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   ISSN (Print) 1098-7371 - ISSN (Online) 1529-1499
   Published by Johns Hopkins University Press Homepage  [23 journals]
  • Omnium Exposita Rapinæ: The Afterlives of the Papers of Samuel
           Hartlib
    • Abstract: The Anglo-Prussian intelligencer Samuel Hartlib died at Axe-Yard, Westminster, on 10 March 1662. Bankrupted physically and financially, Hartlib had finally succumbed after years of tormenting illness and a devastating reversal of fortunes after the Restoration. What was left of his life, by his own estimation, was not much. His once-bustling house, often filled with foreign lodgers, scribes and visitors, was empty but for a few sticks of broken furniture and an accumulation of “loose papers” which Hartlib had collected over some thirty-six years of knowledge-gathering. Today Hartlib’s papers, the majority of which are preserved at the University of Sheffield, with other deposits in the British Library, Yale ... Read More
      Keywords: Hartlib, Samuel,; Scholars; Paper; Paper industry; School notebooks; Enlightenment; Education, Higher; Note-taking; Journalism; English newspapers; Newspaper publishing; Rental libraries; Europe; Subscription libraries; Censorship; Bounty (Ship); Bounty Mutiny, 1789
      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Paper Nationalism: Material Textuality and Communal Affiliation in Early
           America
    • Abstract: On the verge of the U.S. Civil War, mere days after the Dred Scott decision, Pastor M. Emory Wright of Holyoke, Massachusetts wished that, for just one day, the disjointed social order of humanity would run more like a paper mill. Wright had visited the Parsons Paper Mill in Holyoke and was writing a narrative of his tour in the March 1857 National Magazine, an account that he expanded into a pamphlet that same month. Wright was fascinated with the size of the machine and its minute calibrations coordinating different parts so that it produced a single unbroken roll of paper out of the shreds of diverse rags. “In the movements of this wonderful machine,” Wright says, “with its almost infinitude of parts, the least ... Read More
      Keywords: Hartlib, Samuel,; Scholars; Paper; Paper industry; School notebooks; Enlightenment; Education, Higher; Note-taking; Journalism; English newspapers; Newspaper publishing; Rental libraries; Europe; Subscription libraries; Censorship; Bounty (Ship); Bounty Mutiny, 1789
      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Interactive Notebook: How Students Learned to Keep Notes during the
           Scottish Enlightenment
    • Abstract: Studies on early modern student notetaking have gained momentum in recent decades.1 Some practices were elaborate. Students in German universities, for example, used a technique called Schreibechor, or “writing chorus,” in which teams attempted to capture every word spoken by a preacher or professor.2 Students pencilled notes in their pockets in Holland, copied Newtonian notations in Cambridge, replicated manuscript notebooks at Harvard, scribbled marginalia in St. Andrews, implemented notetaking procedures in Rome, and employed commonplacing in Paris.3 Rather than using the same routines, students developed varied techniques in relation to the kinds of information that they needed to learn. Thus, whereas notes of ... Read More
      Keywords: Hartlib, Samuel,; Scholars; Paper; Paper industry; School notebooks; Enlightenment; Education, Higher; Note-taking; Journalism; English newspapers; Newspaper publishing; Rental libraries; Europe; Subscription libraries; Censorship; Bounty (Ship); Bounty Mutiny, 1789
      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The News Machine: Textual Form and Information Function in the London
           Times, 1785–1885
    • Abstract: A newspaper is a modern machine which has grown up, as the British constitution is said to have done. It has not been the fruit of an original design; but has been adapted to the wants of society by a series of improvements, insignificant individually, but striking in the aggregate, in the same manner as the constitution has been suited to the purposes of those for whom it works so well.No complex adaptive system will succeed in adapting in a reasonable amount of time unless the adaptation can proceed subsystem by subsystem.The physical and textual transformation of the London morning newspaper around the turn of the nineteenth century was an emblem of that extraordinary age. Just between the later 1780s and the ... Read More
      Keywords: Hartlib, Samuel,; Scholars; Paper; Paper industry; School notebooks; Enlightenment; Education, Higher; Note-taking; Journalism; English newspapers; Newspaper publishing; Rental libraries; Europe; Subscription libraries; Censorship; Bounty (Ship); Bounty Mutiny, 1789
      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Infidel Books and “Factories of the Enlightenment”: Censorship and
           Surveillance in Subscription and Circulating Libraries in an Age of
           Revolutions, 1790–1850
    • Abstract: The librarian is not concerned with the discovery of knowledge, nor with its teaching, nor with its application. His duty is rather to guard its lines of communication and to make possible its free circulation. Those who would destroy the liberty of the individual know well that the lines of communication are vulnerable, and their first onslaughts are made not only on places of learning but on the libraries that store the material of learning.Following the French Revolution, many European governments tried to prevent libraries from acquiring inflammatory and heretical literature, or “infidel books.” The phrase suggests a time when publishing books advocating political reform or nonorthodox religious views could be ... Read More
      Keywords: Hartlib, Samuel,; Scholars; Paper; Paper industry; School notebooks; Enlightenment; Education, Higher; Note-taking; Journalism; English newspapers; Newspaper publishing; Rental libraries; Europe; Subscription libraries; Censorship; Bounty (Ship); Bounty Mutiny, 1789
      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Authorship and Authority in Sir John Barrow’s Narrative of the
           Mutiny on HMS Bounty
    • Abstract: In 1831, Sir John Barrow, second secretary of the British Admiralty, set out to write a popular history of the mutiny on HMS Bounty. Barrow faced a difficult task: to create a unified narrative from the disparate and often conflicting accounts of the infamous rebellion and its aftermath, while incorporating geographical descriptions of the South Pacific and placing the mutiny in a broader historical context. As an Admiralty official, Barrow could not use his own name in books and articles written for a popular audience without compromising his professionalism. Consequently, his major challenge was balancing authority and anonymity. Throughout the process of publication, the intent of both Barrow and his publisher ... Read More
      Keywords: Hartlib, Samuel,; Scholars; Paper; Paper industry; School notebooks; Enlightenment; Education, Higher; Note-taking; Journalism; English newspapers; Newspaper publishing; Rental libraries; Europe; Subscription libraries; Censorship; Bounty (Ship); Bounty Mutiny, 1789
      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • In the Bookstore: The Houses of Appleton and Book Cultures in Antebellum
           New York City
    • Abstract: In February of 1860, Harper’s Magazine featured what would become an iconic view of bustling nineteenth-century New York City. The double-page illustration of “View of Broadway, Opposite Fulton Street, New York” depicts a raucous, riotous street scene of snow-hampered New Yorkers trying to get somewhere, anywhere, in the packed streets (Figure 1).1 Police struggle with rearing horses, box-laden sleds block passenger omnibuses, and pedestrians freeze against imminent collisions with man and vehicle. Easily overlooked in the frenetic human drama, however, is the retail landscape in which the tableau unfolds. Not simply background, the buildings framing the scene assert their own visual and textual presence ... Read More
      Keywords: Hartlib, Samuel,; Scholars; Paper; Paper industry; School notebooks; Enlightenment; Education, Higher; Note-taking; Journalism; English newspapers; Newspaper publishing; Rental libraries; Europe; Subscription libraries; Censorship; Bounty (Ship); Bounty Mutiny, 1789
      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • John Stuart Mill and the London Library: A Victorian Book Legacy Revealed
    • Abstract: Predating the Natural History Museum, the National Portrait Gallery, and the Victoria and Albert Museum, the London Library is a surviving Victorian institution which has remained an independent (non-publicly funded) subscription lending library throughout its 175-year history. The library’s book collections acquired since 1841 by purchase, donation, and bequest number in excess of a million volumes and grow at an annual rate of 8,000 volumes. Established in the wake of the national railway system and the penny post, the library made use of both advances in its early appeal to potential members outside London.1 It occupied a singular position within the intellectual landscape of the metropolis offering books for ... Read More
      Keywords: Hartlib, Samuel,; Scholars; Paper; Paper industry; School notebooks; Enlightenment; Education, Higher; Note-taking; Journalism; English newspapers; Newspaper publishing; Rental libraries; Europe; Subscription libraries; Censorship; Bounty (Ship); Bounty Mutiny, 1789
      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Thousands of Titles Without Authors: Digitized Newspapers, Serial Fiction,
           and the Challenges of Anonymity
    • Abstract: Literary anonymity and pseudonymity present a conundrum for literary and book historians, not limited to—and in fact, partly produced by—our focus on origins: our urge to ask, as Michel Foucault put it, “From where does [this work] come, who wrote it, when, under what circumstances, or beginning with what design?”1 On the one hand, we are well aware that the discursive relationship of author and text (what Foucault called the “author function”) has changed over time,2 and that literary works have often “circulated without authors’ names attached.”3 On the other hand, the primacy of the relationship of author and text is built into our disciplinary infrastructure: the scholarly editions, library and collection ... Read More
      Keywords: Hartlib, Samuel,; Scholars; Paper; Paper industry; School notebooks; Enlightenment; Education, Higher; Note-taking; Journalism; English newspapers; Newspaper publishing; Rental libraries; Europe; Subscription libraries; Censorship; Bounty (Ship); Bounty Mutiny, 1789
      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Graphing the Archives of Nineteenth-Century Amateur Newspapers
    • Abstract: Amateur newspapers were small periodicals printed and circulated first by youths after the Civil War, in a public they named “Amateurdom,” and later by an increasingly aged group of active amateur journalists. Small in size, printed by aficionados within a community of their own making, amateur newspapers constitute a rich repository of the reading and writing practices of mostly white, male youths in late nineteenth-century America.1 These materials have been preserved in an undetermined number of collections, many of which are listed on the website of The Fossils, the organization devoted to preserving the history of the pastime. David Tribby, a prominent member, has uncovered 12 large collections holding between ... Read More
      Keywords: Hartlib, Samuel,; Scholars; Paper; Paper industry; School notebooks; Enlightenment; Education, Higher; Note-taking; Journalism; English newspapers; Newspaper publishing; Rental libraries; Europe; Subscription libraries; Censorship; Bounty (Ship); Bounty Mutiny, 1789
      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Donald A. Wollheim’s Authoritative Universe: Editors, Readers, and the
           Construction of the Science Fiction Paperback, 1926–1969
    • Abstract: Until 1943, the word “science-fiction” had never appeared on the cover of a paperback book.1 To anyone who’s spent a misty afternoon in a used bookstore skimming through shelves of brilliant, cracked paper spines, this may seem surprising, but it’s true: the very first use of the term in paperback publishing was in the title of an anthology of short stories published in 1943 by the pioneering paperback company Pocket Books—The Pocket Book of Science-Fiction, their 214th title.2The man behind this historic little volume was a young New Yorker named Donald A. Wollheim. His name means little to readers today, but to that segment of the population devoted to the science fiction genre, it once held a semi-legendary ... Read More
      Keywords: Hartlib, Samuel,; Scholars; Paper; Paper industry; School notebooks; Enlightenment; Education, Higher; Note-taking; Journalism; English newspapers; Newspaper publishing; Rental libraries; Europe; Subscription libraries; Censorship; Bounty (Ship); Bounty Mutiny, 1789
      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Semper Aliquid Novi: Reclaiming the Future of Book History from an African
           Perspective
    • Abstract: The study of books has a complex genealogy that can be traced back at least to the nineteenth century, especially if we bear in mind the long history of British bibliography. Yet it was only when an international group of historians, literary scholars, bibliographers, sociologists and librarians began to coordinate their various activities in the 1960s and 1970s that the “history of the book” emerged as a distinct scholarly enterprise, and it was only in the following decade that it started to see itself as a discipline in the making. The defining year was 1982, which saw the publication of Robert Darnton’s essay-cum-manifesto “What is the History of Books?” and the appearance of the first volume of the Histoire de ... Read More
      Keywords: Hartlib, Samuel,; Scholars; Paper; Paper industry; School notebooks; Enlightenment; Education, Higher; Note-taking; Journalism; English newspapers; Newspaper publishing; Rental libraries; Europe; Subscription libraries; Censorship; Bounty (Ship); Bounty Mutiny, 1789
      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Between Quandary and Squander: A Brief and Biased Inquiry into the
           Preservation of West African Arabic Manuscripts: The State of the
           Discipline
    • Abstract: The introduction of Islam and its linguistic vehicle, Arabic, to the Saharan and Sub-Saharan regions between the eighth and thirteenth centuries CE had major consequences for the history of West Africa and its relationship with the rest of the continent and the outside world. As a spoken language, Arabic became the lingua franca of commercial and diplomatic activities across and beyond the great desert, while its writing system provided a cogent and innovative method for preserving and transmitting various types of knowledge (religious, traditional, practical, etc.) in the new language as well as in a number of indigenous African languages, such as Fula, Hausa, Songhay, Tamasheq and Wolof, which started to be ... Read More
      Keywords: Hartlib, Samuel,; Scholars; Paper; Paper industry; School notebooks; Enlightenment; Education, Higher; Note-taking; Journalism; English newspapers; Newspaper publishing; Rental libraries; Europe; Subscription libraries; Censorship; Bounty (Ship); Bounty Mutiny, 1789
      PubDate: 2017-01-12T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
 
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