for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
Followed Journals
Journal you Follow: 0
 
Sign Up to follow journals, search in your chosen journals and, optionally, receive Email Alerts when new issues of your Followed Journals are published.
Already have an account? Sign In to see the journals you follow.
Journal Cover Scientific American
  [SJR: 0.203]   [H-I: 72]   [295 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0036-8733 - ISSN (Online) 0036-8733
   Published by NPG Homepage  [135 journals]
  • Welcome to Everybody's Issue
    • Scientific American 317, 6 (2017). doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0917-6

      Author: Mariette DiChristina

      Scientific American 317, 6 (2017)2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-6
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Letters
    • Scientific American 317, 7 (2017). doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0917-7

      Scientific American 317, 7 (2017)2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-7
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • End the Assault on Women's Health
    • Pages: 9 - 9
      Abstract: Republican efforts to dismantle U.S. health care unfairly target one gender
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 9 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-9
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Africa's CDC Can End Malaria
    • Authors: Carl Manlan
      Pages: 10 - 10
      Abstract: But the body modeled after the U.S. agency needs funding
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 10 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-10
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • The Oldest Homo sapiens'
    • Authors: Kate Wong
      Pages: 12 - 14
      Abstract: Fossils from Morocco complicate the story of modern humans
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 12 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-12
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • A Moth's Eye
    • Authors: Morgen Peck
      Pages: 14 - 14
      Abstract: Insect orbs inspire a glare-free coating for cell-phone screens
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 14 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-14
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Skinlike Sunscreen
    • Authors: Matthew Sedacca
      Pages: 15 - 15
      Abstract: A synthetic form of melanin could protect cells from the sun's harmful rays
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 15 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-15
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Baby's Rainbow
    • Authors: Jane C. Hu
      Pages: 16 - 16
      Abstract: Biology plays a stronger role in color perception than once believed
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 16 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-16a
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Cutting through the Fog
    • Authors: Prachi Patel
      Pages: 16 - 16
      Abstract: A new, low-cost technique could reveal objects shrouded in mist or dust
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 16 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-16b
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Change of Heartbeat
    • Authors: Leslie Nemo
      Pages: 17 - 17
      Abstract: Wireless pacemakers avoid some of the risks traditional devices pose
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 17 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-17
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Living Large
    • Authors: Andrea Marks
      Pages: 18 - 18
      Abstract: A new theory could explain when and why whales became so huge
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 18 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-18
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Wood Is the New Steel
    • Authors: Annie Sneed
      Pages: 19 - 19
      Abstract: Tall timber buildings could reduce emissions
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 19 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-19
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Quick Hits
    • Scientific American 317, 20 (2017). doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0917-20

      Author: Leslie Nemo

      Scientific American 317, 20 (2017)2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-20
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Night Owl Genes
    • Authors: Veronique Greenwood
      Pages: 21 - 21
      Abstract: A mutation that affects the circadian clock may be keeping people up late
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 21 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-21
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Navigating by Touch
    • Authors: Andrea Marks
      Pages: 22 - 22
      Abstract: Tactile maps could help blind pedestrians cross increasingly complex intersections
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 22 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-22
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Pediatric Predicament
    • Authors: Charles Schmidt
      Pages: 24 - 25
      Abstract: New initiatives aim to lessen the obstacles to finding useful treatments for children
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 24 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-24
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Cut That Last Cord
    • Authors: David Pogue
      Pages: 28 - 28
      Abstract: Charging your phone wirelessly all day long may not be far off
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 28 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-28
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • This Is Not A Women's IssueWhy the New Science of Sex & Gender Matters
           for Everyone
    • Scientific American 317, 30 (2017). doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0917-30

      Scientific American 317, 30 (2017)2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-30
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Promiscuous Men, Chaste Women and Other Gender Myths
    • Authors: Cordelia Fine, Mark A. Elgar
      Pages: 32 - 37
      Abstract: The notion that behavioral differences between the sexes are innate and immutable does not hold up under scrutiny
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 32 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-32
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Is There a “Female” Brain'
    • Authors: Lydia Denworth
      Pages: 38 - 43
      Abstract: The debate over whether men and women have meaningfully different brains could have profound implications for health and personal identity
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 38 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-38
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • When Sex and Gender Collide
    • Authors: Kristina R. Olson
      Pages: 44 - 49
      Abstract: Studies of transgender kids are revealing fascinating insights about gender in the brain. Many trans children show surprisingly firm identities at young ages, for instance, and important differences divide trans girls from boys who like pink
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 44 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-44
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Beyond XX and XY
    • Authors: Amanda Montañez
      Pages: 50 - 51
      Abstract: A host of factors figure into whether someone is female, male or somewhere in between
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 50 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-50
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Not Just for Men
    • Authors: Marcia L. Stefanick
      Pages: 52 - 57
      Abstract: Researchers and doctors must dig deeper into gender differences before they can provide women with better treatments
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 52 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-52
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Life before Roe
    • Authors: Rachel Benson Gold, Megan K. Donovan
      Pages: 58 - 59
      Abstract: Before 1973, abortion in the U.S. was severely restricted. More than 40 years later Roe v. Wade is under attack, and access increasingly depends on a woman's income or zip code
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 58 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-58
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • The Brilliance Trap
    • Authors: Andrei Cimpian, Sarah-Jane Leslie
      Pages: 60 - 65
      Abstract: How a misplaced emphasis on genius subtly discourages women and African-Americans from certain academic fields
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 60 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-60
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Girl Code
    • Authors: Reshma Saujani
      Pages: 66 - 69
      Abstract: Early intervention is crucial to close the gender gap in computer science
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 66 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-66
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • The Blogger and the Trolls
    • Authors: Emily Temple-Wood
      Pages: 70 - 71
      Abstract: Turning online harassment into a force for good
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 70 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-70
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Women's Work
    • Authors: Ana L. Revenga, Ana Maria Munoz Boudet
      Pages: 72 - 77
      Abstract: As more women contribute to the economy, life gets better for everyone. Why are the barriers to opportunity so hard to change'
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 72 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-72
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Mind the Gap
    • Authors: Amanda Montañez
      Pages: 78 - 79
      Abstract: Gender inequality remains a global phenomenon
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 78 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-78
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Return of the Missing Daughters
    • Authors: Monica Das Gupta
      Pages: 80 - 85
      Abstract: Traditions that favor sons in Asia—resulting in millions of dead or neglected girls—have started to change
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 80 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-80
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • The Woman Who Saved the Planet
    • Authors: Jen Schwartz
      Pages: 86 - 87
      Abstract: By harnessing “female energy,” Christiana Figueres convinced humanity to take on climate change
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 86 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-86
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Recommended
    • Scientific American 317, 88 (2017). doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0917-88

      Author: Andrea Gawrylewski

      Scientific American 317, 88 (2017)2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-88
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Postmodernism vs. Science
    • Authors: Michael Shermer
      Pages: 90 - 90
      Abstract: The roots of the current campus madness
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 90 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-90
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • The Face of Evil
    • Authors: Steve Mirsky
      Pages: 92 - 92
      Abstract: Not every movie villain has terrible skin, but it helps
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 92 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-92
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • 50, 100 & 150 Years Ago
    • Authors: Daniel C. Schlenoff
      Pages: 94 - 94
      Abstract: Innovation and discovery as chronicled in Scientific American
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 94 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-94
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • The End
    • Authors: Mark Fischetti
      Pages: 96 - 96
      Abstract: What Do Most Women and Men Die Of'
      Citation: Scientific American 317, 96 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-15
      DOI: 10.1038/scientificamerican0917-96
      Issue No: Vol. 317, No. 3 (2017)
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.80.180.248
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2016