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JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association
Journal Prestige (SJR): 8.876
Citation Impact (citeScore): 7
Number of Followers: 1743  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0098-7484 - ISSN (Online) 1538-3598
Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [14 journals]
  • Highlights for June 19, 2018
    • Pages: 2349 - 2351
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.12416
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • JAMA
    • Pages: 2353 - 2354
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.12417
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Pathogenesis : A New Deck-Building Game
    • Authors: Zacharek NN; Malani PN.
      Pages: 2364 - 2364
      Abstract: This Arts and Medicine essay reviews Pathogenesis, a deck-building card game in which players accumulate cards that represent the battle between microbial pathogens and the body’s physical defense barriers and adaptive and innate immune responses.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.1770
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • A Day in the Life: Physician Cares for HIV-Positive Patients in Jail
    • Authors: Rubin R.
      Pages: 2365 - 2367
      Abstract: This Medical News story describes a day in the life of an infectious disease specialist caring for incarcerated individuals living with HIV.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.5315
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • For Patients With Type 2 Diabetes, What’s the Best Target Hemoglobin
           A 1C '
    • Authors: Abbasi J.
      Pages: 2367 - 2369
      Abstract: This Medical News article discusses new clinical guidance for blood glucose targets.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.5420
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • The Need to Simplify Measuring Quality in Health Care
    • Authors: Wilensky G.
      Pages: 2369 - 2370
      Abstract: The leadership of US health care institutions as well as practicing clinicians have raised concerns about the burdens being placed on them by the many quality and performance metrics required by various payers and regulators. Although the total number of health care measures in use in unknown, some 1700 reportedly are used by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid (CMS) alone. The multiplicity of metrics is not a new problem, but resolving this issue is proving difficult.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.6858
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Ethical Guidelines for Genomic Research in Africa
    • Authors: Friedrich MJ.
      Pages: 2371 - 2371
      Abstract: A consortium of African investigators published guidelines for the ethical handling of genomic research and biobanking in Africa. This Framework aims to help African scientists retain control of the trove of genetic information originating in Africa so that it can be used to benefit the health and welfare of people on the continent.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.7241
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • New Platform Showcases Scientific Research From Africa
    • Authors: Friedrich MJ.
      Pages: 2371 - 2371
      Abstract: The African Academy of Sciences (AAS) launched AAS Open Research, a platform for rapid publication and open peer review to showcase cutting edge scientific research by investigators on the African continent who are affiliated with the AAS and programs supported through its funding platform, the Alliance for Accelerating Excellence in Science in Africa (AESA).
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.7853
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Preemptive Antibiotic Use Reduces Childhood Deaths
    • Authors: Friedrich MJ.
      Pages: 2371 - 2371
      Abstract: Twice-yearly mass distributions of the oral broad-spectrum antibiotic azithromycin to preschool children in 3 sub-Saharan African countries reduced child mortality, according to research from the MORDOR Study Group, an international collaboration of investigators.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.7854
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Biosimilar Approved for Anemia
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 2372 - 2372
      Abstract: The first biosimilar to epoetin alfa for patients with anemia from chronic kidney disease, chemotherapy, or zidovudine treatment for HIV infection has received FDA approval.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.7764
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Neurovascular Stent Caution
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 2372 - 2372
      Abstract: The FDA has offered safety recommendations regarding neurovascular stents used in stent-assisted coiling (SAC) of wide-neck intracranial aneurysms. Agency officials said the FDA has received reports of strokes and deaths in the treatment of unruptured brain aneurysm that may be related to how the device was used or to patient characteristics.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.7721
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • New Relief for Opioid Withdrawal
    • Authors: Voelker R.
      Pages: 2372 - 2372
      Abstract: Lofexidine hydrochloride has received FDA approval to help alleviate opioid withdrawal symptoms. It’s the first nonopioid medication approved to relieve the misery of symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, profuse sweating, and tachycardia. In March an FDA advisory committee recommended the approval.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.7719
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • The President’s 2018 Plan to Address High Drug Prices
    • Authors: Sarpatwari A; Avorn J, Kesselheim AS.
      Pages: 2373 - 2374
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses missed opportunities in the 2018 White House blueprint to reduce prescription drug prices, including a proposal that would require CMS to negotiate prices with manufacturers and that would ban unfair practices companies use to extend brand exclusivity.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.7424
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Banning Abortion in Cases of Down Syndrome
    • Authors: Reingold RB; Gostin LO.
      Pages: 2375 - 2376
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses legal and ethical issues raised by the 2017 Ohio law prohibiting physicians from performing abortions if the pregnant woman’s decision was influenced by her belief that the fetus has Down syndrome.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.6118
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing for BRCA Mutations
    • Authors: Gill J; Obley AJ, Prasad V.
      Pages: 2377 - 2378
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the implications of the US FDA’s 2018 marketing authorization permitting 23and Me to market BRCA mutation testing to the general public, including concern about overtesting, false assurance, and the ability of accessible testing to improve population health outcomes.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.5330
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Evolving Payer Coverage Policies on Genomic Sequencing Tests
    • Authors: Phillips KA.
      Pages: 2379 - 2380
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses a 2018 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services national coverage determination on next-generation sequencing tests for patients with advanced cancer and suggests ways to ensure appropriate and equitable access to testing, resource efficiency, and improvement in patient and societal outcomes.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.4863
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • The Microbiome and Risk for Atherosclerosis
    • Authors: Komaroff AL.
      Pages: 2381 - 2382
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the role the human gut microbiome may play in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, both by influencing risk factors and by direct effects on the inflammation and vulnerability of endovascular plaques.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.5240
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Germline Genetic Testing for Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma at Time of
           Diagnosis
    • Authors: Syngal S; Furniss C.
      Pages: 2383 - 2385
      Abstract: Recent attention has focused on the hereditary basis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), a fatal cancer with an overall 5-year survival of 8%. For inherited cancer syndromes such as Lynch and hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndromes, research in the last 20 or more years has culminated in strategies for clinical management, with tailored screening, prophylactic surgery, and targeted therapies aimed at reducing the risk of cancer development or treating cancer in high-risk individuals and their family members. Strategies for identification and management of Lynch syndrome and hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome have been formalized in several clinical guidelines that have been adopted by the medical community.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.6227
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Tension Between Science and Medical Practice
    • Authors: Brisson GE.
      Pages: 2386 - 2387
      Abstract: In this narrative medicine essay, an internist speculates about the perfect specialty in moments of confusion over nonspecified illnesses and concludes that all specialties involve scientific imprecision.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.7132
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Association of Stress-Related Disorders With Subsequent Autoimmune Disease
    • Authors: Song H; Fang F, Tomasson G, et al.
      Pages: 2388 - 2400
      Abstract: This cohort study uses Swedish national registry data to investigate associations between PTSD, stress reactions, and adjustment disorders and subsequent autoimmune disease.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.7028
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Association Between Inherited Cancer Predisposition Genetic Mutations and
           Risk of Pancreatic Cancer
    • Authors: Hu C; Hart SN, Polley EC, et al.
      Pages: 2401 - 2409
      Abstract: This case-control study uses Mayo Clinic registry data to assess associations between inherited germline mutations in 21 cancer predisposition genes and risk of pancreatic cancer.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.6228
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Obesity Prevalence by Demographics and Urbanization in US Youth, 2013-2016
    • Authors: Ogden CL; Fryar CD, Hales CM, et al.
      Pages: 2410 - 2418
      Abstract: This national survey study uses NHANES data to examine trends in obesity and severe obesity among US youth aged 2 to 19 years by sex, age, race and ethnicity, education level, and urbanization from 2013 to 2016.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.5158
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Obesity Prevalence by Demographic Characteristics and Urbanization Level
           in US Adults, 2013-2016
    • Authors: Hales CM; Fryar CD, Carroll MD, et al.
      Pages: 2419 - 2429
      Abstract: This national survey study uses National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data to examine trends in obesity and severe obesity among adults aged 20 years or older by age, sex, race, ethnicity, education level and urbanization level between 2001 and 2016.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.7270
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Glycemic Control in Nonpregnant Adults With Type 2 Diabetes
    • Authors: Tung EL; Davis AM, Laiteerapong N.
      Pages: 2430 - 2431
      Abstract: This JAMA Clinical Guidelines Synopsis summarizes the American College of Physicians’ (ACP’s) 2018 guidance statement on hemoglobin A1c goals in nonpregnant adults with type 2 diabetes.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.6798
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • A Mediastinal Mass in a Young Man
    • Authors: Jain S; Gupta A, Nagalla S.
      Pages: 2432 - 2433
      Abstract: A healthy young adult presented to the emergency department reporting 6 months of fatigue, dry cough, dyspnea, and weight loss. A chest x-ray showed opacification of the right lung field and a CT revealed a centrally necrotic mass in the right anterior mediastinum, right pleural effusion, and compression of the superior vena cava. What would you do next'
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.7107
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Ertugliflozin for Type 2 Diabetes
    • Pages: 2434 - 2435
      Abstract: This Medical Letter review summarizes clinical study data, adverse effects, drug interactions, and dosage and administration of the sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor ertugliflozin alone and in fixed-dose combinations with metformin for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.5840
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Representation of Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease in Trials of Cancer
           Therapy
    • Authors: Kitchlu A; Shapiro J, Amir E, et al.
      Pages: 2437 - 2439
      Abstract: This study characterizes the exclusion of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in randomized clinical trials of drug treatment for bladder, breast, colorectal, lung, and prostate cancer.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.7260
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Motivation to Participate in PTSD Research
    • Authors: Roth WT; Hofmann SG.
      Pages: 2439 - 2440
      Abstract: To the Editor The randomized clinical trial by Dr Foa and colleagues compared massed prolonged exposure therapy, spaced prolonged exposure therapy, present-centered therapy, and a minimal-contact control on severity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among active duty military personnel. The results were different from what was expected from previous studies. Individuals receiving spaced therapy did no better than those randomized to present-centered therapy, a comparison condition to control for common factors in psychotherapy. Foa and colleagues and the Editorial by Hoge and Chard were unable to explain these results.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.4326
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Motivation to Participate in PTSD Research—Reply
    • Authors: Foa EB; McLean CP, Peterson AL.
      Pages: 2440 - 2441
      Abstract: In Reply Drs Roth and Hofmann comment on how motivational factors may have influenced the outcomes of our recent randomized clinical trial comparing prolonged exposure therapy with present-centered therapy in active duty military with PTSD. We agree that motivational factors are important and may help explain the more modest outcomes observed for prolonged exposure and other evidence-based PTSD treatments in military personnel compared with civilians. Other reasons may include the repeated and yet varied nature of military combat trauma, the type of trauma, the use of multiple medications, and comorbid conditions such as head injuries, physical injuries, and chronic pain. However, motivational factors in civilians, such as Medicaid and service-related compensation for veterans, can also influence treatment outcome. The purpose of our study was to report the main findings from our clinical trial; the analysis of predictors of treatment response is currently ongoing. Other research studies are being conducted by our group and others testing intervention modifications to improve treatment outcomes for combat-related PTSD.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.4330
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Bariatric Surgery and Hypertension
    • Authors: Hjelmesæth J; Jakobsen G, Nordstrand N.
      Pages: 2441 - 2441
      Abstract: To the Editor In an Editorial in the obesity theme issue, Dr Livingston discussed the different results of 2 cohort studies regarding use of medications for hypertension and hyperlipidemia after bariatric surgery and suggested that it is unlikely that hypertensive patients undergoing bariatric surgery would be able to discontinue their medication. We partly disagree and would like to comment and discuss recent evidence indicating that gastric bypass may be associated with both remission of hypertension and discontinuation of antihypertensive drugs.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.4446
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Bariatric Surgery and Hypertension—Reply
    • Authors: Livingston EH.
      Pages: 2441 - 2442
      Abstract: In Reply Bariatric surgery has a credibility problem. Aggressive claims were made in the past about the benefits of the jejunoileal bypass, banded gastroplasty, and the laparoscopic banding procedure—all of which proved wrong once long-term outcomes were known. In contrast, there is high-quality evidence that the Roux-en-Y and gastric sleeve resection effectively result in long-term weight loss and diabetes control. Despite these successes, clinicians remain skeptical about bariatric surgery in part because of a long history of the bariatric community overstating the benefits of weight loss operations.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.4470
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Strategies to Prevent Obesity-Related Cancer
    • Authors: Chen Y; Dutson E, Eibl G.
      Pages: 2442 - 2442
      Abstract: To the Editor The Viewpoint by Dr Massetti and colleagues emphasized the link between obesity and cancer and called for more robust clinical intervention to prevent and treat obesity. The authors proposed that sustainable weight loss be achieved by comprehensive strategies that support patients’ efforts to make significant lifestyle changes. However, most published studies have shown that the long-term success rate of lifestyle changes is low. Although lifestyle changes may be sufficient to reduce body weight prior to sustained obesity, once obesity is established, body weight seems to become biologically fixed and lifestyle programs become less effective.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.4942
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Strategies to Prevent Obesity-Related Cancer—Reply
    • Authors: Massetti GM; Dietz WH, Richardson LC.
      Pages: 2442 - 2443
      Abstract: In Reply Trends in the negative health consequences of overweight and obesity are on the rise, coinciding with trends in rates of obesity. It is therefore not surprising that obesity accounts for a significant portion of health care costs in the United States. As Dr Chen and his colleagues point out, our Viewpoint emphasized the opportunities for comprehensive approaches to preventing obesity-related cancers within health care settings. To achieve significant effect on obesity and obesity-related cancers, all tools of the medical and public health community must be brought to bear on the problem. Chen and colleagues propose bariatric surgery as a treatment for severe obesity and a strategy for cancer prevention for eligible patients. As they note, achieving sustainable weight loss among patients with overweight and obesity presents significant challenges. For these reasons, efforts to prevent further weight gain among those who are not yet obese—and would not be eligible for surgery or other invasive medical approaches to treating overweight—are critical. For patients with obesity who have not been successful in losing weight, health care professionals can consider a variety of strategies that meet patients’ needs, including surgical approaches. Data such as those cited by the authors provide empirical links between interventions for overweight or obesity and associations with cancer outcomes. Such findings can inform understanding of the links among weight, weight gain and loss, and cancer.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.4952
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Incorrect Data in Abstract and Text
    • Pages: 2443 - 2443
      Abstract: In the US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement “Screening for Prostate Cancer: US Preventive Services Recommendation Statement” published in the May 8, 2018, issue of JAMA, data were incorrect in the abstract and text. In the “Importance” section of the abstract, the “Importance” subsection of the Rationale section, and the “Burden of Disease” subsection of the Discussion, the lifetime risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer should have been reported as 11%. This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.7453
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Incorrect Data in Table Footnote and Text
    • Pages: 2443 - 2443
      Abstract: In the Clinical Review entitled “Does This Patient Have Acute Mountain Sickness' The Rational Clinical Examination Systematic Review” published in the November 14, 2017, issue of JAMA, a numeric value in the equation in footnote a of Table 2 was incorrect. The footnote should have read: “Based on the random-effects meta-regression model of the 6 scores in 91 studies, the predicted prevalence (%) ≈ 13.4 × [altitude (m)/1000] − 14.2. For example, travelers at 2500 m would have an estimated prevalence of 19% ≈ 13.4 × [2500/1000] – 14.2.” In the Scenario Resolution section, the second sentence should have read: “Based on our model, predicted prevalence of moderate to severe AMS at 4000 m (13 100 ft) is approximately 39% (Figure).” The fourth sentence in the Scenario Resolution section should have read: “Thus, the probability that the patient has AMS is approximately 67%.” This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.7574
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Uncomplicated
    • Authors: Glasgow N.
      Pages: 2444 - 2444
      Abstract: I convince myself that the rhythmic whirof the IV pump is the ocean;pressing my eyes tight, I imagine the sunabove you, though my skin is cold and has been coldsince we arrived, summer clothed, in the EDso sure we were overreacting.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.21352
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • The Early History of Bacteriology in the United States
    • Pages: 2445 - 2445
      Abstract: Whenever we are charged, as a nation, with being occupied solely with the life of trade, and the designation of Yankee is used to designate preeminently commercial habits, it is refreshing to turn to the history of science for the truth. Of course, in the earlier days of the United States as a national enterprise the conditions were scarcely favorable for the widespread prosecution of those studies for which the European peoples of the civilized world had been prepared by generations and even centuries of experience. America’s intellectual life can at best be measured by decades. How has she progressed in some of the more recently recognized intellectual disciplines' The new science of bacteriology, the outcome of the labors of Pasteur, Lister, Koch and others, was born within the memory of many that are still living. The bacillus of tuberculosis was announced in 1882; the vibrio of Asiatic cholera in 1883; the bacilli of lockjaw and of diphtheria in 1884, the same year that marked the better recognition of the typhoid bacillus, which was really discovered in 1879; in 1894 came the discovery of the bacillus of bubonic plague; and along with this period belongs the finding of the micro-organisms of malaria, sleeping sickness, and several other diseases. In the midst of such developments the newer science of parasitology has found a firmer footing and a novel significance.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2017.12424
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
  • Vasectomy
    • Authors: Fainberg J; Kashanian JA.
      Pages: 2450 - 2450
      Abstract: This JAMA Patient Page describes the vasectomy procedure and follow-up practices.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2018.6514
      Issue No: Vol. 319, No. 23 (2018)
       
 
 
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