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Thrombosis & Haemostasis
Number of Followers: 141  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0340-6245 - ISSN (Online) 2567-689X
Published by Thieme Publishing Group Homepage  [206 journals]
  • Use of NOACs in the Peri-Operative Management of Patients with Atrial
           Fibrillation: To Stop, Bridge or Continue'
    • Thromb Haemost 2018; 118: 1123-1126
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1661370



      Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

      Article in Thieme eJournals:
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      Thromb Haemost 2018; 118: 1123-11262018-07-02T00:00:00+01:00
      Issue No: Vol. 118, No. 07 (2018)
       
  • FVIII, Protein C and the Risk of Arterial Thrombosis: More than the Sum of
           Its Parts
    • Thromb Haemost 2018; 118: 1127-1129
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1661373



      Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

      Article in Thieme eJournals:
      Table of contents     Full text

      Thromb Haemost 2018; 118: 1127-11292018-07-02T00:00:00+01:00
      Issue No: Vol. 118, No. 07 (2018)
       
  • Presence of Varicose Veins is the Most Important Risk Factor for
           Developing PTS
    • Thromb Haemost 2018; 118: 1130-1130
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1660859



      Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

      Article in Thieme eJournals:
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      Thromb Haemost 2018; 118: 1130-11302018-07-02T00:00:00+01:00
      Issue No: Vol. 118, No. 07 (2018)
       
  • Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) Incidence and VTE-Associated Survival among
           Olmsted County Residents of Local Nursing Homes
    • Authors: Petterson; Tanya M., Smith, Carin Y., Emerson, Jane A., Bailey, Kent R., Ashrani, Aneel A., Heit, John A., Leibson, Cynthia L.
      Pages: 1316 - 1328
      Abstract: Nursing home (NH) residency is an independent risk factor for venous thromboembolism (VTE), but the VTE burden within the NH population is uncertain. This study estimates VTE incidence and VTE-associated mortality among NH residents. We identified all NH residents in any NH in Olmsted County, Minnesota, United States, 1 October 1998 to 31 December 2005 and all first lifetime VTE among county residents to estimate VTE incidence while resident of local NHs (NHVTE), using Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Minimum Data Set and Rochester Epidemiology Project resources. We tested associations between NHVTE and age, sex and time since each NH admission using Poisson modelling. Additionally, we tested incident NHVTE as a potential predictor of survival using Cox proportional hazards, adjusting for age, sex and NH residency. Between 1 October 1998 and 31 December 2005, 3,465 Olmsted County residents with ≥1 admission to a local NH, contributed 4,762 NH stays. Of the 3,465 NH residents, 111 experienced incident NHVTE (2.3% of all eligible stays), for an overall rate of 3,653/100,000 NH person-years (NH-PY). VTE incidence was inversely associated with time since each NH admission, and was highest in the first 7 days after each NH admission (18,764/100,000 NH-PY). The adjusted hazard of death for incident NHVTE was 1.90 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.38–2.62). In conclusion, VTE incidence among NH residents was nearly 30-fold higher than published incidence rates for the general Olmsted County population. VTE incidence was highest within 7 days after NH admission, and NHVTE was associated with significantly reduced survival. These data can inform future research and construction of clinical trials regarding short-term prophylaxis.
      Citation: Thromb Haemost 2018; 118: 1316-1328
      PubDate: 2018-07-02T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1660436
      Issue No: Vol. 118, No. 07 (2018)
       
  • Searching for a Cell-Based Therapeutic Tool for Haemophilia A within the
           Embryonic/Foetal Liver and the Aorta-Gonads-Mesonephros Region
    • Authors: Serrano; Luis J., Cañete, Ana, Garcia-Leal, Tamara, Tomás-Gallardo, Laura, Flores, Ana I., de la Torre, Paz, Liras, Antonio, Sánchez, María José
      Abstract: The development of new strategies based on cell therapy approaches to correct haemophilia A (HA) requires further insights into new cell populations capable of producing coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) and presenting stable engraftment potential. The major producers of FVIII in the adult are liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and in a lesser degree bone marrow-derived cells, both of which have been shown to ameliorate the bleeding phenotype in adult HA mice after transplantation. We have previously shown that cells from the foetal liver (FL) and the aorta-gonads-mesonephros (AGM) haematopoietic locations possess higher LSEC engraftment potential in newborn mice compared with adult-derived LSECs, constituting likely therapeutic targets for the treatment of HA in neonates. However, less is known about the production of FVIII in embryonic locations. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were performed to assess the relative level of FVIII production in different embryonic tissues and at various developmental stages, identifying the FL and AGM region from day 12 (E12) as prominent sources of FVIII. Furthermore, FL-derived VE-cad+CD45-Lyve1+/− endothelial/endothelial progenitor cells, presenting vascular engraftment potential, produced high levels of F8 ribonucleic acid compared with CD45+ blood progenitors or Dlk1+ hepatoblasts. In addition, we show that the E11 AGM explant cultures expanded cells with LSEC repopulation activity, instrumental to further understand signals for in vitro generation of LSECs. Taking into account the capacity for FVIII expression, culture expansion and newborn engraftment potential, these results support the use of cells with foetal characteristics for correction of FVIII deficiency in young individuals.
      Citation: Thromb Haemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2018-07-10T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1661351
       
  • Inflammasome, T Lymphocytes and Innate-Adaptive Immunity Crosstalk: Role
           in Cardiovascular Disease and Therapeutic Perspectives
    • Authors: Pedicino; Daniela, Giglio, Ada Francesca, Ruggio, Aureliano, Massaro, Gianluca, D'Aiello, Alessia, Trotta, Francesco, Lucci, Claudia, Graziani, Francesca, Biasucci, Luigi Marzio, Crea, Filippo, Liuzzo, Giovanna
      Abstract: Over the past few decades, lot of evidences have shown atherosclerosis as a chronic progressive disease with an exquisite inflammatory feature. More recently, the role of innate immune response in the onset and progression of coronary artery disease (CAD) and an adaptive immunity imbalance, mostly involving T cell sub-sets, have been documented. Therefore, like in many other inflammatory and autoimmune disorders, an altered innate-adaptive immunity crosstalk could represent the key of the inflammatory burden leading to atherosclerotic plaque formation and progression and to the breakdown of plaque stability. In this review, we will address the role of inflammasome in innate immunity and in the imbalance of adaptive immunity. We will discuss how this altered immune crosstalk is related to CAD onset and progression. We will also discuss how unravelling the key molecular mechanisms is of paramount importance in the development of therapeutic tools to delay the chronic progression and prevent the acute destabilization of atherosclerotic plaque.
      Citation: Thromb Haemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2018-07-10T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1666860
       
  • No Association between Thrombin Generation and Intra-Plaque Haemorrhage in
           Symptomatic Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques: The Plaque at RISK (PARISK)
           Study
    • Authors: Crombag; Geneviève A. J. C., Spronk, Henri M., Nelemans, Patty, Schreuder, Floris H. B. M., Truijman, Martine T. B., van Dijk, Anouk C., de Rotte, Alexandra A. J., Liem, Madieke I., Daemen, Mat J. A. P., van der Steen, Anton F. W., Mess, Werner H., Nederkoorn, Paul J., Hendrikse, Jeroen, van der Lugt, Aad, Wildberger, Joachim E., ten Cate, Hugo, van Oostenbrugge, Robert J., Kooi, M. Eline
      Abstract: Background Carotid atherosclerosis is an important cause of stroke. Intra-plaque haemorrhage (IPH) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) increases stroke risk. Development of IPH is only partly understood. Thrombin is an essential enzyme in haemostasis. Experimental animal studies have shown conflicting results on the relation between thrombin and plaque vulnerability. We hypothesize that decreased thrombin generation (TG) is associated with IPH and plaque vulnerability. Objective This article investigates whether TG is associated with IPH and other features of plaque vulnerability in stroke patients. Methods Recently symptomatic stroke patients underwent carotid MRI and blood sampling. MRI plaque features include plaque burden, presence of IPH, amount of lipid-rich necrotic core (LRNC), calcified tissue and fibrous tissue (% of total wall volume). TG was assessed in platelet-poor plasma and expressed as: peak height (PH) and endogenous thrombin potential (ETP). MR images could be analysed in 224 patients. Blood samples were available in 161 of 224 patients. Binary multivariate logistic and linear regression were used to investigate the association between TG and MRI plaque features. Results IPH and LRNC were present in 65 (40%) and 102 (63%) of plaques. There were no significant associations between TG and IPH; PH odds ratio (OR) = 1, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.76 to 1.45 and ETP OR = 1, 95% CI: 0.73 to 1.37. After correction for age, sex and hypercholesterolaemia, the association was weak but non-significant; PH: OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.52 to 1.10 and ETP: OR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.53 to 1.37. Conclusion Features of carotid plaque on MRI show no significant association with TG in stroke patients. Systemic TG does not seem to be an important factor in IPH development.
      Citation: Thromb Haemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2018-07-04T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1666858
       
  • Fentanyl Delays the Platelet Inhibition Effects of Oral Ticagrelor: Full
           Report of the PACIFY Randomized Clinical Trial
    • Authors: Ibrahim; Khalil, Shah, Rohan, Goli, Rakesh R., Kickler, Thomas S., Clarke, William A., Hasan, Rani K., Blumenthal, Roger S., Thiemann, David R., Resar, Jon R., Schulman, Steven P., McEvoy, John W.
      Abstract: Morphine delays oral P2Y12 platelet inhibitor absorption and is associated with adverse outcomes after myocardial infarction. Consequently, many physicians and first responders are now considering fentanyl as an alternative. We conducted a single-centre trial randomizing cardiac patients undergoing coronary angiography to intravenous fentanyl or not. All participants received local anaesthetic and intravenous midazolam. Those requiring percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stenting received 180 mg oral ticagrelor intra-procedurally. The primary outcome was area under the ticagrelor plasma concentration–time curve (AUC0–24 hours). The secondary outcomes were platelet function assessed at 2 hours after loading, measured by P2Y12 reaction units (PRUs) and light transmission platelet aggregometry. Troponin-I was measured post-PCI using a high-sensitivity troponin-I assay (hs-TnI). All participants completed a survey of pain and anxiety. Of the 212 randomized, 70 patients required coronary stenting and were loaded with ticagrelor. Two participants in the no-fentanyl arm crossed over to receive fentanyl for pain. In as-treated analyses, ticagrelor concentrations were higher in the no-fentanyl arm (AUC0–24 hours 70% larger, p = 0.03). Platelets were more inhibited by 2 hours in the no-fentanyl arm (71 vs. 113 by PRU, p = 0.03, and 25% vs. 41% for adenosine diphosphate response by platelet aggregation, p 
      Citation: Thromb Haemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2018-07-04T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1666862
       
  • Major Changes of von Willebrand Factor Multimer Distribution in Cirrhotic
           Patients with Stable Disease or Acute Decompensation
    • Authors: Palyu; Eszter, Harsfalvi, Jolan, Tornai, Tamas, Papp, Maria, Udvardy, Miklos, Szekeres-Csiki, Katalin, Pataki, Lajos, Vanhoorelbeke, Karen, Feys, Hendrik B., Deckmyn, Hans, Tornai, Istvan
      Abstract: Background There is an unstable balance between pro- and anti-haemostatic processes in patients with cirrhosis. We hypothesized, that in patients with acute decompensation (AD) the major alterations of von Willebrand factor (VWF) could contribute to the pro-thrombotic situation as compared to patients with stable (ST) cirrhosis. Patients and Methods We analysed different parameters of VWF, including detailed multimer distribution by densitometry and platelet adhesion, together with a disintegrin-like and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type-1 motifs 13 (ADAMTS13) activity and antigen and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in patients with ST cirrhosis (n = 99), with AD (n = 54) and controls (n = 92). Results VWF antigen, ristocetin co-factor as well as collagen-binding activities were elevated in both cirrhotic groups in a stepwise manner. There was a decrease in high and an increase in low molecular weight multimer ratios in the majority of ST cirrhosis. However, in 24 out of 54 AD patients, ultra-large VWF multimers (ultra-large molecular weight multimers [ULMWM]) were found. ADAMTS13 activity in ST and AD patients without ULMWM was similar to controls (median [interquartile range; IQR]%: 98 [67–132] and 91 [60–110] vs. 106 [88–117], respectively). The presence of ULMWM in AD patients was associated with low ADAMTS13 activity [33 (24–49)%] and high CRP level [23 (7.1–83.6) mg/L]. Adhesion of normal platelets showed a stepwise increase in the presence of cirrhotic plasmas, reaching the highest level in AD patients with ULMWM. Conclusion Characteristic changes of VWF parameters are seen in ST cirrhosis. In AD patients, highly increased VWF and reduced ADAMTS13 activity could be found, along with the presence of ULMWM, which are possible markers and contributors of the disease progression.
      Citation: Thromb Haemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2018-07-04T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1661393
       
  • Genetic Variation in the Syntaxin-Binding Protein STXBP5 in Type 1 von
           Willebrand Disease Patients
    • Authors: Lind-Halldén; Christina, Manderstedt, Eric, Carlberg, Daniel, Lethagen, Stefan, Halldén, Christer
      Abstract: von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels in healthy individuals and in patients with type 1 von Willebrand disease (VWD) are influenced by genetic variation in several genes, for example, VWF, ABO and STXBP5. Here, we comprehensively screen for STXBP5 variants and investigate their association with type 1 VWD in Swedish patients and controls. The coding region of the STXBP5 gene was re-sequenced in 107 type 1 VWD patients and the detected variants were genotyped in the type 1 VWD population and a Swedish control population (464 individuals). The functional effects of missense alleles were predicted in silico and the pattern of genetic variation in STXBP5 was analysed. Re-sequencing of 107 type 1 VWD patients identified three missense and three synonymous variants in the coding sequence of STXBP5. The low-frequency missense variants rs144099092 (0.005) and rs148830578 (0.029) were predicted to be damaging, but were not accumulated in patients. No other rare candidate mutations were detected. STXBP5 showed a high level of linkage disequilibrium and a low overall nucleotide diversity of π = 3.2 × 10−4 indicating intolerance to variants affecting protein function. Three previously type 1 VWD-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms were located on one haplotype that showed an increased frequency in patients versus controls. No differences in messenger ribonucleic acid abundance among haplotypes could be found using Genotype-Tissue Expression project data. In conclusion, a haplotype containing the STXBP5 Asn436Ser (rs1039084) mutation is associated with type 1 VWD and no rare STXBP5 mutations contribute to type 1 VWD in the Swedish population.
      Citation: Thromb Haemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2018-07-04T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1661352
       
  • Predicting Post-Thrombotic Syndrome with Ultrasonographic Follow-Up after
           Deep Vein Thrombosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    • Authors: Dronkers; C. E. A., Mol, G. C., Maraziti, G., van de Ree, M. A., Huisman, M. V., Becattini, C., Klok, F. A.
      Abstract: Background Post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) is a common and potential severe complication of deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Elastic compression stocking therapy may prevent PTS if worn on a daily basis, but stockings are cumbersome to apply and uncomfortable to wear. Hence, identification of predictors of PTS may help physicians to select patients at high risk of PTS. Aims This article identifies ultrasonography (US) parameters assessed during or after treatment of DVT of the leg, that predict PTS. Methods This is a systematic review and meta-analysis study. Databases were searched for prospective studies including consecutive patients with DVT who received standardized treatment, had an US during follow-up assessing findings consistent with vascular damage after DVT and had a follow-up period of at least 6 months for the occurrence of PTS assessed by a standardized protocol. Results The literature search revealed 1,156 studies of which 1,068 were irrelevant after title and abstract screening by three independent reviewers. After full-text screening, 12 relevant studies were included, with a total of 2,684 analysed patients. Two US parameters proved to be predictive of PTS: residual vein thrombosis, for a pooled odds ratio (OR) of 2.17 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.79–2.63) and venous reflux at the popliteal level, for a pooled OR of 1.34 (95% CI, 1.03–1.75). Conclusion The US features reflux and residual thrombosis measured at least 6 weeks after DVT predict PTS. Whether these features may be used to identify patients who may benefit from compression therapy remains to be assessed in further studies.
      Citation: Thromb Haemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2018-07-04T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1666859
       
  • Deletion of Extra Domain A of Fibronectin Reduces Acute Myocardial
           Ischaemia/Reperfusion Injury in Hyperlipidaemic Mice by Limiting
           Thrombo-Inflammation
    • Authors: Chorawala; Mehul R., Prakash, Prem, Doddapattar, Prakash, Jain, Manish, Dhanesha, Nirav, Chauhan, Anil K.
      Abstract: Background Fibronectin splicing variant containing extra domain A (Fn-EDA), which is an endogenous ligand for Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), is present in negligible amounts in the plasma of healthy humans, but markedly elevated in patients with co-morbid conditions including diabetes and hyperlipidaemia, which are risk factors for myocardial infarction (MI). Very little is known about the role of Fn-EDA in the pathophysiology of acute MI under these co-morbid conditions. Materials and Methods We determined the role of Fn-EDA in myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in the hyperlipidaemic apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE−/−) mice. Infarct size, plasma cardiac troponin I (cTnI) levels, intravascular thrombosis (CD41-positive), neutrophil infiltration (Ly6 B.2-positive), neutrophil extracellular traps (citrullinated H3-positive) and myocyte apoptosis (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling-positive) were assessed in myocardial I/R injury model (1-hour ischaemia/23 hours of reperfusion). Results Irrespective of gender, Fn-EDA−/−ApoE−/− mice exhibited smaller infarct size and decreased cTnI levels concomitant with reduced post-ischaemic intra-vascular thrombi, neutrophils influx, neutrophil extracellular traps and myocyte apoptosis (p 
      Citation: Thromb Haemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2018-06-30T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1661353
       
  • Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Children Shifts the
           Coagulation System towards a Pro-Coagulant State
    • Authors: Långström; Satu, Koskenvuo, Minna, Huttunen, Pasi, Lassila, Riitta, Taskinen, Mervi, Ranta, Susanna, Heikinheimo, Markku, Mäkipernaa, Anne
      Abstract: Coagulation system is disturbed by several mechanisms after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We evaluated the effect of HSCT on coagulation system by various conventional and investigational methods in 30 children and adolescents who received HSCT due to haematological malignancies. Pro-thrombin fragment 1 + 2, a specific measure of thrombin generation, and von Willebrand factor, a measure of endothelial activation, increased after conditioning treatment, and remained elevated until 3 months after HSCT (p 
      Citation: Thromb Haemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2018-06-30T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1661394
       
  • Rivaroxaban and Apixaban Anti-Xa Measurements: Impact of Plasma Storage
           for 7 Days at Room Temperature
    • Thromb Haemost
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1661391



      Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York

      Article in Thieme eJournals:
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      Thromb Haemost ; : -2018-06-30T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • Novel Immunoassay for Complement Activation by PF4/Heparin Complexes
    • Thromb Haemost
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1660858



      Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart

      Article in Thieme eJournals:
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      Thromb Haemost ; : -2018-06-30T00:00:00+01:00
       
  • Derivation and Validation of a Prediction Model for Risk Stratification of
           Post-Thrombotic Syndrome in Elderly Patients with a First Deep Vein
           Thrombosis
    • Authors: Méan; Marie, Limacher, Andreas, Alatri, Adriano, Aujesky, Drahomir, Mazzolai, Lucia
      Abstract: Background Not all patients carry the same risk of developing a post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS), we therefore aimed to derive a prediction rule for risk stratification of PTS in patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Methods Our derivation sample included 276 patients with a first acute symptomatic lower limb DVT enrolled in a prospective cohort. We derived our prediction rule using regression analysis, with the occurrence of PTS within 24 months of a DVT based on the Villalta score as outcome, and 11 candidate variables as predictors. We used bootstrapping methods for internal validation. Results Overall, 161 patients (58.3%) developed a PTS within 24 months of a DVT. Our prediction rule was based on five predictors (age ≥ 75 years, prior varicose vein surgery, multi-level thrombosis, concomitant antiplatelet/non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy and the number of leg symptoms and signs). Overall, 16.3, 31.2 and 52.5% of patients were classified as low- (score, 0–3), moderate (score, 4–5) and high-risk (score, ≥ 6), for developing a PTS. Within 24 months of the index DVT, 24.4% of the patients in the low-risk category developed a PTS, 38.4% in the moderate and 80.7% in the high-risk category. The prediction model showed good predictive accuracy (area under the curve, 0.77; 95% confidence interval, 0.71–0.82, calibration slope, 0.90 and Brier score, 0.20). Conclusion This easy-to-use clinical prediction rule accurately identifies patients with DVT who are at high risk of developing PTS within 24 months who could potentially benefit from special educational or therapeutic measures to limit the risk of PTS.
      Citation: Thromb Haemost ; : -
      PubDate: 2018-06-30T00:00:00+01:00
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1661392
       
  • No Relation between Platelet Activity and Haemophilia B Phenotype
    • Thromb Haemost
      DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1660857



      Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart

      Article in Thieme eJournals:
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      Thromb Haemost ; : -2018-06-22T00:00:00+01:00
       
 
 
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