Followed Journals
Journal you Follow: 0
 
Sign Up to follow journals, search in your chosen journals and, optionally, receive Email Alerts when new issues of your Followed Journals are published.
Already have an account? Sign In to see the journals you follow.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
BMJ
Number of Followers: 1844  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0959-8138 - ISSN (Online) 1759-2151
Published by BMJ Publishing Group Homepage  [62 journals]
  • When I use a word . . . . The Lelamour Herbal

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jeffrey K Aronson
      Abstract: Herbs and herbals“A plant of which the stem does not become woody and persistent (as in a shrub or a tree), but remains more or less soft and succulent, and dies down to the ground (or entirely) after flowering.” That is the first definition of the word “herb,” given in the Oxford English Dictionary (OED).1 However, as the next definition in the OED makes clear, not all herbal remedies come from herbs: “specifically applied to plants of which the leaves, or stem and leaves, are used for food or medicine, or in some way for their scent or flavour.”The word was Middle English, the first example of its use cited in the OED coming from the late 13th century, and at that time it was usually written “erbe.” A 14th century text, The Forme of Cury (i.e. The Method of Cooking), included a recipe for “erbolat,” a dish containing eggs...
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T11:06:07-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmj.p225
      Issue No: Vol. 380 (2023)
       
  • A bill before parliament for the right to breath clean air

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Elaine Mulcahy
      Abstract: In August last year, the United Nations General Assembly declared that everyone on the planet has a right to a healthy environment, including clean air, water and a stable climate.1 A new bill before the UK parliament—the Clean Air (Human Rights) Bill—now sets to force the government to take action to bring air quality in every community up to World Health Organisation minimum standards.2The ability to breathe is what defines us as living beings. It is the process in which we inhale the elements we need to keep our bodies functioning and exhale the by-products of waste gas. Keeping this system functioning is critical to our good health and when it starts to malfunction the impacts are life threatening.Over the last 170 years, since the industrial revolution, we have allowed the air that we depend on so ultimately for our survival to get dirtier and dirtier, to the point where...
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T08:56:10-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmj.p224
      Issue No: Vol. 380 (2023)
       
  • “Functional disorders”: one of medicine’s biggest
           failures

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Richard Smith
      Abstract: About a third of patients attending neurological and gastrointestinal, or almost every outpatient clinic—have functional disorders, meaning that they do not have a physical cause that can be detected with a microscope, scanners, or blood or genetic tests. These are patients whom medicine has failed more than almost any other group.I’ve been reading Suzanne O'Sullivan’s The Sleeping Beauties: And Other Stories of Mystery Illness, a book that was recommended by a doctor colleague because it had had a big impact on him. It’s now had a big impact on me and probably will on you if you read it. O'Sullivan is a Queen Square neurologist who specialises in functional disorders and a gifted writer who is acutely aware of the limitations of her medical craft. Her book tells the stories of outbreaks of mass psychogenic illness, including the young asylum seekers in Sweden who have been “asleep” for years, the...
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T08:16:08-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmj.p221
      Issue No: Vol. 380 (2023)
       
  • Medical academic workforce is under threat without urgent action on pay
           and pensions, say peers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jacqui Wise
      Abstract: Clinical research is “on a precipice” unless the government takes urgent action, peers have warned.The Lords science and technology committee said that the UK faces a severe shortage of doctors who work both in the NHS and at universities. This threatens both medical research and teaching. They pointed out in a letter to the health secretary Stephen Barclay that the number of consultant clinical academics is set to decline in the coming years as there are substantially fewer younger clinical academics to replace those who will retire in the next 10 years.The committee’s inquiry concluded that problems with pay and pension inequality must be tackled to ensure that clinical academics are not disadvantaged if they pursue research rather than working full time as clinicians.The Lords inquiry also said that governmental research funders should help to tackle the precariousness of a career in academia by offering more longer term postdoctoral positions....
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T07:36:15-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmj.p220
      Issue No: Vol. 380 (2023)
       
  • Maternity care: Entonox is withdrawn from some hospitals because of risk
           to staff from high exposure

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jacqui Wise
      Abstract: The Princess Alexandra Hospital in Harlow, Essex is the latest to suspend the use of Entonox in its maternity unit after air quality tests found levels of nitrous oxide that may put midwives and other healthcare workers at potential risk of harm.The Health and Safety Executive is already investigating Basildon Hospital, which temporarily stopped using Entonox in December 2022. A BBC report said that nitrous oxide levels found during air sampling were 30 times the legal limit.1The Royal College of Midwives is considering legal action to support midwives working at Basildon, who have reported a variety of symptoms they attribute to exposure to Entonox.Entonox, which consists of 50% oxygen and 50% nitrous oxide, has been used for many years as a pain relieving gas mixture. Suspending its use limits the options available to women during childbirth. Alternatives tend to have more side effects and could lead to more interventions during...
      Keywords: Obstetrics and gynaecology
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T06:26:11-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmj.p212
      Issue No: Vol. 380 (2023)
       
  • Clinicle—a daily dose of word play from The BMJ

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tom Nolan; Jennifer Rasanathan, Riddhi Shenoy, Will Stahl-Timmins
      Abstract: Test your clinical knowledge with The BMJ’s new word game, Clinicle. Move the horizontal word clues to spell the answer vertically, then share your times on social media with friends and colleagues.The story of ClinicleA welcome relief from the 2022 permacrisis has been the chance to spend a couple of minutes each day trying to guess a five letter word. Wordle became a phenomenon, reported to have over 2 million daily users in January 20221 and was soon snapped up for a reported seven figure sum by the New York Times.2As the Wordle craze crested, an Education article in The BMJ by Hardeep Singh, Denise Connor, and Gurpreet Dhaliwal offered readers five strategies for diagnostic excellence.34 Strategy number two is byte sized learning to “integrate brief diagnostic challenges from apps, social media, and medical journals into your daily routine.” As the Wordle clones proliferated, from the supercharged Quordle (https://www.quordle.com/#/), to...
      PubDate: 2022-12-31T16:30:58-08:00
      DOI: 10.1136/bmj.o2967
      Issue No: Vol. 380 (2022)
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.192.38.49
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-