Journal Cover Information Technology and Libraries
  [SJR: 1.126]   [H-I: 25]   [296 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 0730-9295 - ISSN (Online) 2163-5226
   Published by Boston College Homepage  [8 journals]
  • President's Column: For The Record

    • Authors: Aimee Fifarek
      Pages: 1 - 2
      Abstract: President's Column: For The Record
      PubDate: 2017-06-28
      DOI: 10.6017/ital.v36i2.10019
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Editorial Board Thoughts: Developing Relentless Collaborations and
           Powerful Partnerships

    • Authors: Mark Dehmlow
      Pages: 3 - 6
      Abstract: Editorial Board Thoughts: Developing Relentless Collaborations and Powerful Partnerships
      PubDate: 2017-06-28
      DOI: 10.6017/ital.v36i2.10044
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • An Evidence-Based Review of Academic Web Search Engines, 2014-2016:
           Implications for librarians’ practice and research agenda

    • Authors: Jody Condit Fagan
      Pages: 7 - 47
      Abstract: Academic web search engines have become central to scholarly research. While the fitness of Google Scholar for research purposes has been examined repeatedly, Microsoft Academic and Google Books have not received much attention. Recent studies have much to tell us about the coverage and utility of Google Scholar, its coverage of the sciences, and its utility for evaluating researcher impact. But other aspects have been woefully understudied, such as coverage of the arts and humanities, books, and non-Western, non-English publications. User research has also tapered off. A small number of articles hint at the opportunity for librarians to become expert advisors concerning opportunities of scholarly communication made possible or enhanced by these platforms. This article seeks to summarize research concerning Google Scholar, Google Books, and Microsoft Academic from the past three years with a mind to informing practice and setting a research agenda. Selected literature from earlier time periods is included to illuminate key findings and to help shape the proposed research agenda, especially in understudied areas.
      PubDate: 2017-06-28
      DOI: 10.6017/ital.v36i2.9718
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Privacy and User Experience in 21st Century Library Discovery

    • Authors: Shayna Pekala
      Pages: 48 - 58
      Abstract: Over the last decade, libraries have taken advantage of emerging technologies to provide new discovery tools to help users find information and resources more efficiently. In the wake of this technological shift in discovery, privacy has become an increasingly prominent and complex issue for libraries. The nature of the web, over which users interact with discovery tools, has substantially diminished the library’s ability to control patron privacy. The emergence of a data economy has led to a new wave of online tracking and surveillance, in which multiple third parties collect and share user data during the discovery process, making it much more difficult, if not impossible, for libraries to protect patron privacy. In addition, users are increasingly starting their searches with web search engines, diminishing the library’s control over privacy even further.While libraries have a legal and ethical responsibility to protect patron privacy, they are simultaneously challenged to meet evolving user needs for discovery. In a world where “search” is synonymous with Google, users increasingly expect their library discovery experience to mimic their experience using web search engines. However, web search engines rely on a drastically different set of privacy standards, as they strive to create tailored, personalized search results based on user data. Libraries are seemingly forced to make a choice between delivering the discovery experience users expect and protecting user privacy. This paper explores the competing interests of privacy and user experience, and proposes possible strategies to address them in the future design of library discovery tools.
      PubDate: 2017-06-28
      DOI: 10.6017/ital.v36i2.9817
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Picture Perfect: Using Photographic Previews to Enhance Realia Collections
           for Library Patrons and Staff

    • Authors: Dejah Thoris Rubel
      Pages: 59 - 67
      Abstract: Like many academic libraries, the Ferris Library for Information, Technology, and Education (FLITE) acquires a range of materials, including learning objects, to best suit our students’ needs. Some of these objects, such as the educational manipulatives and anatomical models, are common to academic libraries but others, such as the tabletop games, are not. After our liaison to the School of Education, Kristy Motz, discovered some accessibility issues with Innovative Interfaces' Media Manager module, we decided to examine all three of our realia collections to determine what our goals in providing catalog records and visual representations would be. Once we concluded that we needed photographic previews to both enhance discovery and speed circulation service, choosing processing methods for each collection became much easier. This article will discuss how we created enhanced records for all three realia collections including custom metadata, links to additional materials, and photographic previews. 
      PubDate: 2017-06-28
      DOI: 10.6017/ital.v36i2.9474
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Up Against the Clock: Migrating to LibGuides v2 on a Tight Timeline

    • Authors: Brianna B. Buljung, Catherine R. Johnson
      Pages: 68 - 86
      Abstract: During Fall semester 2015, Librarians at the United States Naval Academy were faced with the challenge of migrating to LibGuides version 2 and integrating LibAnswers with LibChat into their service offerings.  Initially, the entire migration process was anticipated to take almost a full academic year; giving guide owners considerable time to update and prepare their guides.  However, with the acquisition of the LibAnswers module, library staff shortened the migration timeline considerably to ensure both products went live on the version 2 platform at the same time. The expedited implementation timeline forced the ad hoc implementation teams to prioritize completion of the tasks that were necessary for the system to remain functional after the upgrade.  This paper provides an overview of the process the staff at the Nimitz Library followed for a successful implementation on a short timeline and highlights transferable lessons learned during the process.  Consistent communication of expectations with stakeholders and prioritization of tasks were essential to the successful completion of the project.    
      PubDate: 2017-06-28
      DOI: 10.6017/ital.v36i2.9585
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 2 (2017)
       
 
 
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