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Studia Liturgica
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0039-3207 - ISSN (Online) 2517-4797
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1141 journals]
  • Marginalia
    • Pages: 3 - 5
      Abstract: Studia Liturgica, Volume 51, Issue 1, Page 3-5, March 2021.

      Citation: Studia Liturgica
      PubDate: 2021-03-09T05:36:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0039320721992255
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Participatory Relationships in the Thanksgiving Prayers of Anglican
           Eucharistic Liturgies: A Case Study in the Church of England and the
           Anglican Church of Australia
    • Authors: Brian Douglas
      Pages: 6 - 21
      Abstract: Studia Liturgica, Volume 51, Issue 1, Page 6-21, March 2021.
      This article examines the participatory relationships in the Thanksgiving Prayers of the Eucharist in two provinces of the Anglican Communion: the Church of England and the Anglican Church of Australia. Two types of participatory relationships are discussed: those between the body and blood of Christ and the elements (known as BBE), and those between the body and blood of Christ and the communicants (known as BBC). It is noted that both of these types of participatory relationship have been and are found in Anglican Thanksgiving Prayers but a balance between the two has not always been found due to a preference for particular eucharistic theologies. In some Thanksgiving Prayers BBE relationships are excluded or muted in order to lessen any realist notions of Christ’s presence in the Eucharist. Some Anglican liturgical history is considered along with modern liturgies to assess how these relationships are used. Recommendations for a balanced use of both relationships are made.
      Citation: Studia Liturgica
      PubDate: 2021-03-09T05:36:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0039320720978922
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Deep in the Bones Lie Memories and Hopes: A Grand Unified Theory
    • Authors: Daniel P. McCarthy
      Pages: 22 - 30
      Abstract: Studia Liturgica, Volume 51, Issue 1, Page 22-30, March 2021.
      Christ’s bones are missing at the Holy Sepulchre; St Peter’s bones remain in his basilica; Hagia Sophia was not built on bones. The absence, presence, or lack of bones effects different emphases on memory (anamnesis) and fulfillment (eschatology). In Jerusalem we witness our future glory (eschatology) already revealed in our history (anamnesis); in Rome we recall (anamnesis) the sacrifice of martyrs whose bones remain until the general resurrection (eschatology), even while we venerate the saints in light; at Hagia Sophia liturgy itself, rather than bones, provides the context for remembering the whole Christ in the power of the Spirit. Celebrating liturgy over the bones of martyrs in Rome, while venerating their sacrifice, may have accentuated the sacrificial character of the eucharistic liturgy in the Christian west, whereas in the Christian east the eschatological glory already revealed in our history and in liturgy may have shaped the eschatological character of liturgy.
      Citation: Studia Liturgica
      PubDate: 2021-03-09T05:36:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0039320720981017
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Infant Baptism: God’s Promise or Ours'
    • Authors: Ryan L. Faber
      Pages: 31 - 45
      Abstract: Studia Liturgica, Volume 51, Issue 1, Page 31-45, March 2021.
      This article examines the baptism liturgies of the Christian Reformed Church in North America (CRC). It argues that parental promises eclipse the promise of God in the practice of baptism in the CRC. A discernible shift from an emphasis on God’s promise in the CRC’s oldest liturgy to an increasing emphasis on parental promises in the new liturgies adopted by Synods 1976 and 1994 is observed. Ambiguity about the meaning of baptism is evident in the CRC’s newest baptism liturgies, adopted by Synods 2013 and 2016. This article concludes that the denomination should adopt a new baptism liturgy in which parental promises are made only after the administration of their child’s baptism.
      Citation: Studia Liturgica
      PubDate: 2021-03-09T05:36:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0039320720981068
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • A General Theological Symbolic Structure of Textless Music in Christian
           Worship
    • Authors: Jennifer Wakeling
      Pages: 46 - 59
      Abstract: Studia Liturgica, Volume 51, Issue 1, Page 46-59, March 2021.
      When textless music is performed as a stand-alone act in Christian worship, it can function as a Christian symbol through which meaning can be generated at experiential, reflective, and transformative levels. This article proposes a four-dimensional theological symbolic structure for conceptualizing and heightening the effectiveness of textless music as a Christian symbol in worship. A piece of textless music can take on Christian symbolic capacity in worship by virtue of its specific musical properties and structures interpreted through the lens of human subjectivity formed within a Christian context (incorporating Christian worship), a locus of divine communication. Relevant aspects of the theology of Paul Tillich, Karl Rahner, and Louis-Marie Chauvet, particularly pertaining to symbols, are applied, fitted together, extended, and supplemented to construct and explicate this structure. Deriving from the structure, elements of praxis regarding the selection, contextualization, performance, and reception of pieces are presented for ongoing reflection and development.
      Citation: Studia Liturgica
      PubDate: 2021-03-09T05:36:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0039320720979053
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • “Lest We Forget”: A Postapartheid Perspective on Remembering in
           Liturgy for Healing and Justice
    • Authors: Hilton Scott
      Pages: 60 - 72
      Abstract: Studia Liturgica, Volume 51, Issue 1, Page 60-72, March 2021.
      The idea of Remembrance Day (also known as Armistice Day) in the United Kingdom and Commonwealth countries carries two important notions: (1) to remember significant tragedies and sacrifices of the past by paying homage, and (2) to ensure that such catastrophes are prevented in the future by not forgetting. This concept can be applied to the South African context of a society and young democracy that is living in the wake of apartheid. In certain spheres this will include decolonizing the long-standing practices of Remembrance Day in South Africa, ritualizing the event(s) to be more relevant to those who partake by shifting the focus to tragedies caused during apartheid, and remembering that such a deplorable catastrophe should never be repeated. The important liturgical functions and pragmatic outcome(s) of this notion are reconciliation, restoration, transformation and, ultimately, liberation, as South Africans look to heal the wounds caused by the tragedies of the recent past and prevent such pain from being inflicted on others in the future.
      Citation: Studia Liturgica
      PubDate: 2021-03-09T05:36:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0039320720978919
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • A Body That Matters: Liturgy, Mediation, Performativity
    • Authors: Charlotte Dalwood
      Pages: 73 - 85
      Abstract: Studia Liturgica, Volume 51, Issue 1, Page 73-85, March 2021.
      Taking the liturgy of The Episcopal Church as an extended case study, this article develops a poststructuralist eucharistic theology that bears upon the theorization of religious identity, Christian liturgy, and material religion. My point of departure is the question of whether a dinner-church Communion—that is, one in which an Episcopal priest consecrates items other than bread and wine—would qualify as an Anglican eucharistic celebration if that service was conducted using the 1979 Episcopal Book of Common Prayer. To this query I respond in the affirmative. In conversation with Birgit Meyer on religious media and Judith Butler on language and matter, I argue that it is in being interpreted as the body and blood of Christ that the eucharistic elements come to be materialized as such, with the Book of Common Prayer governing that interpretation for Anglicans and giving it force.
      Citation: Studia Liturgica
      PubDate: 2021-03-09T05:36:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0039320720978925
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Externalizing Faith: Countering Individualism Through an Embodied Emphasis
    • Authors: Dejan Aždajić
      Pages: 86 - 102
      Abstract: Studia Liturgica, Volume 51, Issue 1, Page 86-102, March 2021.
      While the importance of an embodied theology has been recognized, in light of recent literature that sees a growing modern-day shift from emancipated individuality to ideological individualism, the aim of this article is to deepen the theological reflection on the urgent need for a more intentional embodied emphasis. This strategic approach is particularly significant, since in spite of the current challenge there remains a tendency toward a disembodied, anti-liturgical orientation that prioritizes words and cognition, locating theological truth on the inside of the autonomous individual thinking subject, who remains free to either accept or reject its propositional content. Drawing from relevant literature that provides a conceptual framework, this article argues that especially in today’s context, an overt emphasis on the externalization of faith and the embodiment of theological normatives performed together in community offers more promising pedagogical effectiveness. A bodily focus is principally important since it provides an experiential platform for the communal enactment and consequent appropriation of religious knowledge, thus potentially circumventing the present challenge of increasingly rigid individualism.
      Citation: Studia Liturgica
      PubDate: 2021-03-09T05:36:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0039320720981172
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2021)
       
  • The Faith Once for All Delivered: Liturgical Theology, Scripture, and the
           Evangelical Free Church Tradition
    • Authors: Jonathan Ottaway
      Pages: 103 - 116
      Abstract: Studia Liturgica, Volume 51, Issue 1, Page 103-116, March 2021.
      This article proposes to explain how the evangelical Free Church commitment to scripture as its primary authority affects their interaction with liturgical theology. Free Church theology is underpinned by various hermeneutical, theological, and cultural commitments—none more central than its commitment to scripture as revelation of and from God—which complicates Free Church engagement with much recent liturgical scholarship that emphasizes the ecclesiological basis for Christian worship and the corollary authority of Christian tradition. In the first part of the article, I provide an exploration of theological authority within Free Church evangelicalism, arguing that their commitment to scripture’s authority is a commitment to the ecclesial tradition of the apostolic church. In the second part of the article, I explore two additional hermeneutical considerations for evangelical liturgical theology that follow from their commitment to scripture: the priority of biblical exegesis in the theological process and the application of a trusting hermeneutic in their reading of scripture.
      Citation: Studia Liturgica
      PubDate: 2021-03-09T05:36:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0039320720978923
      Issue No: Vol. 51, No. 1 (2021)
       
 
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