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Journal Cover Computers & Education
  Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.143
  Citation Impact (citeScore): 109
  Number of Followers: 157  
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0360-1315
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3162 journals]
  • Assessing children's interpersonal emotion regulation with virtual agents:
           The serious game Emodiscovery
    • Authors: Daniela Pacella; Belén López-Pérez
      Pages: 1 - 12
      Abstract: Publication date: August 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 123
      Author(s): Daniela Pacella, Belén López-Pérez
      Emotion regulation (ER) is key for children's development and it has recently been considered in many serious games and e-learning technologies. However, these tools have focused on children's efforts to change their own emotions (intrapersonal ER), overlooking how children may engage in modifying the emotions of others (interpersonal ER). To address this gap, we have developed a multiplatform online serious game, Emodiscovery, which evaluates whether children (8-11 year-olds) tend to use different adaptive and maladaptive regulation strategies to change others' negative emotions with the use of 3D animated characters. The game is organized into levels, each representing a different scenario, where the child is asked to interact with the character three times choosing an appropriate regulation strategy to cheer him or her up from four possible options, being two adaptive and two maladaptive strategies. To test the effectiveness of the game, a sample of English children played three scenarios depicting a character feeling sadness, anger, and fear, respectively. Results showed that most children chose adaptive strategies to improve the character's emotion across the different emotion scenarios. Furthermore, emotion recognition was not positively related to children's choices of regulation strategies. The implications and applications of the games are discussed.

      PubDate: 2018-04-24T14:31:01Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.04.005
      Issue No: Vol. 123 (2018)
       
  • Impact of slide-based lectures on undergraduate students’ learning:
           Mixed effects of accessibility to slides, differences in note-taking, and
           memory term
    • Authors: Hyeyoun Kim
      Pages: 13 - 25
      Abstract: Publication date: August 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 123
      Author(s): Hyeyoun Kim
      This paper addresses the effects of access to slide copies during lectures using PowerPoint® for undergraduate students on their learning outcomes depending on the quantity of notes they take and immediate vs. delayed testing. Seventy-one students repeatedly participated in the following six lecture conditions: accessibility to slides (full, partial, and no slide copy) × memory term (immediate and delayed test). Thus, the present study adopted a 3 × 2 within-subjects design with two note-taking covariates (the quantity of words and markers in notes). A mixed-effects model and counterbalancing method were applied to control idiosyncrasies and order effects caused by repeated measurement. The results revealed that accessibility to slide copies and students' note-taking predicted their learning outcomes. The effects of no slide copy were significant in both short- and long-term memory conditions as compared to those of access to full and partial copies. Access to full and partial slide copies did not have significantly different results. However, according to the interaction results between accessibility and memory term, the long-term encoding effect was assumed for the partial slide copy condition. Regarding note-taking variables, students’ performance was considerably impacted by the number of markers but none of the number of words. The findings suggest educational implications for the way slides are prepared and provided and the way students take notes during slide-based lectures from a perspective of writing-to-learn.

      PubDate: 2018-05-01T16:37:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.04.004
      Issue No: Vol. 123 (2018)
       
  • Factors that influence secondary mathematics teachers' integration of
           technology in mathematics lessons
    • Authors: Allison W. McCulloch; Karen Hollebrands; Hollylynne Lee; Taylor Harrison; Asli Mutlu
      Pages: 26 - 40
      Abstract: Publication date: August 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 123
      Author(s): Allison W. McCulloch, Karen Hollebrands, Hollylynne Lee, Taylor Harrison, Asli Mutlu
      While many studies describe the use of technology in the mathematics classroom, few explore the factors that influence teacher decisions around its use. The participants in this study were 21 early career secondary mathematics teachers who had completed an undergraduate mathematics teacher preparation program in the USA with a strong emphasis on the use of technology to teach mathematics. In this qualitative study, interview data were collected and analyzed with attention toward why teachers choose to use technology to teach mathematics, what tools they chose to use and why, as well as the general factors they consider when selecting particular technology tools. Findings indicate that one of the most important factors when deciding whether to use technology was how well it aligned with the goals of a lesson. The range of technology used spanned mathematical action tools, collaboration tools, assessment tools, and communication tools. When selecting particular tools teachers most heavily considered ease of use for both themselves and their students. These findings suggest that when considering how to infuse technology into teacher education programs we suggest that it is important to focus more broadly on types of tools, ways teachers can position them, and how particular activities align with specific mathematics learning objectives.

      PubDate: 2018-05-01T16:37:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.04.008
      Issue No: Vol. 123 (2018)
       
  • Exploring the impacts of interactions, social presence and emotional
           engagement on active collaborative learning in a social web-based
           environment
    • Authors: Sebastian Molinillo; Rocío Aguilar-Illescas; Rafael Anaya-Sánchez; María Vallespín-Arán
      Pages: 41 - 52
      Abstract: Publication date: August 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 123
      Author(s): Sebastian Molinillo, Rocío Aguilar-Illescas, Rafael Anaya-Sánchez, María Vallespín-Arán
      This study examines the influence of social presence, interactions (student-student and teacher-student) and emotional engagement on active learning within the context of social web-based collaborative learning (SWBCL). In order to accomplish this objective, an empirical study was conducted with 416 students from two universities, organized into groups of 4 or 5 students, who were instructed to complete a collaborative project over the course of one semester. At the end of the project, the students filled out a questionnaire and the resulting data was analyzed using the partial least squares (PLS) technique. The results suggest that social presence and teacher-student interaction have a positive influence on students' active learning, both directly and indirectly, through emotional engagement. This variable also mediates the influence of student-student interactions, which have a less significant impact on active learning than the other analyzed variables. Consequently, this study offers important contributions to the study and practice of active learning in a SWBCL environment.

      PubDate: 2018-05-14T21:54:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.04.012
      Issue No: Vol. 123 (2018)
       
  • Evaluating a tactile and a tangible multi-tablet gamified quiz system for
           collaborative learning in primary education
    • Authors: Fernando Garcia-Sanjuan; Sandra Jurdi; Javier Jaen; Vicente Nacher
      Pages: 65 - 84
      Abstract: Publication date: August 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 123
      Author(s): Fernando Garcia-Sanjuan, Sandra Jurdi, Javier Jaen, Vicente Nacher
      Gamification has been identified as an interesting technique to foster collaboration in educational contexts. However, there are not many approaches that tackle this in primary school learning environments. The most popular technologies in the classroom are still traditional video consoles and desktop computers, which complicate the design of collaborative activities since they are essentially mono-user. The recent popularization of handheld devices such as tablets and smartphones has made it possible to build affordable, scalable, and improvised collaborative gamified activities by creating a multi-tablet environment. In this paper we present Quizbot, a collaborative gamified quiz application to practice different subjects, which can be defined by educators beforehand. Two versions of the system are implemented: a tactile for tablets laid on a table, in which all the elements are digital; and a tangible in which the tablets are scattered on the floor and the components are both digital and physical objects. Both versions of Quizbot are evaluated and compared in a study with eighty primary-schooled children in terms of user experience and quality of collaboration supported. Results indicate that both versions of Quizbot are essentially equally fun and easy to use, and can effectively support collaboration, with the tangible version outperforming the other one with respect to make the children reach consensus after a discussion, split and parallelize work, and treat each other with more respect, but also presenting a poorer time management.

      PubDate: 2018-05-14T21:54:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.04.011
      Issue No: Vol. 123 (2018)
       
  • Mood-affect congruency. Exploring the relation between learners’ mood
           and the affective charge of educational videos
    • Authors: Maik Beege; Sascha Schneider; Steve Nebel; Alexandra Häßler; Günter Daniel Rey
      Pages: 85 - 96
      Abstract: Publication date: August 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 123
      Author(s): Maik Beege, Sascha Schneider, Steve Nebel, Alexandra Häßler, Günter Daniel Rey
      In the educational context, the influences of the emotional charge of audiovisual media are rarely investigated. Additionally, the mood of the learner influences learning with multimedia. This study aims to investigate the influence of both variables on learning with videos. Therefore, 162 school students watched educational videos which were manipulated in terms of emotional charge. The participants were randomly assigned to one cell of a 2 (learners mood: positive vs. negative) × 2 (emotional charge of the educational video: positive vs. negative) between-subjects factorial design. Retention and transfer performance were measured in order to examine learning effects. Furthermore, mental load, mental effort, and affective variables were collected. Results revealed that the mood of the learner did not influence learning outcomes and cognitive assessments. The positive emotional charge of the video fostered retention performance and led to a reduced mental load. Transfer performance was fostered in the conditions with congruence between learners mood and the emotional charge of the video. Results are discussed by considering the emotion-as-facilitator hypothesis and the mood congruency effect.

      PubDate: 2018-05-14T21:54:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.05.001
      Issue No: Vol. 123 (2018)
       
  • Study on student performance estimation, student progress analysis, and
           student potential prediction based on data mining
    • Authors: Fan Yang; Frederick W.B. Li
      Pages: 97 - 108
      Abstract: Publication date: August 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 123
      Author(s): Fan Yang, Frederick W.B. Li
      Student performance, student progress and student potential are critical for measuring learning results, selecting learning materials and learning activities. However, existing work doesn't provide enough analysis tools to analyze how students performed, which factors would affect their performance, in which way students can make progress, and whether students have potential to perform better. To solve those problems, we have provided multiple analysis tools to analyze student performance, student progress and student potentials in different ways. First, this paper formulates student model with performance related attributes and non-performance related attributes by Student Attribute Matrix (SAM), which quantifies student attributes, so that we can use it to make further analysis. Second, this paper provides a student performance estimation tools using Back Propagation Neural Network (BP-NN) based on classification, which can estimate student performance/attributes according to students' prior knowledge as well as the performance/attributes of other students who have similar characteristics. Third, this paper proposes student progress indicators and attribute causal relationship predicator based on BP-NN to comprehensively describe student progress on various aspects together with their causal relationships. Those indicators and predicator can tell how much a factor would affect student performance, so that we can train up students on purpose. Finally, this paper proposes a student potential function that evaluates student achievement and development of such attributes. We have illustrated our analysis tools by using real academic performance data collected from 60 high school students. Evaluation results show that the proposed tools can give correct and more accurate results, and also offer a better understanding on student progress.

      PubDate: 2018-05-14T21:54:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.04.006
      Issue No: Vol. 123 (2018)
       
  • Comparing trained and untrained teachers on their use of LMS tools using
           the Rasch analysis
    • Authors: Joseph Chow; Ada Tse; Christine Armatas
      Pages: 124 - 137
      Abstract: Publication date: August 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 123
      Author(s): Joseph Chow, Ada Tse, Christine Armatas
      Measuring training outcomes is important given the resources universities invest in staff learning management system (LMS) training. In this paper we show how the effect of LMS training on LMS usage can be evaluated using Rasch analysis of teachers' LMS usage activity logs by making comparisons between teachers who have attended training and those who have not. Our analysis showed that teachers who attended LMS training workshops had higher LMS activity level compared with the untrained teachers. In particular, trained teachers tended to make relatively more use of ‘grade centre’ and of ‘assessment tool’ but relatively less use of ‘content’ in their teaching compared with teachers who did not attend training. The results support Rasch analysis as a useful approach for evaluating the effect of training across a large number of courses and extend understanding from findings from self-report studies of training effectiveness. They also provide insights that inform training practice and highlight its importance for development of online teaching. Implications for professional development of online teaching and the evaluation are discussed.

      PubDate: 2018-05-14T21:54:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.04.009
      Issue No: Vol. 123 (2018)
       
  • Systematic literature review: Self-Regulated Learning strategies using
           e-learning tools for Computer Science
    • Authors: Rita Garcia; Katrina Falkner; Rebecca Vivian
      Pages: 150 - 163
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 May 2018
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Rita Garcia, Katrina Falkner, Rebecca Vivian
      In 1986, Barry Zimmerman and Manuel Martinez-Pons presented a taxonomy containing 14 categories on Self-Regulated Learning (SRL) strategies performed by high school students when studying. Since this study, researchers have used the taxonomy as a framework for their research on students' SRL strategies and behaviours. When the taxonomy was constructed in the mid-1980s, these categories did not consider students’ SRL behaviours while using digital technologies to study. The goals of this systematic literature review are to understand if the original SRL strategies are addressed in modern Computer Science e-learning tools and to determine if tools have emerged that support SRL strategies not captured by the original taxonomy. This review organises the e-learning tools within the SRL categories. It shows that a preponderance of research has been done on certain SRL skills, with limited focus on other categories. The systematic literature review concludes with suggestions for future research opportunities pertaining to tools that support the original categories, as well as tools that support SRL strategies.

      PubDate: 2018-05-14T21:54:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.05.006
      Issue No: Vol. 123 (2018)
       
  • The effects of a digital formative assessment tool on spelling
           achievement: Results of a randomized experiment
    • Authors: Janke M. Faber; Adrie J. Visscher
      Pages: 1 - 8
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 122
      Author(s): Janke M. Faber, Adrie J. Visscher
      In this study, a randomized experimental design was used to examine the effects of a digital formative assessment tool on spelling achievement of third grade students (eight-to nine-years-olds). The sample consisted of 30 experimental schools (n = 619) and 39 control schools (n = 986). Experimental schools used a digital formative assessment tool, whereas control schools used their regular spelling instruction and materials. Data included standardized achievement pre-posttest data, the number of total assignments completed, and the percentage of adaptive assignments completed by students. Although the results did not show that the use of a digital formative assessment tool affected spelling achievement, the findings point to important issues upon which future research can build.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:12:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.03.008
      Issue No: Vol. 122 (2018)
       
  • Learning engagement and persistence in massive open online courses (MOOCS)
    • Authors: Yeonji Jung; Jeongmin Lee
      Pages: 9 - 22
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 February 2018
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Yeonji Jung, Jeongmin Lee
      The purpose of this study was to investigate how to facilitate learners' engagement and persistence in massive open online courses (MOOCs). Specifically, this study used structural equation modeling to examine the structural relationships among academic self-efficacy, teaching presence, perceived usefulness, and perceived ease of use, learning engagement, and learning persistence in MOOCs. For the data analysis, we selected as the research subjects 306 learners who were taking MOOCs in South Korea. The results indicated that academic self-efficacy, teaching presence, and perceived usefulness had significant direct effects on learning engagement. Furthermore, teaching presence and perceived ease of use had direct effects on learning persistence. Finally, learning engagement had indirect effects on the relationships between academic self-efficacy, teaching presence, perceived usefulness, and learning persistence. These findings suggest implications for designing and developing effective instructional and learning strategies in MOOCs in terms of learners’ perceptions of themselves, instructors, and learning support systems.

      PubDate: 2018-02-26T10:56:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.02.013
      Issue No: Vol. 122 (2018)
       
  • Realistic details in visualizations require color cues to foster retention
    • Authors: Alexander Skulmowski; Günter Daniel Rey
      Pages: 23 - 31
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 122
      Author(s): Alexander Skulmowski, Günter Daniel Rey
      Research on visualizations suggests that realism can be distracting and cognitively demanding, thereby lowering learning performance. These results have been explained using cognitive load theory, assuming that realistic details act as unnecessary mental load. Recent findings from disfluency research, however, imply that under certain circumstances harder-to-perceive learning materials are able to keep learners' attention focused and trigger them to invest more effort. We contrasted these conflicting results by assessing the role of realistic details on learning. For the study, we generated a fictional bone model and varied the level of arbitrary detail (low vs. high). As previous research has revealed positive effects of color coding on visual attention, we used color coding as a second experimental factor (with vs. without) and hypothesized that color coding will primarily help participants learning with a detailed model. We conducted a 2 × 2-factorial between-subjects study (n = 108) and found an interaction between the level of detail and color coding: Highly detailed renderings result in a high retention performance when color coding is available, while color coding on a low-detail model even lowered retention scores. These findings suggest that realistic visualizations require appropriate visual aids in order to be effective.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:12:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.03.012
      Issue No: Vol. 122 (2018)
       
  • A multilevel analysis of what matters in the training of pre-service
           teacher's ICT competencies
    • Authors: Jo Tondeur; Koen Aesaert; Sarah Prestridge; Els Consuegra
      Pages: 32 - 42
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 122
      Author(s): Jo Tondeur, Koen Aesaert, Sarah Prestridge, Els Consuegra
      Few empirical studies investigate the impact of pre-service teachers' background and ICT profile in combination with the support they receive from their teacher training institution on their ICT competencies. Moreover, research focusing on preparing future teachers for ICT integration is generally limited to the impact of one single strategy. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test a model to explain pre-service teachers' perceived ICT competencies that integrates pre-service teachers' background characteristics (age and gender), their ICT profile (e.g., attitudes towards ICT) and the multiple strategies pre-service teachers experience in their teacher training institution: 1) using teacher educators as role models, 2) reflecting on the role of technology in education, 3) learning how to use technology by design, 4) collaboration with peers, 5) scaffolding authentic technology experiences, and 6) continuous feedback. Based on a survey among 931 final-year pre-service teachers in Flanders (Belgium), the multilevel analyses indicated a positive association between the strategies and pre-service teachers' ICT competencies. The more pre-service teachers perceive the occurrences of the strategies during their teacher education, the higher their perceived competence to use ICT for learning processes and to strengthen their instructional practice. Gender and age did not affect pre-service teachers' ICT competence for educational practice. Furthermore, the results revealed a positive impact of pre-service teachers’ attitudes towards ICT (in education) and ease of use, on their ICT competence for educational practice. These results can provide guidance for the preparation of pre-service teachers for the 21st century learning environments with new technologies.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:12:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.03.002
      Issue No: Vol. 122 (2018)
       
  • The mediation effects of gaming motives between game involvement and
           problematic Internet use: Escapism, advancement and socializing
    • Authors: Shan-Mei Chang; Grace M.Y. Hsieh; Sunny S.J. Lin
      Pages: 43 - 53
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 122
      Author(s): Shan-Mei Chang, Grace M.Y. Hsieh, Sunny S.J. Lin
      The main purpose of this study was to examine the longitudinal mediation effects of multiple gaming motives from online game involvement to problematic Internet use (PIU). In terms of mediators, the present study included three specific gaming motivations - escapism, advancement, and socializing. A sample of 389 gamers participated in the study from freshman to junior college years. Gaming involvement was collected at the freshman year, motives at sophomore, and PIU at junior. Initially, the three gaming motives were examined separately for their longitudinal mediation effects in a series of single-mediator models. Next, the three motives were simultaneously included in a multiple-mediator model to compare the relative levels of their mediation effects from gaming involvement to PIU across a period of two years. In the multiple-mediator model, the most compelling results showed that escapism and advancement were positively associated with PIU, yet socializing was not; socializing failed to significantly predict later PIU. Also, the direct effect of gaming involvement on PIU was weak and failed to reach significant level, contradicting to the findings of previous cross-sectional studies. Many game players experience great pleasure from immersing themselves in a virtual world, and often to the extent of developing addictive symptoms. This phenomenon is referred to as “pull” effect which is considered comparable to the motive of “pursuing in-game advancement” in the present study. Conversely, frustrations or other negative experiences in real life might also bring about a “push” effect that tugs players into gaming. The motive of escapism from the real-life in this study resembles the so-called “push” effect. The authors suggest when gamers demonstrated social motive during game time, such as participating in a gamer community and collaborating with the others despite being socially withdrawn in real life, it would be less reasonably to be regarded as PIU. During game time, if gamers experience a temporary sense of well-being, it might help to vent their real-life frustration. However, an excessive use of this emotion-focused coping strategy might still increase the risk of PIU.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:12:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.03.007
      Issue No: Vol. 122 (2018)
       
  • Use of the ARCS model in education: A literature review
    • Authors: Kun Li; John M. Keller
      Pages: 54 - 62
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 122
      Author(s): Kun Li, John M. Keller
      This article reviews empirical research on applying the Attention, Relevance, Confidence, and Satisfaction (ARCS) model to real educational settings, including computer-based learning approaches. This review focuses on three aspects: (1) how the ARCS model was applied to what specific educational settings; (2) what research methods were used; and (3) what outcomes were reported in these studies. Our findings indicate that the ARCS model was applied to a variety of countries and educational settings. The course component(s) in which the ARCS model was incorporated included single course component (e.g. course email), multiple course components, and other programs (e.g. specific software or game). Quantitative methods were used more than qualitative and mixed methods in these reviewed studies. Four major research outcomes were found in regard to participants’ affective domain, cognitive domain, learning behaviors, and psychological traits. We also summarized the studies in this review and provided future research directions. The latter includes applications of design-based research to educational problems that the ARCS model might address, especially in the context of computer-based learning.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:12:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.03.019
      Issue No: Vol. 122 (2018)
       
  • Mental effort detection using EEG data in E-learning contexts
    • Authors: Fu-Ren Lin; Chien-Min Kao
      Pages: 63 - 79
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 122
      Author(s): Fu-Ren Lin, Chien-Min Kao
      E-learning becomes an alternative learning mode since the prevalence of the Internet. Especially, the advance of MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) technology enables a course to enroll tens of thousands of online learners. How to improve learners' online learning experiences on MOOC platforms becomes a crucial task for platform providers. In this research, based on Cognitive Load Theory, we built a system to capture and tag a user's mental states while s/he is watching online videos with a commercial EEG device, and used different normalization schemes and time window lengths to process EEG signals recorded from the EEG device. Finally, we adopted different supervised learning algorithms to train and test the classifiers, and then evaluated their classification performance. The results show that the proposed approach can effectively process EEG data to train classifiers, which achieve high accuracy, precision and recall rates compared with those of previous studies. This system can effectively facilitate users' self-awareness of mental efforts in online learning contexts to enable the automatic feedback in synchronous and asynchronous learning contexts, especially taking MOOCs as an example.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:12:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.03.020
      Issue No: Vol. 122 (2018)
       
  • Understanding students’ preferences toward the smart classroom learning
           environment: Development and validation of an instrument
    • Authors: Jason MacLeod; Harrison Hao Yang; Sha Zhu; Yanhong Li
      Pages: 80 - 91
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 122
      Author(s): Jason MacLeod, Harrison Hao Yang, Sha Zhu, Yanhong Li
      This article presents the rationale for developing an instrument and initial evidence of validity and reliability in a higher education context. The 40-item instrument measures students' preferences toward the smart classroom learning environment from eight constructs that are characteristic for this environment, including: Student Negotiation, Inquiry Learning, Reflective Thinking, Ease of Use, Perceived Usefulness, Multiple Sources, Connectedness, and Functional Design. Data was purposely collected from a group of 462 college students enrolled in at least one smart classroom course during the time of this study. The results showed no difference in preferences between genders and concluded that the instrument was a valid and reliable tool for measuring college students’ preferences toward a smart classroom learning environment.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:12:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.03.015
      Issue No: Vol. 122 (2018)
       
  • Unfamiliar technology: Reaction of international students to blended
           learning
    • Authors: P.W.C. Prasad; Angelika Maag; Margaret Redestowicz; Lau Siong Hoe
      Pages: 92 - 103
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 122
      Author(s): P.W.C. Prasad, Angelika Maag, Margaret Redestowicz, Lau Siong Hoe
      This study enquires into learners’ behavioural intentions towards the use of a blended learning program designed for post-graduate international IT students. The aim of this research is to develop a testing mechanism to measure the extent to which international students have built up digital capital. We use the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) as a framework for this investigation, built around social influence (behavioural intention) performance and effort expectancy (attitude), and facilitating conditions (ease and usefulness), using a critical theoretical approach. We further attempt to understand whether motivation for engagement with blended learning comes from intrinsic or extrinsic sources. For this study, 95 Project Management students were introduced to a blended learning approach using Blackboard, a Learning Management System. Following an introductory session, data on attitude, social influence and facilitating conditions was gathered. Hierarchical multiple regressions were used to assess the influence of each variable in determining first behavioural intentions and latter attitude towards blended learning. This study contributes to the body of knowledge through identifying that social influence has a strong impact on both performance and effort expectation as well as behavioural intentions. This suggests that, overall, the social environments from which the cohort originated provided sufficient economic, social and cultural capital to also develop some digital capital.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:12:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.03.016
      Issue No: Vol. 122 (2018)
       
  • On the Nth presence for the Community of Inquiry framework
    • Authors: Kadir Kozan; Secil Caskurlu
      Pages: 104 - 118
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 122
      Author(s): Kadir Kozan, Secil Caskurlu
      The purpose of the present study was to provide a comprehensive and descriptive review of the earlier research done on the refinement of the Community of Inquiry framework (Garrison, Anderson, & Archer, 2000, 2001, 2010) that has greatly influenced both research and practice in online education so far. To this end, the current review included peer-reviewed journal articles only by handling them both individually and determining their common theoretical and methodological aspects. The results revealed that previous research produced very significant insights into the revision of the framework by producing four new presence types and seven presence dimensions. However, there were some theoretical, methodological and empirical gaps that need to be addressed in the future. Specifically speaking, these gaps ranged from addressing certain educational contexts to focusing on statistical significance only in some of earlier research. Accordingly, all the findings led to the conclusion that addressing the existing gaps in further research would enrich our understanding of the Community of Inquiry framework thereby adding to the contributions of previous revision studies done on it and positively impacting online learning research and practice.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:12:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.03.010
      Issue No: Vol. 122 (2018)
       
  • Visual learning analytics of educational data: A systematic literature
           review and research agenda
    • Authors: Camilo Vieira; Paul Parsons; Vetria Byrd
      Pages: 119 - 135
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 122
      Author(s): Camilo Vieira, Paul Parsons, Vetria Byrd
      We present a systematic literature review of the emerging field of visual learning analytics. We review existing work in this field from two perspectives: First, we analyze existing approaches, audiences, purposes, contexts, and data sources—both individually and in relation to one another—that designers and researchers have used to visualize educational data. Second, we examine how established literature in the fields of information visualization and education has been used to inform the design of visual learning analytics tools and to discuss research findings. We characterize the reviewed literature based on three dimensions: (a) connection with visualization background; (b) connection with educational theory; and (c) sophistication of visualization(s). The results from this systematic review suggest that: (1) little work has been done to bring visual learning analytics tools into classroom settings; (2) few studies consider background information from the students, such as demographics or prior performance; (3) traditional statistical visualization techniques, such as bar plots and scatter plots, are still the most commonly used in learning analytics contexts, while more advanced or novel techniques are rarely used; (4) while some studies employ sophisticated visualizations, and some engage deeply with educational theories, there is a lack of studies that both employ sophisticated visualizations and engage deeply with educational theories. Finally, we present a brief research agenda for the field of visual learning analytics based on the findings of our literature review.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:12:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.03.018
      Issue No: Vol. 122 (2018)
       
  • Learner support in MOOCs: Identifying variables linked to completion
    • Authors: Elena Barberà Gregori; Jingjing Zhang; Cristina Galván-Fernández; Francisco de Asís Fernández-Navarro
      Pages: 153 - 168
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 122
      Author(s): Elena Barberà Gregori, Jingjing Zhang, Cristina Galván-Fernández, Francisco de Asís Fernández-Navarro
      This study investigated learner support strategies that enable the success and completion of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). It examined five MOOCs categorised into three groups according to their pedagogical approach and used in different learning settings: formal MOOCs, conventional MOOCs and professional MOOCs. A total of 4,202,974 units of variables (student behaviours and MOOC features) were analysed using Semi-Supervised Extreme Learning Machine (SSELM) and Global Sensitivity Analysis. In this study, the use of SSELM was compared to the state-of-art models (e.g. ELM, KELM, OP-ELM, PCA-ELM), and SSELM yielded 97.24% accuracy. Using unlabelled students helped improve the learning accuracy for the model, which confirms that SSELM is a good model to predict completion in MOOCs, considering the difficulty of labelling students in such an open and flexible learning environment. The findings show that designers and teachers should pay special attention to their students during the second quartile of the course (independently of the type of MOOC). The teachers’ presence during the course, his or her interactions with students and the quality of the videos presented are significant determinants of course completion.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:12:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.03.014
      Issue No: Vol. 122 (2018)
       
  • Demographic data of MOOC learners: Can alternative survey deliveries
           improve current understandings'
    • Authors: Karmijn van de Oudeweetering; Orhan Agirdag
      Pages: 169 - 178
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 122
      Author(s): Karmijn van de Oudeweetering, Orhan Agirdag
      Although demographic data in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have regularly been reported, these data are mainly retrieved through email-based surveys with very low response rates. This indicates an increased risk of misrepresentation. This study examined whether a survey embedded in the MOOC environment could yield higher response rates, could affect the representation of demographics and influence the estimated effects of demographics on learning outcomes. In six MOOCs, learners (N = 3834) were randomly assigned to receive a demographic survey only by email or to receive the embedded survey too. Results showed that the inclusion of the embedded survey caused response to increase from 6.9% to 61.5%. Although survey delivery barely affected the representation of demographics, it did influence the estimated effects of parental education and country of residence on learning outcomes. The findings raise awareness about the importance of survey delivery for response rates and data quality in MOOCs.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:12:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.03.017
      Issue No: Vol. 122 (2018)
       
  • An exploratory study of blending the virtual world and the laboratory
           experience in secondary chemistry classrooms
    • Authors: Georgia Wood Hodges; Lu Wang; Juyeon Lee; Allan Cohen; Yoonsun Jang
      Pages: 179 - 193
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 122
      Author(s): Georgia Wood Hodges, Lu Wang, Juyeon Lee, Allan Cohen, Yoonsun Jang
      Research suggests that serious educational games may support learning of microscopic phenomena by making the invisible visible. The current study presents a novel instructional approach that blends a traditional lab experience with a serious educational game (SEG) to engage students with the hands-on laboratory experience while examining the molecular level mechanisms that cause the phenomena. We conducted a mixed methods study to examine teacher use of the blended reality environment (BRE) that utilizes a real-time data capture system and the learning gains associated with use of the BRE with chemistry students (n = 578) in a public high school in the southeast. The results demonstrate that students who experienced the blended reality environment (a) experienced significantly higher learning gains than students who experienced the business as usual (BAU) condition and (b) improved on specific scientific practices outlined in the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) by practicing science skills in an authentic environment as scientists do. Analysis also reveals the explanatory power of examining student interaction within the BRE. Thematic analysis of teacher interviews identified three strengths of the BRE environment: (a) a coherent explanation of scientific phenomena, (2) an authentic science inquiry, and (3) a connection between the student and teacher within the learning environment.

      PubDate: 2018-04-15T11:12:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.03.003
      Issue No: Vol. 122 (2018)
       
  • Instructor presence effect: Liking does not always lead to learning
    • Authors: Kristin E. Wilson; Mark Martinez; Caitlin Mills; Sidney D'Mello; Daniel Smilek; Evan F. Risko
      Pages: 205 - 220
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 122
      Author(s): Kristin E. Wilson, Mark Martinez, Caitlin Mills, Sidney D'Mello, Daniel Smilek, Evan F. Risko
      Online education provides the opportunity to present lecture material to students in different formats or modalities, however there is debate about which lecture formats are best. Here, we conducted four experiments with 19–68 year old online participants to address the question of whether visuals of the instructor in online video lectures benefit learning. In Experiments 1 (N = 168) and 2 (N = 206) participants were presented with a lecture in one of three modalities (audio, audio with text, or audio with visuals of the instructor). Participants reported on their attentiveness – mind wandering (MW) – throughout the lecture and then completed a comprehension test. We found no evidence of an advantage for video lectures with visuals of the instructor in terms of a reduction in MW or increase in comprehension. In fact, we found evidence of a comprehension cost, suggesting that visuals of instructors in video lectures may act as a distractor. In Experiments 3 (N = 88) and 4 (N = 109) we explored learners' subjective evaluations of lecture formats across 4 different lecture formats (audio, text, audio + text, audio + instructor, audio + text + instructor). The results revealed learners not only find online lectures with visuals of the instructor more enjoyable and interesting, they believe this format most facilitates their learning. Taken together, these results suggest visuals of the instructor potentially impairs comprehension, but learners prefer and believe they learn most effectively with this format. We refer to as the Instructor Presence Effect and discuss implications for multimedia learning and instructional design.

      PubDate: 2018-05-01T16:37:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.03.011
      Issue No: Vol. 122 (2018)
       
  • Engaged in learning neurorehabilitation: Development and validation of a
           serious game with user-centered design
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 125
      Author(s): Federica Savazzi, Sara Isernia, Johanna Jonsdottir, Sonia Di Tella, Stefania Pazzi, Francesca Baglio
      The presence of Serious Games (SGs) in the medical educational field is spreading due to their beneficial results in terms of learning outcomes and user' engagement. The effectiveness of these tools for physical therapy students is, however, still to be proven and prototypes for this user target are lacking. We adopted a user-centered design (UCD) approach to develop and validate a SG on dual task motor and cognitive rehabilitation for junior physical therapists training. The SG development and validation consisted in two phases: a design-evaluation-redesign phase with two groups of junior and senior physiotherapists (group 1, N = 10; group 2, N = 28), and the SG prototype testing phase comparing outcomes of junior physiotherapists in lab (N = 20) and physical therapy students in real context (N = 23). Usability, motivation, flow state, affective engagement and learning were tested. Results showed a high usability of the tool together with good levels of engagement in all groups. Interestingly, we observed a decrease in physiotherapists' negative affect and an increment of students' positive affect after experiencing the prototype. The adoption of the UCD for the validation of a SG on neurorehabilitation allowed the development of a usable and engaging prototype. Future research on SG topics should include a rehabilitation paradigm in their content.

      PubDate: 2018-06-12T21:04:19Z
       
  • A critical examination of the relationship among research, theory, and
           practice: Technology and reading instruction
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 125
      Author(s): Xinyuan Yang, Li-Jen Kuo, Xuejun Ji, Erin McTigue
      Recent technological advancements have changed how literacy is perceived, and it is no longer confined to the interaction with print text. The evolving definition of literacy has been reflected in the increasing number of teachers who are incorporating technology into their reading instruction. However, less is known about the extent to which these technology-integrated instructional practices are supported by reading theories. The purpose of this study is to systematically review how technology has been implemented in reading instruction and to explore how transitions of instructional practice from traditional classrooms to digital settings have been grounded in reading theories. The present study reviewed articles published over the past twelve years in flagship practitioner journals to examine the connections and the gaps between theory and practice. Our review uncovered that technology has served in reading instruction primarily in three ways: 1) to increase reading motivation, 2) to present information in multi-modalities, and 3) to promote collaborative learning. Consistent with other domains of reading instruction, social theories were found to be the prominent theoretical bases supporting technology-integrated practices; dual-coding theory has also emerged in recent years as the theoretical basis for technology use in reading instruction. However, most of the theories were rarely referred explicitly. Implications for researchers and practitioners were provided based on the gaps between theory and practice revealed in the current review.

      PubDate: 2018-06-12T21:04:19Z
       
  • Using enhanced OER videos to facilitate English L2 learners’
           multicultural competence
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 125
      Author(s): Yu-Ju Lin, Hung-Chun Wang
      This study investigated whether applying enhanced open educational resource (OER) videos in English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) classes could improve university students' multicultural competence, and it also explored their perceptions of OERs. The study was implemented with 65 students who were enrolled in two General English classes at a public university in Taiwan. Videos of two TED Talks that carried different multicultural themes were adopted for the purpose of developing the students' multicultural competence and English skills. For each of the videos, the students watched a presentation before class and discussed it with their peers in the class meeting. Data collected from an Intercultural Competence Scale, OER Perception Survey, and post-intervention interviews were analyzed to address the research issues. Results showed that the OER intervention was particularly helpful to the students' use of communicative strategies and attentive preparation for multicultural encounters. The intervention also reinforced their beliefs in the educational value of OERs. Based on the results, pedagogical implications are discussed to provide insights into how to integrate OERs into EFL curricula to facilitate students’ multicultural competence.

      PubDate: 2018-06-12T21:04:19Z
       
  • Strengthening dialogic peer feedback aiming for deep learning in SPOCs
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 125
      Author(s): Renée M. Filius, Renske A.M. de Kleijn, Sabine G. Uijl, Frans J. Prins, Harold V.M. van Rijen, Diederick E. Grobbee
      This study is focused on how peer feedback in SPOCs (Small Private Online Courses) can effectively lead to deep learning. Promoting deep learning in online courses, such as SPOCs, is often a challenge. We aimed for deep learning by reinforcement of ‘feedback dialogue’ as scalable intervention. Students provided peer feedback as a dialogue, both individually and as a group. They were instructed to rate each other's feedback, which was aimed at deep learning. Data from questionnaires from 41 students of a master epidemiology course were used to measure for each feedback assignment to what extent deep learning was perceived. The feedback received by students who scored extremely high or low on the questionnaire was analyzed in order to find out which features of the feedback led to deep learning. In addition, students were interviewed to retrieve information about the underlying mechanisms. The results support the view that peer feedback instruction and peer feedback rating lead to peer feedback dialogues that, in turn, promote deep learning in SPOCs. The value of peer feedback appears to predominantly result from the dialogue it triggers, rather than the feedback itself. Especially helpful for students is the constant attention to how one provides peer feedback: by instruction, by having to rate feedback and therefore by repeatedly having to reflect. The dialogue is strengthened because students question feedback from peers in contrast to feedback from their instructor. As a result, they continue to think longer and deeper, which enables deep learning.

      PubDate: 2018-06-12T21:04:19Z
       
  • Learner-generated materials in a flipped pronunciation class: A sequential
           explanatory mixed-methods study
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 125
      Author(s): Arif Bakla
      As a relatively popular practice in recent years, the flipped learning model moves traditional lecturing outside the class, yet it might prove challenging to find appropriate in-class activities that promote research, active learning and higher-order thinking skills. This study attempts to investigate if learner-generated materials could promote active and inquiry-based learning in such a class and help develop positive attitudes towards flipped learning in general. It also seeks to understand the role, perceived value and ease of using authoring tools used to build learning materials in facilitating inquiry-based active learning in the classroom. It adopts a sequential explanatory mixed-methods research design, in which 40 intermediate Turkish learners of English studied various topics in phonetics and phonology by creating learning materials in teams. The analysis of the data from a post-instruction survey and follow-up interviews with 8 participants imply that learner-generated materials produced using user-friendly authoring tools seem to be a good option for learners to get involved in research in a flipped class. The findings also revealed that although the learners reported mostly positive attitudes and that the higher and lower scorers (Moodle Scores) viewed the flipped learning model almost equally valuable, the higher scorers talked more positively about how the course was delivered. However, as the findings indicated, radical changes introduced by both the use of the flipped model itself and new software and a lesson sequence based on thinking, production and research might constitute a major challenge for students that are accustomed to traditional methods.

      PubDate: 2018-06-06T20:59:28Z
       
  • An empirical study on gender, video game play, academic success and
           complex problem solving skills
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 125
      Author(s): Muhterem Dindar
      This study investigated the video gaming behaviors of 479 high school students with respect to gender-based differences, as well as the relationship between video gaming, academic success and Complex Problem Solving skills (CPS). Video gaming was measured under the gaming experience, gaming time, gaming frequency, perceived gaming skills, playing alone vs. playing with a team, and game genre dimensions. The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2012 Creative Problem Solving test was utilized to measure CPS. Findings showed that the sampled males had more experience and skills in video gaming and spent more time on video games than their female counterparts. On the other hand, it emerged that the females actually played video games more often than the males. No relationship of practical significance was found between any of the video gaming variables investigated in the study and CPS or academic success. The current findings contribute to the limited empirical evidence on the relationship between video gaming and CPS, and demonstrate that the transferal of video gaming skills to real-life problem solving might not be as obvious as is claimed in the literature.

      PubDate: 2018-06-06T20:59:28Z
       
  • Implementing flipped classroom that used an intelligent tutoring system
           into learning process
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 124
      Author(s): Hafidi Mohamed, Mahnane Lamia
      Students nowadays are hard to be motivated to solve logical problems with traditional teaching methods. Computers, Smartphone's, tablets and other smart devices disturb their attention. But those smart devices can be used as auxiliary tools of modern teaching methods. The flipped classroom is one such innovative method that moves the solving problems outside the classroom via technology and reinforces solving problems inside the classroom via learning activities. In this paper, the authors implement flipped classroom as an element of Internet of Things (IOT) into learning process of mathematical logic course. In the flipped classroom, an Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS) was used to help students work with the problems in the course outside the classroom. This study showed that perceived usefulness, self-efficacy, compatibility, and perceived support for enhancing social ties are important antecedents to continuance intention to use flipped classroom.

      PubDate: 2018-06-03T20:53:07Z
       
  • A systematic review of cloud computing tools for collaborative learning:
           Opportunities and challenges to the blended-learning environment
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 124
      Author(s): Hosam Al-Samarraie, Noria Saeed
      The use of online collaborative learning activities has been notably supported by cloud computing. Although specific reference has been made to a certain online application or service, there has been no clear understanding of how different cloud computing tools have shaped the concept of collaborative learning, and the extent to which these resources are accessible to today's students. Thus, a review of the literature was conducted to identify studies on cloud computing tools for collaborative learning in a blended classroom. The review of the literature led to the inclusion of 29 relevant studies categorized as synchronized tools, Learning Management System (LMS) tools, and social networking tools. The review results revealed a set of evidences supporting the use of certain cloud computing tools for certain collaborative learning activities categorized under sharing, editing, communication and discussion. The key opportunities and challenges associated with the use of these tools in a blended learning context were also identified and discussed. Findings from this study will certainly help academicians, practitioners and researchers to understand the potential of using cloud computing environments from a wider perspective.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T20:50:53Z
       
  • Comparison of reading performance on screen and on paper: A meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 123
      Author(s): Yiren Kong, Young Sik Seo, Ling Zhai
      This meta-analysis looked at 17 studies which focused on the comparison of reading on screen and reading on paper in terms of reading comprehension and reading speed. The robust variance estimation (RVE)- based meta-analysis models were employed, followed by four different RVE meta-regression models to examine the potential effects of some of the covariates (moderators) on the mean differences in comprehension and reading speed between reading on screen and reading on paper. The RVE meta-analysis showed that reading on paper was better than reading on screen in terms of reading comprehension, and there were no significant differences between reading on paper and reading on screen in terms of reading speed. None of the moderators were significant at the 0.05 level. In the meanwhile, albeit not significant, examination of the p-values for the difference tests prior to 2013 and after 2013 respectively (not shown here) indicated that the magnitude of the difference in reading comprehension between paper and screen followed a diminishing trajectory. It was suggested that future meta-analyses include latest studies, and other potential moderators such as fonts, spacing, age and gender.

      PubDate: 2018-05-31T20:50:53Z
       
  • Comparison of virtual reality and hands on activities in science education
           via functional near infrared spectroscopy
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 124
      Author(s): Richard Lamb, Pavlo Antonenko, Elisabeth Etopio, Amanda Seccia
      There has been an increased focus on the use of cognitive strategies in the science classroom, in part this increased focus is due to the implementation of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). This focus has created the need to examine claims regarding the cognitive basis for disciplinary approaches such as video lecture, virtual reality (VR), Serious Educational Games (SEGs), and hands on activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in the level of hemodynamic response as it relates to four different approaches to teaching topics in the life sciences. The first approach used a video based lecture approach. The other approaches used an immersive Serious Educational Game and a virtual reality environment in which students were exposed to an experience involving the process of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) replication. The final condition was that of a hands-on activity. Researchers used functional near-infrared spectroscopy to examine hemodynamic localization and intensity as it related to each condition. In addition to examination of cognitive dynamics, content learning gains were also examined. Results provide evidence that there is parity between the hands on condition, Serious Educational Games, and the virtual reality conditions in learning outcomes and cognitive processing.

      PubDate: 2018-05-28T20:47:41Z
       
  • Game-Based Auxiliary Training System for improving visual perceptual
           dysfunction in children with developmental disabilities: A proposed design
           and evaluation
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 124
      Author(s): Yee-Pay Wuang, Yu-Hsien Chiu, Yenming J. Chen, Chiu-Ping Chen, Chih-Chung Wang, Chien-Ling Huang, Tang-Meng Wu, Wen-Hsien Ho
      The main purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a Game-Based Auxiliary Training System (GBATS) in special education for improving visual perceptual dysfunction in children with developmental disabilities. The GBATS application program was designed in the first stage of the study. Sixty participants with visual perceptual dysfunction were then randomly assigned to either an experimental group or a control group (n = 30 each) to evaluate the effectiveness of the GBATS. The experimental group received the GBATS while the control group received the Conventional Visual Perceptual Training Program (CVPTP). Both the GBATS and CVPTP were administered in two 30-min sessions per week for 8 weeks. The post-intervention outcome measures were the Test of Visual Perceptual Skill, Third Edition, the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale, and the School Function Assessment. At post-intervention, the GBATS group significantly outperformed the CVPTP group in all three measures. Specifically, children in the GBATS group showed significantly larger improvements in demonstrated benefit in improving visual perceptual function. The GBATS group also showed significantly larger improvements in adaptive behaviors and school functions. The present study shows that the GBATS can be used as a training program adjuvant to other rehabilitative interventions that have proven effective for treating visual perceptual dysfunction in children.

      PubDate: 2018-05-28T20:47:41Z
       
  • Promises of structured relationship building for higher distance
           education: Evaluating the effects of a virtual fast-friendship procedure
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 124
      Author(s): Stefan Stürmer, Toni A. Ihme, Björn Fisseler, Katharina Sonnenberg, Maria-Luisa Barbarino
      The main aim of the present research is to introduce and evaluate the effects of a virtual relationship-building program designed to foster social integration among distance education students. To achieve this purpose, the authors developed a Moodle-based adaptation of Aron et al.’s (1997) “fast-friendship procedure.” The evaluation has employed a longitudinal randomized delayed intervention group design with an additional non-random comparison group (intervention groups: N = 855, comparison group: N = 754). Significant and practically relevant program effects on interpersonal liking and perceived social integration have been confirmed through mixed-model ANOVAs, using multiple comparison groups, individual and dyadic data, and socio-demographic controls. Mediational analyses have further confirmed that program participation had a significant and positive effect on the end-of-semester exam attendance of distance students, mediated by program-induced social integration. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed below.

      PubDate: 2018-05-28T20:47:41Z
       
  • Relationship among smartphone usage, addiction, academic performance and
           the moderating role of gender: A study of higher education students in
           India
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 123
      Author(s): Jogendra Kumar Nayak
      Smartphones have penetrated into people's lives at a faster pace in the recent times in India. They are being used for several purposes besides talking and messaging such as live chatting, searching for information, mobile banking and entertainment, etc. The discussions over the smartphone has taken over personal discussions and one to one interactions among people. The usage has become so high that it has turned into addiction in many cases. In this study smartphones's addiction on students academic performance has been measured and the effect of gender and relationship status on smartphone usage and addiction has also been checked. Smartphone usage has been measured with the help of amount of time spent on the phone and monthly bill. A questionnaire was constructed and administered to 429 higher education students in India to check addiction, effect on performance and smartphone usage, along with the main utilities of a smartphone and the demographic profile of the respondents. Results show that the usage is more in the case of females than male students. However the effect on performance is found to be severe in the case of the male students. Apart from behavioural changes female students were found to have hardly any effect of Smartphone addiction on them, unlike the male students who were found to neglect work, feel anxious and lose control of themselves.

      PubDate: 2018-05-28T20:47:41Z
       
  • Motivation is a game: Massively multiplayer online games as agents of
           motivation in higher education
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 123
      Author(s): Papia Bawa, Sunnie Lee Watson, William Watson
      Stakeholders in the education arena are seeking effective and affordable ways to integrate technology in curriculum. One technology integration approach that has received attention is using commercial digital games as technological tools in the curriculum. Massively Multiplayer Online Games or MMOGs are a sub-genre of commercial, made for entertainment games. While there is considerable evidence that such games provide robust, stimulating and motivating environments for users, there are gaps in examinations of how learners perceive their experiences when immersed in MMOG based curricular environments. As learners are the focal points of designing instruction, understanding their conceptions is crucial for effective instructional design. Using a Phenomenography approach, this study highlighted the experiences of 95 students in English and Business courses that used an MMOG based curriculum. A key finding is that participants approve of game related contents such as information on game sites, game wikis and YouTube tutorials, with or without experiencing gameplay. This suggests a possible paradigm shift in the way MMOGs may be infused in the curriculum, as teachers and instructional designers may find it easier to implement and adopt MMOGs in their classrooms if complexities such as mandatory gameplay are not necessary. Researcher and practitioner implications are also discussed.

      PubDate: 2018-05-28T20:47:41Z
       
  • The Creativity Challenge Game: An educational intervention for creativity
           enhancement with the integration of Information and Communication
           Technologies (ICTs)
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 123
      Author(s): Afroditi Stolaki, Anastasios A. Economides
      Creativity enhancement is an educational objective. The integration of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) into the curriculum is another goal of many educators. In this study a creativity enhancement intervention was conducted with participants students (N = 90, 46 male, 44 female) of mean age M = 18.38, in an information systems course. A quasi-experimental design was employed and the proposed method included the extensive use of Facebook, a collaborative team structure, a game-like competitive environment, questions generation and answering. Creativity was measured with several pre-post divergent thinking tests. Academic achievement was obtained through exam results. Additional data were collected with online questionnaires. Results show that the intervention was overall effective in stimulating creativity. There was a statistically significant increase in fluency, flexibility, elaboration and originality, as measured by divergent thinking tests. Total student creativity calculated with the use of principal component analysis showed a significant positive link to academic achievement and ICT knowledge. Students with almost zero Facebook usage exhibited the highest levels of creativity followed closely by their peers with the highest Facebook usage. Creativity enhancement was not related to Facebook usage or ICT knowledge. Results and implications are discussed, and propositions for future research are offered.

      PubDate: 2018-05-28T20:47:41Z
       
  • Automated essay scoring in applied games: Reducing the teacher bandwidth
           problem in online training
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018
      Source:Computers & Education, Volume 123
      Author(s): Wim Westera, Mihai Dascalu, Hub Kurvers, Stefan Ruseti, Stefan Trausan-Matu
      This paper presents a methodology for applying automated essay scoring in educational settings. The methodology was tested and validated on a dataset of 173 reports (in Dutch language) that students have created in an applied game on environmental policy. Natural Language Processing technologies from the ReaderBench framework were used to generate an extensive set of textual complexity indices for each of the reports. Afterwards, different machine learning algorithms were used to predict the scores. By combining binary classification (pass or fail) and a probabilistic model for Precision, a trade-off can be made between validity of automated score prediction (Precision) and the reduction of teacher workload required for manual assessment. It was found from the sample that substantial workload reduction can be achieved, while preserving high precision: allowing for a precision of 95% or higher would already reduce the teacher's workload to 74%; lowering precision to 80% produces a workload reduction of 50%.

      PubDate: 2018-05-28T20:47:41Z
       
  • The role of motivation, ability, and opportunity in university teachers’
           continuance use intention for flipped teaching
    • Authors: Hui-Min Lai; Yu-Lin Hsiao; Pi-Jung Hsieh
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 May 2018
      Source:Computers & Education
      Author(s): Hui-Min Lai, Yu-Lin Hsiao, Pi-Jung Hsieh
      On-site teaching practice is changing due to the development of digital technology. Traditional lecturing has long focused on instructor-based teaching but now has transitioned to a flipped classroom that emphasizes student learning. In the past, quasi-experimental methods or qualitative interviews were primarily used to explore learners' learning performance, learning satisfaction, and the interaction between teachers and students. Studies on teachers' points of view are rare, as are studies on factors that influence teachers to continue flipped teaching. Thus, the empirical results of this innovative teaching strategy must be assessed to confirm the expectations of practice and theory. Drawing on theories of self-determination and motivation-opportunity-ability, this paper proposes and empirically supports the notion that teachers' motivational factors, perceived self-efficacy, and supportive flipped teaching resources interact to perpetuate flipped teaching in the higher education context. To test the proposed research model, a survey was conducted among 169 university teachers. The results indicate that intrinsic challenge motivation and extrinsic compensation motivation are critical predictors of teachers' continuance use intention for flipped teaching. Perceived self-efficacy was also shown to critically moderate teachers' continuance use intention for flipped teaching. Specifically, when teachers have high perceived self-efficacy, challenge motivation leads to continuance use intention. Conversely, when teachers have low perceived self-efficacy, compensation motivation leads to continuance intention. Further, the results also suggest that teachers’ continuance use intention for flipped teaching is highest when challenge motivation, perceived self-efficacy, and supportive flipped teaching resources are all sufficient and mutually reinforcing.

      PubDate: 2018-05-17T21:55:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2018.05.013
       
 
 
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