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Advanced Journal of Professional Practice
Number of Followers: 14  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2059-3198
Published by
  • Editorial

    • Authors: Kenneth Eaton
      PubDate: 2022-06-17
      DOI: 10.22024/UniKent/03/ajpp.1082
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Improving Numeracy in Medicine, by Bonny P McClain (2015).

    • Authors: Hugh Oborne
      Pages: 1 - 7
      Abstract: Bonny P McClain (2015) has created a useful introduction to the world of statistics in medicine, which can help medical students take their first dive into the topic. The book covers a wide variety of concepts in statistics and asks thought provoking questions which help you develop as a clinician and a researcher.
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.22024/UniKent/03/ajpp.1067
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Capacity to Participate in Everyday Decisions in People Living with
           Dementia

    • Authors: Declan Green
      Pages: 8 - 18
      Abstract: This student essay, by a 1st year medical student, won the Dr Jim Appleyard Prize for Reflection on Practice, for best essay on person-centred care.
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.22024/UniKent/03/ajpp.1070
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Patient-centred Care: Striking the Balance

    • Authors: Grace Dabson
      Pages: 19 - 21
      Abstract: This 750-word piece of reflective writing by a first-year medical student, won the Peter Pettit Prize for Reflection on Practice, and for its focus on patient-centred care.
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.22024/UniKent/03/ajpp.1068
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Cervical screening uptake in people aged 25-29: A quality improvement
           project at a single GP practice in the UK

    • Authors: Mary McDonald
      Pages: 22 - 30
      Abstract: This student essay, by a 1st year medical student, won the Dr Jim Appleyard Prize for Reflection on Practice, for best essay on person-centred care.
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.22024/UniKent/03/ajpp.1069
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • The identification of novel transmission blocking vaccine targets in the
           Plasmodium falciparum gametocyte life stage using a systems-wide approach
           through comparative proteomics and bioinformatics

    • Authors: Danny Radford
      Pages: 31 - 31
      Abstract: Aim: To investigate P. falciparum gametocytogenesis during blood stage development and identify novel transmission blocking vaccine targets in gametocytes by using a systems-wide approach through comparative proteomics and bioinformatics.
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.22024/UniKent/03/ajpp.1066
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Seeing but not perceiving: Inattentional blindness as a cause of missed
           cues in the General Practice consultation

    • Authors: Martin Brunet, Claire L. Parkin
      Pages: 32 - 32
      Abstract: Background It is well known that healthcare professionals, including GPs, frequently fail to respond to cues made by their patients. A possible explanation for this behaviour is that the phenomenon of IB could lead to a failure to observe the cue, rather than a deliberate choice to ignore it. This study sought to explore that possibility, and to consider whether GP trainees are more susceptible to IB than GP trainers. Aim A pre-recorded video of a simulated consultation was used, where the patient gave two significant cues which were not picked up by the doctor in the video. The aim was to compare the rates with which both trainee GPs and GP trainers observed these missed cues. Methods The research was a case study involving two groups of participants - GP trainees and GP trainers from a localised GP Training Scheme. Actors were used to record a video of a pre-defined GP consultation involving a patient affected by headaches, who gave two significant cues which were not responded to in the video. Participants observed the video while being asked to focus on the diagnosis and management of the patient’s headaches, following which they completed a questionnaire, including questions about the cues. Results  Cues were missed by 24-53% of participants, suggesting a high rate of IB within the GP consultation. Unexpected findings included the recording by some participants of false observations from the video. There was no significant difference between trainers and trainees in the rates of IB. Conclusions IB appears to be a real and significant phenomenon within the GP consultation, and is likely to have important implications for patient care. More research is needed to confirm these findings, establish IB rates as a cause of missed cues among healthcare professionals and evaluate possible interventions to reduce susceptibility to IB.
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.22024/UniKent/03/ajpp.1071
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 1 (2022)
       
 
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