for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
Followed Journals
Journal you Follow: 0
 
Sign Up to follow journals, search in your chosen journals and, optionally, receive Email Alerts when new issues of your Followed Journals are published.
Already have an account? Sign In to see the journals you follow.
Journal Cover Computers & Education
  [SJR: 3.143]   [H-I: 109]   [141 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0360-1315
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3123 journals]
  • Evaluating the effectiveness of a game-based rational number training -
           In-game metrics as learning indicators
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 120
      Author(s): Kristian Kiili, Korbinian Moeller, Manuel Ninaus
      It was argued recently that number line based training supports the development of conceptual rational number knowledge. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated training effects of a digital game based on the measurement interpretation of rational numbers. Ninety-five fourth graders were assigned to either a game-based training group (n = 54) who played a digital rational number game for five 30-min sessions or a control group (n = 41) who attended regular math curriculum. Conceptual rational number knowledge was assessed in a pre- and posttest session. Additionally, the game groups' playing behavior was evaluated. Results indicated that the game-based training group improved their conceptual rational number knowledge significantly more strongly than the control group. In particular, improvement of the game-based training group was driven by significant performance increases in number magnitude estimation and ordering tasks. Moreover, results revealed that in-game metrics, such as overall game performance and maximum level achieved provided valid information about students’ conceptual rational number knowledge at posttest. Therefore, results of the current study not only suggest that aspects of conceptual rational number knowledge can be improved by a game-based training but also that in-game metrics provide crucial indicators for learning.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:47:05Z
       
  • A framework for cooperative and interactive mobile learning to improve
           online information evaluation skills
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 120
      Author(s): Nadia Parsazadeh, Rosmah Ali, Mehran Rezaei
      The quality of online information is highly variable because anyone can post data on the internet, and not all online sources are equally reliable, valuable, or accurate. Previous studies reveal problems with online information evaluation skills and a lack of ability in using evaluation criteria, including currency, relevance, authority, accuracy and purpose. The primary purpose of this study is to develop a framework for cooperative and interactive mobile learning to improve students' online information evaluation skills. A mobile learning application is subsequently developed based on the proposed framework. To assess the effectiveness of the developed application, an experiment is conducted on diploma students in a university. A usability questionnaire is conducted on an experimental group to identify students' perceptions regarding the usability of the developed mobile application. The experimental results indicate that the application is significantly more effective with an effect size of 1.91 in improving students’ online information evaluation skills than traditional learning. The results contribute to the extant literature in the context of mobile learning by identifying usability evaluation features and providing a framework for developing cooperative and interactive mobile learning. The implications of the present findings for research and instructional practice are discussed.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:47:05Z
       
  • Exploring communities of inquiry in Massive Open Online Courses
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 119
      Author(s): Vitomir Kovanović, Srećko Joksimović, Oleksandra Poquet, Thieme Hennis, Iva Čukić, Pieter de Vries, Marek Hatala, Shane Dawson, George Siemens, Dragan Gašević
      This study presents an evaluation of the Community of Inquiry (CoI) survey instrument developed by Arbaugh et al. (2008) within the context of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). The study reports the results of a reliability analysis and exploratory factor analysis of the CoI survey instrument using the data of 1487 students from five MOOC courses. The findings confirmed the reliability and validity of the CoI survey instrument for the assessment of the key dimensions of the CoI model: teaching presence, social presence, and cognitive presence. Although the CoI survey instrument captured the same latent constructs within the MOOC context as in the Garrison's three-factor model (Garrison et al., 1999), analyses suggested a six-factor model with additional three factors as a better fit to the data. These additional factors were 1) course organization and design (a sub-component of teaching presence), 2) group affectivity (a sub-component of social presence), and 3) resolution phase of inquiry learning (a sub-component of cognitive presence). The emergence of these additional factors revealed that the discrepancies between the dynamics of the traditional online courses and MOOCs affect the student perceptions of the three CoI presences. Based on the results of our analysis, we provide an update to the famous CoI model which captures the distinctive characteristics of the CoI model within the MOOC setting. The results of the study and their implications are further discussed.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:47:05Z
       
  • Internet source evaluation: The role of implicit associations and
           psychophysiological self-regulation
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 119
      Author(s): Lucia Mason, Sara Scrimin, Maria Caterina Tornatora, Caterina Suitner, Angelica Moè
      This study focused on middle school students' source evaluation skills as a key component of digital literacy. Specifically, it examined the role of two unexplored individual factors that may affect the evaluation of sources providing information about the controversial topic of the health risks associated with the use of mobile phones. The factors were the implicit association of mobile phone with health or no health, and psychophysiological self-regulation as reflected in basal Heart Rate Variability (HRV). Seventy-two seventh graders read six webpages that provided contrasting information on the unsettled topic of the potential health risks related to the use of mobile phones. Then they were asked to rank-order the six websites along the dimension of reliability (source evaluation). Findings revealed that students were able to discriminate between the most and least reliable websites, justifying their ranking in light of different criteria. However, overall, they were little accurate in rank-ordering all six Internet sources. Both implicit associations and HRV correlated with source evaluation. The interaction between the two individual variables was a significant predictor of participants’ performance in rank-ordering the websites for reliability. A slope analysis revealed that when students had an average psychophysiological self-regulation, the stronger their association of the mobile phone with health, the better their performance on source evaluation. Theoretical and educational significances of the study are discussed.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:47:05Z
       
  • Delaying access to a problem-skipping option increases effortful practice:
           Application of an A/B test in large-scale online learning
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 119
      Author(s): Alexander O. Savi, Nienke M. Ruijs, Gunter K.J. Maris, Han L.J. van der Maas
      We report on an online double-blind randomized controlled field experiment (A/B test) in Math Garden, a computer adaptive practice system with over 150,000 active primary school children. The experiment was designed to eliminate an unforeseen opportunity to practice with minimal effort. Some children tend to skip problems that require deliberate effort, and only attempt problems that they can spontaneously answer. The intervention delayed the option to skip a problem, thereby promoting effortful practice. The results reveal an increase in the exerted effort, without being at the expense of engagement. Whether the additional effort positively affected the children's learning gains could not be concluded. Finally, in addition to these substantial results, the experiment demonstrates some of the advantages of A/B tests, such as the unique opportunity to apply truly blind randomized field experiments in educational science.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:47:05Z
       
  • Associations among scaffold presentation, reward mechanisms and
           problem-solving behaviors in game play
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 119
      Author(s): Chuen-Tsai Sun, Li-Xian Chen, Hsiu-Mei Chu
      Learning assistance tools used with digital games—commonly called scaffolds—can reduce player frustration and help them create problem-solving strategies while supporting achievement. Reward mechanisms in the form of external incentives are also believed to enhance motivation and promote learning, but possibly at the expense of excessive learner reliance. Some researchers have suggested that reward mechanisms can be used to discourage players from becoming dependent on scaffolds. For this study we customized Professor Sudoku, a simplified version of the popular digital reasoning game, to investigate the effects of scaffold presentation-plus-reward mechanism on problem-solving behaviors and actions aimed at leveling-up. A total of 126 participants were divided into active scaffold (providing direct assistance to players at the beginning of a game), passive scaffold (provided by the game system when players made three mistakes within a specified time frame), and hidden scaffold groups (accessible at any time). Each scaffold served three functions: critical feature marking, frustration control, and demonstration. The three groups were given point-gain and point-loss reward mechanisms. Our data indicate that the appropriate presentation of one or more scaffolds reduced player reliance on support, thereby increasing the potential for positive learning effects and reducing frustration. Results suggest that the reward mechanism promoted independent problem solving instead of reliance on scaffolds, and that the addition of scaffolds and reward mechanisms encouraged experienced players to create new rules, overcome the limitations of existing rules, and develop more complex learning strategies. We discuss the need to carefully design scaffold presentation type according to specific instructional purposes, and possible benefits for teachers in terms of analyzing the difficulties that individual students face when solving numerical problems.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:47:05Z
       
  • Exploring the effect of using different levels of emotional design
           features in multimedia science learning
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 119
      Author(s): Ahmet Murat Uzun, Zahide Yıldırım
      The current study aims to examine the influence of incorporating different emotional design approaches into multimedia on 7th grade middle school students’ positive emotions, mental effort investments and learning achievements (recall and transfer). To this end, four different instructional materials were created. Each material was identical, with only the extent of emotional design differing. For the Neutral Design (ND) group, none of the emotional design principles were used (monochromatic grayscale). For the Colorful Design (CD) group, attention-grabbing, bright and saturated colors were added to the material. For the Anthropomorphic Design (AD) group, expressive facial expressions (anthropomorphism of lifeless objects and expressive facial expressions of human characters) were incorporated into the material. Finally, for the Anthropomorphic Design and Sound Effects (ADSE) group, interesting sound effects were also used. The study was conducted at a middle school with a group of 106 students. Positive emotions were measured using an emWave emotion detection device. Results revealed that positive emotions generally increased as the amount of emotional design features increased. However, while students who used the Colorful Design invested more mental effort compared to students who used the Neutral Design, students who used the Anthropomorphic Design and Sound Effects (ADSE) invested less mental effort compared to students who used the Colorful Design. In addition, students who used the Colorful Design outperformed students who used the Neutral Design in terms of their recall scores. No significant difference in terms of transfer of learning scores was observed across the groups. Results were discussed with respect to different views in the literature regarding the use of emotional design in multimedia.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:47:05Z
       
  • Could the mobile and social perspectives of mobile social learning
           platforms motivate learners to learn continuously'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Keng-Boon Ooi, Jun-Jie Hew, Voon-Hsien Lee
      Learning with smart mobile devices and mobile social networks is an emerging and current trend that deserves attention. Nonetheless, the post-adoption continuance behaviours of learners are still a neglected research focus. Moreover, not much study has examined this research area from a mobile and social perspective. In view of these, this study aims to investigate the continued use of mobile social networks as a platform for learning through a mobile and social perspective. The Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modelling technique was engaged to analyse a sample that consists of 229 university students, who involve themselves in using mobile social learning platforms for learning purposes. Mobile usefulness, mobile ease of use, and sense of belonging were found to have significant direct influence over satisfaction, which directly influences learners’ site attachment and continued use. Other than satisfaction, site attachment is another direct and significant predictor of continued use. From the mediation analysis, although perceived mobility and social presence have no direct impact over satisfaction, they affect satisfaction indirectly through mobile usefulness and sense of belonging respectively. Serving as a forerunner in examining the continued use of mobile social learning platforms for learning from a mobile and social perspective, this study has closed several crucial literature gaps and provided useful insights to learning institutions and mobile social networking service providers on developing a better mobile social environmental for learning purposes.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:47:05Z
       
  • Are digital natives open to change' Examining flexible thinking and
           resistance to change
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Miri Barak
      The goal of this study was to examine university students' flexible thinking and resistance to change (as an opposite trait) according to their expertise in information and communication technology (ICT). An exploratory study was conducted, wherein an online questionnaire was administered to undergraduates (N = 679) from two higher education institutions. The findings show that undergraduates who are inclined to adapt to new learning situations are less likely to seek routine, react emotionally, and have short-term focus. The findings also indicated that technology proficient students are more likely to be flexible in thought and less inclined to resist change than those who are less technology savvy. Moreover, technology proficient students who prefer to learn in collaboration reported the highest inclination to think flexibly. This may indicate the importance of integrating collaborative technology as means for facilitating flexible thinking; thus preparing higher education students to a world of online communication and teamwork.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:47:05Z
       
  • Improving programming skills in engineering education through
           problem-based game projects with Scratch
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Damla Topalli, Nergiz Ercil Cagiltay
      Nowadays, programming skills are receiving widespread attention for different age groups alongside occupational education programs to better prepare individuals for their future careers. However, introducing programming concepts in an appropriate manner is a challenge in higher education. The main assumption of this study is that enhancing the classical introduction to programming courses through real-life problem-based game development with Scratch programming environment potentially improves the learners' programming skills and motivation. Accordingly, in this study, during one academic semester period, the Introduction to Programming course for engineering students is enriched up to a certain level through real-life game development projects with Scratch. The students are followed within a four-year period starting from freshman until their graduation. The progress of the students who have taken the Introduction to Programming course in enriched or classical form in the fourth year Senior-project course are evaluated. The results show that by slightly improving the course curriculum through real-life game development projects in the Scratch environment, students’ performance on the graduation projects improved significantly. As a conclusion, game-based learning, problem-based learning, visual programming and projects are technologies that can potentially help learners to perform better in the introduction to programming course, in turn affecting their performances in projects.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:47:05Z
       
  • Off-task multitasking, note-taking and lower- and higher-order classroom
           learning
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Bradley M. Waite, Rachel Lindberg, Brittany Ernst, Laura L. Bowman, Laura E. Levine
      We examined whether multitasking via concurrent off-task text messaging during an academic presentation impacted students’ performance on tests assessing lower-order and higher-order learning. College students (N = 183) were assigned to one of two conditions involving either concurrent texting or not texting during an academic presentation, or to a no presentation condition. Students in presentation conditions were encouraged to take hand-written notes. Between-participants analyses revealed that students who saw the presentation performed better on learning measures than the control group who did not see the presentation, indicating that students did learn from the presentations. Non-texters scored higher than texters on multiple choice tests of factual, lower-order information (e.g., knowledge, comprehension), but not on essays requiring higher-order application, analysis, evaluation, and synthesis of information. Within-participants analyses demonstrated that texters performed more poorly on lower-order questions that were based on information presented at times when they were texting. Non-texters took more quality notes than texters; amount of quality notes was positively related to test scores of all types. The amount of quality notes taken partially mediated the relationship between texting condition and multiple choice test scores. It appears that multitasking with media devices during an academic presentation interferes with note-taking and the encoding of information specific to the presentation.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:47:05Z
       
  • Word processors as monarchs: Computer-generated feedback can exercise
           power over and influence EAL learners' identity representations
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Amin Zaini
      While the efficacy of computer-generated feedback in affecting learners' scores, errors, and writing skills has already been established, the impact of such feedback on learners' identity representations remains unexplored. The current paper explores the ways in which computer-generated feedback from Microsoft Word Office™ (MWO) and Grammarly influences English as an Additional Language (EAL) learners' identity representations while writing on a screen. To this end three participants were involved in a case study whereby they were asked to complete five writing tasks. Power relations, intertextuality and multimodality levels, and attitudes—in their technical sense—as relevant concepts were employed to explore potential factors that influence EAL writers’ identity representations. The results obtained from think-aloud sessions and interviews show that while the participants relied on computer-generated feedback to spell correctly and to make well-formed sentences, they experienced pressures, control and power from automatic feedback, which subsequently influenced their identity representations.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:47:05Z
       
  • Enhancing student learning experience with technology-mediated
           gamification: An empirical study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Crystal Han-Huei Tsay, Alexander Kofinas, Jing Luo
      We evaluated the use of gamification to facilitate a student-centered learning environment within an undergraduate Year 2 Personal and Professional Development (PPD) course. In addition to face-to-face classroom practices, an information technology-based gamified system with a range of online learning activities was presented to students as support material. The implementation of the gamified course lasted two academic terms. The subsequent evaluation from a cohort of 136 students indicated that student performance was significantly higher among those who participated in the gamified system than in those who engaged with the nongamified, traditional delivery, while behavioral engagement in online learning activities was positively related to course performance, after controlling for gender, attendance, and Year 1 PPD performance. Two interesting phenomena appeared when we examined the influence of student background: female students participated significantly more in online learning activities than male students, and students with jobs engaged significantly more in online learning activities than students without jobs. The gamified course design advocated in this work may have significant implications for educators who wish to develop engaging technology-mediated learning environments that enhance students’ learning, or for a broader base of professionals who wish to engage a population of potential users, such as managers engaging employees or marketers engaging customers.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:47:05Z
       
  • When first-order barriers are high: A comparison of second- and
           third-order barriers to classroom computing integration
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Taj W. Makki, LaToya J. O'Neal, Shelia R. Cotten, R.V. Rikard
      This study examines the role of second- and third-order barriers to classroom computing integration among fourth- and fifth-grade teachers in an urban, low-income school district (i.e., where computing resources are limited, or first-order barriers are high). We examine the impact of teachers' (N = 114) computer anxiety, computer attitudes, and computer feature comfort (i.e., second-order barriers) on their intention to use computer features in their classrooms. We also assess the role of teachers’ participation in training sessions aimed at fostering their design thinking (i.e., third-order barriers). Our results indicate that computer feature comfort and summer institute attendance are the strongest predictors of computing integration in cases where first-order barriers are high. Findings also suggest that tackling third-order barriers may help teachers overcome second-order barriers. Implications for future training interventions are discussed.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:47:05Z
       
  • Staying motivated to e-learn: Person- and variable-centred perspectives on
           the longitudinal risks and support
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Luke K. Fryer, H.N. Bovee
      Persistence in any of the growing variety of e-learning formats is a longstanding and pernicious problem. The widely acknowledged nature of this issue makes the considerable gap in our understanding of students' motivation to e-learn a serious concern. Building on initial studies, the current research examines important predictors and outcomes of students’ motivation for the weekly review and extension e-learning experiences within a blended course. The present study aimed to simultaneously provide variable and person-centred longitudinal perspectives on students’ motivations to e-learn, thereby illustrating the potential outcomes of these experiences and indicating how they might be better structured and supported. Japanese students (n = 642) studying in a blended course of foreign language study (two classes a week, with weekly online review and extension activities) completed surveys at three time points across an academic semester of study. Prior language competency and final e-learning completion were also included in modelling. Variable-centred results highlighted the essential role of teachers in supporting students’ ability, value and effort related motivations for studying online. All three motivations played an important role in predicting e-learning completion. Person-centred results tracking student movement between latent subgroups confirmed the importance of teachers, but also indicated a prior competence threshold below which teacher efforts alone might be insufficient to support substantive motivation for e-learning, and thereby, e-learning completion. The theoretical and practical implications of the present study's findings regarding teacher-support and initial content competence are discussed.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:47:05Z
       
  • Examination of relationships among students' self-determination,
           technology acceptance, satisfaction, and continuance intention to use
           K-MOOCs
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Young Ju Joo, Hyo-Jeong So, Nam Hee Kim
      Recognizing the recent MOOC movement in higher education, this study aims to examine credit-receiving university students' motivation to use K-MOOCs. In the hypothesized model, we posit three student-level variables, namely self-determination, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, and satisfaction as a mediating variable, and examine how these variables affect students' continuance intention to use K-MOOCs. This study hypothesizes: 1) perceived ease of use has a positive influence on perceived usefulness; 2) self-determination, perceived ease of use, and perceived usefulness has a positive influence on satisfaction; and 3) satisfaction has a positive influence on continuance intention to use K-MOOCs. The participants include 222 university students who took the K-MOOC course offered by a large-sized university in Korea. For data collection and analysis, we adapted the existing instruments to fit into our research goals and conducted structural equation modeling to investigate the relationships among the latent variables. The results indicate that both perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness had a positive influence on students' satisfaction with the K-MOOC course. Satisfaction with the K-MOOC course significantly had a positive influence on students' continuance intention to use. The perceived ease of use and the perceived usefulness, mediated by satisfaction, had indirect effects on the continuance intention to use K-MOOCs. Unexpectedly, students' self-determination did not have a significant influence on satisfaction with the K-MOOC course. The contribution of this study is that it provides empirical evidence regarding what factors are likely to influence credit-receiving students' continuance intention to use K-MOOCs and the motivational factors underlying students' intention to earn credits rather than intrinsic motivation.

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T07:47:05Z
       
  • Pre-service teachers' perspectives of cyberbullying
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 119
      Author(s): Petrea Redmond, Jennifer V. Lock, Victoria Smart
      For over a decade practitioners and researchers have been concerned about cyberbullying within educational contexts. Few tools exist to explore this complex phenomenon in-depth from a teacher or pre-service teacher perspective. Importantly, pre-service teacher perceptions of cyberbullying may have a significant impact on how pre-service teachers respond to issues of cyberbullying. Pre-service teachers (n = 61) participated in a five-phase online project to develop knowledge and understanding of resources and responses to cyberbullying. First, this article provides a short scan of the literature to contextualize current understandings of the issue and explore different responses to cyberbullying. The literature was analysed using a constant comparison method to search for and identify current and emerging themes. Out of this work, the researchers developed a Cyberbullying Conceptual Framework, which can be used as a tool to investigate cyberbullying. The framework provides key elements for identifying, managing, and preventing cyberbullying. These elements represent a template to guide researchers and educators in exploring cyberbullying from a conceptual, practical, and research basis. Second, the framework is used as a lens to analyse pre-service teachers' online discussions. Each of the pre-service teachers' online posts were coded against the Cyberbullying Conceptual Framework to examine pre-service teachers' perceptions of cyberbullying. Two factors were evident from the study: 1) The online project provided an opportunity for students to develop greater awareness and confidence in identifying, managing, and preventing cyberbullying; and 2) the framework provided a structure to unpack the complex phenomenon of cyberbullying and the meta-language to begin constructive conversations about addressing the issue. Finally, the article concludes with implications for teacher education programs.

      PubDate: 2017-12-27T11:04:12Z
       
  • A mixed-methods study to identify effective practices in the teaching of
           writing in a digital learning environment in low income schools
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 119
      Author(s): Rebecca Jesson, Stuart McNaughton, Naomi Rosedale, Tong Zhu, Victoria Cockle
      This paper reports on the teaching practices identified as effective for students' writing progress in a digital learning environment. The study is situated within a design-based research partnership between researchers and a group of urban schools serving culturally diverse students from low income communities who have implemented a digital pedagogy innovation which includes student device ownership, wireless access and a shared pedagogical approach. The research design logic was to select demonstrably effective teachers as ‘case studies’ in order to understand what effective teachers in the innovation did that promoted greater progress in writing. Qualitative analyses of selected teachers' class sites and students' individual blogs identified features of teaching practice hypothesised to promote student development in writing. To strengthen our understandings, teachers were interviewed to check the comprehensiveness and validity of our interpretation. Classroom observations from these case study teachers were compared with observations from a larger group of teachers to investigate whether identified practices were differentially employed by these effective teachers. Finally, the effects on student writing achievement of the relative presence of these practices in all observed classes were predicted using a hierarchical linear model. Our findings indicate effects of using digital tools in ways that promote complex compositional tasks, discussion and critical thinking. The study adds to a growing number of studies that investigate the nature of effective pedagogy within a digital environment. It contributes to the identification of promising practices for the design of more effective instruction in writing within classes that have ubiquitous digital access.

      PubDate: 2017-12-27T11:04:12Z
       
  • How extroversion affects student attitude toward the combined use of a
           wiki and video recording of group presentations
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 119
      Author(s): Elena Fraj-Andrés, Laura Lucia-Palacios, Raúl Pérez-López
      The aim of this paper is to analyze the effect of extroversion on students' attitude toward the combined use of a wiki and the video recording of oral presentations to improve communication skills using a quantitative approach. The model includes stress because it is considered an important aspect in public speaking situations, especially so in a case like ours where the videos will be available to the class. The students’ enjoyment and the relative advantages of the learning activity are also included because they may have an influence on satisfaction and course recommendation. A survey was carried out among first-year undergraduate students. Using partial least squares methodology, the results suggest that extrovert individuals perceive less stress and more enjoyment when performing this activity, which results in them having a better attitude toward it. A total mediation effect of enjoyment between extroversion and attitude is found. Our findings also confirm that stress acts as a barrier to satisfaction, but it does not create a negative reaction toward the activity. Finally, the results show the mediation effect of attitude between the perceived relative advantages and satisfaction and between enjoyment and satisfaction.

      PubDate: 2017-12-27T11:04:12Z
       
  • Guidelines for designing and using collaborative-competitive serious games
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 118
      Author(s): Diego Buchinger, Marcelo da Silva Hounsell
      There are already evidences of Serious Games (SG) effectiveness in teaching-learning processes for some areas of knowledge. Some studies analyzed the influence of different interaction modes, with focus on competitive and collaborative SG modes separately. New research studies however, suggest that SG with collaboration and competition altogether, could also provide benefits. A review on Collaborative-Competitive SG (CCSG) was performed, but no methodology was found to design such games. Instead, different research studies claim that specific design features should require attention in the design phase since they may compromise the success of a CCSG in terms of usage and learning. Once the outcome is said to be sensitive to those features, we hypothesized that a CCSG with such concerns altogether still promote learning. Thus, a new CCSG was designed considering all of these features, implemented, put to use and tested. Learning evaluations on a pre-experimental research design showed an increase in knowledge acquisition and level of confidence on students that played the resulting game. Data show that joining all design concerns regarding a CCSG did not compromise game capability to promote learning. Based on the feedback of game use, more features arose and we advocate that they should be considered as design concerns as well. Game design features identified in this work have been proved effective and can be used as guidelines for future educational CCSG.

      PubDate: 2017-12-27T11:04:12Z
       
  • Social network site use and academic achievement: A meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 December 2017
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Chiungjung Huang
      This meta-analysis examines the relation between use of social network sites and academic achievement. Thirty studies consisting of 21,367 participants are identified. The weighted mean correlation between use of social network sites and academic achievement is r ¯  = −0.07. The weighted mean correlation is negligible ( r ¯  = −0.02) for studies assessing Facebook use, and small ( r ¯  = −0.12) for studies measuring use of all social network sites. Further, the weighted mean correlation is small ( r ¯  = −0.10) for studies assessing the duration of use, and close to zero ( r ¯  = −0.01) for studies measuring visiting frequency. The implication of the research for the relation between social network site use and academic achievement is discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-12-27T11:04:12Z
       
  • Modeling a learning organization using a molecular network framework
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 118
      Author(s): Matej Janežič, Vlado Dimovski, Milan Hodošček
      In this paper we present a new approach for modeling a learning organization using molecular network framework. For the purpose of this study, we have developed a new FUTURE-O-DYN model for simulation of learning organization by combining the FUTURE-O® model, a comprehensive model that through the seven elements leads to a fully-fledged learning organization, with molecular dynamics simulation technique. Molecular dynamics simulation, in which the classical equations of motion for all particles of a system are integrated over finite period of time, provides an important insight into the structure and function of molecules. The resulting trajectory is used to compute the time-dependent properties of the system. Here, we apply molecular dynamics, in particular free energy simulation, to simulate a learning organization or any other system including the use of computer technology in educational process. All steps of modeling process; from data preparation to development of a suitable simulation space, potential energy function and parameters to carry out simulations of a learning organization are discussed. Major achievement of this study is that we apply molecular dynamics technique to model a learning organization consisting of two individuals, which is done for the first time, with the newly developed FUTURE-O-DYN model. For this purpose we also developed parameters that define potential energy function for a pair of programmers case described in the literature. In our model, the free energy is proportional to the values of the seven elements in the FUTURE-O® model. The simulation results indicate that the calculated free energies using FUTURE-O-DYN model are in excellent agreement with the experimentally measured values. The approach described here is general and applicable to any education, business or corporate based learning organization.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T16:57:15Z
       
  • The role of value on teachers' internalization of external barriers and
           externalization of personal beliefs for classroom technology integration
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 118
      Author(s): Vanessa W. Vongkulluksn, Kui Xie, Margaret A. Bowman
      Recent research has shown that access alone does not automatically equate to greater or higher quality of technology integration. Teacher beliefs are also important factors of how teachers integrate technology in the classroom. This study examined how teachers' value beliefs about technology affect the way they internalize actual technology access and administrator support into perceptions of support on first-order barriers. This study also examined how teachers' value beliefs affect the relationship between perceived support on first-order barriers and their classroom technology integration practice. Using hierarchical linear modeling and multilevel path modeling, the study found that value beliefs moderated the extent to which teachers translate actual school support into perceptions of support on first-order barriers. Value beliefs also mediated and moderated the relationship between how teachers' perceived support on first-order barriers influences both the quantity and quality of classroom technology integration, suggesting a moderated-mediation interaction pattern. This study makes contribution to the literature by highlighting the importance of teachers' values beliefs in technology integration.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T16:57:15Z
       
  • A mixed research-based model for pre-service science teachers' digital
           literacy: Responses to “which beliefs” and “how and why they
           interact” questions
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 118
      Author(s): Erhan Güneş, Eralp Bahçivan
      This study constructs a science teaching belief system to examine pre-service science teachers' scientific epistemological beliefs (SEBs) and conceptions of teaching and learning (COTL). The aim of the study was to investigate the structural relations among pre-service science teachers' SEBs, COTL and digital literacy skills and to determine the reasons for these relations. First, quantitative research was conducted to examine the structural relations among the variables, using structural equation modeling analysis on the data gathered from 979 pre-service science teachers. Next, qualitative research investigated the reasons for these relations. Thus, the study has a sequential explanatory research design. The findings of the study showed that pre-service science teachers' SEBs affected their constructivist conceptions positively. On the other hand, their SEBs were related to their traditional conceptions negatively. In addition, pre-service teachers' COTL contribute more positively to their digital literacy skills if they hold constructivist conceptions. The previous experiences of pre-service science teachers were also found to affect their beliefs and digital literacy skills. The findings contribute to the educational literature by focusing on the relationships among pre-service science teachers' SEBs, COLT and digital literacy, which is one of the most important 21st century skills, in the context of pre-service science teachers' belief systems.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T16:57:15Z
       
  • Effects of success v failure cases on learner-learner interaction
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 118
      Author(s): Andrew A. Tawfik, Philippe J. Giabbanelli, Maureen Hogan, Fortunata Msilu, Anila Gill, Cindy S. York
      Studies have found that students struggle to challenge their peers and engage in co-construction of knowledge when in asynchronous problem-based learning (PBL) contexts. In other settings, case libraries have been shown to support problem solving competencies, such as argumentation and problem representation. However, research has yet to study how the design and types of cases impact learner-learner interaction. To accommodate that gap, this study used content analysis and sequential analysis to ascertain how learner interaction differed when participants had access to success- and failure-based case libraries. Results found the failure-based condition had higher overall number of postings and differed in terms of the number of elicitations and planning (meta) interactions. Finally, results of the sequential analysis indicated participants in the success-based condition were more likely to begin planning their final assignment earlier, while the failure condition was more likely to continue engaged in collaborative problem-solving with their peers. Given these differences, the findings suggest failure-based cases may serve as a catalyst for learner-learner interaction when compared with success-based cases. Implications for practice, case-based reasoning, and failure-driven memory theory are discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T16:57:15Z
       
  • Editorial Board/Publication information
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T16:57:15Z
       
  • Technology valued' Observation and review activities to enhance future
           teachers’ utility value toward technology integration
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117
      Author(s): Ugur Kale
      This study examined the influence of observation of technology demonstrations and review of relevant text resources on the utility values of mobile and social networking tools that preservice teachers recognize in their reflections. Eighty-two preservice teachers from a mid-Atlantic university participated in the study. The findings revealed that the kinds of utility values identified varied depending on the sequence of observation and review activities, participants' expectancy for successful teaching (low and high), and their grade level focus (elementary and secondary). Discussion offered insights into how the activity sequence, expectancy for successful teaching with technology, and grade level might influence future teachers’ likelihood to value technologies.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T16:57:15Z
       
  • Applying “First Principles of Instruction” as a design theory of the
           flipped classroom: Findings from a collective study of four secondary
           school subjects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 December 2017
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Chung Kwan Lo, Chi Wai Lie, Khe Foon Hew
      The flipped classroom approach is a type of technology-enhanced pedagogy that has grown popular in education settings. An increasing number of empirical studies have evaluated this approach, but there is still no adequate theoretical framework for guiding the design and implementation of flipped classrooms. Furthermore, few such studies have been conducted in secondary school contexts, and the effects of flipped classrooms have not been adequately compared with those of non-flipped classrooms. This study aims to address these research gaps by applying the meta design theory “First Principles of Instruction” to design our flipped classroom approach. A two-stage study was conducted in two secondary schools, involving a total of 382 students and five teacher participants from four subject areas, namely mathematics, physics, Chinese language, and information and communication technology (ICT). Based on the experience of the pilot study (Study 1), we refined our flipped classroom model and examined its efficacy through a quasi-experimental design in the main study (Study 2). Although the students in the flipped ICT course had learning outcomes similar to those of students in the non-flipped ICT course, the levels of student achievement in the other three courses (i.e., mathematics, physics, and Chinese language) were improved after flipping, with a small to medium-sized effects. The design, benefits, and challenges of the model are discussed. We conclude by making several recommendations for practice, and suggesting ideas for further research.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T16:57:15Z
       
  • Social tagging strategy for enhancing e-learning experience
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 December 2017
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Aleksandra Klašnja-Milićević, Boban Vesin, Mirjana Ivanović
      Success of e-learning systems depends on their capability to automatically retrieve and recommend relevant learning content according to the preferences of a specific learner. Learning experience and dynamic choice of educational material that is presented to learners can be enhanced using different recommendation techniques. As popularity of collaborative tagging systems grows, users’ tags could provide useful information to improve recommender system algorithms in e-learning environments. In this paper, we present an approach for implementation of collaborative tagging techniques into online tutoring system. The implemented approach combines social tagging and sequential patterns mining for generating recommendations of learning resources to learners. Several experiments were carried out in order to verify usability of the proposed hybrid method within e-learning environment and analyze selected social tagging techniques.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T16:57:15Z
       
  • A review of the types of mobile activities in mobile inquiry-based
           learning
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 November 2017
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Ángel Suárez, Marcus Specht, Fleur Prinsen, Marco Kalz, Stefaan Ternier
      Inquiry-based Learning is increasingly suggested as an efficient approach for fostering learners' curiosity and motivation. It helps learners to develop their ability to work on complex and unpredictable environments making them more critical thinkers and agentic learners. Although, mobile technology is a suitable support for this learning process, there is a lack of practical strategies for educational practitioners to enact the right balance between enabling agency and supporting the students through the mobile technology. Thus, we conducted a literature review that analyzed 62 studies on mobile inquiry-based learning. The analysis focused on the level of agency supported by mobile technology. This review study provided two main results. The first result is a two-layer classification –with five types and twelve subtypes– of the most common mobile activities used in inquiry-based learning. The types and subtypes are: 1) Direct instruction formed by 1a) location guidance, 1b) procedural guidance and 1c) metacognitive guidance, 2) Access to content formed by 2a) fixed and 2b) dynamic content, 3) Data collection that consists of 3a) cooperative and 3b) collaborative data collection, 4) Peer-to-peer communication formed by 4a) asynchronous and 4b) synchronous social communications and 5) Contextual support that includes 5a) augmented experience, 5b) immersive experience and 5c) adaptive feedback. The second result consists of an analytical framework –based on six dimensions– to assess the level of agency supported by the different types of mobile activities. The learners' agency dimensions are: 1) Goals, 2) Content, 3) Actions, 4) Strategies, 5) Reflection and 6) Monitoring. Finally, the review presents insights on how this analytical framework can be used by educational practitioners to identify mobile activities that effectively balance learners’ agency with mobile technology.

      PubDate: 2017-11-16T15:07:50Z
       
  • The role of textbook learning resources in e-learning: A taxonomic study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 November 2017
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Kwok Hung Lau, Tri Lam, Booi Hon Kam, Mathews Nkhoma, Joan Richardson, Susan Thomas
      While textbooks are crucial to learning in the traditional classroom-based setting, their role in e-learning environment might be different. Through a categorical analysis, this study investigates if the currently available learning resources provided by textbooks are suitable for e-learning purpose. An e-learning framework incorporating different stages of learning and usage of learning resources was first developed as a guide. Then, a sample of learning resources that came with 100 commonly used textbooks in the disciplines of logistics/supply chain management and information systems were classified using the framework. To corroborate the classification, cluster analysis was also conducted to identify major clusters of learning resources along two dimensions - complexity of content and ease of use. The findings show that most of the sampled textbook learning resources are only suitable for low-order to mid-order learning according to the revised Bloom's taxonomy. The majority of the resources investigated lack the sophistication and complexity to support high-order learning that involves a great deal of interaction and collaboration among learners and facilitators on e-learning platforms. In other words, existing textbook learning resources might contribute well to self-regulated low-order and mid-order e-learning involving basic to intermediate cognitive processes, such as remembering, understanding, applying and analysing. They are generally ill-designed to facilitate high-order e-learning involving advanced cognitive processes, such as evaluating and creating, which require extensive interaction and collaboration among learners and facilitators in an e-learning environment.

      PubDate: 2017-11-16T15:07:50Z
       
  • The influence of internationalised versus local content on online
           intercultural collaboration in groups: A randomised control trial study in
           a statistics course
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 November 2017
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Jenna Mittelmeier, Bart Rienties, Dirk Tempelaar, Garron Hillaire, Denise Whitelock
      Computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) has been highlighted as a beneficial learning experience for students in blended and online settings. In highly diverse and international contexts, CSCL also allows students the opportunity to encounter new ideas and values from peers with different backgrounds. However, previous research has highlighted that there are wide variations in student participation levels in CSCL activities and that many students experience social and cultural tensions when working with diverse peers. These issues may damage the quality of online collaboration and limit the potential gains of CSCL. In this study, we explored one evidence-based solution for encouraging CSCL participation: the internationalisation of the online academic content used for collaborative activities. Using a randomised control trial method with 428 undergraduate students in an introductory statistics course, we compared individual and group-level participation in an online collaborative task when students used content from the local context compared to content from international contexts. Our findings suggest that internationalisation of online content can encourage individual-level participation and decrease the disparity of participation within small groups when the content is situated in countries that are personally relevant to students’ own backgrounds. At the same time, participation was influenced by individual demographics and group dynamics.

      PubDate: 2017-11-16T15:07:50Z
       
  • Needle in a haystack: Identifying learner posts that require urgent
           response in MOOC discussion forums
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2017
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Omaima Almatrafi, Aditya Johri, Huzefa Rangwala
      Although massive open online courses or MOOCs have been successful in attracting a large number of learners, they have not been equally successful in retaining the learners to the point of course completion. One critical point of failure in many courses, especially those that use discussion forums as a means of collaborative learning, is the large number of messages exchanged on the forums. The extensive exchange of messages often creates chaos from the instructors' perspective and several questions remain unanswered. Lack of attention and response to urgent messages – those that are critical from the learners’ perspective to move forward – becomes a major challenge in this environment. This paper proposes a model to identify “urgent” posts that need immediate attention from instructors. In our analysis, we investigate different feature sets and different data mining techniques, and report the best set of features and classification techniques for addressing the problem of identifying messages that need urgent attention. The results demonstrate the ability to use a limited number of linguistic features with select metadata to build a moderate to substantially reliable classification model that can identify urgent posts in MOOC forums regardless of the course content. The work has potential application across a range of platforms that provide large scale courses and can help instructors efficiently navigate the discussion forums and prioritize the responses so that timely intervention can support learning and may reduce dropout rates.

      PubDate: 2017-11-16T15:07:50Z
       
  • Critical evaluation of existing audio learning systems using a proposed
           TOL model
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117
      Author(s): Raj Kishen Moloo, Kavi Kumar Khedo, Tadinada Venkata Prabhakar
      This work forms part of a larger research work which advocates that audio-only learning mode can be developed into a full fledge audio-MOOC. The audio-MOOC should incorporate a learner-centric approach to provide effective learning capabilities to the oral and low-literate population. For long, audio-based learning (which includes variances in audio technologies) has been an established practice and has proved to be a successful means of conveying information to the mass especially for illiterate and semi-literate population. However, it is widely used as a supplement to Distance Education mode without exploiting its full potential. This paper aims at providing a comprehensive evaluation of existing audio learning systems which is missing in recent literature. There is no formal and established evaluation framework for evaluating such systems. Hence, this paper contributes to the audio-based learning research area by proposing a Technology, Organisation and Learner (TOL) evaluation model to analyse the existing audio learning systems. The proposed evaluation model uses a set of 50 criteria which is derived from a review of methodologies and strategies for multimedia evaluation. Besides, this work makes use of empirical data in the proposed TOL evaluation model to critically appraise various audio technologies used in learning. Recommendations are made for the development of full-fledge Audio-only Learning Management Systems/MOOCs. Moreover, the proposed evaluation model can also be used for the selection of media suited to the learning needs of organisations.

      PubDate: 2017-11-08T16:31:42Z
       
  • Embodied interactive video lectures for improving learning comprehension
           and retention
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117
      Author(s): I-Chun Hung, Kinshuk, Nian-Shing Chen
      The increased interaction with multimedia content has been recognized as a significant factor to improve learners’ learning outcomes. As a result, interactive video lectures are increasingly being adopted in digital learning contexts for increasing interactivity. However, conventional video lecture lacks interactive learning activities (ILAs) that are an indispensable component of interactivity. Interactive video lectures can provide learners opportunities to obtain timely constructive support to produce effective learning outcomes because of ILAs. In order to carefully design and create ILAs for effective learning, instructors need to invest substantial efforts for conceiving the content and interactions of ILAs. This study proposed an approach to design the content of ILAs by leveraging collective intelligence (CI) gathered from the discussion forums specifically related to the content of video lectures. When learners exercised ILAs, meaningful interactions by speaking and gesturing worked as learning support to improve comprehension of learning materials. To evaluate the effects of the CI-based ILAs, an experiment was conducted with 90 university students, who were randomly and equally assigned to three different groups (i.e., embodied interactive, non-embodied interactive, and conventional video lectures). The results show that learners who learned with the embodied interactive video lecture performed better in comprehension and retention of learning contents than the other two counter groups. The findings also revealed that this approach does not impose any additional cognitive load on learners. The design guidelines derived in this study can serve as reference for instructors to create interactive video lectures with CI-based ILAs in digital learning contexts.

      PubDate: 2017-11-08T16:31:42Z
       
  • Keyboarding versus handwriting speed of higher education students with and
           without learning disabilities: Does touch-typing assist in narrowing the
           gap'
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117
      Author(s): Hayley Weigelt-Marom, Naomi Weintraub
      Keyboarding has become an essential writing mode. Yet, many do not keyboard as fast as they handwrite, perhaps due to lack of efficient keyboarding skills. The current study examined the immediate and long-term effect of a touch-typing program on narrowing the gap between keyboarding and handwriting speed among higher education students. The study included 17 normally achieving students and 25 students with specific learning disabilities (i.e., reading and/or writing disabilities). Results showed that at the end of the program, handwriting remained a faster writing mode than keyboarding. This condition changed over time, and at the delayed post-test (approximately 3 months following the completion of the program), keyboarding became faster than handwriting. However, this change was significant only within the group of students with specific learning disabilities. These results stress the importance of efficient and automatic keyboarding for writing among the general population and particularly among students with specific learning disabilities.

      PubDate: 2017-11-08T16:31:42Z
       
  • Cell phone usage and academic performance: An experiment
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117
      Author(s): Daniel Darghan Felisoni, Alexandra Strommer Godoi
      This paper makes use of an experiment to test the relationship between the actual average time students spend using their smartphones per day and academic performance. Differently from previous studies that rely on self-reporting mobile phone usage data, which tends to significantly underestimate the time spent by students at their phones, we employed Apps (namely ‘Moment’ and ‘App Usage Tracker’) to effectively measure actual usage. Collecting data from 43 students at Fundação Getúlio Vargas (FGV), a business school from São Paulo, Brazil, our analysis yielded a significant negative relationship between total time spent using smartphones and academic performance, after controlling for known predictors of performance such as self-efficacy and past academic results. Each 100 min spent using the device on average per day corresponded to a reduction in a student's position at the school's ranking of 6.3 points, in a range from 0 to nearly 100. Moreover, if we consider usage during class time only (as opposed to during free time and weekends), the effect was almost twice as high. The magnitude of the effect found is alarming. Thus, this study brings new evidence of the potential harm of excessive smartphone use and should be useful for educators and other academic stakeholders interested in the subject of the impact of technology on students' performance.

      PubDate: 2017-11-08T16:31:42Z
       
  • Geography learning in primary school: Comparing face-to-face versus
           tablet-based instruction methods
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 November 2017
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Steven Walczak, Natalie Greene Taylor
      Touchscreen tablet technology is being widely adopted in primary and secondary schools throughout the world. Current research largely explores how to use this technology to teach reading and writing, mathematics, and to a lesser extent science. However a research gap exists in exploring tablet technology to teach geography. The research in this article examines if any differences in learning outcomes exist between a more traditional teaching method and one that is centered on using touchscreen tablet technology when teaching USA states’ shapes and locations to second-graders. The results indicate that there is no statistically significant difference between the two teaching methods, but that combining the two methods may lead to significant improvements in learning outcomes.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2017-11-08T16:31:42Z
       
  • Editorial Board/Publication information
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 116


      PubDate: 2017-11-02T16:20:57Z
       
  • Enhance emotional and social adaptation skills for children with autism
           spectrum disorder: A virtual reality enabled approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117
      Author(s): Horace H.S. Ip, Simpson W.L. Wong, Dorothy F.Y. Chan, Julia Byrne, Chen Li, Vanessa S.N. Yuan, Kate S.Y. Lau, Joe Y.W. Wong
      Deficits in social-emotional reciprocity, one of the diagnostic criteria of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), greatly hinders children with ASD from responding appropriately and adapting themselves in various social situations. Although evidences have shown that virtual reality environment is a promising tool for emotional and social adaptation skills training on ASD population, there is a lack of large-scale trials with intensive evaluations to support such findings. This paper presents a virtual reality enabled program for enhancing emotional and social adaptation skills for children with ASD. Six unique learning scenarios, of which one focuses on emotion control and relaxation strategies, four that simulate various social situations, and one that facilitates consolidation and generalization, are designed and developed with corresponding psychoeducation procedures and protocols. The learning scenarios are presented to the children via a 4-side immersive virtual reality environment (a.k.a., half-CAVE) with non-intrusive motion tracking. A total number of 94 children between the ages of 6–12 with clinical diagnosis of ASD participated in the 28-session program that lasted for 14 weeks. By comparing pre- and post-assessments, results reported in this paper show significant improvements in the project's primary measures on children's emotion expression and regulation and social-emotional reciprocity but not on other secondary measures.

      PubDate: 2017-10-25T16:15:50Z
       
  • On the students' perceptions of the knowledge formation when submitted to
           a Project-Based Learning environment using web applications
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117
      Author(s): Laio Oriel Seman, Romeu Hausmann, Eduardo Augusto Bezerra
      This work presents a statistical analysis of the views of Electrical Engineering students, regarding the knowledge formation process in a Project-Based Learning application, as a complement to classical teaching methods. In order to assess this approach, an active learning methodology developed especially for part-time degree courses, called Project-Based Learning Agile (PBLA), has been proposed and implemented at the Regional University of Blumenau (FURB), Brazil. Through the analysis of questionnaire responses obtained over four consecutive semesters, using partial least squares path modeling (PLS-PM), it was possible to understand statistically how the learning process is connected to PBLA. The data analysis suggests that the educational process applied in this work is rooted in a humanist basis, formed by Ego and Cooperation among students. The PBLA approach, sustained by this Humanization, serves as a basis for the Learning. Thus, the results suggest that humanization is an important part in the education process of a new electrical engineer.

      PubDate: 2017-10-25T16:15:50Z
       
  • Cross-repository aggregation of educational resources
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117
      Author(s): Marcos Mouriño-García, Roberto Pérez-Rodríguez, Luis Anido-Rifón, Manuel J. Fernández-Iglesias, Víctor M. Darriba-Bilbao
      The proliferation of educational resource repositories promoted the development of aggregators to facilitate interoperability, that is, a unified access that would allow users to fetch a given resource independently of its origin. The CROERA system is a repository aggregator that provides access to educational resources independently of the classification taxonomy utilized in the hosting repository. For that, an automated classification algorithm is trained using the information extracted from the metadata of a collection of educational resources hosted in different repositories, which in turn depends on the classification taxonomy used in each case. Then, every resource will be automatically classified on demand independently of the original classification scheme. As a consequence, resources can be retrieved independently of the original taxonomy utilized using any taxonomy supported by the aggregator, and exploratory searches can be made without a previous taxonomy mapping. This approach overcomes one of the recurring problems in taxonomy mapping, namely the one-to-none matching situation. To evaluate the performance of this proposal two methods were applied. Resource classification in categories existing in all repositories was automatically evaluated, obtaining maximum performance values of 84% (F 1 score), 87.8% (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve), 86% (area under the precision-recall curve) and 75.1% (Cohen's κ). In the case of resources not belonging to one of the common categories, human inspection was used as a reference to compute classification performance. In this case, maximum performance values obtained were respectively 69.8%, 73.8%, 75% and 54.3%. These results demonstrate the potential of this approach as a tool to facilitate resource classification, for example to provide a preliminary classification that would require just minor corrections from human classifiers.

      PubDate: 2017-10-25T16:15:50Z
       
  • Improving high school students' executive functions through digital game
           play
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117
      Author(s): Bruce D. Homer, Jan L. Plass, Charles Raffaele, Teresa M. Ober, Alisha Ali
      Executive functions (EF), the skills required to plan, monitor and control cognitive processes, are linked to many important educational and developmental outcomes. The Alien Game is a digital game developed to train the EF subskill of shifting. High school students (N = 82; age range 14–18 years; average = 15.5 years) were asked to play the Alien Game for 20 min per week for 6 consecutive weeks. Two EF measures were administered before and after this intervention: the Dimensional Change Card Sort (DCCS) task (a measure of shifting) and the Flanker task (a measure of inhibition). Students had a significant pre- to posttest increase in DCCS, t (81) = 4.29, p < 0.001, d = 0.54, and Flanker, t (77) = 2.93, p = 0.004, d = 0.22. Controlling for pretest score, gains in shifting were significantly predicted by a measure of game performance in the Alien Game. These findings provide evidence that the Alien Game is having the intended effect of improving EF, and argue that video games can be effective tools for training cognitive skills when they are explicitly designed for this purpose and when a rigorous design approach is used.

      PubDate: 2017-10-25T16:15:50Z
       
  • Analyzing productive learning behaviors for students using immediate
           corrective feedback in a blended learning environment
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117
      Author(s): Xin Chen, Lori Breslow, Jennifer DeBoer
      Undergraduate classes in many science and engineering courses are utilizing asynchronous computer platforms to host educational materials such as lecture videos or discussion forums. These platforms also have the ability to provide immediate feedback to students on formative assessment tasks such as homework problems, reading questions, or weekly quizzes. Although there have been a number of studies on computer-based feedback, there is more we need to know about how students interact with immediate feedback, and how those interactions influence their learning. In this study, we characterize introductory physics students' interactions with one computer-based immediate simple corrective feedback tool, the “checkable answer feature” (CAF), powered by the institutional version of the edX platform. We investigate how much students interact with the CAF, the patterns of interaction, and, ultimately, how these patterns are associated with course performance. We utilize rich quantitative data, including a large volume of server tracking logs that show students’ use the CAF, as well as performance metrics. Our findings show certain patterns of engagement with feedback reflect productive study strategies and significantly predict higher performance. The findings provide guidance for instructional practice and the continued development of online feedback tools in introductory STEM courses.

      PubDate: 2017-10-25T16:15:50Z
       
  • The influence of Gesture-Based Learning System (GBLS) on Learning Outcomes
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 117
      Author(s): Moamer Shakroum, Kok Wai Wong, Chun Che Fung
      The effectiveness of Gesture-Based Learning System (GBLS) has been reported in some recent studies. However, not many of those studies have investigated on how GBLS mode influences the learning outcomes. The aim of this study therefore focuses on investigating how GBLS mode impacts the learning outcomes. The findings of this study revealed that GBLS's features positively affect the students' intrinsic motivation. Consequently, the increase in the intrinsic motivation leads to improving the learning outcomes; this study also showed that GBLS's features indirectly influence the learning outcomes via intrinsic motivation. In other words, this study found that the GBLS's features (interactivity and multimodality) create an instructional learning environment that positively influences the students' intrinsic motivation. The increase of the students' positive intrinsic motivation led to enhancing the learning achievements of students.

      PubDate: 2017-10-25T16:15:50Z
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 50.19.34.255
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-