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Journal Cover Nature Communications
  [SJR: 6.539]   [H-I: 114]   [192 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Online) 2041-1723
   Published by NPG Homepage  [135 journals]
  • Mitigating oxygen loss to improve the cycling performance of high capacity
           cation-disordered cathode materials
    • Mitigating oxygen loss to improve the cycling performance of high capacity cation-disordered cathode materials

      Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2017; doi:10.1038/s41467-017-01115-0

      The performance of lithium-excess cation-disordered oxides as cathode materials relies on the extent to which the oxygen loss during cycling is mitigated. Here, the authors show that incorporating fluorine is an effective strategy which substantially improves the cycling stability of such a material.

      Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2017; doi:10.1038/s41467-017-01115-02017-10-17
      DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-01115-0
       
  • Cis P-tau is induced in clinical and preclinical brain injury and
           contributes to post-injury sequelae
    • Cis P-tau is induced in clinical and preclinical brain injury and contributes to post-injury sequelae

      Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2017; doi:10.1038/s41467-017-01068-4

      Induction of the cis form of phosphorylated tau (cis P-tau) has previously been shown to occur in animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI), and blocking this form of tau using antibody was beneficial in a rodent model of severe TBI. Here the authors show that cis P-tau induction is a feature of several different forms of TBI in humans, and that administration of cis P-tau targeting antibody to rodents reduces or delays pathological features of TBI.

      Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2017; doi:10.1038/s41467-017-01068-42017-10-17
      DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-01068-4
       
  • Real-time tracking of metal nucleation via local perturbation of hydration
           layers
    • Real-time tracking of metal nucleation via local perturbation of hydration layers

      Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2017; doi:10.1038/s41467-017-01087-1

      Electrochemical deposition is important for industrial processes however, tracking the early stages of metallic phase nucleation is challenging. Here, the authors visualize the birth and growth of metal nuclei at electrode surfaces in real time via high-speed non-contact lateral molecular force microscopy.

      Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2017; doi:10.1038/s41467-017-01087-12017-10-17
      DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-01087-1
       
  • Anomeric memory of the glycosidic bond upon fragmentation and its
           consequences for carbohydrate sequencing
    • Anomeric memory of the glycosidic bond upon fragmentation and its consequences for carbohydrate sequencing

      Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2017; doi:10.1038/s41467-017-01179-y

      Establishing generic carbohydrate sequencing methods is both a major scientific challenge and a strategic priority. Here the authors show a hybrid analytical approach integrating molecular spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to resolve carbohydrate isomerism, anomeric configuration, regiochemistry and stereochemistry.

      Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2017; doi:10.1038/s41467-017-01179-y2017-10-17
      DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-01179-y
       
  • Circuit quantum acoustodynamics with surface acoustic waves
    • Circuit quantum acoustodynamics with surface acoustic waves

      Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2017; doi:10.1038/s41467-017-01063-9

      In this work, Manenti et al. present measurements of a device in which a tuneable transmon qubit is piezoelectrically coupled to a surface acoustic wave cavity, realising circuit quantum acoustodynamic architecture. This may be used to develop new quantum acoustic devices.

      Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2017; doi:10.1038/s41467-017-01063-92017-10-17
      DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-01063-9
       
  • Inverse poroelasticity as a fundamental mechanism in biomechanics and
           mechanobiology
    • Inverse poroelasticity as a fundamental mechanism in biomechanics and mechanobiology

      Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2017; doi:10.1038/s41467-017-00801-3

      How soft tissues respond to mechanical load is essential to their biological function. Here, the authors discover that – contrary to predictions of poroelasticity – fluid mobility in collagenous tissues induces drastic volume decrease with tensile loading and pronounced chemo-mechanical coupling.

      Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2017; doi:10.1038/s41467-017-00801-32017-10-17
      DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-00801-3
       
  • Nanoscale control of competing interactions and geometrical frustration in
           a dipolar trident lattice
    • Nanoscale control of competing interactions and geometrical frustration in a dipolar trident lattice

      Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2017; doi:10.1038/s41467-017-01238-4

      Artificial magnetic nanostructures enable the study of competing frustrated interactions with more control over the system parameters than is possible in magnetic materials. Farhan et al. present a two-dimensional lattice geometry where the frustration can be controlled by tuning the unit cell parameters.

      Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2017; doi:10.1038/s41467-017-01238-42017-10-17
      DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-01238-4
       
  • Glycaemic control boosts glucosylated nanocarrier crossing the BBB into
           the brain
    • Glycaemic control boosts glucosylated nanocarrier crossing the BBB into the brain

      Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2017; doi:10.1038/s41467-017-00952-3

      There are only a few examples of nanocarriers that can transport bioactive substances across the blood-brain barrier. Here the authors show that by rapid glycaemic increase the accumulation of a glucosylated nanocarrier in the brain can be controlled.

      Nature Communications, Published online: 17 October 2017; doi:10.1038/s41467-017-00952-32017-10-17
      DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-00952-3
       
 
 
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