           assessment strategies, audience, and mindset

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      Authors: Mega Subramaniam, Nitzan Koren, Shandra Morehouse, David Weintrop
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the current state of assessment of computational thinking (CT) programming in public libraries in the United States. In particular, this study identifies the assessment tools and strategies that public library staff use to evaluate the success of CT youth programming, as well as how they share these assessment results, what they share, and with whom. This work also examines the perceptions of library staff on assessment of CT learning in libraries. Through our work, we highlight the need for a change of mindset in the perception of library staff toward assessment of CT learning in libraries. We also demonstrate the need for suitable assessment strategies to measure learning in CT programming in libraries beyond attendance and retention, that communicate to library staff on how they can revise their programs and to share their program impact with library stakeholders who make decisions on budget and resource allocations.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-03-17T05:00:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221084126
       
  • Information literacy self-efficacy versus performance: Secondary students

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      Authors: Jen R. Spisak
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to determine if secondary students overestimate their information literacy (IL) abilities and if differences exist between their information literacy self-efficacy and performance levels. A sample of 397 secondary students completed the Information Literacy Self-efficacy Scale (ILSES) and the Tool for Real-time Assessment of Information Literacy Skills (TRAILS) to measure their information literacy self-efficacy and performance. Descriptive means were calculated, compared using a t-test, and reported for student information literacy self-efficacy levels according to the ILSES and student information literacy performance levels according to the TRAILS measure. Quantitative analyses showed that all groups overestimated their information literacy abilities. Additional findings were that as self-efficacy increased, so too did performance. However, the discrepancy between self-efficacy and performance increased as self-efficacy increased as well.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T11:35:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221081847
       
  • Information literacy in the legal workplace: Current state of
           lawyers’ skills in Pakistan

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      Authors: Muhammad Asif Naveed, Naveed Abbas Shah
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigated the current state of information literacy (IL) skills among lawyers practicing at the District Bar Association of Sargodha, Punjab, Pakistan. A cross-sectional survey using a questionnaire was conducted to collect data from 297 lawyers. The questionnaire comprised 20 statements related to information literacy along with certain demographic variables. Each lawyer was personally visited in the assigned chamber by one of the researchers to record responses. Both descriptive (frequencies, percentages, mean scores, standard deviations) and inferential statistics (Pearson correlation coefficient, t-test, and one-way analysis of variance) were applied for data analysis in SPSS. The results showed that a large majority of lawyers participating in the survey never received any formal training concerning information literacy. However, most of these lawyers perceived IL skills as important in the context of their workplace especially in conducting legal research. These lawyers were more competent in the basic IL skills and less competent in advanced IL skills. In addition, the lawyers’ age, practical experience, practicing levels, computer proficiency, and English Language proficiency predicted their levels of IL skills. There was a critical need for the development of IL instruction programs for not only practicing lawyers but also for law students to improve their skills since these lawyers felt less competent with advanced levels of IL skills. It is hoped that the present study contributes to the existing body of WIL literature focusing especially on the role of IL in the context of legal work and outlining the current state of lawyers’ IL skills in Pakistan as no such study has appeared so far.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T12:32:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221081895
       
  • Acknowledgement behaviour of Information Science students of
           Nigeria’s premier university

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      Authors: Janet O. Adekannbi
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study is an exploratory analysis of master’s dissertation acknowledgements (DAs) of Information Science students of Nigeria’s premier university – University of Ibadan. A total of 932 DAs from 1992 to 2019 were examined. Fifteen recent graduates of the Africa Regional Centre for Information Science were also interviewed. Descriptive and Inferential statistics as well as qualitative content analysis were carried out on the DAs while transcribed interview data were analysed thematically. Findings revealed that while addressees thanked in the DAs included supervisors, other academics, administrative staff, organisations, family and friends, most of the DAs however, acknowledged God first. More friends were acknowledged in the DAs than academics and family members, suggesting the extent to which the students value their social cycle. Interview data and excerpts from DAs revealed cases of students copying acknowledgements in past dissertations and acknowledgements of fellow colleagues. Results also showed that academic and moral supports were acknowledged more than technical, spiritual, financial and access. Overall, results from this study have shown the influence of socio-cultural and religious beliefs on the acknowledgement genre among Information Science students of Nigeria’s premier university.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-03-03T05:27:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221079359
       
  • The role of feelings in personal information management behavior: Deleting
           and organizing information

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      Authors: Lilach Alon, Rafi Nachmias
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      An increasingly intense experience of personal information management (PIM) manifests in how people manage personal information archives and how they feel about it. To this point, however, the relations between feelings and PIM behavior have attracted limited study. We examined how feelings shape people’s organizing and deleting practices, focusing on four affective aspects: anxiety, self-efficacy, belonging, and loss of control. We hypothesized that these affective aspects would predict the extent to which people utilize organizing and deleting practices. Data were collected via two self-reported questionnaires distributed to 465 respondents. Findings partially supported the hypotheses and showed self-efficacy was the strongest predictor of deleting and organizing. This suggests the process of PIM is more efficient and productive when people enjoy interacting with personal information and do not perceive it as a burden. We discuss the results and suggest several implications for research, PIM literacy development, and platform design.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-03-03T05:25:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221079357
       
  • Journal and disciplinary variations in academic open peer review
           anonymity, outcomes, and length

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      Authors: Mike Thelwall
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Understanding more about variations in peer review is essential to ensure that editors and reviewers harness it effectively in existing and new formats, including for mega-journals and when published online. This article analyzes open reviews from the MDPI suite of journals to identify commonalities and differences from a simplistic quantitative perspective, focusing on reviewer anonymity, review length, and review outcomes. The sample contained 45,385 first round open reviews from published standard journal articles in 288 MDPI journals classified into one or more Scopus disciplinary areas (Health Sciences; Life Sciences; Physical Sciences; Social Sciences). The eight main findings include substantial differences between journals and disciplines in review lengths, reviewer anonymity, review outcomes, and the use of attachments. In particular, Physical Sciences journal reviews tended to be stricter and were more likely to be anonymous. Life Sciences and Social Sciences reviews were the longest overall. Signed reviews tend to be 15% longer (perhaps to be more careful or polite) but gave similar decisions to anonymous reviews. Finally, reviews with major revision outcomes tended to be 68% longer than reviews with for minor revision outcomes, except in a few journals. In conclusion, signing reviews does not seem to threaten the validity of peer review outcomes and authors, editors, and reviewers of multidisciplinary articles should be aware of substantial field differences in what constitutes an appropriate review.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-03-02T06:54:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221079345
       
  • Research data management systems and the organization of universities and
           research institutes: A systematic literature review

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      Authors: Eva Katharina Donner
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      New technological developments, the availability of big data, and the creation of research platforms open a variety of opportunities to generate, store, and analyze research data. To ensure the sustainable handling of research data, the European Commission as well as scientific commissions have recently highlighted the importance of implementing a research data management system (RDMS) in higher education institutes (HEI) which combines technical as well as organizational solutions. A deep understanding of the requirements of research data management (RDM), as well as an overview of the different stakeholders, is a key prerequisite for the implementation of an RDMS. Based on a scientific literature review, the aim of this study is to answer the following research questions: “What organizational factors need to be considered when implementing an RDMS' How do these organizational factors interact with each other and how do they constrain or facilitate the implementation of an RDMS'” The structure of the analysis is built on the four components of Leavitt’s classical model of organizational change: task, structure, technology, and people. The findings reveal that the implementation of RDMS is strongly impacted by the organizational structure, infrastructure, labor culture as well as strategic considerations. Overall, this literature review summarizes different approaches for the implementation of an RDMS. It also identifies areas for future research.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-02-01T12:20:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211070282
       
  • Book review: Torben Larsen, Review of Applied Doughnut Economics

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Are Holen, Torben Larsen
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-01-17T09:25:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211070284
       
  • When does credibility matter' The assessment of information sources in
           teenagers navigation regimes

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      Authors: Carla Almeida, Mônica Macedo-Rouet, Vanessa Brasil de Carvalho, Washington Castilhos, Marina Ramalho, Luís Amorim, Luisa Massarani
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this paper is to investigate when and how Brazilian teenagers assess the credibility of information sources. We analyze data collected through focus groups, guided internet searches, and interviews with sixty-one 14- to 19-year olds from the state of Rio de Janeiro. Participants used different criteria to attribute credibility to information sources, with expertise and reputation being two of the most relevant, placing specialists, teachers, and the mainstream media at the top of their list of credible sources. Interestingly, these sources are not necessarily the ones that are most present in their daily lives, and credibility is only a relevant factor in some circumstances. Based on our results and data from other studies on the topic, we propose three navigation regimes (dilletante, motivated, and constrained) as a framework for analyzing teenagers’ information evaluation behavior, in which the role of sources’ credibility varies considerably. We believe this framework can help in the development of more effective strategies for improving young people’s sourcing skills and media literacy.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-01-17T09:22:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211064647
       
  • Democratic librarianship in the Nordic model

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      Authors: Masanori Koizumi, Håkon Larsen
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this research is to examine the evolving democratic librarianship and its robust connection to the Nordic societal model. Through an analysis of libraries in Oslo, Tromsø, Stockholm, Aarhus and Helsinki, as well as recent changes in library laws, we have analysed contemporary democratic librarianship in the Nordic countries through four essential factors: (1) citizens in democratic activities within libraries, (2) library managerial decisions, (3) activities of political parties within public libraries and (4) library laws. Through the analysis, we show that this robust and unique ecosystem is supported by (1) discussions at book clubs and shared readings events connected to common societal concerns, (2) criteria of library directors and managers, such as neutrality, freedom of speech and clauses of the Library Act, (3) perception of politicians regarding public libraries as the centre of the democratic community and (4) the Library Acts critically impacting democratic librarianship.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-01-13T09:12:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211069673
       
  • How real is real enough' Participant feedback on a behavioral
           simulation used for information-seeking behavior research

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      Authors: Amy G. Buhler, Brittany Brannon, Tara Tobin Cataldo, Ixchel M. Faniel, Lynn Silipigni Connaway, Joyce Kasman Valenza, Rachael Elrod, Christopher Cyr
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      A challenge of studying information-seeking behavior in open web systems is the unpredictability of those systems. One solution to counteract this issue is employing a simulation to ensure experimental control. However, concerns arise over the realism of such an environment. This paper assesses the realism of a behavioral simulation used to study the evaluation behavior of 175 students from fourth grade through graduate school. We assess realism through the examination of targeted participant feedback about what would have made the simulated environment and tasks more realistic to these participants. Based on this feedback, we reflect on decisions made in designing the simulation and offer recommendations for future studies interested in incorporating behavioral simulation in their research design. We find that a thoughtfully designed simulation can elicit naturalistic behavior when the controlled environment is designed to be realistic in meaningful ways. Because the simulation does not have to perfectly match reality to elicit these behaviors, designing a simulation that is real enough is an effective method to study information-seeking behavior.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-01-12T12:28:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211067799
       
  • Future of information retrieval systems and the role of library and
           information science experts in their development

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      Authors: Abolfazl Asadnia, Mehrdad CheshmehSohrabi, Ahmad Shabani, Asefeh Asemi, Mohsen Taheri Demneh
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Many organizations and businesses are using futurology to keep pace with the ever-increasing changes in the world, as the businesses and organizations need to be updated to achieve organizational and business growth and development. A review of the previous studies has shown that no systematic research has been already conducted on the future of information retrieval systems and the role of library and information science experts in the future of such systems. Therefore, a qualitative study was conducted by reviewing resources, consulting experts, doing interaction analysis, and writing scenarios. The results demonstrated 13 key factors affecting the future of information retrieval systems in the form of two driving forces of social determinism and technological determinism, and four scenarios of Canopus star, Ursa major, Ursa minor, and single star. The results also showed the dominance of technology and social demand and its very important role in the future of information retrieval systems.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-01-08T09:26:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211067537
       
  • A comparison of information behavior studies in United States and India:
           Number of publications, authorship, journals, theories, research
           populations, and methods

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      Authors: Vinit Kumar, Brady Lund
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study compares attributes (authors, journals, populations, theories, methods) of information seeking behavior studies based in the United States and India, based on a search of published articles from 2011 to 2020 in relevant information science databases. The findings indicate major differences in information behavior research among the two countries. Information behavior research in the United States tends to focus more on health and medicine-related research populations, employ greater use of information behavior theories, and use a variety of quantitative and qualitative research methods (as well as mixed methods). Information behavior research in India tends to focus more on general populations, use less theory, and rely heavily on quantitative research methods—particularly questionnaires (88% of studies). These findings suggest a healthy and intellectually-diverse information behavior research area in the United States and ample room for growth of the research area within India.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T09:57:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211069672
       
  • Reaching into the basket of doom: Learning outcomes, discourse and
           information literacy

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      Authors: Alison Hicks, Annemaree Lloyd
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      Learning outcomes form a type of arrangement that holds the practice of information literacy within higher education in place. This paper employs the theory of practice architectures and a discourse analytical approach to examine the learning goals of five recent English-language models of information literacy. Analysis suggests that the practice of information literacy within higher education is composed of 12 common dimensions, which can be grouped into two categories, Mapping and Applying. The Mapping category encompasses learning outcomes that introduce the learner to accepted ways of knowing or what is valued by and how things work within higher education. The Applying category encompasses learning outcomes that encourage the learner to implement or integrate ideas into their own practice, including to their own questions, to themselves or to their experience. Revealing what is prioritised as well as what is less valued within the field at the present time, these findings also raise questions about supposed epistemological differences between models, the influence of research, and the language employed within these documents. This paper represents the third and final piece of work in a research programme that is interrogating the epistemological premises and discourses of information literacy within higher education.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T09:56:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211067216
       
  • Branding in libraries: Identifying key requirements and dimensions to
           provide a conceptual model

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      Authors: Farzane Sahli, Sirous Alidousti, Nader Naghshineh
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this review is to explore factors affecting brand building in libraries. Based on the nine steps of the National Health Service (NHS) center for reviews and dissemination, articles on the subject of library branding were searched in nine Iranian databases and seven international databases. The search period includes all date range of databases until 7–22 January 2021. The results were assessed for quality and 44 English articles and 3 Persian articles were selected for further analysis. Factors in promoting libraries brand building fall five categories. They include library architecture, library information resources and services, librarians’ personal branding, marketing, and library management. Inhibiting factors in libraries brand building have two final categories including internal and external inhibiting factors to brand building. Internal inhibitors covered branding costs, lead-time for branding, effort for branding and its management, the difficulty of strategic brand planning, and library staff unpreparedness. External inhibitors covered the difficulties of branding in the digital age and the economic situation of the country. If libraries manage their brand and move toward rebranding in line with the new information environment, they will be able to survive in today’s competitive world and build their true value in relationship with users.
      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-01-06T09:28:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006211056650
       
  • Book review: Data-driven decisions: a practical toolkit for library and
           information professionals

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Katrina Clifford
      First page: 817
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-09-21T04:59:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221125128
       
  • Book Review: Stories and Lessons from the World’s Leading Opera,
           Orchestra Librarians, and Music Archivists

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: David Baker
      First page: 818
      Abstract: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Librarianship and Information Science
      PubDate: 2022-09-05T06:17:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09610006221114482
       
 
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