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JBI Evidence Implementation
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2691-3321
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [297 journals]
  • Preparing for audit and feedback: practical considerations

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      Authors: Khalid; Ahmad Firas; Grimshaw, Jeremy M.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • We go farther together: practical steps towards conducting a collaborative
           autoethnographic study

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      Authors: Ratnapalan; Savithiri; Haldane, Victoria
      Abstract: imageAutoethnography is an underused qualitative research method in implementation science. Autoethnography can be used to reflect on and archive personal experiences, which can yield useful information to advance our knowledge. In particular, collaborative autoethnography is an important method towards providing greater insights on the experiences of multidisciplinary teams conducting research amidst complexity and intersectionality. In conducting a collaborative autoethnography, all authors are participants who narrate, analyze and theorize about their individual and or collective experiences. This article provides an overview of collaborative autoethnography for health research teams and implementation scientists embarking on autoethnographic studies.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Unfolding and characterizing the barriers and facilitators of scaling-up
           evidence-based interventions from the stakeholders’ perspective: a
           concept mapping approach

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      Authors: Zhang; Xiaoyan; Zhao, Junqiang; Li, XueJing; Yan, Lijiao; Hao, Yufang; Liu, Jianping
      Abstract: imageIntroduction and aims: Much attention has been paid to scaling-up evidence-based interventions (EBIs) in previous implementation science studies. However, there is limited research on how stakeholders perceive factors of the scaling-up of EBIs. This study aimed to identify the barriers and facilitators of scaling-up the nurse-led evidence-based practice of post-stroke dysphagia identification and management (EBP-PSDIM) from the stakeholders’ perspective, and to assess their importance and feasibility.Methods: This study was conducted using concept mapping. Through purposive sampling, 18 stakeholders were recruited for brainstorming in which they responded to the focus prompt. Here, statements regarding perceived barriers and facilitators to EBI scaling-up were elicited and then sorted by similarity before being rated based on the importance and feasibility. Cluster analysis, multidimensional scaling, and descriptive statistics were utilized to analyze the data.Results: Ultimately, 61 statements perceived to influence the scaling-up were grouped into four primary clusters, that is, community-related factors, resource team-related factors, evidence-based practice program-related factors, and scaling-up strategy-related factors. The ‘perceived needs of the community’ was rated as the most important and feasible factor to address, whereas ‘costs/resource mobilization’ was rated as the least important and feasible one.Conclusion: From the stakeholders’ perspective, factors involved in the EBP-PSDIM program scaling-up were initially validated as being multidimensional and conceptually distinct;The importance and feasibility ratings of the barriers and facilitators could be used to help decision-makers to prioritize the most appropriate factors to be considered when developing implementation strategies.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Improving care for thalassemia patients in line with best practice
           standards at a tertiary referral cancer care center

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      Authors: Bongay; Leilani; Kynoch, Kathryn
      Abstract: imageBackground: Beta-thalassemia major is a chronic hematological disorder that requires life-long management. This project aimed to improve thalassemia patients’ care through the implementation of best practice standards at a tertiary referral cancer care center.Methods: The current project utilized a clinical audit design. A pre and post-implementation audit was carried out following best practice standards for patients with thalassemia. Chart review of nine thalassemia patients was undertaken pre and post-implementation of staff education, local clinical guidelines, and an annual care plan to manage thalassemia to determine adherence to best practice standards. Data were collected between June 2019 and June 2020 at a specialist outpatient and day treatment unit located in inner Brisbane, Australia.Results: The pre-implementation audit results showed low compliance to the audit criteria, with the exception of nursing staff education. Following the implementation of strategies to align current care with evidence-based recommendations, the post-implementation audit showed improvement across all areas. Overall, implementation strategies were successful in improving patient care for thalassemia patients by 100%. Staff thalassemia education increased from 45 to 92%.Conclusion: Implementing an individualized treatment plan and thalassemia-specific nursing documentation as well as developing local clinical guidelines and providing targeted nurse education were effective strategies to improve care for thalassemia patients in line with best practice standards.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Prevention of needle-stick injury among nurses in an acute ward of a
           hospital: a best practice implementation project

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      Authors: Huang; Hui-Mei; Chien, Hsing-Chin; Lin, Wen-ling; Chang, Chia-Hui; Chang, Mei-Yu; Su, Jui-Yuan; Mu, Pei-Fan
      Abstract: imageObjectives: This evidence implementation project aimed to identify barriers leading to needle-stick injuries (NSIs) and to develop implementation strategies to prevent NSIs in the acute ward of a hospital in central Taiwan.Introduction: The incidence rate of NSIs was 5.6% in the acute ward of a hospital in Taiwan. NSIs commonly occur during the drawing of blood, intravenous insertion, needle recapping, or performing any procedure involving sharp medical devices. NSIs are critical occupational risks among healthcare workers, possibly leading to transmission of infectious diseases, especially blood-borne viruses, such as HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C.Methods: A clinical audit was undertaken using the JBI Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System (PACES) and the Getting Research into Practice (GRiP) approach. Five audit criteria that represented best practice recommendations for prevention of NSIs were used. Baseline data were collected from 177 nurses in five acute wards, followed by the implementation of multiple strategies during a 20-week period of the project. Both baseline and postimplementation audits were undertaken to determine changes in practice.Results: According to the pre-audit concerning the use of safety-engineered injection devices and safe use and disposal of needles, there was 14–15% compliance, which indicated poor compliance with current best-practice criteria. Following the project implementation, the nursing staff were educated about the well tolerated use and disposal of sharps and the improved compliance rate ranged from 40 to 96.6%, with safety needle use increasing from 16 to 95.5%, safety needle operation procedure awareness increasing from 14 to 96%, needles not recapped after use increasing from 47 to 85%, and placing used needles in the sharps collection box increasing from 75 to 80%.Conclusion: This article suggests that standardized puncture prevention education and training enhanced nurses’ awareness in the acute ward.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Clinical assessment and screening of stroke patients with aphasia: a best
           practice implementation project

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      Authors: Wang; Run; Wei, Wei; Zhou, Jungui; Yu, Mei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Luo, Yansi; Yang, Lixiao; Ye, Xiaoling; Wu, Yanni; Zhou, Chunlan
      Abstract: imageIntroduction and aims: As a critical form of stroke damage, aphasia negatively impacts stroke patients’ return to society. Speech and language intervention has been found to assist in optimizing poststroke aphasia patient outcomes; consequently, early identification and diagnosis are vital for poststroke aphasia to ensure that patients receive the rehabilitation they require. This project aimed to promote evidence-based practice (EBP) in the assessment and screening of stroke patients with aphasia and to improve the clinical outcomes of patients who suffer from poststroke aphasia in a large tertiary hospital.Methods: The current evidence implementation project was conducted in the neurology and rehabilitation departments of a tertiary hospital in China. Six audit criteria were developed for the baseline and follow-up audits. The project used the JBI PACES software, as well as JBI's Getting Research into Practice audit and feedback tool, to foster evidence-based healthcare in practice.Results: Although the performance of all evidence-based criteria during the baseline audit was poor, barriers were identified through baseline, and the project team carried out and implemented developed strategies following Getting Research into Practice resources. All the criteria improved from baseline after the follow-up cycle, with four out of six criteria achieving a compliance rate of 100%, and two evidence-based criteria recorded at 73 and 80% compliance, respectively.Conclusion: The current project successfully increased EBP for the assessment and screening of stroke patients with aphasia. Further studies are needed to ensure the project's long-term sustainability.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Pelvic floor muscle training in mother fit healthcare centres: a best
           practice implementation project

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      Authors: Ghaderi; Fariba; Hajebrahimi, Sakineh; Ghaderi, Farzaneh; Pashazadeh, Fariba
      Abstract: imageIntroduction and aims: Pelvic floor dysfunctions are common complications during the childbirth process. Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) has been used as a conservative treatment in both prenatal and postnatal women. The aim of this project was to assess the compliance with evidence-based criteria regarding PFMT among prenatal and postnatal women in mother fit healthcare centres.Methods: The current study was performed in three phases. Phase 1: stakeholder engagement and team establishment and baseline audit. Phase 2: Design and implementation of strategies to improve PFMT among prenatal and postnatal women in mother fit healthcare centres. Phase 3: Follow-up audit. Baseline and follow-up audit with six yes/no audit questions was performed using the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System. Fifteen midwives involved in prenatal and postnatal healthcare centres and 60 pregnant women participated in this study.Results: The compliance for each audit criterion found in the baseline audit was low (0–7%). However, after implementation of the project and training the trainers (midwives), the compliance increased significantly (77–100%).Conclusion: The current study demonstrated that we have some problems in the healthcare system to teach PFMT to pregnant women. We should also implement similar projects in all healthcare centres country wide. Healthcare system managers should be aware of the value of holding PFMT courses for pregnant women and it is recommended to use pelvic floor physiotherapists to train midwives.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
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