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JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association
Journal Prestige (SJR): 8.876
Citation Impact (citeScore): 7
Number of Followers: 2307  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0098-7484 - ISSN (Online) 1538-3598
Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [14 journals]
  • Audio Highlights
    • Abstract: Listen to the JAMA Editor’s Audio Summary for an overview and discussion of the important articles appearing in this week’s issue of JAMA.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.0031
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • JAMA
    • Pages: 419 - 420
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.13547
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Taking a Closer Look at COVID-19, Health Inequities, and Racism
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Pages: 427 - 429
      Abstract: This Medical News article is an interview with Chicago public health legend and retired physician Linda Rae Murray, MD, MPH, an adjunct assistant professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health and a past president of the American Public Health Association.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.11672
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Virus Surveillance and Diagnosis With a CRISPR-Based Platform
    • Authors: Hampton T.
      Pages: 430 - 430
      Abstract: A newly developed technology draws on the latest genome editing advances to detect viruses at scale—including the one that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)—for surveillance and diagnostic purposes. The innovation, recently described in Nature, uses clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR–associated protein 13 (Cas13), gene editing tools based on a bacterial defense system against invading viruses.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.12669
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • COVID-19 and Massive Job Losses Will Test the US Health Insurance Safety
           Net
    • Authors: Levitt L.
      Pages: 431 - 432
      Abstract: With massive and rapid job losses during the current economic crisis related to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the US is at risk of a historic decrease in job-based health insurance.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.12248
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Immunotherapy Is Now First-line Therapy for Some Colorectal Cancers
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 433 - 433
      Abstract: Pembrolizumab is the first immunotherapy drug approved as a first-line treatment for patients with certain types of colorectal cancer that can be administered without initial chemotherapy.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.13299
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • First-in-Class HIV Drug Is Approved
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 433 - 433
      Abstract: A new medication has been approved for patients with HIV infection who, after receiving multiple treatments, have exhausted other options because of drug resistance, intolerance, or safety issues.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.13103
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Breast Cancer Drug Can Be Given at Home or in the Clinic
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 433 - 433
      Abstract: A formulation of pertuzumab and trastuzumab that health care professionals can administer by subcutaneous injection in a patient’s home instead of intravenously in an infusion center has received approval for adults with certain types of breast cancer.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.13100
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Academic Medicine and Black Lives Matter—Time for Deep Listening
    • Authors: Yancy CW.
      Pages: 435 - 436
      Abstract: In the context of the Black Lives Matter movement, this Viewpoint considers the demand that academic medicine address its own structural racism, and concludes on the basis of its history, culture, role, and influence that the institution can, should, and must make racial justice a part of its work and mission.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.12532
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Leading SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine Candidates
    • Authors: O’Callaghan KP; Blatz AM, Offit PA.
      Pages: 437 - 438
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the mechanisms of the 5 leading COVID-19 vaccine candidates—2 messenger RNA vaccines, 1 recombinant VSV vector product, and 2 replication-defective adenovirus vector approaches—and emphasizes the need to demonstrate safety as well as efficacy to facilitate broad uptake by the public.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.12190
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Safeguards Needed for Development of COVID-19 Vaccines
    • Authors: Lurie N; Sharfstein JM, Goodman JL.
      Pages: 439 - 440
      Abstract: This Viewpoint lists 4 safeguards policy makers should consider before release of a COVID-19 vaccine, including ensuring effectiveness through clinical trials, providing evidence of safety, requiring informed consent before vaccination, and establishing comprehensive adverse effects monitoring systems.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.12461
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Airborne Transmission of SARS-CoV-2—Theoretical Considerations and
           Available Evidence
    • Authors: Klompas M; Baker MA, Rhee C.
      Pages: 441 - 442
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses physical and epidemiological evidence supporting droplet vs aerosol transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and concludes on balance that aerosol transmission seems unlikely to be the dominant mode of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) spread.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.12458
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Communicating Science in the Time of a Pandemic
    • Authors: Saitz R; Schwitzer G.
      Pages: 443 - 444
      Abstract: This Viewpoint uses the example of rapid changes to public reporting on the efficacy of hydroxychloroquine and remdesivir for COVID-19 to illustrate how misinformation damages the public’s trust in science and medicine, and urges accuracy and circumspection in news reports of developments in the pandemic.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.12535
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Accounting For Lives Lost in The COVID-19 Pandemic From Unemployment,
           Social Isolation, and Depression
    • Authors: VanderWeele TJ.
      Pages: 445 - 446
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses how COVID-19–related policy decisions lead to trade-offs between medical, economic, social, and psychological outcomes, and emphasizes the need to account for deaths associated with unemployment and depression when estimating excess mortality.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.12187
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Behavioral Health Parity Efforts in the US
    • Authors: Carlo AD; Barnett BS, Frank RG.
      Pages: 447 - 448
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses halting progress in legislative and policy attempts to make access to high-quality mental health and substance use disorders service equal to that for medical-surgical services and prospects for further regulation of insurance to achieve the goal.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.3505
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Assessing Quantitative Comparisons of Health and Social Care Between
           Countries
    • Authors: Carlson MD; Roy B, Groenewoud A.
      Pages: 449 - 450
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses differences that complicate cross-country comparisons of health and social services and proposes a framework for assessing the appropriateness of those comparisons to help researchers improve their investigations and help readers critically appraise them.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.3813
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Ways to Improve Racial Competence
    • Authors: Vince RA; Jr.
      Pages: 451 - 452
      Abstract: In this narrative medicine essay, a urology fellow offers 5 actions the medical community should take to eliminate racial injustice and health disparities in the United States.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.12432
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Maintaining Quality of Editorial Evaluation and Peer Review
    • Authors: Bauchner H; Fontanarosa PB, Golub RM.
      Pages: 453 - 454
      Abstract: Concerns have been raised about how journals maintain their standards during the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, given the rapid pace and unprecedented volume of research being conducted in such a short time, and the large number of reports submitted to journals. For example, at JAMA, from January 1 to June 1, 2020, more than 11 000 manuscripts were submitted, compared with approximately 4000 manuscripts submitted during the same period in 2019. Virtually the entire increase has been related to manuscripts focused on COVID-19, with about one-third representing original research (full-length manuscripts, brief reports, and research letters) and two-thirds representing opinion (Viewpoints, A Piece of My Mind) and reviews.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.11764
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Hopeful Signals From a Randomized Trial of Convalescent Plasma to Treat
           COVID-19
    • Authors: Casadevall A; Joyner MJ, Pirofski L.
      Pages: 455 - 457
      Abstract: Convalescent plasma for the treatment of infectious diseases has been used since the early 20th century and was associated with reduced mortality during the 1918 influenza, 2003 SARS, and 2009 influenza H1N1 pandemics. However, most published studies of these diseases were case series and retrospective comparisons of treated and nontreated individuals. Consistent with this, several uncontrolled case series of convalescent plasma use in patients with coronavirus disease (2019) COVID-19 have suggested a possible benefit. Given encouraging historical precedents and the absence of proven SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory disease coronavirus 2) antiviral therapies, convalescent plasma therapy has been proposed as a treatment option for COVID-19. The availability of clinical information generated from randomized clinical trials is therefore of substantial importance given that the world remains in the grip of the COVID-19 epidemic and convalescent plasma is currently in use in many countries, including the US.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.10218
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Mortality and Morbidity in a Pandemic
    • Authors: Zylke JW; Bauchner H.
      Pages: 458 - 459
      Abstract: By late May 2020, more than 100 000 individuals in the US died of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). News reports lamented the number, comparing it to the capacity of a large football stadium or a small town and noting its similarity to the number of US soldiers killed in World War I or in the Korean and Vietnam wars combined.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.11761
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Convalescent Plasma Therapy and Clinical Improvement in Severe and
           Life-threatening COVID-19
    • Authors: Li L; Zhang W, Hu Y, et al.
      Pages: 460 - 470
      Abstract: This randomized trial compares the effects of convalescent plasma therapy with standard care vs standard care alone on time to clinical improvement among patients with severe or life-threatening COVID-19 disease in China.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.10044
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Effect of Vitamin D 3 Supplementation vs Placebo on Risk of Depression or
           Relevant Depressive Symptoms
    • Authors: Okereke OI; Reynolds CF, III, Mischoulon D, et al.
      Pages: 471 - 480
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial compares the effects of vitamin D₃ supplementation vs placebo on depression risk and mood scores in men and women aged 50 years or older.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.10224
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Diagnosis Coding and Differences in Mortality Between Critical Access
           Hospitals (CAHs) and Non-CAHs
    • Authors: Kosar CM; Loomer L, Thomas KS, et al.
      Pages: 481 - 487
      Abstract: This study uses Medicare data to estimate mortality differences for common medical conditions (pneumonia, heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, urinary tract infection, others) at US critical access vs non–critical access hospitals between 2007 and 2017 with vs without adjustment for discharge diagnosis counts to assess the extent to which coding practices rather than illness severity might account for observed mortality differences.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.9935
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Review
    • Authors: Murphy SP; Ibrahim NE, Januzzi JL, Jr.
      Pages: 488 - 504
      Abstract: This narrative review summarizes the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, management, and prognosis of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.10262
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Tafamidis (Vyndaqel; Vyndamax) for Transthyretin Amyloid Cardiomyopathy
    • Pages: 505 - 505
      Abstract: This Medical Letter review describes how tafamidis prevents transthyretin protein complexes from disocciating into amyloid fibrils, and its recent approval in 2 different formulations (Vyndaqel and Vyndamax) for treatment of adults with transthyretin-mediated amyloid cardiomyopathy (ATTR-CM).
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.0753
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Mortality, Admissions, and Patient Census at Urban US SNFs During the
           COVID-19 Pandemic
    • Authors: Barnett ML; Hu L, Martin T, et al.
      Pages: 507 - 509
      Abstract: This study uses Medicare’s Nursing Home Compare and a university long-term care database to compare census, admissions, discharges, and mortality at skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) in 3 metropolitan areas during March-May 2020 vs March-May 2019.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.11642
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Excess Deaths From COVID-19 and Other Causes, March-April 2020
    • Authors: Woolf SH; Chapman DA, Sabo RT, et al.
      Pages: 510 - 513
      Abstract: This study uses data from the National Center for Health Statistics to estimate excess deaths (ie, the difference between observed and expected deaths) in the US and the District of Columbia in the early weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.11787
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Prevalence, Characteristics, and Costs of Urgent Care Center Membership
           Programs
    • Authors: Hsiang W; Jin G, Forman H, et al.
      Pages: 513 - 514
      Abstract: This study uses simulated patient phone calls to a random selection of US urgent care clinics (UCCs) to describe the proportion that offer membership programs with access to discounted visits for recurring fees and the characteristics (affiliations, accreditations, population income) and fees and charges of those that do.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.7317
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Intravenous Interferon β-1a for Severe ARDS—Reply
    • Authors: Bellingan G; Ranieri V, Karvonen MK.
      Pages: 515 - 516
      Abstract: In Reply Drs Zhou and Tang comment that the survival curves crossed each other in our study, and thus they questioned whether the proportionality assumption was met. Although the 1-year survival curves in the Kaplan-Meier plot overlapped at some points, the lines were generally distinct and there was no actual line crossing except at the very end, when there were few patients left in follow-up. In a diagnostic graph of log(−log[survival]) vs log of survival time, there was visible crossing of lines only in the very beginning of the log-time axis. Thus, overall, the time proportionality assumption seemed to hold well. In addition, in a Cox regression model including the evaluation of proportional hazards using the ASSESS statement (SAS proc phreg), no evidence of proportional hazards assumption violation was observed (P > .05). Further testing applying a Cox regression model including evaluation of proportional hazards using an interaction test with log(time) did not reveal a significant interaction (P > .05). In all, no significant deviation from the proportional hazards assumption was noted in visual or statistical evaluation of survival curves or resulting hazards.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.7992
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Intravenous Interferon β-1a for Severe ARDS
    • Authors: Zhou X; Tang G.
      Pages: 515 - 515
      Abstract: To the Editor Dr Ranieri and colleagues found that intravenous interferon (IFN) β-1a administered for 6 days, compared with placebo, did not result in significant improvement in a composite score that included death and ventilator-free days over a total of 28 days in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Some important issues remain to be discussed.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.7980
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Research and Development Costs of New Drugs
    • Authors: Dominguez LW; Willis JS.
      Pages: 516 - 516
      Abstract: To the Editor The study by Dr Wouters and colleagues estimated the cost of pharmaceutical research and development using publicly available data. However, the discussion failed to address certain salient factors.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.8645
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Research and Development Costs of New Drugs
    • Authors: Dierynck B; Joos P.
      Pages: 516 - 517
      Abstract: To the Editor Using publicly available data, Dr Wouters and colleagues estimated a mean cost for research and development of 63 products of $1335.9 million. This finding is noteworthy given that DiMasi and colleagues estimated a mean research and development cost of $2800 million based on data for 106 products developed by 10 large firms. Wouters and colleagues attributed this difference, among other reasons, to higher clinical costs incurred by larger pharmaceutical firms in the sample of DiMasi et al. The sample used by Wouters and colleagues contained 41% of US pharmaceutical firms with a market capitalization greater than $10 billion and 5% of all pharmaceutical firms with less than $1 billion. Thus, smaller firms were not oversampled, as claimed.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.8642
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Research and Development Costs of New Drugs
    • Authors: DiMasi JA.
      Pages: 517 - 517
      Abstract: To the Editor The article by Dr Wouters and colleagues compared their estimate of the mean cost of developing a new drug with that found in a study by myself and colleagues. Their base case mean cost per approved new drug of $1.3 billion (in 2018 US dollars) stands in contrast to our estimate of $2.8 billion (2018 US dollars). The authors acknowledged that their sample was nonrepresentative in a number of drug characteristics (including therapeutic class) and by firm size (primarily small firms). Given that our sample consisted of midsized to large firms, their results could be viewed as complementary. Wouters and colleagues also noted that their information came from public sources, whereas our estimates were based in part on proprietary information.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.8648
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Research and Development Costs of New Drugs—Reply
    • Authors: Wouters OJ; McKee M, Luyten J.
      Pages: 518 - 518
      Abstract: In Reply The correspondents raise concerns about the nonrepresentativeness of our sample, which arose because we restricted ourselves to publicly available data. Other studies have relied on confidential data that companies agreed to share. To the best of our knowledge, none of the previous studies on this topic, including that by DiMasi et al, which involved only 10 midsized to large companies, are representative.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.8651
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Errors in Trial of Effect of Convalescent Plasma Therapy on Time to
           Clinical Improvement in Patients With Severe and Life-threatening COVID-19
           
    • Authors: Liu Z.
      Pages: 518 - 519
      Abstract: To the Editor My coauthors and I recently undertook a review of the Original Investigation “Effect of Convalescent Plasma Therapy on Time to Clinical Improvement in Patients With Severe and Life-threatening COVID-19: A Randomized Clinical Trial,” published online in JAMA on June 3, 2020. In this trial, we assessed the effect of convalescent plasma therapy in addition to standard treatment vs standard treatment alone among 103 patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), stratified by disease severity. The primary outcome was time to clinical improvement within 28 days. We found that among patients with severe or life-threatening COVID-19, convalescent plasma therapy added to standard treatment, compared with standard treatment alone, did not result in a statistically significant improvement in time to clinical improvement within 28 days.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.12607
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Correction to Data in Trial of Convalescent Plasma Treatment for COVID-19
    • Pages: 519 - 519
      Abstract: In the Original Investigation titled “Effect of Convalescent Plasma Therapy on Time to Clinical Improvement in Patients With Severe and Life-threatening COVID-19: A Randomized Clinical Trial,” published online June 3, 2020, in JAMA, the authors incorrectly reported relative risk instead of odds ratio data for the outcome of 28-day mortality as well as other secondary clinical outcomes. In addition, errors in some baseline laboratory values and supplemental eFigure 1 occurred. This article was corrected online and a letter of explanation accompanies this correction.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.13216
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Remains
    • Authors: Sample SJ.
      Pages: 520 - 520
      Abstract: Gone is the body
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.5364
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • The Future of the Physician
    • Pages: 521 - 521
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2019.13554
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
  • Patient Information: Convalescent Plasma and COVID-19
    • Authors: Malani AN; Sherbeck JP, Malani PN.
      Pages: 524 - 524
      Abstract: This JAMA Patient Page describes the possible benefits of convalescent plasma transfusion in the treatment of COVID-19 as well as plasma donation eligibility criteria.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Aug 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.10699
      Issue No: Vol. 324, No. 5 (2020)
       
 
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