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IEEE Spectrum
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.159
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 212  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0018-9235
Published by IEEE Homepage  [191 journals]
  • IEEE Spectrum - Front cover
    • Abstract: Presents the front cover for this issue of the publication.
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Advertisement [Zurich Instruments]
    • Abstract: Advertisement
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Advertisement
    • Abstract: Advertisement
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Advertisement
    • Abstract: Advertisement
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • That special glow [Back Story]
    • Pages: 3 - 3
      Abstract: Jens Boos was an impressionable 15-year-old when he encountered his first Nixie tube. The year was 2005, and Boos was visiting the Heinz Nixdorf MuseumsForum, in Paderborn, Germany. The teenager liked the various displays on computer history well enough, but what really caught his eye was a set of four Nixie tubes, glowing orange as they cycled through the first few hundred digits of pi.
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Advertisement [COMSOL Server]
    • Pages: 5 - 5
      Abstract: Advertisement
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Addicted to your smartphone' Welcome to apple rehab [Spectral Lines]
    • Authors: Tekla S. Perry;
      Pages: 6 - 6
      Abstract: We've all been there: You're out with friends for dinner and everyone has finished their entrees and placed orders for coffee and dessert. The conversation seems to fade along with the food and, almost simultaneously, everyone suddenly realizes they have to give their phones a quick peek- any text messages' And as long as it's in their hands, maybe a glance at email or Facebook. The scrolling goes on until the coffee arrives.
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • New battery tech launches in drones [News]
    • Authors: Prachi Patel;
      Pages: 7 - 9
      Abstract: Lithium-ion batteries boast a powerful blend of energy capacity and long cycle life. But they have a dangerous tendency to burst into flames, leading to injuries, product recalls, and flight bans. Researchers have touted solid-state lithium batteries as a safer alternative. These devices swap out flammable liquid electrolytes for an inert solid such as plastic or ceramic. But researchers have pursued solid-state battery technology for decades without coming up with any products.
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • 3 sensors to track every bite and gulp [News]
    • Authors: Eliza Strickland;
      Pages: 9 - 10
      Abstract: People looking to track their diets and count their calories can choose from dozens of apps designed to help them do just that. But using the apps properly requires a lot of effort.
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Silicon chip delivers quantum speeds [News]
    • Authors: John Boyd;
      Pages: 10 - 11
      Abstract: Fujitsu has designed a new computer architecture running on silicon-dubbed the Digital Annealer-which the company claims rivals quantum computers in utility. Fujitsu began offering cloud services in Japan in May, employing the technology to resolve combinatorial optimization problems, such as finding similarities among patterns of molecules to speed drug discovery.
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Wall street tries shortwave radio [News]
    • Authors: David Schneider;
      Pages: 12 - 12
      Abstract: In 2010, the company Spread Networks completed a fiber-optic cable linking two key trading hubs: Chicago and New York (or rather New Jersey, where Wall Street has its computerized trading equipment). That cable, built at a cost of some US $300 million, took the most direct route between those two points and shaved more than a millisecond from what had formerly been the shortest round-trip travel time for information: 14.5 milliseconds.
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Advertisement
    • Pages: 13 - 13
      Abstract: Advertisement
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • High and dry [The Big Picture]
    • Pages: 14 - 15
      Abstract: FLEET VEHICLES are usually where new driving technology is tried out first. That is true for self-driving technology, which Uber wants to use to shuttle people along city streets. But taxis may also be first to test new tech for water travel. The vessel seen here during testing in May and June on the Seine river, in Paris, is known as a SeaBubble. The battery-powered, fourpassenger craft doesn’t glide through the water like a traditional boat. Hydrofoils that jut up from beneath the vessel, propelled by electric motors, let it race along, with its hull flying above the water's surface, at speeds of up to 50 kilometers per hour.
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Build a neural synthesizer
    • Authors: David Schneider;
      Pages: 16 - 17
      Abstract: My teenage son has become interested in making music. In my generation, that would have meant picking up an electric guitar and forming a garage band. Instead, he's installed a digital-audio workstation on his laptop, studied up on music theory, and started composing "EDM," or electronic dance music. Frankly, I don't understand what he's doing.
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Giving burning man its wings [Resources]
    • Authors: Susan Karlin;
      Pages: 18 - 18
      Abstract: Most people know Burning Man as the 70,000-strong end-of-summer experimental arts festival in Nevada's Black Rock Desert. Lesser known is its FAA-designated airport. The Black Rock City Municipal Airport springs up each year to coordinate nearly 3,700 general aviation, chartered, and scenic flights carrying some 6,000 passengers in and out of the gate.
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Where the jobs are: 2018 [Resources]
    • Authors: Julianne Pepitone;
      Pages: 19 - 19
      Abstract: Employers in the United States plan to hire 4 percent more new graduates from the class of 2018 than they did from the class of 2017, according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers. And when it comes to competing for jobs, newly minted engineers have the power to punch well above their weight.
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Radio free everywhere [Resources]
    • Authors: Julianne Pepitone;
      Pages: 20 - 20
      Abstract: Last year, we inaugurated IEEE Spectrum's online Chip Hall of Fame, highlighting 27 integrated circuits that helped shape the modern world. This year we add five new inductees, including the Nvidia NV20, a GPU that serendipitously paved the way for the machine-learning revolution, and the Photobit PB-100, the image sensor that put webcams on the map. For the full list and their citations, visit the hall, but as an example of how a tiny device can have a big impact, here's the tale of one inductee, the Philips TDA7000 FM receiver.
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • 6 ways IoT is vulnerable
    • Pages: 21 - 21
      Abstract: CONNECTING PHYSICAL infrastructure to the Internet makes systems vulnerable to new security threats. What keeps executives awake at night varies by industry, but cybersecurity problems are worsening everywhere. Security officers in manufacturing worry about employees inserting infected USB drives into machines, while hospital administrators fear that malware will wipe out an unpatched MRI machine, or that a hacker will direct an infusion pump to administer a lethal dose of medicine.
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • July 1958: Kilby conceives the IC
    • Pages: 22 - 22
      Abstract: IN 1958, 11 YEARS AFTER BELL LABS reinvented the transistor, it became clear that semiconductors would be able to conquer the electronics market only if they could be greatly miniaturized. There wasn't much progress to be made by hand soldering separate components into circuits, but as is often the case, the solution came just when it was needed
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • When imperfect understanding is good
    • Pages: 23 - 23
      Abstract: I RECENTLY ATTENDED A CONFERENCE by watching live presentations over the Internet. This was a kind of out-of-body experience, as I virtually hovered over the meeting without the visceral interaction of physical attendance. My attention often wavered, and I viewed the entirety through a sometimes unfocused perspective.
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • In-wheel motors roll again
    • Authors: Andrew Whitehead;Chris Hilton;
      Pages: 24 - 29
      Abstract: AT THE END of the 19th century, Ferdinand Porsche in Vienna and Joseph Ledwinka and Fred Newman in Chicago attached an electric motor to each wheel of their horseless carriages to provide power simply, efficiently, and controllably. These automotive pioneers hardly expected that electric propulsion would soon wither and that ever more complex hardware would be developed to transform the output from a centrally mounted internal combustion engine into torque at the wheels. But that's what happened.
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • The future of cybersecurity is quantum
    • Authors: Carlos Abellan;Valerio Pruneri;
      Pages: 30 - 35
      Abstract: In 1882, a banker in Sacramento, Calif., named Frank Miller developed an absolutely unbreakable encryption method. Nearly 140 years later, cryptographers have yet to come up with something better. Miller had learned about cryptography while serving as a military investigator during the U.S. Civil War. Sometime later, he grew interested in telegraphy and especially the challenge of preventing fraud by wire-a problem that was frustrating many bankers at the time. As a contemporary, Robert Slater, the secretary of the French Atlantic Telegraph Co., wrote in his 1870 book Telegraphic Code, to Ensure Secresy [sic] in the Transmission of Telegrams, "Nothing then is easier for a dishonest cable operator than the commission of a fraud of gigantic extent."
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • The nixie tube story
    • Authors: Jens Boos;
      Pages: 36 - 41
      Abstract: ON A COLD DECEMBER MORNING in the Czech village of Brezolupy, a man stops his truck in front of a 17thcentury castle. He puts on some heavy gloves, steps out of the truck, and opens the back hatch. Carefully, almost lovingly, he unloads crate after crate of heavy equipment and supplies-an industrial glass lathe, a turbomolecular vacuum pump, and glass. Lots and lots of glass.
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • When e-cigarettes go boom
    • Authors: Michael Pecht;
      Pages: 42 - 45
      Abstract: On 23 November 2016, as he stood behind the counter of a wine store in New York City, Otis Gooding felt an explosion on his right thigh. The e-cigarette he’d been carrying in his pants pocket had suddenly erupted like a small fireworks display. As a security camera later showed, the 31-year-old Gooding struggled to pull the burning device out of his pants. Gooding would later need a skin graft and 51 staples, and he may never recover the full use of his hand.
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Advertisement
    • Pages: 46 - 46
      Abstract: Advertisement
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Advertisement
    • Pages: 47 - 47
      Abstract: Advertisement
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • The wheelchair that might have been
    • Pages: 48 - 48
      Abstract: In 1959, the U.S. National Inventors Council, a clearinghouse for inventions that might have military use, sponsored a design competition for a stair-climbing wheelchair. Ernesto Blanco submitted his idea and created this one-quarter scale model as a proof of concept. He didn't win the US $5,000 prize-in fact, the council never picked a winner. But Blanco went on to invent numerous aids for people with disabilities because he viewed such work as a form of social justice. "Engineering is a service profession," the engineer told an interviewer in 2002. "It is about improving things for mankind."
      PubDate: July 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 7 (2018)
       
 
 
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