Journal Cover The Economist - UK
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   ISSN (Print) 0013-0613
   Published by The Economist Group Homepage  [4 journals]
  • Brexit and the border: Theresa May’s Irish answer poses new Brexit
           questions
    • Abstract: Print section UK Only Article:  standard article Fly Title:  Brexit and the border Main image:  20171209_brp501.jpg THE lunch Theresa May had with Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Commission’s president, in Brussels on December 4th was billed as a make-or-break one. Britain’s prime minister had to concede enough ground over outstanding issues in the first phase of the Brexit negotiations, setting the terms of divorce from the European Union, to persuade Mr Juncker to recommend to EU leaders at next week’s summit that “sufficient progress” had been made to start a second phase of talks, on the future relationship. In the event, the lunch fell short of a deal, but both leaders are promising to reach agreement later in the week.Mrs May’s manoeuvring has, however, kicked a new hornet’s nest at home. She had already upset hardline Brexiteers with concessions on the rights of EU citizens in Britain and by offering as much as £45bn-55bn ($60bn-75bn) to settle Britain’s exit bill, the two other parts of the divorce. But it was the third issue, avoiding a hard border between Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic after Brexit, which ...
      PubDate: Mon, 04 Dec 2017 17:22:23 +000
       
  • The Economist explains: How landing and take-off slots are allocated at
           congested airports
    • Abstract: Main image:  WHEN commercial aviation took off after the second world war, there was no such thing as runway congestion. Over 9,000 miles-worth of concrete airstrips and taxiways had been built in wartime Britain alone. There were plenty of time slots available in which airliners could take off and land. But as air travel opened up to the masses, these early airports quickly filled. Expanding them proved more difficult than was originally thought. Opposition from locals to noisy jet engines and by environmentalists to the emissions they produce has meant that only a few new runways have been built. In 1946 the British government approved a third runway at Heathrow airport, outside London. Since then, more than a dozen commissions, policy documents and white papers have been produced about where to put it—but no action has been taken (and Heathrow has become the most congested airport in Europe). So how is the limited capacity rationed out between airlines'Airports do not decide who should use their runways and when. Instead, since the 1940s schedules have been hammered out at meetings between airlines. In the 1960s, with traffic starting to strain some airports, these events evolved into a way of parcelling out the most prized slots. Since the 1970s allocation has been steered in most countries by the ...
      PubDate: Mon, 04 Dec 2017 05:55:22 +000
       
  • Bagehot: Two new books lay out Britain’s unappetising choices
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  Two new books suggest that Britain faces some singularly unappetising choices Print Headline:  A menu of misery Print Fly Title:  Bagehot UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How—and why—to end the war in Yemen Fly Title:  Bagehot Main image:  20171202_BRD000.jpg AN IRON law of British life these days is that, however bad things seem, the reality is worse. The recent budget sharply downgraded already-weak forecasts of economic growth. Real wages may not recover to pre-crisis levels until 2030. Now two new political books—“Betting The House: The Inside Story of the 2017 Election” by Tim Ross and Tom McTague, and “Fall Out: A Year of Political Mayhem” by Tim Shipman—demonstrate that the country’s politics are even more messed up than its economics. The books have slightly different focuses, the first limiting itself to the ...
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Nov 2017 15:56:11 +000
       
  • Leading from the rear: Chaos in the government helps enterprising
           backbenchers
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  Chaos on the front benches is empowering enterprising MPs Print Headline:  Leading from the rear Print Fly Title:  Backbenchers in Parliament UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How—and why—to end the war in Yemen Fly Title:  Leading from the rear Main image:  20171202_BRP003.jpg A 59-WORD plan to crack down on non-residents selling property in Britain was only a small move by the chancellor in the budget on November 22nd. But it marked a big victory for Stella Creasy. The backbench Labour MP had for weeks demanded that the government close a loophole through which foreign property-owners could avoid capital-gains tax when selling up. Now they will have to cough up £470m ($630m) over the next six years.It capped off a legislative hat-trick for the MP for Walthamstow, who has a knack for turning campaigns into law. This summer ...
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Nov 2017 15:56:11 +000
       
  • A king’s ransom: Prince Harry’s engagement highlights how hard it is
           for Britons to wed foreigners
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  The royal engagement highlights how hard it is for Britons to wed foreigners Print Headline:  A king’s ransom Print Fly Title:  Marriage and migration UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How—and why—to end the war in Yemen Fly Title:  A king’s ransom Main image:  20171202_BRP001.jpg FOR fellow Britons planning to marry a foreigner, the news this week of Prince Harry’s engagement to Meghan Markle, an American actress, may have evoked feelings of affinity—but also, perhaps, of some sympathy. Since immigration rules were tightened in 2012 by the then-home secretary, Theresa May, it has become much harder for Britons to wed foreigners. An obstacle course of expensive tests has significantly cut the number of Britons deciding to settle down with a special citizen of nowhere. Before his spring wedding, Prince Harry faces a long ...
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Nov 2017 15:56:11 +000
       
  • Duct warfare: More competition could speed up Britain’s broadband
           market
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  New entrants could speed up a slothful broadband market Print Headline:  Duct warfare Print Fly Title:  Industrial strategy UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How—and why—to end the war in Yemen Fly Title:  Duct warfare THE British appetite for all things online shows no signs of abating. According to a parliamentary report, the country already has the highest share in Europe of GDP attributed to the digital economy, and the highest percentage of people using the internet of any G7 economy. Households streamed and downloaded a third more data in 2016 than in the previous year. Just keeping up with this rate of growth would tax most countries’ digital infrastructures. But on November 27th the government announced that, as part of its industrial strategy, it also wanted Britain to be at the forefront of the world’s “data revolution”. It that is to happen, it will need better broadband.At the ...
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Nov 2017 15:56:11 +000
       
  • Wobbling into the World Trade Organisation: Brexiteers claim that trade on
           WTO terms would be fine. Wrong
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  Brexiteers claim that trade on WTO terms alone would be just fine. Wrong Print Headline:  Wobbling into the WTO Print Fly Title:  Trade after no deal UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How—and why—to end the war in Yemen Fly Title:  Wobbling into the World Trade Organisation Main image:  20171202_BRD002.jpg IT HAS long been an article of faith for hard Brexiteers: there is nothing to fear from the World Trade Organisation. Many are suspicious of the compromises that a free-trade deal with the EU may entail, such as accepting its rules or even its courts. So why not just walk out and trade with the EU as other countries do, on WTO terms'One answer is that Britain’s relationship with the EU is far more intimate than most countries’. The EU accounts for 43% of Britain’s goods exports and half its imports. In services, which ...
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Nov 2017 15:56:11 +000
       
  • A handover of confidence: London’s property market is rescued by its
           former colony, Hong Kong
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  A former colony rescues London’s property market Print Headline:  A handover of confidence Print Fly Title:  Property UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How—and why—to end the war in Yemen Fly Title:  A handover of confidence Location:  HONG KONG Main image:  20171202_BRP002.jpg IF ANYWHERE is more obsessed with property than Britain, it is Hong Kong. In the storeyed former colony, handed over to China 20 years ago, real estate fills the conversation just as it fills the skyline.Nor is this interest confined to Hong Kong’s own tightly packed buildings. On a recent weekend, an international property fair organised by REA Group, an online estate agent, drew over 2,500 participants. They were treated to an eclectic menu of options, from luxury flats in Dubai ...
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Nov 2017 15:56:11 +000
       
  • Deal or no deal': The siren song of a no-deal Brexit
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  The government’s slow and painful concessions have not killed off the idea that it would be better just to walk out. That is a dangerous delusion Print Headline:  The siren song of no deal Print Fly Title:  The Brexit negotiations UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How—and why—to end the war in Yemen Fly Title:  Deal or no deal' Main image:  20171202_BRD001.jpg ALL the signs are that Britain is caving in on the three issues in the first phase of the Brexit talks. Theresa May was told she had to yield by next week to persuade the European Union summit on December 14th-15th to agree that there had been sufficient progress to begin talks on transition and a future trade framework. The prime minister has duly made big concessions on the rights of EU citizens in Britain and on the exit bill, perhaps enough to pass the test. There ...
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Nov 2017 15:56:11 +000
       
  • Politics this week
    • Abstract: Print section Print Headline:  Politics this week UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How—and why—to end the war in Yemen Main image:  20171202_WWP001_0.jpg More than 300 people were slain by jihadists who attacked a mosque attended by Sufi Muslims in Egypt’s Sinai peninsula. Up to 30 terrorists armed with automatic rifles and flying an Islamic State banner mounted the assault in a region that is more used to attacks on Coptic Christian churches. An IS-affiliated group in Sinai has a record of persecuting Sufis, beheading a 100-year-old cleric late last year. Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi, Egypt’s president, ordered his armed forces to use any means necessary to restore order.Uhuru Kenyatta was sworn in for a second term as Kenya’s president. Two people were killed in opposition protests against his inauguration. Raila Odinga, who lost to Mr Kenyatta in the recent disputed election and does not recognise the result, upped the ante by saying he would take an oath of office on December 12th, Kenya’s independence day.A jury in Washington, DC, convicted Ahmed Abu ...
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Nov 2017 15:56:11 +000
       
  • Borderline solution: The fate of the Irish frontier shows the compromises
           that Brexit entails
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  The fate of the Irish frontier shows the compromises that Brexit will force Britain to make Print Headline:  Borderline solution Print Fly Title:  Brexit and the Irish question UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How—and why—to end the war in Yemen Fly Title:  Borderline solution Main image:  20171202_LDP001_0.jpg NORTHERN IRELAND barely featured in last year’s Brexit referendum campaign, in which Britons were more interested in matters of migration and money. Yet the future of the 500km border that separates the North from the Irish Republic—and which will soon separate the United Kingdom from the European Union—has become one of the trickiest issues of the exit talks.The winding border has revealed a tangle in the “red lines” laid down by Theresa May. After leaving the EU, Britain wants to do its own trade deals with the ...
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Nov 2017 15:56:07 +000
       
  • The mushroom man: Antonio Carluccio died on November 8th
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  Antonio Carluccio, ambassador for Italian food, died on November 8th, aged 80 Print Headline:  The mushroom man Print Fly Title:  Antonio Carluccio UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How—and why—to end the war in Yemen Fly Title:  The mushroom man Main image:  20171202_OBP002_0.jpg WHEN Antonio Carluccio arrived in Britain in 1975, nervous and tongue-tied, he found Italian food restricted mostly to London’s Soho. There a few trattorie made their own pasta, and knew that olive oil was not merely for unblocking ears. At Lina Stores he could buy olives, panforte and dry spaghetti. Otherwise and elsewhere, what he called “Britalian” food held sway: ragù that was just flavoured mince, avocado served with a gloop made of ketchup and mayonnaise and, to finish, oranges in a sickly syrup masquerading as caramelata. All very ...
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Nov 2017 15:56:07 +000
       
  • Letters: Letters to the editor
    • Abstract: Print section Print Fly Title:  On the TPP, airports, plea bargaining, Protestantism, manure UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How—and why—to end the war in Yemen Fly Title:  Letters The TPPing pointThe rebirth of the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal without the participation of America (“Repair job”, November 18th) will have large consequences for the country. America is now excluded from a vital process for renewing the rules of international trade. For example, the new Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for the TPP has suspended several measures that were a priority for America.It has left a pact that is bound to grow. We estimate, in the paper referenced in your article and published by the Peterson Institute, that adding the five countries that have expressed interest in joining would triple benefits and produce larger gains than the old TPP did. America’s exit leaves a leadership void that China is already beginning to fill through the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership, the Belt and Road Initiative and the Asian ...
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Nov 2017 15:56:07 +000
       
  • The foresting of the West: Trees are covering more of the land in rich
           countries
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  The steady expansion of tree-covered land in rich countries is not always popular. It will continue all the same Print Headline:  The foresting of the West Print Fly Title:  Woodlands UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How—and why—to end the war in Yemen Fly Title:  The foresting of the West Location:  ESLIN Main image:  20171202_IRP001_0.jpg COLM STENSON drives around County Leitrim, pointing out new tree plantations. In this corner of Ireland, close to the border with Northern Ireland, conifers seem to be springing up all around. The encroachment is not just visual. Mr Stenson, who is a police officer as well as a cattle farmer, recently received a bill from his feed supplier. It came with a brochure advertising easy returns from converting farmland into ...
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Nov 2017 15:56:07 +000
       
  • Presidential tweeting: A very British row
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  Donald Trump’s rebuke to Theresa May was not just another tweet Print Headline:  A very British row Print Fly Title:  Presidential tweeting UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  How—and why—to end the war in Yemen Fly Title:  Presidential tweeting Main image:  In happier times In happier timesEARLY morning fusillades of gibberish are nothing new in the Trump presidency. Nor is a tendency to attack allies, or to give encouragement to racist groups. On November 29th, though, the president achieved a rare triple. On waking he seems to have grabbed his phone to attack CNN, give air to an old conspiracy theory and broadcast propaganda from a hitherto obscure band of British xenophobes to his 43.6m Twitter followers. Later in the day he had a go at Britain’s prime minister, Theresa May, whose office had earlier criticised him for ...
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Nov 2017 11:33:18 +000
       
  • Russians, Anglicans, Sunnis and Shias: As Russian and British clerics
           concur and spar, Middle Eastern ghosts loom
    • Abstract: Main image:  RELATIONS between the secular authorities of Britain and Russia have rarely been so tense, to judge by the thundering rhetoric used this month by Theresa May. Denouncing the Kremlin for “weaponising information” and using dirty tricks to subvert British democracy, the British prime minister declared on November 13th: “I have a very simple message for Russia. We know what you are doing and you will not succeed.” At a meeting with European leaders on November 24th, she renewed calls to resist the influence of Russia, a “hostile state”, over its former satellites in central Europe.Yet only this week, senior figures from other parts of the two countries’ establishments had a generally cordial meeting in Moscow in which they concurred about a global issue close to their hearts. One was Archbishop Justin Welby, the leader of the Anglican church. The other was Patriarch Kirill of Moscow, head of the Russian Orthodox church. And the matter on which they agreed was the woes of Christians from the Middle East, both those in flight and those still living in zones of strife.That was the main topic of a joint statement issued by the two clerics, who declared: “Our hearts are pained by the mass exodus of the Christian population from those places where the good news [of Christ] began to be spread ...
      PubDate: Fri, 24 Nov 2017 12:48:10 +000
       
  • A looser knot: The state of marriage as an institution
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  Marriage is becoming less hidebound, less dutiful and less obligatory—but even more important, says Joel Budd Print Headline:  A looser knot Print Fly Title:  The state of marriage UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  A looser knot Fly Title:  A looser knot Main image:  20171125_SRP027_0.jpg “THIS IS SO exciting!” trills a young woman, squeezing her friend’s arm. Laid out before her, in the Olympia exhibition centre in west London, is the National Wedding Show. Some 300 merchants have turned up to sell everything that is needed to throw a wedding, and a great many things besides. There are florists, harpists, teeth-whiteners, tiara-sellers, a fireworks firm and more than a dozen photographers. A new company, Hitch and Pooch, arranges for people’s dogs to play a role in their weddings—as ring-bearers, say. Every two hours a ...
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Nov 2017 15:52:19 +000
       
  • Business this week
    • Abstract: Print section Print Headline:  Business this week UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  A hated tax but a fair one America’s Department of Justice filed a lawsuit to block the $109bn merger of AT&T and Time Warner, arguing that it would reduce competition. The deal, announced a year ago, was expected to be completed by the end of 2017. AT&T described the decision as “unprecedented”. For decades regulators in America have been most concerned by horizontal mergers. The merger of AT&T and Time Warner is a vertical one, integrating telecoms distribution with media content.In another big decision that affects the distribution of media, the Federal Communications Commission proposed abolishing the network-neutrality rules drawn up under the Obama administration which require internet providers to treat all online traffic the same. Under the FCC’s plans broadband companies will only have to state what their network policies are; compliance will be controlled by another regulator, the Federal Trade Commission.A digital diversionUber admitted it did not disclose a hacking attack last year that laid bare the personal data ...
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Nov 2017 15:52:19 +000
       
  • Adam and Steve: Getting used to gay unions
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  The challenge from gay marriage is not what conservatives predicted Print Headline:  Adam and Steve Print Fly Title:  Gay unions UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  A looser knot Fly Title:  Adam and Steve Main image:  And Eve and Genevieve And Eve and GenevieveTHE SCRIPT IS familiar by now. Supporters talk about freedom and equality, and point out that many other countries allow it. Opponents pose as plucky defenders of traditional norms, and warn that schools will push homosexuality and gender confusion on children. Then gay marriage becomes the law of the land. Australia is the latest country to go through these motions: on November 15th a majority of voters supported gay marriage in a non-binding plebiscite. The excitement will be quickly forgotten.Few things have gone from unthinkable to normal with such speed. “I can’t ...
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Nov 2017 15:52:19 +000
       
  • For richer: Marriage in the West
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  In wealthy countries, marriage is no longer a rite of passage but a sign of having arrived Print Headline:  For richer Print Fly Title:  The West UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  A looser knot Fly Title:  For richer Main image:  Joining the uxariat Joining the uxariatIN A CLASSROOM in southern England, a group of 17-year-old girls has just learned something extraordinary. The pupils are interviewing a couple, Jane and Graham Marshall, who have been sent to their school by the Students Exploring Marriage Trust, a charity that tries to promote wedlock by providing teenagers with real-life examples. Mr Marshall has mentioned that he has been married to Mrs Marshall for 48 years. “Aww,” say the girls. Then they stop to think, because Jane and Graham do not look terribly old. Hold on, asks one pupil after a few seconds—how old ...
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Nov 2017 15:52:19 +000
       
  • Diplomatic distress: Britain loses its judge on the world court for the
           first time ever
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  For the first time in its history, the world court will lack a British judge Print Headline:  Diplomatic distress Print Fly Title:  Foreign policy UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  A hated tax but a fair one Fly Title:  Diplomatic distress Main image:  20171125_BRP503.jpg ON NOVEMBER 21st Boris Johnson, the foreign secretary, denied in Parliament that Britain’s loss of its place on the International Court of Justice (ICJ) was a failure. “It has been a long-standing objective of UK foreign policy to support India in the UN,” he insisted. That Britain wilted in the face of an Indian challenge, leaving it with no judge on the court for the first time since it was founded in 1946, was thus almost a success.His answer put a creative gloss on an unhappy state of affairs. The ICJ has 15 judges; five are elected every three years ...
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Nov 2017 15:52:14 +000
       
  • Due diligence: Brexit could deprive British law firms of business in two
           ways
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  Brexit could deprive British lawyers of business in two ways Print Headline:  Due diligence Print Fly Title:  Law firms UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  A hated tax but a fair one Fly Title:  Due diligence Main image:  20171125_BRP502.jpg ALTHOUGH London’s legal district traces its roots back to the 14th century, the city’s law firms are modern, international businesses. Britain is home to four of the world’s ten largest law firms by revenue, and its companies have extensive networks of offices abroad. The British legal industry earns around £25bn ($33bn) a year, a fifth of it from exports. Much of its success is due to the dominance of English law, which is often chosen as the governing law for international commercial contracts and dispute resolution, even by parties with no links to Britain.Brexit presents London’s ...
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Nov 2017 15:52:14 +000
       
  • Hair-shirt time: A member of the liberal elite on his tribe’s
           failings
    • Abstract: Print section Print Headline:  Struggling for answers Print Fly Title:  Liberal self-criticism UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  A hated tax but a fair one Fly Title:  Hair-shirt time Main image:  20171125_BKP507.jpg WTF. By Robert Peston.Hodder & Stoughton; 277 pages; £20.ROBERT PESTON is a quintessential member of the British liberal establishment. The son of a leading economist, he glided from Balliol College, Oxford, to the Financial Times to the BBC to ITV, where he presents his own show, “Peston on Sunday”. “In my closest circle of perhaps a hundred family members and friends”, he writes, “no one voted to leave the EU.”All this prepares the reader for a highly predictable book: a fulmination against David Cameron’s decision to hold the referendum; a condemnation of the ignorance and bigotry of the 52% who voted to leave; a few crocodile tears about how “we” should have done more for the left-behind; ...
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Nov 2017 15:52:13 +000
       
  • Winter is coming: Philip Hammond’s cautious budget grimly reflects
           Britain’s state
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  Philip Hammond’s cautious budget struck the right notes, but was a grim reflection of Britain’s predicament Print Headline:  Winter is coming Print Fly Title:  Britain’s budget UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  A hated tax but a fair one Fly Title:  Winter is coming THE glass of booze that chancellors of the exchequer may sip while delivering the budget speech is well deserved. High economics, low politics and bad jokes combine in an hour-long monologue before a baying crowd. Philip Hammond, who presented his budget on November 22nd, had it harder than most. The deficit still yawns, voters are sick of austerity and, amid a Conservative civil war, many of Mr Hammond’s own side want rid of him. Impressively, he stuck to mineral water.It was a decent speech, focusing on the dire productivity problem that is holding Britain back (see article). It should be enough to save his job, which is just ...
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Nov 2017 15:52:13 +000
       
  • Frankfurters’ foray: In a pre-Brexit skirmish with the City, Eurex
           takes on LCH
    • Abstract: Print section Print Rubric:  A German bid to loosen London’s grip on clearing euro interest-rate swaps Print Headline:  Frankfurters’ foray Print Fly Title:  Euro-denominated clearing UK Only Article:  standard article Issue:  A hated tax but a fair one Fly Title:  Frankfurters’ foray Main image:  20171125_FNP503.jpg SEEN from the continent, it just isn’t right. LCH, a firm mostly owned by the London Stock Exchange (LSE), dominates the clearing of interest-rate derivatives. Each day it clears $3.4trn-worth, counting both sides of a trade. (The simplest variety is a swap of fixed and floating rates, allowing counterparties to reduce or increase their exposure to changes in rates.) In euro-denominated derivatives, the biggest category after dollars, LCH’s market share comfortably exceeds 90%, according to Clarus Financial Technology, a research firm.Eurex, the ...
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Nov 2017 15:52:13 +000
       
 
 
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