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Journal Cover Computers & Education
  [SJR: 3.143]   [H-I: 109]   [137 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0360-1315
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3049 journals]
  • A review of the types of mobile activities in mobile inquiry-based
           learning
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 November 2017
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Ángel Suárez, Marcus Specht, Fleur Prinsen, Marco Kalz, Stefaan Ternier
      Inquiry-based Learning is increasingly suggested as an efficient approach for fostering learners' curiosity and motivation. It helps learners to develop their ability to work on complex and unpredictable environments making them more critical thinkers and agentic learners. Although, mobile technology is a suitable support for this learning process, there is a lack of practical strategies for educational practitioners to enact the right balance between enabling agency and supporting the students through the mobile technology. Thus, we conducted a literature review that analyzed 62 studies on mobile inquiry-based learning. The analysis focused on the level of agency supported by mobile technology. This review study provided two main results. The first result is a two-layer classification –with five types and twelve subtypes– of the most common mobile activities used in inquiry-based learning. The types and subtypes are: 1) Direct instruction formed by 1a) location guidance, 1b) procedural guidance and 1c) metacognitive guidance, 2) Access to content formed by 2a) fixed and 2b) dynamic content, 3) Data collection that consists of 3a) cooperative and 3b) collaborative data collection, 4) Peer-to-peer communication formed by 4a) asynchronous and 4b) synchronous social communications and 5) Contextual support that includes 5a) augmented experience, 5b) immersive experience and 5c) adaptive feedback. The second result consists of an analytical framework –based on six dimensions– to assess the level of agency supported by the different types of mobile activities. The learners' agency dimensions are: 1) Goals, 2) Content, 3) Actions, 4) Strategies, 5) Reflection and 6) Monitoring. Finally, the review presents insights on how this analytical framework can be used by educational practitioners to identify mobile activities that effectively balance learners’ agency with mobile technology.

      PubDate: 2017-11-16T15:07:50Z
       
  • The role of textbook learning resources in e-learning: A taxonomic study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 November 2017
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Kwok Hung Lau, Tri Lam, Booi Hon Kam, Mathews Nkhoma, Joan Richardson, Susan Thomas
      While textbooks are crucial to learning in the traditional classroom-based setting, their role in e-learning environment might be different. Through a categorical analysis, this study investigates if the currently available learning resources provided by textbooks are suitable for e-learning purpose. An e-learning framework incorporating different stages of learning and usage of learning resources was first developed as a guide. Then, a sample of learning resources that came with 100 commonly used textbooks in the disciplines of logistics/supply chain management and information systems were classified using the framework. To corroborate the classification, cluster analysis was also conducted to identify major clusters of learning resources along two dimensions - complexity of content and ease of use. The findings show that most of the sampled textbook learning resources are only suitable for low-order to mid-order learning according to the revised Bloom's taxonomy. The majority of the resources investigated lack the sophistication and complexity to support high-order learning that involves a great deal of interaction and collaboration among learners and facilitators on e-learning platforms. In other words, existing textbook learning resources might contribute well to self-regulated low-order and mid-order e-learning involving basic to intermediate cognitive processes, such as remembering, understanding, applying and analysing. They are generally ill-designed to facilitate high-order e-learning involving advanced cognitive processes, such as evaluating and creating, which require extensive interaction and collaboration among learners and facilitators in an e-learning environment.

      PubDate: 2017-11-16T15:07:50Z
       
  • The influence of internationalised versus local content on online
           intercultural collaboration in groups: A randomised control trial study in
           a statistics course
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 November 2017
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Jenna Mittelmeier, Bart Rienties, Dirk Tempelaar, Garron Hillaire, Denise Whitelock
      Computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) has been highlighted as a beneficial learning experience for students in blended and online settings. In highly diverse and international contexts, CSCL also allows students the opportunity to encounter new ideas and values from peers with different backgrounds. However, previous research has highlighted that there are wide variations in student participation levels in CSCL activities and that many students experience social and cultural tensions when working with diverse peers. These issues may damage the quality of online collaboration and limit the potential gains of CSCL. In this study, we explored one evidence-based solution for encouraging CSCL participation: the internationalisation of the online academic content used for collaborative activities. Using a randomised control trial method with 428 undergraduate students in an introductory statistics course, we compared individual and group-level participation in an online collaborative task when students used content from the local context compared to content from international contexts. Our findings suggest that internationalisation of online content can encourage individual-level participation and decrease the disparity of participation within small groups when the content is situated in countries that are personally relevant to students’ own backgrounds. At the same time, participation was influenced by individual demographics and group dynamics.

      PubDate: 2017-11-16T15:07:50Z
       
  • Needle in a haystack: Identifying learner posts that require urgent
           response in MOOC discussion forums
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2017
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Omaima Almatrafi, Aditya Johri, Huzefa Rangwala
      Although massive open online courses or MOOCs have been successful in attracting a large number of learners, they have not been equally successful in retaining the learners to the point of course completion. One critical point of failure in many courses, especially those that use discussion forums as a means of collaborative learning, is the large number of messages exchanged on the forums. The extensive exchange of messages often creates chaos from the instructors' perspective and several questions remain unanswered. Lack of attention and response to urgent messages – those that are critical from the learners’ perspective to move forward – becomes a major challenge in this environment. This paper proposes a model to identify “urgent” posts that need immediate attention from instructors. In our analysis, we investigate different feature sets and different data mining techniques, and report the best set of features and classification techniques for addressing the problem of identifying messages that need urgent attention. The results demonstrate the ability to use a limited number of linguistic features with select metadata to build a moderate to substantially reliable classification model that can identify urgent posts in MOOC forums regardless of the course content. The work has potential application across a range of platforms that provide large scale courses and can help instructors efficiently navigate the discussion forums and prioritize the responses so that timely intervention can support learning and may reduce dropout rates.

      PubDate: 2017-11-16T15:07:50Z
       
  • Critical evaluation of existing audio learning systems using a proposed
           TOL model
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117
      Author(s): Raj Kishen Moloo, Kavi Kumar Khedo, Tadinada Venkata Prabhakar
      This work forms part of a larger research work which advocates that audio-only learning mode can be developed into a full fledge audio-MOOC. The audio-MOOC should incorporate a learner-centric approach to provide effective learning capabilities to the oral and low-literate population. For long, audio-based learning (which includes variances in audio technologies) has been an established practice and has proved to be a successful means of conveying information to the mass especially for illiterate and semi-literate population. However, it is widely used as a supplement to Distance Education mode without exploiting its full potential. This paper aims at providing a comprehensive evaluation of existing audio learning systems which is missing in recent literature. There is no formal and established evaluation framework for evaluating such systems. Hence, this paper contributes to the audio-based learning research area by proposing a Technology, Organisation and Learner (TOL) evaluation model to analyse the existing audio learning systems. The proposed evaluation model uses a set of 50 criteria which is derived from a review of methodologies and strategies for multimedia evaluation. Besides, this work makes use of empirical data in the proposed TOL evaluation model to critically appraise various audio technologies used in learning. Recommendations are made for the development of full-fledge Audio-only Learning Management Systems/MOOCs. Moreover, the proposed evaluation model can also be used for the selection of media suited to the learning needs of organisations.

      PubDate: 2017-11-08T16:31:42Z
       
  • Embodied interactive video lectures for improving learning comprehension
           and retention
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117
      Author(s): I-Chun Hung, Kinshuk, Nian-Shing Chen
      The increased interaction with multimedia content has been recognized as a significant factor to improve learners’ learning outcomes. As a result, interactive video lectures are increasingly being adopted in digital learning contexts for increasing interactivity. However, conventional video lecture lacks interactive learning activities (ILAs) that are an indispensable component of interactivity. Interactive video lectures can provide learners opportunities to obtain timely constructive support to produce effective learning outcomes because of ILAs. In order to carefully design and create ILAs for effective learning, instructors need to invest substantial efforts for conceiving the content and interactions of ILAs. This study proposed an approach to design the content of ILAs by leveraging collective intelligence (CI) gathered from the discussion forums specifically related to the content of video lectures. When learners exercised ILAs, meaningful interactions by speaking and gesturing worked as learning support to improve comprehension of learning materials. To evaluate the effects of the CI-based ILAs, an experiment was conducted with 90 university students, who were randomly and equally assigned to three different groups (i.e., embodied interactive, non-embodied interactive, and conventional video lectures). The results show that learners who learned with the embodied interactive video lecture performed better in comprehension and retention of learning contents than the other two counter groups. The findings also revealed that this approach does not impose any additional cognitive load on learners. The design guidelines derived in this study can serve as reference for instructors to create interactive video lectures with CI-based ILAs in digital learning contexts.

      PubDate: 2017-11-08T16:31:42Z
       
  • Keyboarding versus handwriting speed of higher education students with and
           without learning disabilities: Does touch-typing assist in narrowing the
           gap'
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117
      Author(s): Hayley Weigelt-Marom, Naomi Weintraub
      Keyboarding has become an essential writing mode. Yet, many do not keyboard as fast as they handwrite, perhaps due to lack of efficient keyboarding skills. The current study examined the immediate and long-term effect of a touch-typing program on narrowing the gap between keyboarding and handwriting speed among higher education students. The study included 17 normally achieving students and 25 students with specific learning disabilities (i.e., reading and/or writing disabilities). Results showed that at the end of the program, handwriting remained a faster writing mode than keyboarding. This condition changed over time, and at the delayed post-test (approximately 3 months following the completion of the program), keyboarding became faster than handwriting. However, this change was significant only within the group of students with specific learning disabilities. These results stress the importance of efficient and automatic keyboarding for writing among the general population and particularly among students with specific learning disabilities.

      PubDate: 2017-11-08T16:31:42Z
       
  • Cell phone usage and academic performance: An experiment
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117
      Author(s): Daniel Darghan Felisoni, Alexandra Strommer Godoi
      This paper makes use of an experiment to test the relationship between the actual average time students spend using their smartphones per day and academic performance. Differently from previous studies that rely on self-reporting mobile phone usage data, which tends to significantly underestimate the time spent by students at their phones, we employed Apps (namely ‘Moment’ and ‘App Usage Tracker’) to effectively measure actual usage. Collecting data from 43 students at Fundação Getúlio Vargas (FGV), a business school from São Paulo, Brazil, our analysis yielded a significant negative relationship between total time spent using smartphones and academic performance, after controlling for known predictors of performance such as self-efficacy and past academic results. Each 100 min spent using the device on average per day corresponded to a reduction in a student's position at the school's ranking of 6.3 points, in a range from 0 to nearly 100. Moreover, if we consider usage during class time only (as opposed to during free time and weekends), the effect was almost twice as high. The magnitude of the effect found is alarming. Thus, this study brings new evidence of the potential harm of excessive smartphone use and should be useful for educators and other academic stakeholders interested in the subject of the impact of technology on students' performance.

      PubDate: 2017-11-08T16:31:42Z
       
  • Geography learning in primary school: Comparing face-to-face versus
           tablet-based instruction methods
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 November 2017
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Steven Walczak, Natalie Greene Taylor
      Touchscreen tablet technology is being widely adopted in primary and secondary schools throughout the world. Current research largely explores how to use this technology to teach reading and writing, mathematics, and to a lesser extent science. However a research gap exists in exploring tablet technology to teach geography. The research in this article examines if any differences in learning outcomes exist between a more traditional teaching method and one that is centered on using touchscreen tablet technology when teaching USA states’ shapes and locations to second-graders. The results indicate that there is no statistically significant difference between the two teaching methods, but that combining the two methods may lead to significant improvements in learning outcomes.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2017-11-08T16:31:42Z
       
  • Editorial Board/Publication information
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 116


      PubDate: 2017-11-02T16:20:57Z
       
  • Use of Facebook for the Community Services Practices course: Community of
           inquiry as a theoretical framework
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 116
      Author(s): Esra Keles
      This study examines an online learning community created on Facebook (FB) for the Community Services Practices (CSP) course at the Faculty of Education, Karadeniz Technical University. The study aims to analyze FB group shares and prospective teachers' views in order to investigate the reflections of the teaching process that took place within the Community Services Practices course. The study was carried out with prospective teachers enrolled in the Computer Education Instructional Technology (CEIT) Teacher Training program. Its implementation entailed a case study with 92 prospective teachers, and the FB group was used as one of the main elements of the course in which students shared weekly discussion topics, social activities, and community service projects for 12 weeks. In this context, data were gathered via an analysis of the learning environment screenshots from the FB group. Furthermore, quantitative data gathered through multiple-choice, as well as open-ended questions, were presented with reference to frequencies and percentages, whereas qualitative data were presented in the form of themes, codes, and quotations. The study attempted to interpret the findings through the ‘Community of Inquiry’ (CoI) framework. In this vein, FB's social network supported a teaching presence for both the instructors and the students and enabled them to share responsibility for the teaching process. Moreover, the communication and socialization characteristics of FB directly contributed to the social presence of the learning groups created through this media. While the practices implemented over FB contributed to increased social sensitivity and awareness among prospective teachers, low-quality shares and irrelevant discussions in the FB group had negative effects on the learning environment.

      PubDate: 2017-11-02T16:20:57Z
       
  • Enhance emotional and social adaptation skills for children with autism
           spectrum disorder: A virtual reality enabled approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117
      Author(s): Horace H.S. Ip, Simpson W.L. Wong, Dorothy F.Y. Chan, Julia Byrne, Chen Li, Vanessa S.N. Yuan, Kate S.Y. Lau, Joe Y.W. Wong
      Deficits in social-emotional reciprocity, one of the diagnostic criteria of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), greatly hinders children with ASD from responding appropriately and adapting themselves in various social situations. Although evidences have shown that virtual reality environment is a promising tool for emotional and social adaptation skills training on ASD population, there is a lack of large-scale trials with intensive evaluations to support such findings. This paper presents a virtual reality enabled program for enhancing emotional and social adaptation skills for children with ASD. Six unique learning scenarios, of which one focuses on emotion control and relaxation strategies, four that simulate various social situations, and one that facilitates consolidation and generalization, are designed and developed with corresponding psychoeducation procedures and protocols. The learning scenarios are presented to the children via a 4-side immersive virtual reality environment (a.k.a., half-CAVE) with non-intrusive motion tracking. A total number of 94 children between the ages of 6–12 with clinical diagnosis of ASD participated in the 28-session program that lasted for 14 weeks. By comparing pre- and post-assessments, results reported in this paper show significant improvements in the project's primary measures on children's emotion expression and regulation and social-emotional reciprocity but not on other secondary measures.

      PubDate: 2017-10-25T16:15:50Z
       
  • On the students' perceptions of the knowledge formation when submitted to
           a Project-Based Learning environment using web applications
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117
      Author(s): Laio Oriel Seman, Romeu Hausmann, Eduardo Augusto Bezerra
      This work presents a statistical analysis of the views of Electrical Engineering students, regarding the knowledge formation process in a Project-Based Learning application, as a complement to classical teaching methods. In order to assess this approach, an active learning methodology developed especially for part-time degree courses, called Project-Based Learning Agile (PBLA), has been proposed and implemented at the Regional University of Blumenau (FURB), Brazil. Through the analysis of questionnaire responses obtained over four consecutive semesters, using partial least squares path modeling (PLS-PM), it was possible to understand statistically how the learning process is connected to PBLA. The data analysis suggests that the educational process applied in this work is rooted in a humanist basis, formed by Ego and Cooperation among students. The PBLA approach, sustained by this Humanization, serves as a basis for the Learning. Thus, the results suggest that humanization is an important part in the education process of a new electrical engineer.

      PubDate: 2017-10-25T16:15:50Z
       
  • Cross-repository aggregation of educational resources
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117
      Author(s): Marcos Mouriño-García, Roberto Pérez-Rodríguez, Luis Anido-Rifón, Manuel J. Fernández-Iglesias, Víctor M. Darriba-Bilbao
      The proliferation of educational resource repositories promoted the development of aggregators to facilitate interoperability, that is, a unified access that would allow users to fetch a given resource independently of its origin. The CROERA system is a repository aggregator that provides access to educational resources independently of the classification taxonomy utilized in the hosting repository. For that, an automated classification algorithm is trained using the information extracted from the metadata of a collection of educational resources hosted in different repositories, which in turn depends on the classification taxonomy used in each case. Then, every resource will be automatically classified on demand independently of the original classification scheme. As a consequence, resources can be retrieved independently of the original taxonomy utilized using any taxonomy supported by the aggregator, and exploratory searches can be made without a previous taxonomy mapping. This approach overcomes one of the recurring problems in taxonomy mapping, namely the one-to-none matching situation. To evaluate the performance of this proposal two methods were applied. Resource classification in categories existing in all repositories was automatically evaluated, obtaining maximum performance values of 84% (F 1 score), 87.8% (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve), 86% (area under the precision-recall curve) and 75.1% (Cohen's κ). In the case of resources not belonging to one of the common categories, human inspection was used as a reference to compute classification performance. In this case, maximum performance values obtained were respectively 69.8%, 73.8%, 75% and 54.3%. These results demonstrate the potential of this approach as a tool to facilitate resource classification, for example to provide a preliminary classification that would require just minor corrections from human classifiers.

      PubDate: 2017-10-25T16:15:50Z
       
  • Improving high school students' executive functions through digital game
           play
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117
      Author(s): Bruce D. Homer, Jan L. Plass, Charles Raffaele, Teresa M. Ober, Alisha Ali
      Executive functions (EF), the skills required to plan, monitor and control cognitive processes, are linked to many important educational and developmental outcomes. The Alien Game is a digital game developed to train the EF subskill of shifting. High school students (N = 82; age range 14–18 years; average = 15.5 years) were asked to play the Alien Game for 20 min per week for 6 consecutive weeks. Two EF measures were administered before and after this intervention: the Dimensional Change Card Sort (DCCS) task (a measure of shifting) and the Flanker task (a measure of inhibition). Students had a significant pre- to posttest increase in DCCS, t (81) = 4.29, p < 0.001, d = 0.54, and Flanker, t (77) = 2.93, p = 0.004, d = 0.22. Controlling for pretest score, gains in shifting were significantly predicted by a measure of game performance in the Alien Game. These findings provide evidence that the Alien Game is having the intended effect of improving EF, and argue that video games can be effective tools for training cognitive skills when they are explicitly designed for this purpose and when a rigorous design approach is used.

      PubDate: 2017-10-25T16:15:50Z
       
  • Analyzing productive learning behaviors for students using immediate
           corrective feedback in a blended learning environment
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117
      Author(s): Xin Chen, Lori Breslow, Jennifer DeBoer
      Undergraduate classes in many science and engineering courses are utilizing asynchronous computer platforms to host educational materials such as lecture videos or discussion forums. These platforms also have the ability to provide immediate feedback to students on formative assessment tasks such as homework problems, reading questions, or weekly quizzes. Although there have been a number of studies on computer-based feedback, there is more we need to know about how students interact with immediate feedback, and how those interactions influence their learning. In this study, we characterize introductory physics students' interactions with one computer-based immediate simple corrective feedback tool, the “checkable answer feature” (CAF), powered by the institutional version of the edX platform. We investigate how much students interact with the CAF, the patterns of interaction, and, ultimately, how these patterns are associated with course performance. We utilize rich quantitative data, including a large volume of server tracking logs that show students’ use the CAF, as well as performance metrics. Our findings show certain patterns of engagement with feedback reflect productive study strategies and significantly predict higher performance. The findings provide guidance for instructional practice and the continued development of online feedback tools in introductory STEM courses.

      PubDate: 2017-10-25T16:15:50Z
       
  • The influence of Gesture-Based Learning System (GBLS) on Learning Outcomes
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117
      Author(s): Moamer Shakroum, Kok Wai Wong, Chun Che Fung
      The effectiveness of Gesture-Based Learning System (GBLS) has been reported in some recent studies. However, not many of those studies have investigated on how GBLS mode influences the learning outcomes. The aim of this study therefore focuses on investigating how GBLS mode impacts the learning outcomes. The findings of this study revealed that GBLS's features positively affect the students' intrinsic motivation. Consequently, the increase in the intrinsic motivation leads to improving the learning outcomes; this study also showed that GBLS's features indirectly influence the learning outcomes via intrinsic motivation. In other words, this study found that the GBLS's features (interactivity and multimodality) create an instructional learning environment that positively influences the students' intrinsic motivation. The increase of the students' positive intrinsic motivation led to enhancing the learning achievements of students.

      PubDate: 2017-10-25T16:15:50Z
       
  • Exploring effects of discussion on visual attention, learning performance,
           and perceptions of students learning with STR-support
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 116
      Author(s): Wu-Yuin Hwang, Yung-Hui Li, Rustam Shadiev
      In this study, we aimed to explore effects of discussion on visual attention, learning performance, and perceptions of non-native English speaking students attending lectures in English in learning environments supported by Speech-to-Text Recognition (STR) system. One experiment was carried out with 60 students who were assigned into the control (n = 30) and experimental (n = 30) groups. Students in the control group attended lectures without discussing lectures content whereas students in the experimental group attended lectures and discussed lectures content. Our result showed that students in the experimental group had higher fixation time during two lectures compared to their counterparts in the control group. We also found that students in the experimental group had higher fixation count during the first lecture compared to the control group but there was no difference between the two groups in fixation count during the second lecture. Our results demonstrated that the experimental group outperformed the control group on both tests. In addition, most students in the two groups had high perceptions towards usefulness of STR-text for learning; however, no differences were found between the two groups in their perceptions towards STR-text. Based on our results, we suggest that learning activities, such as student discussion, need to be introduced during lectures in order to stimulate active learning, which in turn, enhances students’ learning and comprehension of lecturing content. Discussion may encourage and facilitate students to take more active role in their learning.

      PubDate: 2017-10-11T06:42:32Z
       
  • PhD students' presenting, staging and announcing their educational status
           - An analysis of shared images in social media
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 116
      Author(s): Martin Salzmann-Erikson, Henrik Eriksson
      Little research has been conducted on the question of academics' use of social media. The effects of social media on the educational environment of postgraduate students need to be further explored. The purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying values and ideas of being in postgraduate education by analysing 176 posted photos on social media. The findings show that PhD students manifest their educational status by presenting themselves as being in a process, staging academic artefacts and announcing important achievements towards the goal of earning their degree. These activities represent a global understanding of being a PhD student, that exists regardless of nation, gender or ethnicity and as such represents a “meta curricula” that exists above and beyond any locally defined PhD syllabus. It should be considered that the constant mirroring of PhD student life that has been made possible via social platforms seems to gain in importance and that the enculturation into the academic culture that exists among postgraduate students' own activities on social media needs to be taken into account when addressing postgraduate education, in practice as well as in research.

      PubDate: 2017-10-11T06:42:32Z
       
  • Participatory methodologies to promote student engagement in the
           development of educational digital games
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 116
      Author(s): Taciana Pontual Falcão, Flávia Mendes de Andrade e Peres, Dyego Carlos Sales de Morais, Glaucileide da Silva Oliveira
      Engagement is a fundamental condition for learning, which the outdated educational system is failing to sustain for the current generation of students, born in a world permeated with digital technologies. This article presents an analysis of high school students’ engagement while playing the roles of programmers and designers of educational digital games in the Community of Practice of the DEMULTS project, which aims to provide an alternative within the traditional educational system. Data collection was performed within an ethnographic approach with participant observation, questionnaires and social network interaction, and analysis was based on the constructs of Activity Theory. Four groups of students were identified with similar needs and motivations, each engaged at different levels according to the nature of the tasks, interaction with peers and educators, and personal expectations. Results reveal that, even in a supposedly fun and innovative context, the relationship between the object of the activity and the students' needs is crucial to promote engagement and learning. Identifying and taking into account students' needs and expectations is reinforced as an indispensable step in educational interventions.

      PubDate: 2017-10-03T18:41:37Z
       
  • Implementation fidelity in computerised assessment of book reading
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 116
      Author(s): Keith Topping
      Measuring the implementation fidelity (IF) or integrity of interventions is extremely important, since without it a positive or negative outcome cannot be interpreted. However, IF is actually measured relatively rarely. Direct and indirect methods of measurement have been used in the past, but tend to over-emphasize teacher behaviour. This paper focuses on student behaviour collated through computers - an interesting alternative. It deals with the reading of real books and reading achievement, for which variables a very large amount of computerised data was available – on 852,295 students in 3243 schools. Reading achievement was measured pre-post with STAR Reading, a computerised item-banked adaptive norm-referenced test of reading comprehension. IF came from the Accelerated Reader (AR), which measures understanding of independent reading of real books the student has chosen by a quiz. Results showed higher IF was related to higher achievement. Neither IF nor reading achievement related to socio-economic status. Primary (elementary) schools had higher IF and achievement than secondary (high) schools. Females had higher IF and achievement than males. Students of higher reading ability implemented AR at a higher level, but did not gain in reading at a higher level. However, this computerised method of measuring IF with book reading showed limited reliability, no greater than methods emphasising teacher behaviour. In future, IF measures emphasising student response and those emphasising teacher behaviour need to be blended, although the latter will never generate the sample size of the former. This may be true of implementation fidelity in areas other than book reading.

      PubDate: 2017-10-03T18:41:37Z
       
  • Anonymous versus identified peer assessment via a Facebook-based learning
           application: Effects on quality of peer feedback, perceived learning,
           perceived fairness, and attitude toward the system
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 116
      Author(s): Guan-Yu Lin
      This study investigated online peer assessment within a Facebook-based learning application, with a focus on the effects of anonymity. First, it examined anonymity's effects on the distributions of affective, cognitive, and meta-cognitive peer feedback. Second, it looked at the effects of anonymity on learners' perceived learning, their perceptions of whether peer assessment was fair, and their attitudes toward the system. The study's two-group experimental design randomly assigned 32 pre-service teachers either to an identifiable condition (with the assessors' full real names attached), or an anonymous condition; and both groups were asked to provide written comments on five assessees' microteaching performance based on videos of their teaching. The results indicated that the anonymous group provided significantly more cognitive feedback (i.e., vague suggestions, the “extension” type of explicit suggestions for improvement), whereas the identifiable group offered more affective feedback (i.e., supporting, opposing) and more metacogntive feedback (i.e., reflective comments). The anonymous group also perceived that they had learned more from peer assessment and had more positive attitudes toward the system, but they also perceived peer comments as being less fair than the identifiable group did. The findings provide important evidence for the cognitive and pedagogical benefits of anonymity in online peer assessment among pre-service teachers.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T10:40:32Z
       
  • The NISPI framework: Analysing collaborative problem-solving from
           students' physical interactions
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 116
      Author(s): Mutlu Cukurova, Rose Luckin, Eva Millán, Manolis Mavrikis
      Collaborative problem-solving (CPS) is a fundamental skill for success in modern societies, and part of many common constructivist teaching approaches. However, its effective implementation and evaluation in both digital and physical learning environments are challenging for educators. This paper presents an original method for identifying differences in students' CPS behaviours when they are taking part in face-to-face practice-based learning (PBL). The dataset is based on high school and university students' hand position and head direction data, which can be automated deploying existing multimodal learning analytics systems. The framework uses Nonverbal Indexes of Students' Physical Interactivity (NISPI) to interpret the key parameters of students' CPS competence. The results show that the NISPI framework can be used to judge students' CPS competence levels accurately based on their non-verbal behaviour data. The findings have significant implications for design, research and development of educational technology.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T10:40:32Z
       
  • Collaborative agile learning in online environments: Strategies for
           improving team regulation and project management
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 116
      Author(s): Ingrid Noguera, Ana-Elena Guerrero-Roldán, Ricard Masó
      Unsatisfactory prior experiences in collaborative learning influence students' predisposition towards team-based learning activities. Incorporating strategies for helping teams to effectively regulate group work and enhance planning processes may result in an increase in students' engagement with learning activities and collaborative processes. Taking into account the benefits of the agile method for teamwork organisation, this study sought to analyse the usefulness of agile strategies for team regulation and project management in online higher education. An iterative process of course redesign was conducted in the context of an undergraduate project-based learning course during two consecutive semesters. The new design was piloted and evaluated based on the students' and teacher's views and the learning outcomes. A total of 114 students were surveyed about their satisfaction with the course and their perception of the usefulness of the method. Two interviews were conducted to collect the teacher's opinions. The results of the study indicate that agile strategies are useful for improving students' online project management and collaboration. Nevertheless, no significant impact has been observed in students' satisfaction nor in the overall learning outcomes.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T10:40:32Z
       
  • Testing a path-analytic model of adult dropout in online degree programs
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 116
      Author(s): Hee Jun Choi, Ji-Hye Park
      Using large samples from multiple online degree programs, this study aimed to empirically identify the direct and indirect relationships between major adult dropout factors (i.e., basic scholastic aptitude, physical constraints, interaction with course content, satisfaction, and GPA) and provide educational practitioners with insights that will enable them to indirectly handle uncontrollable adult dropout factors based on the empirical evidence. To achieve these purposes, we formulated and empirically tested a hypothesized path model encompassing multiple hypotheses derived from related literature. We found that the physical constraints variable has statistically significant direct and indirect relationships through interactions with course content, satisfaction, and GPA with adult students’ dropout decisions, and the basic scholastic aptitude variable has an indirect relationship with dropout decisions through interactions with course content and GPA. This paper concludes by discussing the implications of our findings for educational practitioners in online degree programs.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T10:40:32Z
       
  • Educational apps from the Android Google Play for Greek preschoolers: A
           systematic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 116
      Author(s): Stamatios Papadakis, Michail Kalogiannakis, Nicholas Zaranis
      In the seven years since the introduction of the tablet (Apple iPad) in 2010, the use of software for smart mobile devices has grown rapidly in popularity and has become a hotly debated issue in the field of education and child development. However, the rise in popularity of mobile applications (apps) mainly addressed to young children is not in line with a corresponding increase in their quality, as there is conflicting evidence about the real value and suitability of educational apps. The purpose of this study was to examine whether self-proclaimed educational apps for Greek preschoolers have been designed in accordance with developmentally appropriate standards to contribute to the social, emotional and cognitive development of children in formal and informal learning environments. The study results were discouraging. The majority of the apps aimed to teach children the basics about numbers and letters. Overall, they were drill-and-practice-style, based on a low level of thinking skills, thereby promoting rote learning, and were unable to contribute to a deeper conceptual understanding of certain concepts.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T10:40:32Z
       
  • Combining e-books with mind mapping in a reciprocal teaching strategy for
           a classical Chinese course
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 116
      Author(s): Ting-Ting Wu, An-Chi Chen
      Chinese texts contain the essence of traditional Chinese culture and humanistic spirit, although they are obscure and difficult to understand. The integration of e-books into language learning can play a positive role and improve reading comprehension because of the diversified support tools and features of multimedia interaction in e-books. Therefore, this study investigated the teaching of classical Chinese with a combination of e-books, reciprocal teaching, and mind mapping; the effects of this approach on reading comprehension and knowledge sharing were explored. The sample consisted of two tenth-grade classes of a vocational school. Both groups received the reciprocal teaching strategy with mind mapping. The control group received traditional paper books; the experimental group received e-books. Quantitative and qualitative analyses were used in this study. The results were as follows. (1) Classical Chinese reading comprehension aspect: The experimental group performed more satisfactorily than did the control group, indicating that the integration of the e-book resulted in this measurable improvement by enhancing learners’ reading comprehension. (2) Knowledge sharing aspect: The pretest and posttest scores significantly differed between the experimental and control groups, indicating that diversified support tools can promote knowledge sharing. (3) Mind-mapping aspect: the scores of the whole structure (color and image), association skills, and the contents of the articles were more satisfactory in the experimental group than in the control group. (4) Learners had a positive attitude toward the combination of e-books, reciprocal teaching, and mind mapping.

      PubDate: 2017-09-20T03:55:20Z
       
  • Editorial Board/Publication information
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 115


      PubDate: 2017-09-20T03:55:20Z
       
  • Learning symbols from permanent and transient visual presentations: Don't
           overplay the hand
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 116
      Author(s): Juan C. Castro-Alonso, Paul Ayres, Mona Wong, Fred Paas
      Instructional dynamic pictures (animations and videos) contain transient visual information. Consequently, when learning from dynamic pictures, students must process in working memory the current images while trying to remember the images that left the screen. This additional activity in working memory may lead dynamic pictures to be less suitable instructional materials than comparable static pictures, which are more permanent. In order to directly show the influence of transient visual information on dynamic learning environments, we designed a well-matched comparison between a permanent and a transient presentation of an abstract-symbol memory task on the computer. In the task, 104 university students (50% females) had to memorize the type, color, and position of the symbols in a rectangular configuration. In addition, an embodied cognition factor was included where the symbols in the task were either shown with a precision grasping static hand or not. We also assessed how individual characteristics (spatial ability, spatial memory span, and gender) influenced performance. Results showed that (a) permanent outperformed transient presentations, (b) observing hands hindered learning, and (c) high spatial ability and high spatial memory span were beneficial, but gender did not affect performance.

      PubDate: 2017-09-13T15:18:33Z
       
  • The effect of online argumentation of socio-scientific issues on students'
           scientific competencies and sustainability attitudes
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 116
      Author(s): Chun-Yen Tsai
      One focal point of science learning is to develop students' ability to actively participate in discussions of socio-scientific issues (SSIs) in their daily lives. This study proposed the SSIs-Online-Argumentation Pattern (SOAP) to develop a pedagogical strategy enabling students to participate in online argumentation of SSIs. Two quasi-experiments were conducted to investigate the variations in scientific competencies and sustainability attitudes of students following the SOAP strategy. The participants were 127 senior high school students and 68 undergraduates respectively. Students' scientific competencies and sustainability attitudes were assessed using quantitative methods. The results showed that the SOAP strategy led to differences in high school students' scientific competencies. The mean scientific competency of the experimental group was higher than that of the comparison group in the post-test and in the delayed test. Specifically, for the constructs ‘identifying scientific issues’ and ‘using scientific evidence’, the difference between the two groups did not reach significance in the post-test and in the delayed test. The results showed that the SOAP strategy resulted in differences in undergraduates' sustainability attitudes. In the post-test, the mean sustainability attitude of the experimental group was higher than that of the comparison group. Specifically, for the constructs of ‘economic’ aspect, the post-test difference between the two groups did not reach significance. Finally, this research proposed suggestions and implications for future studies related to SSIs and science education.

      PubDate: 2017-09-13T15:18:33Z
       
  • Effect of augmented reality game Pokémon GO on cognitive performance and
           emotional intelligence in adolescent young
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 116
      Author(s): Alberto Ruiz-Ariza, Rafael Antonio Casuso, Sara Suarez-Manzano, Emilio J. Martínez-López
      The main aim was to analyse the effect of 8 weeks of Pokémon GO on cognitive performance (memory, selective attention, concentration, mathematical calculation and linguistic reasoning) and emotional intelligence (well-being, self-control, emotionality and sociability) in Spanish adolescents between 12 and 15 years. A longitudinal design was used, with a Control Group (n = 103) that did not use Pokémon GO, and Experimental Group (n = 87) that used Pokémon GO during 8 weeks. Age, sex, BMI, maternal educational level, number of computers at home and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were used as confounders. Results showed that players walked 54 km and spent 40 min/day playing in this period. Boys played more, won more points and reached a higher level in the game than girls. The players playing Pokémon GO significantly increased their selective attention (p = 0.003), concentration levels (p < 0.001), and sociability levels (p = 0.003) against their peers. It is concluded that Pokémon GO increases, in a playful way, the amount of daily exercise in adolescents, could positively affect their cognitive performance, and improve the social relationships. Further studies are required to perform comparisons between single and collaborative play and to identify the pedagogical benefits through some subjects such as Physical Education.

      PubDate: 2017-09-13T15:18:33Z
       
  • Principle-based design: Development of adaptive mathematics teaching
           practices and beliefs in a knowledge building environment
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 115
      Author(s): Huang-Yao Hong, Ching Sing Chai
      This study investigated teacher-education students' development of adaptive mathematics teaching practices and beliefs in an online knowledge building environment under principle-based design guidance. Participants were students who took a university course titled Middle-School Mathematics Teaching over a year. Data analyses focused on (a) students' collaborative lesson design activities as documented in an online database, (b) students' video-taped teaching practices, and (c) students’ mathematical beliefs using a survey. Correspondingly, the results indicate that the principle-based design guidance (a) was conducive in promoting reflective and collaborative knowledge work in the online community, (b) was likely to motivate the participants to progressively practice more adaptive teaching, and (c) facilitated their development towards more constructivist-oriented mathematical beliefs.

      PubDate: 2017-09-02T00:20:49Z
       
  • Re-designed flipped learning model in an academic course: The role of
           co-creation and co-regulation
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 115
      Author(s): Ina Blau, Tamar Shamir-Inbal
      In traditional flipped classroom (FC), learning of new content mostly occurs through watching videos and transferring information from instructor to students utilizing technological tools. The present study devised and examined a novel extension of the FC model. This model adds components that acknowledge the roles of instructor, learners, peer assessment, and embedded evaluation. Moreover, it highlights the value of technology and digital tools in supporting and enhancing active individual and collaborative learning, and the development of self-regulated strategies in in-class and out-of-class settings. The model was investigated in a qualitative study, which was conducted in a blended academic course, including synchronous and asynchronous lessons. The participants were 36 graduate students who were studying towards a Master Degree in Education. The paper analyzed learning experiences and their interpretations by the students. In contrast to traditional FC model, the findings revealed active learning of students in both in- and out-of-class settings that took place before, during, and after the lesson. The instructor promoted extensive independent learning, learning regulation, continuous dialogue and collaborative interactions among peers. The re-designed model highlights co-creation of the course content and of digital learning outcomes by students, self-regulation and teamwork co-regulation, which are rare in higher education.

      PubDate: 2017-09-02T00:20:49Z
       
  • The development and evaluation of a tablet painting application for
           enhancing the artistic expression skills of students through reflection
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 115
      Author(s): Tracy Kwei-Liang Ho, Huann-shyang Lin, Ching-Kong Chen, Ling Lee
      Researchers have been concerned about the deterioration of artistic creativity among children during primary schooling. While modern technologies offer considerable potential to address this issue, they have thus far been inadequate for providing the necessary foundation to nurture and enhance the artistic expression skills of students. This study assessed the effect of a tablet application (app) called “PresentAsian” designed with the unique ability to record the illustration drawing process including any manipulations in stroke parameters in addition to providing educational tutorials. An experimental study was conducted to compare the artistic expression and originality between students learning with reflection support and learning with direct teaching in replication. Students learning with reflection support demonstrated significantly higher scores not only in four skill subcomponents—brushwork diversity, brushwork fluency, wet/dry contrast and replication similarity—and overall replication skill, but also in the originality of brushwork. Using this tablet app for continuous analysis, synthesis and practice will allow students to acquire creative illustration skills. This study provides evidence that the continued development of creative modern technologies and apps utilizing these technologies in modern-day classrooms will cultivate and enrich the artistic expression skills of children.

      PubDate: 2017-09-02T00:20:49Z
       
  • Taiwanese high school teachers' conceptions of mobile learning
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 115
      Author(s): Wen-Min Hsieh, Chin-Chung Tsai
      This qualitative study describes the results of a phenomenographic analysis of teachers' conceptions of mobile learning. Fifteen senior high school (Grades 10–12) teachers from five schools in northern Taiwan involved in a national mobile learning program participated in this study. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews. Through data analysis, six qualitatively different conceptions of mobile learning were obtained: 1) meeting students' preferences, 2) conducting classes with efficiency, 3) invigorating and enhancing learning, 4) parting from traditional teaching, 5) focusing on student ownership, and 6) extending learning beyond school. The conception categories form a hierarchy and show a trajectory moving from teacher-/content-oriented to learner-/learning-oriented conceptions. In addition, technology was almost invisible in the more sophisticated conceptions. Finally, juxtaposing the conception categories with the replacement, amplification, and transformation framework revealed that teachers’ central ideas regarding mobile learning fell within the amplification category, suggesting the use of technology mainly to increase efficiency and productivity. It is concluded that for mobile devices to exert transformative power on learning, it might be necessary to cultivate the more sophisticated conceptions of mobile learning among teachers.

      PubDate: 2017-09-02T00:20:49Z
       
  • A comprehensive text analysis of lecture slides to generate concept maps
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 115
      Author(s): Thushari Atapattu, Katrina Falkner, Nickolas Falkner
      Current instructional methods widely support verbal learning through linear and sequential teaching materials, focusing on isolated pieces of information. However, an important aspect of learning design is to facilitate students in identifying relationships between information. The transformation of linearity in teaching resources into integrated network models such as concept maps facilitates effective knowledge organisation by constructing relationships between new and existing knowledge. However, the manual construction of concept maps from teaching materials places an additional workload on the academics involved. Consequently, this research investigates the effectiveness of automated approaches in extracting concept maps from lecture slides and the suitability of auto-generated concept maps as a pedagogical tool. We develop a set of Natural Language Processing (NLP) algorithms to support concept-relation-concept triple extraction to form concept maps. Structural and graph-based features are utilised to rank the triples according to their importance. The natural layout of the lecture slides is incorporated to organise the triples in a hierarchy, facilitating highly integrated structure. Our evaluation studies identify promising results, with several case studies demonstrating a statistically significant correlation (rs > 0.455) between auto-generated concept maps and human experts' judgment. Auto-generated concept maps were rated from ‘good’ to ‘very good’ by the academics on evaluation factors such as coverage, accuracy, and suitability as a pedagogical tool. Thus, auto-generated concept maps from this research can be utilised as a positive alternative to the manual construction of expert concept maps and further, it is possible to utilise these maps for a wider range of applications including knowledge organisation and reflective visualisation of course contents. Our research contributes to bridging the gap between linearity in teaching materials and the necessity of creating integrated network models from teaching resources.

      PubDate: 2017-09-02T00:20:49Z
       
  • A social network analysis on elementary student engagement in the
           networked creation community
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 115
      Author(s): Chen-Chung Liu, Yu-Chi Chen, Shu-Ju Diana Tai
      The recent development of social networking tools has enabled students to collaborate to learn in the social constructivists' approach. Yet, the learning process in the networked creation community involves complex dynamics of social networking activities between students to produce online artifacts. This study thus investigated how elementary students teamed and collaborated with peers to create multimedia stories and analyzed their engagement with social network analysis (SNA). This study confirmed that the free teaming between students had a positive impact on their engagement. The SNA also revealed that no particular gender showed higher popularity (in-degree centrality) and activeness (out-degree centrality) in the social network. However, students' knowledge level had a significant impact on their structural positions in the social network. Students of lower proficiency were more active in the social network while their knowledge level did not directly influence their popularity. Further triangulating the social network with students' perceptual engagement indicated that students’ structural positions in the social network significantly influenced their flow perception and motivation in the networked creation activity. The students who occupied the central position in the out-degree centrality perceived higher level perceptual engagement, while those who occupied the central positions in the in-degree centrality perceived lower level perceptual engagement. The implications of the educational practice are discussed and the direction for future studies is also addressed.

      PubDate: 2017-09-02T00:20:49Z
       
  • Studies of student engagement in gamified online discussions
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 115
      Author(s): Lu Ding, ChanMin Kim, Michael Orey
      This article presents two trial studies using the gamification approach in online discussions to increase student engagement. A gamified online discussion tool, gEchoLu, was designed and implemented. The first trial focused on examining student engagement in online discussions. The results indicated that gEchoLu had positive influences on student behavioral engagement, emotional engagement, and cognitive engagement. The second trial aimed to investigate the effect of specific game elements implemented in gEchoLu on student motivation and engagement in online discussions. Findings from the second trial suggested that badges, thumps-ups, progress bars, and avatars in gEchoLu promoted student engagement in online discussions. The limitations and implications are discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-09-02T00:20:49Z
       
  • What affects learner's higher-order thinking in technology-enhanced
           learning environments' The effects of learner factors
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 115
      Author(s): Jihyun Lee, Hyoseon Choi
      Higher-order thinking has long been confirmed as a critical predictor of success, both in academia and the workplace. Widespread endeavors to foster higher-order thinking have involved implementing instructional design interventions that engage learners in complicated cognitive activities. One representative design approach is the technology-enhanced learning environment (TEL), in which technological affordances are used to facilitate learners' higher-order thinking activities. For such design factors to work as intended, however, learner factors such as epistemological beliefs, attitudes toward technology use, and approaches to learning must lay the groundwork for the design intervention. This study investigated how learner factors interactively affected higher-order thinking in the contexts of TEL. A total of 487 undergraduates enrolled in various courses across seven universities in South Korea participated in this study. Structural equation modeling (SEM) revealed that learners' higher-order thinking was strongly and directly affected by deep learning approaches, but not by epistemological beliefs or attitudes toward technology use. Instead, these two factors indirectly affected higher-order thinking, mediated through the learner's deep learning approach. The theoretical and practical implications of the results for promoting higher-order thinking in TEL contexts are discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-09-02T00:20:49Z
       
  • Effects of different interactions on students' sense of community in
           e-learning environment
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 115
      Author(s): Nuan Luo, Mingli Zhang, Dan Qi
      While e-learning is increasingly being adopted, the issue of e-learning continuous usage has been an important task both in practice and in academia. Grounded in social exchange theory, this study aims to understand how interactions influence students' sense of community and continuous use intention of e-learning platform. A total of 643 students participated in this study. The results indicate that student-instructor interaction and student-student interaction significantly strengthen students' sense of membership and influence, in turn, promoting their stickiness with the e-learning platform. In addition, student-content interaction moderates the relationship between interactions among members and their sense of community. For online learning institutions, the results suggest that managers may need to provide relevant mechanisms to encourage interactions in e-learning platform for driving students' continuous usage.

      PubDate: 2017-09-02T00:20:49Z
       
  • Does gender stereotype threat in gamified educational environments cause
           anxiety' An experimental study
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 115
      Author(s): Josmario Albuquerque, Ig I. Bittencourt, Jorge A.P.M. Coelho, Alan P. Silva
      Gamification has been used by many researchers and practitioners in online education to increase students' motivation and engagement. However, studies showed that gamification elements also caused negative effects on learning. Moreover, recent investigations reported stereotype threat by gender had impacted students performance, in particular, the use of a male-dominant leaderboard affected women math performance. In this sense, we attained to conduct a hypothetical study to investigate whether gender stereotype threat in online gamified educational scenarios influences anxiety and performance. We conducted a three-stage survey where participants were asked indirectly about their anxiety, then they were redirected to a hypothetical online gamified system to solve a logic quiz. Afterward, their anxiety was assessed one more time in order to find out how much it had changed. We found evidence indicating the male-stereotyped environment affected participants’ anxiety.

      PubDate: 2017-09-02T00:20:49Z
       
  • “Sore eyes and distracted” or “excited and confident”' – The
           role of perceived negative consequences of using ICT for perceived
           usefulness and self-efficacy
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 115
      Author(s): Ronny Scherer, Ove E. Hatlevik
      Many adolescents feel confident about using information and communication technology (ICT) and believe that it can help them to learn and achieve. However, recent research also shows that some adolescents are reporting physical discomfort from using ICT such as sore eyes and pain in neck and shoulders. This paper explores how primary school students perceive the negative consequences of using ICT (i.e., discomfort and distraction) in relation to the use of ICT for school and leisure purposes, their self-beliefs, and the perceived usefulness of ICT. Using the data obtained from a large sample of Norwegian seventh-graders (N = 1,640, between 12 and 13 years old), we performed structural equation modelling to test our assumptions on the role of students' discomfort from using ICT. We hypothesized an indirect effects model, in which the use of ICT and students' beliefs are indirectly associated via perceived discomfort. Our findings are two-fold: First, discomfort from using ICT was negatively related to students’ use of ICT for leisure; yet neither to self-efficacy in using ICT nor perceived usefulness. In contrast, perceived distraction by ICT was negatively related to perceived usefulness, yet positively associated with ICT use in lessons. Second, the direct and positive relations among the use of ICT, perceived usefulness, and self-efficacy were statistically significant. These findings uncover that the potentially negative consequences of distraction relate to the extent to which students perceive ICT as useful.

      PubDate: 2017-09-02T00:20:49Z
       
  • Community playgroup social media and parental learning about young
           children's play
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 115
      Author(s): K. McLean, S. Edwards, H. Morris
      Although parents are active in social media the use of social media as a collaborative tool for parental learning about play is yet to be fully realised. Models for parental education including those that use social media, predominantly use top-down, deficit-based approaches to involving parents in learning about children's play. Increasing social media use by parents aligned with their participation in community playgroups suggests a powerful social situation for parental learning about play that is both collaborative and more connected to parents' life-worlds than traditional approaches. As an important first step to realising the pedagogical potential of social media for contributing to parental learning about play, this paper uses the socio-cultural concept of ‘learning activity’ to identify the nature of what parents are thinking about their children's play in community playgroup social media. The findings indicated that parents (N = 16) did have content knowledge of children's play-types and how these relate to learning. Importantly, the findings point to a transformational role for social media in parental education initiatives, which utilises the collaborative functionality of social media and situates parents positively as holding valuable knowledge that can be shared and extended upon with others via social media.

      PubDate: 2017-09-02T00:20:49Z
       
  • Editorial Board/Publication information
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 114


      PubDate: 2017-09-02T00:20:49Z
       
  • Integrating ICT into teacher education programs from a TPACK perspective:
           Exploring perceptions of university lecturers
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 115
      Author(s): Vicente Chua Reyes, Christine Reading, Helen Doyle, Sue Gregory
      Three distinct clusters were identified from a survey study of a sample of 127 unit coordinators from a regional Australian University. The clusters emerged after a survey that explored perceptions of pedagogical practices that incorporated the use of Information Communication and Technology (ICT). The key components of the survey were based on seven constructs derived from the Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge (TPACK). For future investigations of TPACK application in university contexts, a three-cluster configuration of teacher-practitioners is proposed that requires empirical confirmation. Alongside the theorised clusters of university lecturers according to their perceived engagement with ICT, several layers of technology policy disconnect have also been discovered. The relevance of the findings of the inquiry and their implications on universities that conduct ICT intensive courses are also discussed, especially in relation to improving teaching practices.

      PubDate: 2017-08-03T07:05:10Z
       
  • Examining the effects of learner-learner interactions on satisfaction and
           learning in an online undergraduate course
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 115
      Author(s): Murat Kurucay, Fethi A. Inan
      The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of learner-learner interactions on students' perceived learning, achievement, and satisfaction in an online undergraduate course. A quasi-experimental research design was conducted with 77 students registered into an online course. Two sections of the course were randomly assigned to control and treatment conditions. While students in the control group completed course assignments individually, students in the treatment group completed the assignments in small groups. The results of the study revealed that learner-learner interaction has a significant effect on students' achievement in an online course. Students working collaboratively achieved significantly higher than those working individually. Furthermore, students’ perceptions of online collaboration increased after being involved in online group activities.

      PubDate: 2017-08-03T07:05:10Z
       
 
 
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