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The Journal of Aquatic Physical Therapy
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2377-6102 - ISSN (Online) 2377-6110
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [297 journals]
  • EDITORIAL

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      Authors: Van Wingerden; Anita Marie; Michaels, Natalie Norman
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Academy of Aquatic Physical Therapy 2022 Combined Sections Meeting Posters
           and Platforms

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      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Intensity of Aquatic Physical Activity Is Best When Tailored to the
           Participants' Mental and Physical Capabilities: An Exploratory Study

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      Authors: Barrios; Nathalie; Sames, Carol; Allen, Amy; Vieira, Edgar R.; Boolani, Ali
      Abstract: imageBackground: Aquatic exercise has been shown to modify feelings of energy and fatigue in patients with chronic diseases. However, we are unaware of studies that have explored individual characteristics such as personality traits, sleep quality, and physical functioning that can determine whether or not a patient's mood improves with aquatic exercise. The purpose of this study was to identify individual characteristics associated with participants who reported a decline in feelings of energy or an increase in feelings of fatigue after a group aquatic exercise session.Methods: Participants were recruited from a community group aquatic program and asked to complete a series of surveys to assess their health status, sleep quality, and predisposition to feelings of energy and fatigue (trait energy and fatigue). Participants also completed a series of objective functional assessments. Current feelings of mental and physical energy and fatigue were measured on random days over multiple occasions before and after aquatic exercise. Participants were split into groups based on whether they reported an increase or decrease in feelings of energy and fatigue.Results: Participants (n = 11) completed a minimum of 2 sessions where mood was measured, and all 11 reported an increase in feelings of physical energy compared with the start of each session. All but one participant reported an improvement in feelings of mental energy. Interestingly, 4 participants reported an increase in feelings of physical fatigue, while 5 reported an increase in feelings of mental fatigue after exercise. All participants who reported an increase in feelings of physical fatigue also reported an increase in feelings of mental fatigue. When comparing the 2 groups, those who reported an increase in feelings of fatigue after exercise also reported low social functioning when compared with those who reported a decrease in feelings of fatigue.Discussion: Positive mood responses to exercise are associated with continued participation; therefore, this study provides insight into identifying individuals who consistently feel fatigued and may be less likely to complete an aquatic exercise program. These results suggest that either the modality or intensity of exercise may need to be changed for people with low social functioning as they may experience increased feelings of fatigue after a session of aquatic exercise. Future research with larger sample sizes is needed.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • A Novel Intervention: Stand Up Paddle Boarding Aquatic Therapy (SUPAT) for
           Pediatric Patients With Cerebral Palsy: 2 Case Studies

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      Authors: Walz; Alyssa D.; Doran, Stephen; Potter, Priscilla; Chen, Yuping
      Abstract: imageBackground and Purpose: Cerebral palsy (CP) is a nonprogressive neurological condition that typically causes motor dysfunction. Children with CP often have decreased endurance, balance, and strength. This leads to decreased physical activity and difficulty performing sports with their age-related peers. The purpose of these case studies was to determine whether stand up paddle boarding aquatic therapy (SUPAT) improves gross motor function and decreases the number of falls experienced by 2 children with spastic CP.Case Description: Participants included 2 adolescent girls diagnosed with spastic CP categorized as Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level II.Intervention: Over 10 weeks, the patients attended seven 1-hour SUPAT sessions. The sessions included a 10-minute warm-up and a variety of paddle boarding skills. Both participants completed Gross Motor Function Measure-88 (GMFM-88) and reported the average number of falls before and after the SUPAT intervention. During each session, a trial run (the total duration a child could maintain balance on the paddle board) was also measured.Outcomes: Participant 1 increased GMFM-88 scores from 92.5% to 95.5% and trial run duration from 1 minute 24 seconds to 6 minutes 14 seconds. Participant 2 increased GMFM-88 scores from 91.6% to 92.9% and trial run duration from 1 minute 12 seconds to 3 minutes 7 seconds. Both participants reported a reduction in the number of falls.Discussion: These case studies indicated the SUPAT program was beneficial for pediatric patients with CP. Following the SUPAT intervention, both participants improved scores on the GMFM-88 and increased their ability to maintain balance on the board (trial run). These findings support the notion that the SUPAT program is beneficial for increasing gross motor function, improving balance, and decreasing the number of falls. SUPAT could be a viable alternative therapeutic intervention to traditional aquatic therapy and an opportunity to participate in an outdoor sport.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Exercise in the Aquatic Environment for People With Primary Hip
           Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analyses

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      Authors: Geigle; Paula Richley; Van Wingerden, Anita; Biondi, Marti; Gangaway, Janet; Modica, Stephen; Morris, David; Salem, Yasser; Thein Brody, Lori
      Abstract: imageBackground and Purpose: More than 31 million Americans experience activity limitations related to hip osteoarthritis (OA), and aquatic exercise is one management option. To guide aquatic-based exercise practice, the available evidence-based data (quantity and quality) of aquatic environment exercise for people with primary hip OA was evaluated.Methods: A systematic search was conducted from 2004 to 2020 using 8 databases: PubMed, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED), Science Citation Index Expanded, ISI Proceedings (Web of Science), and REHABDATA. The extracted data included information related to authors, study design, participant characteristics (demographics, time since diagnosis, comorbidity), intervention details (setting, type, water temperature and depth, and dosage parameters such as frequency, intensity, duration and length), outcome measures, and adverse events.Results: There were 196 studies identified, with 136 studies screened at the abstract level with 48 resultant studies, reviewed at the full-text level with 9 resultant publications included in this quantitative analyses (7 randomized controlled trials [RCTs] and 2 non-RCTs). Individuals with hip OA who participated in prescribed aquatic exercise experienced improved overall lower extremity function including range of motion, strength, balance, gait, function performance (p = .00; standardized mean difference [SMD] = 0.30; SE = 0.07; I2 = 0), and pain (p = .00; SMD = 0.34; SE = 0.12; I2 = 45) but no change in quality of life (p = .07; SMD = 0.15; SE = 0.08; I2 = 0).Discussion and Conclusion: For individuals with primary hip OA, prescribed exercise in an aquatic environment improved lower extremity function, balance, and pain outcomes. To improve consistent, evidence-driven aquatic intervention for individuals experiencing limitations secondary to hip OA, these researchers recommend that schedule individual or staff time to review these systematic review results, establish a user-friendly dosage rubric including these minimum intensity and aquatic environment parameters, and discuss the evidence-driven suggested outcomes and include other specific standardized outcomes for their facility, as well as a means to efficiently document these outcomes.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
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