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Journal of Professional Capital and Community
Number of Followers: 0  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 1 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Online) 2056-9548
Published by Emerald Homepage  [364 journals]
  • A professional development practice to enhance principals' instructional
           leadership – enabling and constraining arrangements

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Mette Liljenberg
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to increase the knowledge of principals' professional development (PD) by focusing on the arrangements that shape a PD practice initiated to enhance principals' instructional leadership. The paper draws on findings from a three-year PD initiative in a Swedish school district. The data consist of field notes and semi-structured interviews with principals and managers. Theoretically, the paper takes its starting point in the theory of practice architectures and the cultural-discursive, material-economic and social-political arrangements that shape practices. Practices for principals' PD require a fine balance to prevent the perception of hierarchical control. Designated time, common artifacts and external expertise are arrangements of practice that enable principals' PD. High expectations and relations between principals and managers both enable and constrain principals' PD. As trustful relations are of particular importance, the implication for managers and others organizing for principals' PD is to make sure that collaborative work settings also become a natural way of working for principals. As building relations takes time, a longer time perspective is also recommended. The findings have practical implications for educational leaders responsible for organizing PD practices for principals in any context. This paper adopts a practice theory approach to its study of principals' PD and provide an elaborated illustration of arrangements that enable and constrain principals' PD in collegial settings.
      Citation: Journal of Professional Capital and Community
      PubDate: 2021-05-11
      DOI: 10.1108/JPCC-12-2020-0102
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Teachers’ perceptions of their schools changing toward professional
           learning communities

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      Authors: Loes de Jong, Tom Wilderjans, Jacobiene Meirink, Wouter Schenke, Henk Sligte, Wilfried Admiraal
      Abstract: In professional learning communities (PLCs), teachers collaborate and learn with the aim of improving students' learning. The aim of this study is to gain insight into teachers' perceptions of their schools' changing toward PLCs and conditions which support or hamper this change. Questionnaires were completed by a total of 2.111 teachers from 15 Dutch secondary schools for three years. With the use of multilevel regression analyses, the research questions were answered. Although the development of a school toward a PLC seems to be a slow process, the findings demonstrate the influence of school conditions on this development. Human resource management (HRM) stands out, as this school condition has a direct and longitudinal effect on the change. The main recommendation is to embed PLC elements in HRM policies such as facilitating teachers to collaboratively work and learn and aligning teachers' professional development with schools' vision and ambitions. PLCs have been studied occasionally in longitudinal in-depth case studies or in large-scale, cross-sectional research. This large-scale longitudinal study provides insights into the sustainability of schools as PLCs and the school conditions that are associated with sustainability.
      Citation: Journal of Professional Capital and Community
      PubDate: 2021-03-05
      DOI: 10.1108/JPCC-07-2020-0051
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Department chair as mentor: perceptions of young female faculty members
           from Kazakhstan

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      Authors: Moldir Yelibay
      Abstract: The study explores factors affecting workplace–mentoring relationships of young female faculty members and their department chairs. The author used a qualitative interview research design to answer the research questions of the study. Semi-structured interviews of ten female faculty members from Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan were analyzed with the help of thematic coding and its interpretation. The study suggests implementing women-only formal mentorship programs with Kochan's (2013) cultural framework for an organizational culture change. The reason is that study provides some insights into the traditional values that underpin age and gender biases in the professional community of Kazakhstani academia. However, but the results differ for participants who are informally mentored by department chairs with modern values. The author acknowledges that the small sample limits the findings and it's interpretation. Hence more research in the interdisciplinary field of gender, education and workforce in the context is required. The study presents new evidence to support existing Western research on factors influencing workplace relationships and mentorship for young female faculty members. This empirical research adds on findings to the existing data from the Central Asian context, particularly to the sector of women studies and organizational culture in higher education institutions.
      Citation: Journal of Professional Capital and Community
      PubDate: 2021-01-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JPCC-01-2020-0001
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Guest editorial

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      Guest editorial
      Katina Pollock, Carol Campbell
      Journal of Professional Capital and Community, Vol. 6, No. 1, pp.1-6Journal of Professional Capital and Community2021-01-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JPCC-01-2021-083
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Rethinking social mobility in education: looking through the lens of
           professional capital

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      Authors: Lee Elliot Major, Jennie Miles Weiner
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to argue that current ways school systems have addressed social mobility is misguided at best and, at worst, hurts social mobility. Instead, we call for a focus on investment in teachers' professional capital as a primary lever for enhancing the likelihood they can effectively prepare and develop all children to lead successful lives after school. These arguments have become even more pertinent with the COVID-19 pandemic. Using contemporary research, and grounded in our collective decades of research in these areas, we define social mobility and document how the aim of improving it has become a central tenet of our governments' stated ambitions and the yardstick by which school systems' success is measured. We then show how the application of market-based approaches to schools and teachers' work has hindered social mobility and offer a new path forward. After 50 years of neoliberal policies incentivising individualistic and competitive behaviours, it is time to move towards policies that enhance professional capital and promote high quality collaboration between teachers. We call for a new path forward: a re-orientation to invest in teachers' capacity to realise the potential of education to improve the life prospects for all children, irrespective of their background. As with so many issues, the COVID-19 pandemic has shone an intense light on the role of educators in society. There are credible concerns that economic and educational inequalities resulting from the crisis have the potential to trigger a fall in future social mobility levels. Yet this should also be seen as a new dawn for renewed thinking in which we seriously consider a shift away from neoliberal to professional capital policies to create an education system that nurtures teaching professionals, promotes collective behaviour and helps rather than hinders efforts to improve social mobility.
      Citation: Journal of Professional Capital and Community
      PubDate: 2020-12-02
      DOI: 10.1108/JPCC-09-2020-0070
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2020)
       
  • An exploratory study of teacher buoyancy

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      Authors: Angel Kit Yi Wong, Sylvia Yee Fan Tang, Dora Dong Yu Li, May May Hung Cheng
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is threefold. Firstly, a new concept, teacher buoyancy, is introduced. Based on the significance to study how teachers bounce back from minor and frequent setbacks (vs. major adversities emphasized in resilience) in their daily work and the research on buoyancy by Martin and Marsh, a dual-component framework to conceptualize this new concept is introduced. Secondly, the development of a new instrument, the Teacher Buoyancy Scale (TBS), to measure it is presented. Thirdly, results of a study using the TBS are reported, which provide insights into how teacher buoyancy can be fostered. The study employed a quantitative design. A total of 258 teachers taking a part-time initial teacher education (ITE) program completed the TBS. Their responses were analyzed by exploratory factor analysis (EFA). In addition to descriptive statistics and reliability coefficients, Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to examine the relationship among the factors. The data analysis indicated five factors, namely, Coping with difficulties, Bouncing back cognitively and emotionally, Working hard and appraising difficulties positively, Caring for one's well-being and Striving for professional growth. These factors can be readily interpreted by the dual-component framework. Correlations among the factors further revealed that enabling factors can be subdivided into more proximal personal strengths relating to direct coping, and more distal personal assets pertaining to personal well-being. It is the latter that correlates most highly with perceived teacher buoyancy. The most original contribution of this paper is the proposal of the new concept of teacher buoyancy which is teachers' capacity to deal with the everyday challenges that most teachers face in their teaching. The delineation between buoyancy and resilience sharpens the focus of the problem domain that is most relevant to teachers. The development of the TBS provides a useful and reliable instrument to examine teacher buoyancy in future studies.
      Citation: Journal of Professional Capital and Community
      PubDate: 2020-10-27
      DOI: 10.1108/JPCC-02-2020-0011
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2020)
       
  • Professional development for teachers of advanced placement courses

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      Authors: Rebecca Small, Rebecca A. Thessin, William R. Dardick
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to explore how the Advanced Placement Summer Institute (APSI) supported Advanced Placement (AP) teacher's instructional needs considering the expansion of the AP program in recent decades. A survey including Likert-style and open-ended questions was distributed to participants at one East Coast APSI to gather data, which were analyzed quantitatively. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted on the Likert items to identify latent constructs, and two logistic regression (LR) models were run to predict what features of the professional development (PD) improved teacher perception of APSI. Open-ended constructs were analyzed by identifying and describing common themes. The findings indicated that APSI improved teachers' perceived content knowledge and pedagogy and improved teachers' perceptions of their ability to better support student achievement, but that more focused professional learning was needed in working with academically diverse student learners in AP courses. This study was limited to analysis of perception of teachers who attended one APSI training site, making it difficult to generalize without repeated measures. This is the only multidisciplinary study connecting literature on effective PD to an analysis of the effectiveness of APSI for AP teachers.
      Citation: Journal of Professional Capital and Community
      PubDate: 2020-10-21
      DOI: 10.1108/JPCC-02-2020-0007
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2020)
       
  • Navigating the leadership tensions in creating collective responsibility

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      Authors: Deidre Le Fevre, Frauke Meyer, Linda Bendikson
      Abstract: The purpose of this research is to use a collective responsibility theoretical lens to examine the work of three school principals as they focussed on school-wide goal-setting processes to achieve valued student achievement goals. The tensions principals face in creating collective responsibility are examined so that these might be intentionally navigated. Qualitative case studies of three New Zealand schools include data from interviews with principals, middle leaders and teachers. An inductive and deductive thematic analysis approach was employed. Principals face four key tensions: (1) whether to promote self or centrally directed and voluntary or mandatory professional learning; (2) how to balance a top-down versus a middle-up process for accountability; (3) ways to integrate both educator and student voice and (4) the complexity of both challenging teachers' beliefs and providing support. These challenges seemed inherent in the work of developing collective responsibility and leaders tended to move along response continuum. This research highlights the importance of being intentional and transparent with staff members about both the nature of these tensions and their navigation, and opens up further questions in relation to leader, and teacher perceptions of tensions in creating collective responsibility for achieving school-improvement goals. An understanding of the tensions that need to be navigated can help leaders and other educators to take effective action, scrutinize the reasoning behind decisions, and understand the inherent challenges faced. Leadership tensions in creating collective responsibility are explored and implications for leadership practice and learning considered.
      Citation: Journal of Professional Capital and Community
      PubDate: 2020-09-28
      DOI: 10.1108/JPCC-03-2020-0014
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2020)
       
  • Sustaining Indigenous students' and families' well-being and culture in an
           Ontario school board

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      Authors: Shaneé Adrienne Washington
      Abstract: This paper describes how an Ontario school board's majority First Nation, Metís and Inuit (FNMI) student population influenced the direction and priorities of the board toward culturally responsive and well-being focused initiatives. Using culturally sustaining/revitalizing pedagogy (CSRP) as a conceptual framework, it explores the board's efforts to meet the socioemotional and identity needs of its FNMI students (and families) through investments in professional learning communities (PLCs) and targeted programming and technologies. This paper presents findings from one case in a larger multi-year (2015–2017), multiple-case (10 school boards) study by a university research team that included the author. Thematic analysis was used to code interviews and focus groups conducted with over 40 administrators, educators and community partners in the board featured in this paper. The board's culturally responsive and well-being focused initiatives, while intended to support FNMI students' socioemotional success and sense of inclusiveness in schools, was inadequate at fostering and sustaining students' (and families') cultural survival and communal well-being. Findings offer practical ways that schools serving large populations of FNMI students might support students' identity development and self-regulation skills in schools while also serving as a cautionary example of strategies that do not sufficiently address student challenges that are the result of ongoing legacies of colonization. This study provides a distinctive example of a predominantly FNMI school board that, in recent years, has prioritized student well-being and identity development over achievement. It provides insight into the transformative possibilities and constraints of trying to support FNMI students' socioemotional healing and cultural sustenance in a colonized system.
      Citation: Journal of Professional Capital and Community
      PubDate: 2020-08-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JPCC-06-2020-0049
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2020)
       
  • Teacher disappointment: subjective definitions, factors and consequences

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      Authors: Shira Grossman, Izhar Oplatka
      Abstract: The purpose of the current study was to explore the feeling of disappointment among teachers, their subjective definition of this feeling, the sources of their disappointment and its consequences. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 14 Israeli teachers. From an analysis of the teachers' accounts it was clear that teachers attribute great importance to the feeling of disappointment and consider it to be an inherent part of their work in school. Furthermore, their accounts provide insight into the importance of two main factors – the teachers' role partners and the educational system. These factors are perceived by the interviewees to have much influence on teachers' sense of disappointment, which ultimately leads to implications for daily life in school and for the teachers themselves. The uniqueness of this study is reflected in both its theoretical and practical aspects. First, the aim of this study is to deepen the concept of disappointment within the educational context. Second, the importance of this study is in presenting the feeling of disappointment from an unexplored venue – the teachers' subjective perspective. Addressing these aspects may increase our understanding of emotions in education, in general, and help focus the discussion on teacher disappointment, in particular.
      Citation: Journal of Professional Capital and Community
      PubDate: 2020-06-11
      DOI: 10.1108/JPCC-03-2020-0012
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2020)
       
  • Enhancing teachers' and administrators learning experiences through
           school–university partnerships: a qualitative case study in China

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      Authors: Guoyuan Sang, Jun Zhou, Abdulghani Muthanna
      Abstract: This qualitative study aimed to explore how the school–university partnership (SUP) enhances the elementary teachers' professional development in a school-based setting. By following the qualitative case study methodology, this case study employs semi-structured interviews (the authors designed) with 10 school teachers and administrators. The authors adapted the iterative process analysis (Miles and Huberman, 1984) for compiling, coding, annotating the data and interpreting the interview transcripts. The authors also used the member checking technique that establishes credibility in a qualitative study (Lincoln and Guba, 1985) with six participants. The findings suggest that participating in a series of professional learning activities led to the enhancement of teachers' and administrators learning experiences in view of educational theories, action research abilities, teaching efficiency, teaching research capacities and improvement of school guidelines. Further, they reveal that the participants' expectations for future SUP collaborations centred on realizing the sustainability and effectiveness of collaborations, and autonomy of teachers. The limitations of the current study include its focus on a single SUP within one school and the reliance on data collected only by interviews during the SUP process. This study offers implications for teacher learning within SUP collaborations. First, schools should consider how to involve and influence all teachers rather than SUP core members only. To this end, authentic professional learning communities need to be constructed. Second, universities should pay much more attention to the professional development of their faculty members towards integration of theoretical knowledge and practical experiences. This original study explores practical ways of improving teachers' theoretical and practical teaching practices/experiences through SUP projects, and contributes new knowledge to the teaching professional development of school teachers and administrators.
      Citation: Journal of Professional Capital and Community
      PubDate: 2020-06-05
      DOI: 10.1108/JPCC-01-2020-0003
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2020)
       
  • A capital idea: exploring the relationship between human and social
           capital and student achievement in schools

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      Authors: Alan J. Daly, Yi-Hwa Liou, Claudia Der-Martirosian
      Abstract: As accountability policies worldwide press for higher student achievement, schools across the globe are enacting a host of reform efforts with varied outcomes. Mounting evidence suggests reforms, which encourage greater collaboration among teachers, may ultimately support increased student learning. Specifically, this study aims to investigate the relationship between human and social and student achievement outcomes. In exploring this idea, the authors draw on human and social capital and examine the influence of these forms of capital on student achievement using social network analysis and hierarchical linear modeling. The results indicate that teacher human and social capital each have a significant and positive relationship with student achievement. Moreover, both teacher human and social capital together have an even stronger effect on student achievement than either human or social capital alone. As more schools across the globe adopt structures for teacher collaboration and the development of learning communities, there is a need to better understand how schools may capitalize on these opportunities in ways that yield improved student learning. Our work sheds new light on these critical foundational elements of human and social capital that are individually and collectively associated with student achievement.
      Citation: Journal of Professional Capital and Community
      PubDate: 2020-12-10
      DOI: 10.1108/JPCC-10-2020-0082
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • A research model to study research-practice partnerships in education

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      Authors: Amanda Cooper, Stephen MacGregor, Samantha Shewchuk
      Abstract: This scoping review utilizes findings from 80 articles to build a research model to study research-practice-policy networks in K-12 education systems. The purpose of this study was to generate a broad understanding of the variation in conceptualizations of research-practice-policy partnerships, rather than dominant conceptualizations. Arskey and O'Malley's (2005) five stage scoping review process was utilized including: (1) a consultative process with partners to identify research questions, (2) identify relevant studies, (3) study selection based on double-blind peer review, (4) charting the data and (5) collating, summarizing and reporting the results in a research model identifying key dimensions and components of research-practice partnerships (RPPs). Coburn et al. (2013) definition of RPPs arose as an anchoring definition within the emerging field. This article proposes a model for understanding the organization and work of RPPs arising from the review. At the core lies shared goals, coproduction and multistakeholder collaboration organized around three dimensions: (1) Systems and structures: funding, governance, strategic roles, policy environment, system alignment; (2) Collaborative processes: improvement planning and data use, communication, trusting relationships, brokering activities, capacity building; (3) Continuous Learning Cycles: social innovation, implementation, evaluation and adaptation. By using a common framework, data across RPPs and from different studies can be compared. Research foci might test links between elements such as capacity building and impacts, or test links between systems and structures and how those elements influence collaborative processes and the impact of the RPPs. Research could test the generalizability of the framework across contexts. Through the application and use of the research model, various elements might be refuted, confirmed or refined. More work is needed to use this framework to study RPPs, and to develop accompanying data collection methods and instruments for each dimension and element. The practical applications of the framework are to be used by RPPs as a learning framework for strategic planning, iterative learning cycles and evaluation. Many of the elements of the framework could be used to check-in with partners on how things are going – such as exploring how communication is working and whether these structures move beyond merely updates and reporting toward joint problem-solving. The framework could also be used prior to setting up an RPP as an organizing approach to making decisions about how that RPP might best operate. Despite increased attention on multistakeholder networks in education, the conceptual understanding is still limited. This article analyzed theoretical and empirical work to build a systematic model to study RPPs in education. This research model can be used to: identify RPP configurations, analyze the impact of RPPs, and to compare similarities and differences across configurations.
      Citation: Journal of Professional Capital and Community
      PubDate: 2020-12-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JPCC-11-2019-0031
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Field building through strategic bricolage: system leadership and the
           institutionalizing role of intermediary organizations

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      Authors: David Eddy-Spicer, Paula Arce-Trigatti, Michelle D. Young
      Abstract: This article explores two intermediary organizations that are attempting to alter the landscape of US education by building organizational networks and professional capital that disrupt traditional relationships between K-12 education and higher education. The work is a theory-driven, comparative case study of the University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA) and the National Network of Education Research-Practice Partnerships (NNERPP). Through the lens of institutional theory, the authors employ an extended case method that uses comparative analysis of situationally-embedded organizational case studies to build theory. The two organizations play an intermediary role by The two organizations play an intermediary role by establishing new standards, norms, and patterns of practice between higher education and local systems of education. In doing so, these organizations serve as meso-institutions, alliances that mediate the processes of institutionalization and play essential parts in developing new facets of infrastructure and new professional identities that hold the potential for nurturing and sustaining professional capital. System leadership hinges on strategic bricolage to identify near-term next steps that align with longer-term strategic goals related to field building. Professional capital as a concept was initially characterized from a bottom-up perspective, valorizing the agentive dimensions of human, social and decisional capital in opposition to top-down, centralized control. Our conceptualization of intermediary organizations as meso-institutions addresses how the processes of mediated networking and system leadership operate to build professional capital in specific ways that crystallize institutional change.
      Citation: Journal of Professional Capital and Community
      PubDate: 2020-11-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JPCC-11-2019-0032
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Is distributed leadership an effective approach for mobilising
           professional capital across professional learning networks' Exploring
           a case from England

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      Authors: Chris Brown, Jane Flood, Paul Armstrong, Stephen MacGregor, Christina Chinas
      Abstract: There is currently a focus on using networks to drive school and school system improvement. To achieve such benefits, however, requires school leaders actively support the mobilisation of networked-driven innovations. One promising yet under-researched approach to mobilisation is enabling distributed leadership to flourish. To provide further insight in this area, this paper explores how the leaders involved in one professional learning network (the Hampshire Research Learning Network) employed a distributed approach to mobilise networked learning activity in order to build professional capital. A mixed methods approach was used to develop a case study of the Hampshire RLN . Fieldwork commenced with in-depth semi-structured interviews with all school leaders of schools participating in the network and other key participating teachers (12 interviews in total). A bespoke social network survey was then administered to schools (41 responses). The purpose of the survey was to explore types of RLN-related interaction undertaken by teachers and how teachers were using the innovations emerging from the RLN within their practice. Data indicate that models of distributed leadership that actively involves staff in decisions about what innovations to adopt and how to adopt them are more successful in ensuring teachers across networks: (1) engage with innovations; (2) explore how new practices can be used to improve teaching and learning and (3) continue to use/refine practices in an ongoing way. Correspondingly we argue these findings point to a promising approach to system improvement and add valuable insight to a relatively understudied area.
      Citation: Journal of Professional Capital and Community
      PubDate: 2020-11-03
      DOI: 10.1108/JPCC-02-2020-0010
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Systems approaches to professional and decisional mathematics capital

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      Authors: Brandon Dickson, Carolyn Mussio, Donna Kotsopoulos
      Abstract: This study aims to explore how the theories of professional capital and decisional capital can be extended to introduce “professional mathematics capital” and “decisional mathematics capital”. Professional development (PD) efforts in one school district in elementary mathematics education are described to illustrate these extensions and to contemplate ways to enhance teacher learning of mathematics pedagogy. Both theoretical extensions provided useful frameworks for conceptualizing mathematics PD. Preliminary evidence suggests that participants demonstrated the emergence of professional and decisional mathematics capital. While there were observed and reported changes to teacher practice, further research is needed to explore the implications of these theoretical extensions on student learning. This study serves to enhance the literature related to PD and teachers' mathematical content knowledge. The theoretical extensions of professional and decisional mathematics capital are a novel and promising concept that allows for a unique approach to be laid out for those designing PD in mathematics.
      Citation: Journal of Professional Capital and Community
      PubDate: 2020-10-23
      DOI: 10.1108/JPCC-11-2019-0030
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Journal of Professional Capital and Community

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