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Journal Cover The Economist - UK
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   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0013-0613
   Published by The Economist Group Homepage  [4 journals]
  • Tackling inequality: Taxing the rich
    • Abstract: Main image:  FOR once, the Daily Mail and the Guardian, British newspapers of the right and left, agree. In the former, Alex Brummer says “IMF's new line of thinking of tax should please Corbyn & co” while the latter says that the IMF “analysis supports tax strategy of Labour in UK”. Both are responding to the IMF's fiscal monitor which does indeed say that there would appear to be scope for increasing the progressivity of income taxation without significantly hurting growth for countries wishing to enhance income redistribution.The report details how income tax progressivity in advanced economies declined in the 1980s and 1990s and that the tax system has done little to reduce inequality in recent yearsBetween 1985 and 1995, rising fiscal redistribution was able to offset about 60 percent of the increase in market income inequality. In contrast, average fiscal redistribution hardly changed between 1995 and 2010, while market income inequality continued to increase. As a result, average disposable income inequality increased broadly in line with market income inequalityBut the report is about the west as a whole, rather than Britain in particular. When it comes to a specific tax rate, it says that  Assuming a welfare weight of zero for the very rich, the optimal marginal ...
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 15:35:57 +000
       
  • Business this week
    • Abstract: Print section Print Headline:  Business this week UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  China’s Xi Jinping has more clout than Donald Trump. The world should be wary Procter & Gamble declared victory in seeing off a challenge from Nelson Peltz, an activist investor, for a seat on the board. The consumer-goods group said a preliminary count showed that all its current directors had been re-elected by shareholders at its annual meeting. Mr Peltz said he would wait for the final tally to be certified before conceding defeat. It was the biggest and costliest proxy fight for a board seat in American corporate history. After Mr Peltz’s firm took a $3.5bn stake in P&G, the company spent tens of millions fighting his campaign for it to boost profits by streamlining its business. See article.In some good news for Mr Peltz, the chief investment officer at Trian, his management fund, won a seat on the board of General Electric and will argue for deeper cost-cutting at the conglomerate. This year has seen a sizeable increase in spending by activist investors overall, as they set their sights on bigger-than-usual corporate ...
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 14:51:03 +000
       
  • Throttling back: BAE Systems sheds 2,000 jobs in Britain
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  The defence giant jettisons jobs but will benefit from rising defence spending Print Headline:  Throttling back Print Fly Title:  BAE Systems UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  China’s Xi Jinping has more clout than Donald Trump. The world should be wary Fly Title:  Throttling back Main image:  20171014_BRP003_1.jpg THE shrinking of Britain’s manufacturing industry has been a big concern of successive British governments. It now accounts for just 10% of GDP, down from 25% in the 1970s. So news of job cuts at BAE Systems, the country’s largest manufacturer, stoked old worries.On October 10th the defence contractor announced that it was shedding almost 2,000 jobs out of about 35,000 in Britain, mostly in its military aerospace division. But although this was bad news for British industry and its workers, investors are more ...
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 14:51:03 +000
       
  • Buttonwood: The finance industry ten years after the crisis
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  Banks may be safer, but finance is still a big source of risk Print Headline:  The more things change Print Fly Title:  Buttonwood UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  China’s Xi Jinping has more clout than Donald Trump. The world should be wary Fly Title:  Buttonwood Main image:  20171014_fnp508.jpg MANY people complain that the finance industry has barely suffered any adverse consequences from the crisis that it created, which began around ten years ago. But a report from New Financial, a think-tank, shows that is not completely true.The additional capital that regulators demanded banks should take on to their balance-sheets has had an effect. Between 2006 and 2016, the return on capital of the world’s biggest banks has fallen by a third (by more in Britain and Europe). The balance of power has shifted away from the ...
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 14:50:58 +000
       
  • Standing novations: Brexit will give the derivatives market a nasty
           headache
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  Brexit will give the derivatives market a nasty headache Print Headline:  Standing novations Print Fly Title:  Brexit and derivatives UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  China’s Xi Jinping has more clout than Donald Trump. The world should be wary Fly Title:  Standing novations Main image:  20171014_FND001_0.jpg FOR all the talk of banks deserting London as Britain’s departure from the EU looms, relatively little attention has been paid to the derivatives market. Yet this is a crucial area of business for British-based banks. The City handles a big chunk of the market, including 39% of the market in interest-rate derivatives alone, where global daily turnover averages $3trn. The rest of the EU accounts for just 9%. Brexit seems sure to cause significant disruption. Mark Carney, the governor of the Bank of England, recently ...
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 14:50:58 +000
       
  • Ready or not: The Home Office: a crisis in waiting
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  A just-about-managing department looks ill-prepared for Brexit Print Headline:  A crisis in waiting Print Fly Title:  The Home Office UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  China’s Xi Jinping has more clout than Donald Trump. The world should be wary Fly Title:  Ready or not Main image:  20171014_BRP006_0.jpg “I DON’T think, under current resources, that the challenge of Brexit can be met, and certainly not met smoothly.” David Wood’s verdict on the Home Office was damning. On October 10th Mr Wood, who until 2014 was head of immigration enforcement at the department, told a parliamentary committee of his grave doubts about his old employer’s ability to deal with Britain’s exit from the European Union. John Vine, a former chief inspector of borders who also gave evidence, said that at the Home Office “management of change was ...
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 14:50:58 +000
       
  • Bagehot: The Conservative Party is debating the merits of capitalism
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  Margaret Thatcher’s party is debating the merits of the market Print Headline:  Popular capitalism, take two Print Fly Title:  Bagehot UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  China’s Xi Jinping has more clout than Donald Trump. The world should be wary Fly Title:  Bagehot Main image:  20171014_BRD000_0.jpg THE most exciting, if also the most troubling, change in British politics in recent years is the rebirth of ideology. During the Blair-Brown-Cameron years, political debate was imprisoned in the gilded cage of economic and social liberalism. Today that cage lies in pieces, smashed by the triple hammer-blows of the financial crisis, Brexit and Jeremy Corbyn, Labour’s socialist leader. Britain is consumed by fundamental arguments: about the role of the nation-state in a global economy; about the costs and benefits of immigration; ...
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 14:50:58 +000
       
  • Best-laid plans: Poor productivity leaves Britain’s public finances
           looking shaky
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  The latest obstacle to closing the deficit: poor productivity Print Headline:  Best-laid plans Print Fly Title:  The public finances UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  China’s Xi Jinping has more clout than Donald Trump. The world should be wary Fly Title:  Best-laid plans SINCE coming to power in 2010 the Conservatives have seen their plans to balance the fiscal books scuppered time and again. In 2010 the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR), the official fiscal watchdog, reckoned that the budget deficit would be nearly eliminated by 2015. The turmoil in the euro zone, which caused economic growth in Britain to slow, put paid to that. By 2016 it assumed that the deficit would be gone by 2019. Then the country voted for Brexit. The government now hopes to close the deficit sometime in the 2020s.Unfortunately, more disappointing news came on October 10th, when the OBR suggested that it was ...
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 14:50:58 +000
       
  • Letters: Letters to the editor
    • Abstract: Print section Print Fly Title:  On Catalonia, the American constitution, cancer, guns, Tom Petty UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  China’s Xi Jinping has more clout than Donald Trump. The world should be wary Fly Title:  Letters The Catalan conundrumIt is the Spanish constitution, and not the government, which prevents a referendum on self-determination in Catalonia (“The Catalan question”, September 23rd). Artur Mas, Catalonia’s president between 2010 and 2016, whom I had the honour to serve as a consultant, inherited a financial mess from the previous Socialist-led governments. Enticed by radicals and unwilling to practise austerity, he decided to pursue the “right to decide” and a first illegal referendum was held in 2014.Since 2012, the Spanish government has adopted austerity and structural reforms, which have resulted in booming exports and in 2017 will deliver GDP growth above 3%. It has allocated €66.5bn ($79bn) to Catalonia out of a total of €217bn for all regions. Today, Carles Puigdemont’s coalition government in Catalonia with the ...
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 14:50:57 +000
       
  • Britain’s zombie leadership: Theresa May should clear out her
           cabinet
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  A purge would reanimate Theresa May’s weak and stable government Print Headline:  Clear out the cabinet Print Fly Title:  British politics UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  China’s Xi Jinping has more clout than Donald Trump. The world should be wary Fly Title:  Britain’s zombie leadership Main image:  20171014_LDD002_0.jpg ONLY six months ago Theresa May seemed all-powerful. Yet the snap election that was supposed to deliver a landslide for the Conservatives instead took away their majority, and with it every shred of the prime minister’s authority. The minority government is paralysed: it lacks the numbers to get anything meaningful through Parliament; the cabinet is unable to agree on anything, or to disguise the fact; and the party is terrified of ousting its feeble leader, lest the subsequent civil war let in the newly ...
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Oct 2017 08:18:24 +000
       
  • Of balls, courts and no deals: Theresa May’s weakness at home is
           slowing down the Brexit talks
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  A weakened Tory prime minister faces make-or-break European Union talks. Sound familiar' Print Headline:  Of balls, courts and no deals Print Fly Title:  Brexit and Theresa May’s future UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  China’s Xi Jinping has more clout than Donald Trump. The world should be wary Fly Title:  Of balls, courts and no deals Main image:  20171014_brp001.jpg THE parallels are almost oppressive. Successive Tory leaders, from Margaret Thatcher to David Cameron, have experienced painful party rifts over Europe. The most telling was John Major’s battle in the 1990s with anti-EU Tory rebels over the Maastricht treaty, which set up the single currency. Now, as Theresa May fends off coup attempts from her own backbenchers, Tim Bale, a historian of the Conservative Party at Queen Mary University of London, detects a ...
      PubDate: Wed, 11 Oct 2017 16:28:23 +000
       
  • The cost of pensions: Can you afford to retire'
    • Abstract: Main image:  HOW much money do you need to retire' Depending on your age, it is a question you think about a lot (if retirement is imminent) or barely at all. For younger people, the subject is a combination of too far away, too complex and too boring, and too depressing. When you consider that you might live for 20, 25 or even 30 years after you stop working, it is a pretty important issue.Say you want to retire on £20,000 a year (not a fortune) and you are 65. The best annuity rate at the moment in the UK is just under 5.2% which means you would need a pot of £385,000 to afford this. But hold on a minute. That is a flat £20,000 which does not account for inflation; if prices rise at 3% a year, the value of that pension will halve by your 90th birthday. To get an income of £20,000 that is guaranteed to rise in line with prices, you would need a pot of £619,000. (For American readers, the dollar amounts won't be exactly the same, but they will be in the ballpark). These are very big sums and explain why private sector employers have been dropping final-salary pension plans and why public-sector employers in America face a huge-and-growing bill. The issue turns (all too easily) into a debate about accounting. Low bond yields mean that the cost of buying a guaranteed income has risen sharply. The ...
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Oct 2017 14:55:05 +000
       
  • Business this week
    • Abstract: Print section Print Headline:  Business this week UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  It is not too late to stop the break-up of Spain The European Commission ordered Luxembourg to collect €250m ($300m), plus interest, in back taxes from Amazon, the latest broadside from the regulator that penalises sweetheart tax deals between EU countries and multinationals. Amazon’s main European hub is in Luxembourg. The commission claims that a tax-reducing deal struck in 2003 between the online retailer and the government in Luxembourg, led at the time by Jean-Claude Juncker, who is now the commission’s president, amounted to illegal aid. See article.Showing that it means business in its clampdown on illegal tax benefits, the commission referred Ireland to the European Court of Justice for failing to recover €13bn ($15.3bn) in back taxes from Apple, a requirement imposed by the regulator on Ireland.In a move that could muddle America’s electricity markets, Rick Perry, the energy secretary, proposed a system to reward power plants for stockpiling 90 days supply of fuel in order to cope with “the threat of energy outages”. The scheme ...
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Oct 2017 14:54:20 +000
       
  • Buried treasure: A new study details the wealth hidden in tax havens
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  Vast wealth is salted away offshore. But whose' And where' Print Headline:  Buried treasure Print Fly Title:  Tax havens UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  It is not too late to stop the break-up of Spain Fly Title:  Buried treasure Main image:  20171007_fnp504.jpg SWITZERLAND, which developed cross-border wealth-management in the 1920s, was once in a league of its own as a tax haven. Since the 1980s, however, tax-dodgers have been spoilt for choice: they can hide assets anywhere from the Bahamas to Hong Kong. The percentage of global wealth held offshore has increased dramatically. But it has been hard to say how much that is, and who owns it.Few offshore centres used to disclose such data. But in 2016 many authorised the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) to make banking statistics publicly available. Using these ...
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Oct 2017 14:54:20 +000
       
  • Crash-landing: Monarch Airlines runs out of runway
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  An ailing airline runs out of runway Print Headline:  Crash-landing Print Fly Title:  The collapse of Monarch UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  It is not too late to stop the break-up of Spain Fly Title:  Crash-landing Main image:  20171007_brp509.jpg SHORTLY before dawn on October 2nd, startled passengers booked to fly on Monarch Airlines began to get text messages informing them that their flights had been cancelled. It was the first news that Britain’s fifth-biggest airline had ceased trading and was in administration.The government had been warned that Monarch was in trouble only a month before, so a prepared rescue plan quickly took off. Over 30 aircraft were hired to bring back about 110,000 passengers from abroad in what was billed as the country’s biggest peacetime repatriation. A further 860,000 people lost forward ...
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Oct 2017 14:54:20 +000
       
  • Lurking in the dark: After failing to take over UKIP, the far right is at
           bay
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  After failing to take over an ailing party, the far right is at bay Print Headline:  Lurking in the dark Print Fly Title:  Far-right politics UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  It is not too late to stop the break-up of Spain Fly Title:  Lurking in the dark Location:  TORQUAY Main image:  Far wrong Far wrongIT WAS a narrow escape. On September 29th the UK Independence Party (UKIP) elected Henry Bolton, a 54-year-old former Liberal Democrat candidate, and the choice of Nigel Farage, the party’s most popular figure, as its new leader. Anne Marie Waters, an anti-sharia campaigner who calls Islam “evil”, claimed second place, taking 21% of the vote and besting five other candidates. Most of the attendees at the party’s annual conference in Torquay, a seaside ...
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Oct 2017 14:54:20 +000
       
  • Everyone’s a winner: From dentistry to car-park planning, industry
           awards are growing
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  Why corporate backslapping events are becoming more common Print Headline:  Everyone’s a winner Print Fly Title:  Professional awards UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  It is not too late to stop the break-up of Spain Fly Title:  Everyone’s a winner Main image:  20171007_BRD001_0.jpg DURING business-awards season, which fills the lull between the warm-prosecco receptions of late summer and the rubber-turkey lunches of Christmas, a chancer in a dinner jacket could stroll around London attending four or five prize ceremonies a night, confides one regular on the circuit. Security is lax, so getting in is not difficult. Once there, the opportunist would be treated to celebrity entertainment, decent food and plenty of booze.Industry awards have long varied from glamorous bashes, like the British Academy’s film and television ...
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Oct 2017 14:54:20 +000
       
  • It’s not the American way: Britain’s labour-force
           participation has jumped
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  A little-noticed success story in the British labour market Print Headline:  Not the American way Print Fly Title:  Labour-force participation UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  It is not too late to stop the break-up of Spain Fly Title:  It’s not the American way IN MANY ways Britain’s and America’s labour markets look remarkably similar. Both are highly flexible. They share an unemployment rate of around 4.5%, far lower than the euro zone’s 9%. They both have low rates of productivity growth. Annual growth in private-sector nominal wages this year has been around the 2.5% mark.Yet they differ in one big way. In America, labour-force participation (ie, the proportion of people either in or looking for work) among people of “prime age” is much lower than it was a decade ago. One in five Americans aged 25-54 is not in the labour force. Some fear that this is the beginning of a worrying trend, ...
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Oct 2017 14:54:20 +000
       
  • Letters: Letters to the editor
    • Abstract: Print section Print Fly Title:  On cancer, Syria, China, Brazil, corn, spies, free speech UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  It is not too late to stop the break-up of Spain Fly Title:  Letters Fighting cancerThe oncology drug pipeline is full of promising immunotherapies and targeted treatments (Technology Quarterly on cancer, September 16th). Unfortunately, no one knows the optimal way to use them. Doctors and patients alike struggle with conflicting expert opinions and the information overload. Moreover, a cure will probably involve intelligent combinations of remedies, and there are far more plausible regimens than there are patients available to test them in clinical trials. Treatments, outcomes and quality of life vary widely across institutions, falling off sharply from elite cancer centres to rural, disadvantaged and third-world communities.In the absence of definitive clinical studies, the fastest way to improve outcomes is by aggregating the insights, experiences and intuitions of our best clinicians, and continuously validating and refining ...
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Oct 2017 14:54:14 +000
       
  • Lonely at the top: Why pessimism is key to understanding the Victorians
    • Abstract: Print section Print Headline:  A hard-won century Print Fly Title:  19th-century Britain UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  It is not too late to stop the break-up of Spain Fly Title:  Lonely at the top Main image:  20171007_bkp506.jpg Victorious Century: The United Kingdom, 1800-1906. By David Cannadine. Allen Lane; 602 pages; £30. To be published in America by Viking in February 2018; $40.IN THE 19th century, Britain’s old enemy France was vanquished. Britain was industrialising faster than its European neighbours, while preserving its monarchy and parliamentary system. It slowly grew more democratic and added more patches to its imperial map. Iron, steel, cotton and steam enriched Britons at home as globalisation took off.By mid-century two-fifths of traded manufactured goods were produced in the United Kingdom. A quarter of global trade flowed through the country’s ports. In 1851 Britons had an average income 65% ...
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Oct 2017 14:54:14 +000
       
  • Peak Britannia: The decadent late-Victorian and Edwardian era
    • Abstract: Print section Print Headline:  Scratch beneath the surface Print Fly Title:  Peak Britannia UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  It is not too late to stop the break-up of Spain Fly Title:  Peak Britannia Main image:  20171007_bkp003.jpg The Age of Decadence: Britain 1880 to 1914. By Simon Heffer. Random House Books; 897 pages; £30.IN the late Victorian and early Edwardian period of 1880-1914, at least (see article), Britain had a swagger in its step. You could see it in Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee of 1897 and Edward VII’s coronation in 1902, or hear it in the music of Edward Elgar. You could detect it in the objects of everyday life: coins of gold and silver, books bound in leather embossed with gold, stamps doubling as works of art. The middle classes lived in solid contentment, with enough space to bring up a family and enough servants to lighten the domestic drudgery. No wonder the generation shattered by the ...
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Oct 2017 14:54:14 +000
       
  • Charlemagne: Love triangle: Trade deals between the EU and Japan only get
           you so far
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  The EU and Japan are getting closer. But America is still the partner that matters most Print Headline:  Love triangle Print Fly Title:  Charlemagne UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  It is not too late to stop the break-up of Spain Fly Title:  Charlemagne: Love triangle Main image:  20171007_EUD000_0.jpg AKIRA SHIMIZU of Keidanren, Japan’s main business lobby, has a theory about Brexit. The first one, he says, came in 1534 with Henry VIII’s decision to break from the Catholic church. This rupture sparked a period of free-thinking innovation that culminated in James Watt’s invention of the steam engine 250 years later and the advent of the Industrial Revolution. With luck, chuckles Mr Shimizu, Brexit the Sequel will spur a somewhat quicker reinvention of Britain’s economic model.But even Mr Shimizu thinks Britain may face ...
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Oct 2017 14:54:14 +000
       
  • Men, women and work: The gender pay gap
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  Women still earn a lot less than men, despite decades of equal-pay laws. Why' Print Headline:  The gender gap Print Fly Title:  Men, women and work UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  It is not too late to stop the break-up of Spain Fly Title:  Men, women and work Main image:  20171007_IRD001_0.jpg “I ALWAYS wanted to be a mum,” says Meghan, a British woman with two children. She wanted a career, too, and worked hard for it, earning a degree in economics and accounting, and taking professional exams. At a big accounting firm in London, she managed junior employees. When her daughter was born she faced a choice between her career and being the mother she wanted to be. After her boss refused her a flexible work schedule, she quit. Six years later she is a childminder, earning a fraction of her former salary. Now divorced, she ...
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Oct 2017 14:54:14 +000
       
  • Jobs at The Economist: Job listing: Foreign correspondent
    • Abstract: Print section Print Headline:  Job listing: Foreign correspondent Print Fly Title:  Jobs at The Economist UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  It is not too late to stop the break-up of Spain Fly Title:  Jobs at The Economist Main image:  econlogo.png THE ECONOMIST is looking for a journalist with a good knowledge of China and of standard Chinese, and who is keen to be posted in Beijing or elsewhere outside the UK, to help with our coverage of foreign affairs. Salary negotiable. Applicants should submit a test piece of no more than 600 words which they think could appear in the newspaper, two further ideas for articles and a CV. Please send them to chinajob@economist.com by October 31st.The Economist Group values diversity. We are committed to equal opportunities and creating an inclusive environment for all our employees. We welcome applicants regardless of ethnic origin, national origin, gender, race, colour, religious ...
      PubDate: Tue, 03 Oct 2017 15:54:55 +000
       
  • The pursuit of the millennium: A strange disease has taken hold of British
           politics
    • Abstract: Main image:  BRITAIN is suffering from a very un-British affliction at the moment: millenarianism. A country that has always prided itself on its support for common sense and gradual change is being hijacked by people who believe that the end is nigh and the kingdom of God is upon us.  I was reminded of the Labour Party’s millenarian streak when, on arriving in Manchester for the Conservative Party conference, I got into a debate with a bearded gentleman selling Socialist Worker, a leftie newspaper. The bearded gentleman informed me that “the Russian Revolution was the greatest event in the history of the world”. I asked him if he had ever been to Russia. He said that he hadn’t—an odd admission in an age of cheap travel for somebody who thought that it was the greatest thing ever. Yet he was singularly unimpressed by my claim that, having been there several times, including in the 1980s, the country didn’t look like the product of the greatest event ever. He told me in no uncertain terms that I was incapable of seeing what was really going on because I was a lackey of the capitalist class. The conversation went downhill from there. This gentleman might be an extreme example of the breed but last week’s Labour conference in Brighton was full of people with a similarly millenarian mind-set. ...
      PubDate: Tue, 03 Oct 2017 14:43:29 +000
       
 
 
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