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JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association
Journal Prestige (SJR): 8.876
Citation Impact (citeScore): 7
Number of Followers: 2528  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0098-7484 - ISSN (Online) 1538-3598
Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [14 journals]
  • Audio Highlights

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      Abstract: Listen to the JAMA Editor’s Audio Summary for an overview and discussion of the important articles appearing in this week’s issue of JAMA.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.17977
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • JAMA

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      Pages: 2235 - 2236
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.17975
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • Restrictive Policies Threaten Efforts to Stop 2 West Virginia HIV
           Outbreaks

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      Authors: Kuehn BM.
      Pages: 2238 - 2240
      Abstract: This Medical News article discusses ongoing HIV outbreaks in West Virginia and restrictive new laws that jeopardize syringe services programs aimed at halting HIV transmission.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.7404
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • The Push for Earlier Bariatric Surgery for Adolescents With Severe Obesity

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      Authors: Jaklevic M.
      Pages: 2241 - 2242
      Abstract: This Medical News article describes efforts to encourage the use of clinical indicators rather than age for referring severely obese adolescents for bariatric surgery.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.7912
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • “Nanotraps” Designed to Capture and Clear SARS-CoV-2

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      Authors: Abbasi J.
      Pages: 2243 - 2243
      Abstract: An interdisciplinary team led by University of Chicago researchers is designing biodegradable nanomedicines to capture and clear the novel coronavirus. The “nanotraps” are dotted with angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors or SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies that bind the virus and prevent it from infecting cells.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.8165
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • Robots Induce Parkinson Disease Hallucinations

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      Authors: Abbasi J.
      Pages: 2243 - 2243
      Abstract: About 50% of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) experience the sensation that someone is nearby when no one is present. Minor hallucinations including these so-called presence hallucinations often appear early in the disease course, manifesting before motor symptoms in as many as a third of patients. What’s more, PD hallucinations are associated with psychosis, cognitive decline, and death, making them a potential marker for poor clinical outcomes. Yet because many patients are reluctant to report these hallucinations and physicians may not ask about them, they often go undiagnosed.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.8625
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • Mobile Device App Helps Distinguish Toddlers With Autism

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      Authors: Abbasi J.
      Pages: 2243 - 2243
      Abstract: A prototype app reliably distinguished toddlers with autism from those with typical development in a National Institutes of Health–funded study. The app uses a tablet or smartphone’s camera to record eye-gaze patterns while children watch short videos on the device.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.8627
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • Adolescents With Autism Face Multiple Unmet Health Needs

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      Authors: Kuehn BM.
      Pages: 2244 - 2244
      Abstract: Although mental and physical health problems are far more common among adolescents with autism spectrum disorder, a recent study showed that they’re about half as likely as their peers without autism to be given guidance on transitioning from pediatric to adult health care.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.7963
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • Tick Bites Send Concerned Patients to the Emergency Department

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      Authors: Kuehn BM.
      Pages: 2244 - 2244
      Abstract: US residents averaged nearly 50 000 annual emergency department (ED) visits—or 1 out of every 2000 trips to the ED—for tick bites between 2017 and 2019, according to CDC surveillance data.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.8447
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • Influenza Activity in the US During the 2020-2021 Season

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      Authors: Uyeki TM; Wentworth DE, Jernigan DB.
      Pages: 2247 - 2248
      Abstract: In this Viewpoint, CDC authors discuss the unusually low circulation of influenza virus in the US during the first year of the coronavirus pandemic, and implications for clinical practice and public health including the accuracy of diagnostic testing and the effectiveness of population mitigation strategies for influenza control.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.6125
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • The 2020-2021 US Medical Residency Application Cycle—Lessons Learned
           and Lingering Problems

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      Authors: Hammoud MM; Standiford TC, Carmody J.
      Pages: 2249 - 2250
      Abstract: This Viewpoint summarizes lessons learned in the 2020-2021 US medical residency application cycle, when the COVID-19 pandemic forced a shorter season and virtual interviews, and discusses opportunities for improvement related to systems equity, efficiency, and more.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.5708
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • Legislation to Criminalize Gender-Affirming Medical Care for Transgender
           Youth

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      Authors: Turban JL; Kraschel KL, Cohen I.
      Pages: 2251 - 2252
      Abstract: This Viewpoint describes legislation aiming to criminalize medical care for transgender youth and explains why these bills are harmful and potentially unlawful.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.7764
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • A Mothers Gold

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      Authors: Robinson M.
      Pages: 2253 - 2254
      Abstract: In this narrative medicine essay, a family medicine intern frames her infant’s beginning with another mother’s ending from COVID-19 and considers the threads of loss for the mother isolated from her son and imagines her own losses, beginning with her daughter’s weaning.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.8406
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • Broadening Access to Continuous Glucose Monitoring for Patients With Type
           2 Diabetes

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      Authors: Peek ME; Thomas CC.
      Pages: 2255 - 2257
      Abstract: Persons from racial and ethnic minority populations, those in low-income groups, and other socially marginalized groups are disproportionately affected by type 2 diabetes and experience higher disease prevalence, poorer glycemic control, higher rates of diabetes complications, and higher prevalence of comorbid conditions. Achieving glucose targets that will reduce the risk of diabetes complications, particularly among high-risk groups, is critical to improve the health and well-being of those with diabetes and to reduce health care utilization and expenditures. Yet, diabetes control remains elusive. Self-monitoring of blood glucose, while still a standard part of diabetes self-management, has not been shown to result in self-adjustments to insulin in primary care settings. This represents a significant opportunity gap because 30% of patients with type 2 diabetes are treated with some form of insulin.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.6208
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • Realizing the Potential of Maternal Influenza Vaccination

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      Authors: Azziz-Baumgartner E; Grohskopf L, Patel M.
      Pages: 2257 - 2259
      Abstract: Influenza viruses cause substantial morbidity and mortality in pregnant women and neonates worldwide annually, with higher incidence during pandemics. To reduce disease incidence in these vulnerable populations, the World Health Organization recommended in 2012 that countries prioritize pregnant women for influenza vaccination. Over 2 decades, compelling evidence has accumulated about the complex interplay among risks of influenza virus infection to the mother, the fetus, and the offspring, vs the benefits and safety of vaccination.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.7776
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • The Routine General Medical Checkup

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      Authors: Brett AS.
      Pages: 2259 - 2261
      Abstract: During the mid-20th century, the routine checkup became an annual ritual among people with access to medical care in the US. A complete physical examination and performance of various laboratory tests—neither of which were standardized or tailored specifically to patients’ needs or risk profiles—were assumed to constitute good preventive medical care. However, clinicians and researchers began to question the value of this practice, and, in 1976, Canada preceded the US in establishing a task force to develop a more logical, evidence-influenced, and cost-effective approach to health promotion and disease prevention. In 1979, the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination published its initial version of The Periodic Health Examination, arguing that “the routine annual check-up be abandoned in favour of a selective approach that is determined by a person's age and sex.” Soon thereafter, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) was created and adopted a similar philosophy and model, with strong emphasis on evidence-based practices.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.4922
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • Effect of CGM on Glycemic Control in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Treated
           With Basal Insulin

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      Authors: Martens T; Beck RW, Bailey R, et al.
      Pages: 2262 - 2272
      Abstract: This clinical trial compares the efficacy of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) vs traditional blood glucose meter monitoring on glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes treated with basal insulin without prandial insulin in primary care practices.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.7444
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • Real-time Continuous Glucose Monitoring and Glycemic Control in
           Insulin-Treated Patients With Diabetes

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      Authors: Karter AJ; Parker MM, Moffet HH, et al.
      Pages: 2273 - 2284
      Abstract: This cohort study investigates the effect of real-time continuous glucose monitoring on glycemic control among patients with insulin-treated diabetes.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.6530
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • Association of Maternal Influenza Vaccination During Pregnancy With Early
           Childhood Health Outcomes

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      Authors: Mehrabadi A; Dodds L, MacDonald NE, et al.
      Pages: 2285 - 2293
      Abstract: This population-based cohort study uses a birth registry linked with health administrative data to assess the association between maternal influenza vaccination during pregnancy and early childhood health outcomes in Nova Scotia, Canada.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.6778
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • Review of Adult General Health Checks

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      Authors: Liss DT; Uchida T, Wilkes CL, et al.
      Pages: 2294 - 2306
      Abstract: This review provides updated evidence on general health checks in multiple important outcome domains, including mortality, cardiovascular outcomes, and risk factor control.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.6524
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • Responding to Intimate Partner Violence During Telehealth Clinical
           Encounters

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      Authors: Simon MA.
      Pages: 2307 - 2308
      Abstract: This JAMA Insights Clinical Update discusses the surge in intimate partner violence (IPV) during the COVID-19 lockdown and provides safe and patient-centered methods for primary care clinicians to screen for IPV and counsel patients during telehealth consultations.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.1071
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • Intervention for Patients With Secondary Mitral Regurgitation

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      Authors: Hirji S; Cifu AS, Kaneko T.
      Pages: 2309 - 2310
      Abstract: This JAMA Clinical Guidelines Synopsis summarizes the ACC/AHA guideline for the treatment of patients with valve disease, with an emphasis on mitral regurgitation.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.2741
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • Rural-Urban Disparity in Mortality in the US From 1999 to 2019

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      Authors: Cross SH; Califf RM, Warraich HJ.
      Pages: 2312 - 2314
      Abstract: This study analyzes all deaths occurring in the US using the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Wide-Ranging Online Data for Epidemiologic Research database from 1999-2019 and the National Center for Health Statistics Urban-Rural Classification Scheme to create population categories per the 2013 US Census classification (large, small- or medium-sized, and rural areas).
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.5334
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • Expansion of Health Care Services in the US

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      Authors: Morris CR.
      Pages: 2314 - 2314
      Abstract: To the Editor The recent Viewpoints regarding health care policy and the new Biden administration plans propose the goal of achieving access to health care for every American. Unfortunately, an important question remains that these plans fail to answer: who is going to provide this care'
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.5124
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • The Expansion of Health Care Services in the US—Reply

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      Authors: Westmoreland TM; Bloche M, Gostin LO.
      Pages: 2314 - 2315
      Abstract: In Reply We agree with Dr Morris that health care professional shortages, and especially maldistribution of physicians and nurses, could detract from any health reform designed to reduce the number of uninsured individuals. The adequacy of the supply of health care professionals and the inequitable distribution of trained professionals by geography and specialty have been long-standing issues in state and federal health policy.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.5130
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • High-Intensity Strength Training, Knee Pain, and Knee Joint Compressive
           Forces in Adults With Knee Osteoarthritis

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      Authors: Karaismailoglu B.
      Pages: 2315 - 2316
      Abstract: To the Editor In the recent study by Dr Messier and colleagues, the authors stressed that their results do not support the use of high-intensity strength training over either low-intensity strength training or an attention control in adults with knee osteoarthritis. However, their study also indicated that low-intensity training does not provide any benefit over attention control, which calls into question the training programs applied for patients with knee osteoarthritis. The authors preferred to avoid this point by focusing only on the lack of a significant effect of high-intensity training. In the article’s Discussion section, the authors provided only 1 reference about the modest effect that exercise interventions may have knee osteoarthritis. Moreover, they stated that the placebo response for the subjective outcome of pain may have increased because of the large sample size and long duration of the intervention, referring to a study about medication in neuropathic pain, rather than training in knee osteoarthritis. The necessity of training in knee osteoarthritis should have been described in more detail, with references to studies demonstrating the critical role of exercise in the management of knee osteoarthritis.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.6000
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • The Expansion of Health Care Services in the US—Reply

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      Authors: Levitt L.
      Pages: 2315 - 2315
      Abstract: In Reply Dr Morris makes the important point that health coverage does not necessarily translate into access to health care. That is why I believe it is more appropriate to use the term “universal coverage” as the goal of many health reform proposals rather than “universal health care,” as I did in my Viewpoint.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.5127
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • Error in Supplement

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      Pages: 2316 - 2316
      Abstract: The Original Investigation titled “Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome and Maternal Opioid-Related Diagnoses in the US, 2010-2017,” published in the January 12, 2021, issue of JAMA, included an error in the Supplement that inadvertently included 2 “in remission” International Classification of Disease, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification codes. This was corrected and an updated Supplement has been provided online. All other information in the Supplement was correct and is unchanged.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.8098
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • High-Intensity Strength Training, Knee Pain, and Knee Joint Compressive
           Forces in Adults With Knee Osteoarthritis—Reply

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      Authors: Messier SP.
      Pages: 2316 - 2316
      Abstract: In Reply The prespecified objective of our trial was to determine whether high-intensity strength training reduced knee pain and knee joint compressive forces more than low-intensity strength training and more than attention control in patients with knee osteoarthritis. This study showed that older adults with knee osteoarthritis safely increased lower extremity strength relative to attention control with 18 months of either high- or low-intensity strength training. However, this statistically significant improvement in strength did not result in better clinical outcomes. Specifically, high-intensity strength training, low-intensity strength training, and attention control were not significantly different in pain and knee joint compressive forces at 18-month follow-up. These results call into question what proportion of pain reduction in the strength training groups was a result of increased strength and what, if any, reduction in pain was due to other factors such as the attention and social interaction that occurred 3 times per week for 18 months. Our results do not permit us to advocate the overall necessity of strength training to improve clinical outcomes for older adults with knee osteoarthritis compared with an attention control group. Of note, high-intensity strength training did not exacerbate disease progression or inflammation relative to attention control.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.6003
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • Paul’s Addiction

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      Authors: Borsari B.
      Pages: 2318 - 2318
      Abstract: The Clark’s Nutcracker buries seeds in the summer. Months later, when Bryce Canyon is covered by a white blanket and food is scarce, the bird recalls the exact spots of the hidden rations and unearths them providing sustenance to survive the barren winter.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.6151
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • Centenary of the French Academy of Medicine

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      Pages: 2319 - 2319
      Abstract: Our Paris correspondent has told of the celebration, beginning Dec. 20, 1920, of the most important anniversary connected with French medicine—the centenary of the Academy of Medicine, which has the same preeminence in medicine that the general French Academy bears in relation to the more liberal arts. Its roster bears only the names of those who have by years of achievement won recognition in the profession, and there are few below middle life who have been accorded the honor of election. Trousseau, who received the academy prize in 1837 for his classical treatise on laryngeal phthisis, was considered unusually fortunate in that he gained admission in his thirty-sixth year. The academy was founded in 1820 by royal edict of Louis XVIII, although its name appeared as early as 1804 as an entirely ephemeral institution, the chief interest attaching to it being that Dr. Guillotin was one of its presidents. The French Revolution, with its ruthless submergence of all that pertained to the old order of things, dissolved all medical associations, and among these the Academy of Surgery and the Royal Society of Medicine, which after nearly a century of existence disappeared, to come to life again in the founding of the present Academy of Medicine. The initial concept of the academy was the formation of a body which, by its scientific labors and achievements, should be an asset to the state in matters of public health. The decree which constituted it lays down certain functions which it was to carry on. Among them were improvements in the method of vaccination against smallpox, the measures for the control of epidemic diseases, regulations as to and concerning legal jurisprudence, and the examination of and passing on new remedies, together with the limitation of the sale of nostrums, both those of French and those of foreign origin. While the present academy still holds the latter function, its work, to a large degree, is hampered by the administration of French law, as was pointed out in a former editorial.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2020.17978
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
  • Patient Information: Cough

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      Authors: Walter K.
      Pages: 2322 - 2322
      Abstract: This JAMA Patient Page describes medical evaluation and treatment of cough based on its subtypes of acute, subacute, and chronic duration.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jama.2021.2323
      Issue No: Vol. 325, No. 22 (2021)
       
 
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