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Journal Cover Journal of Electronic Publishing
  [SJR: 0.108]   [H-I: 12]   [139 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 1080-2711
   Published by Michigan Publishing Homepage  [19 journals]
  • Understanding the Needs of Scholars in a Contemporary Publishing
           Environment

    • Authors: Katrina S. Fenlon
      Abstract: This is the extended abstract of the author’s presentation given at IFLA 2016. View the video recording of the author’s presentation. The presentation begins at 46:02.
      PubDate: Summer 2017
      DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.219
      Issue No: Vol. http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.219
       
  • Sowing the Seeds of Journal Success: Cultivating Relationships with
           Journal Editors and Staff

    • Authors: Marianne A. Reed
      Abstract: Since 2007, the University of Kansas Libraries has provided support to the KU community for the management and distribution of online scholarly journals and other publications, and currents hosts over 20 scholarly journals. While much of the literature about library publishing focuses on issues such as technical infrastructure, policies and processes, skills and training, or economic models–all important areas to address, to be sure–this presentation will focus on a less documented aspect of library-based publishing: building and maintaining relationships with journal editors and staff. This is often time consuming and hidden labor, but has been key to the ongoing viability of our program. Through regular and ongoing engagement with our journal partners we can keep abreast of their evolving needs, catch potential issues before they blossom into problems, and create goodwill and trust that we can tap into down the road when advocating to administrators about the value of the publishing program. We will share and discuss the various outreach and engagement efforts (successful and unsuccessful) that we have pursued, including regular meetings of our “Editors Forum”, an email listserv for journal editors and staff, regular check-ins regarding journal operations, and coordinated efforts with related library initiatives such as open access and digital humanities. We will advocate for an intentional, multi-faceted approach to building relationships with journal editors as a key aspect of a sustainable publishing program.
      PubDate: Summer 2017
      DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.218
      Issue No: Vol. http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.218
       
  • Functioning in the Grey: Kennesaw State University’s Library Journal
           Publishing Projects

    • Authors: Aajay Murphy
      Abstract: View the video recording of the author’s presentation. The presentation begins at 4:36.Download Slides (PPTX)
      PubDate: Summer 2017
      DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.217
      Issue No: Vol. http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.217
       
  • Sustaining Library Publishing Through Multi-Stakeholder Cooperatives

    • Authors: Kevin Stranack
      Abstract: View the video recording of the author’s presentation. The presentation begins at 1:03:10.Library-based open access publishing continues to grow internationally, with a variety of economic models emerging to provide sustainable funding for the production and dissemination of high quality, peer-reviewed publications. Although author processing charges have become increasingly common, some library-based publishers are experimenting with cooperative structures where key stakeholders, including libraries, societies, funding agencies, and others come together to collectively fund and support publishing activities. This session will report on the MacArthur-funded Open Access Publishing Cooperative Study, which is investigating the viability of publishing cooperatives through an examination of pilot projects from around the world.
      PubDate: Summer 2017
      DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.216
      Issue No: Vol. http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.216
       
  • Distributed Publishers: Collaborating and Facilitating Publishing Across
           Campus

    • Authors: Andrea Wirth
      Abstract: While the support for publishing open access journals in libraries is widespread as evidenced by the Library Publishing Coalition member roster and discussions about journals on library listservs and at conferences, not all libraries approach journal support by taking on the role of “publisher.” Local practices, policies, and the relationship of the library with the university provide guidance as to how a particular library and its campus address journal publishing.But if not publisher, then what' Instead, libraries, recognizing implementing and sustaining a publishing program can be costly and daunting, have alternatives to consider. In one scenario, the library may act a journal “host” by collaborating and sharing expertise with faculty, students, and academic units that do wish to start a journal. As host, the library can provide critical services and technology for the campus-wide publishing enterprise, without assuming complete oversight for the journals that it supports. For example, the provision of a journal platform, technical expertise on the platform, and sharing expertise in the area of scholarly publishing facilitate journal success. This approach, however, has both benefits and drawbacks.The University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) Libraries act as journal host, in order to best utilize the available staffing around journal services and to help promote a sense of ownership in UNLV’s academic units (which act as publishers). Using the UNLV model as an example, this presentation describes how journals are supported including an overview of what works well, what issues arise with distributed campus publishing, and takeaways for libraries who wish to support local journal publishing, but may not have the staffing and other resources to become a publisher.
      PubDate: Summer 2017
      DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.215
      Issue No: Vol. http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.215
       
  • Sustainable Book Publishing as a Service at the University of Michigan

    • Authors: Jason Colman
      Abstract: This is the speaker notes of the author’s presentation given at IFLA 2016. View the video recording of the author’s presentation. The presentation begins at 26:43.
      PubDate: Summer 2017
      DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.214
      Issue No: Vol. http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.214
       
  • Achieving Financial Sustainability: Are We Asking the Wrong Questions'

    • Authors: Kevin S. Hawkins
      Abstract: This is the speaker notes of the author’s presentation given at IFLA 2016. View the video recording of the author’s presentation. The presentation begins at 13:18.While technology has made producing copies of digital content almost entirely free, there is no escaping that publishing, according to most definitions of the term, still requires time and money. Any publishing service offered by a library must find a way to achieve financial sustainability—that is, operate without losing money.However, even "losing money" is a tricky concept, especially when taking into account varying definitions of operating expenses (overhead costs) under different models for auxiliary services. Libraries are by their very nature cost centers, providing services without the expectation of recovering revenue, and are usually part of larger organizations that similarly provide services under partial or full subsidies. While libraries are often comfortable with charging for convenience services and for services to those outside their designed community of users, careful thought should be given to which costs a publishing service—or any new service—should be expected to recover.I’m going to speak today about financial sustainability of scholarly publishing and libraries, but I think it doesn’t actually make sense to talk about libraries in isolation. The way to think about this topic is similar to how we talk about it for traditional publishers, and there’s actually been quite a bit of discussion in the past year or two about measuring and relating costs in university press publishing. I’m going to try to summarize that and relate it to library publishing.Two quick assumptions that I think will be uncontroversial and won’t really surprise anyone: I’m using the term publishing to mean more than making creative works public by simply posting them online. Rather, a publisher performs some combination of selection, editing, design, marketing, and managing distribution. These stages of publishing require a combination of time and money to carry out. Publishing isn’t actually free in the age of the Internet.If a library creates a publishing service, it might decide that the service should be self-sustaining (not require any subsidy). I see two possible reasons that might be given for this.First, publishing might be seen as non-essential to the mission of the library—not an essential service. The thinking is that the library’s limited resources should only fund core, essential services. A classic example is a library publishing service that just provides hosting for open-access journals. In this case, the service might be seen as a convenience for journal editors to save them from finding hosting elsewhere. Another is a library-based service for authors of books, in which the library brokers relationships between the authors and freelancers or vendors that offer editing or design services. While authors could arrange this on their own, the library has expertise in finding appropriate service providers and can save the authors some time.Second, since most publishers are run as businesses, a library’s administration might feel that a publishing operation should also be treated as one. I think a library’s administration is more likely to hold this view if the publishing service sells something to customers directly (like copies of books in print or digital form) rather than simply providing a service to authors or editors. In this case, you might be expected to recover at least some of your costs.Let’s assume that your library publishing service is expected to cover at least some of its costs. The question, really, is: what sorts of things do we count as contributing toward the costs of publishing' In other words, what’s in scope for cost recovery'In economics and budgeting, costs are generally divided into two types: fixed and variable. Variable costs, also called unit-level costs, are easy to measure in publishing: what it costs to produce each individual copy of a print book or ebook. Fixed costs, on the other hand, are incurred before any copies are produced—things like staff salaries and benefits, equipment to run the publishing operation, and workspace. They form a greater portion of the costs in publishing than variable costs, but theses costs are also harder to fully represent. Fixed costs are sometimes referred to as “first-copy costs” or “zeroeth-copy costs” (since you haven’t produced even the first copy).Another way of dividing costs is between indirect costs and direct costs. Indirect costs are shared across all of a publisher’s projects: staff time spent on administration, equipment, workspace, and other things that you can’t attribute to specific projects. Direct costs, on the other hand, include staff time spent on a particular project, fees paid to editors and designer, and printing costs. Note that staff time is included in both indirect and indirect costs, depending on whether it can be attributed to a particular project or to the organization as a whole.You can get into debates on how to divide staff time between direct and indirect costs, but if you want to know the total costs of a publishing operation, you just need to add up the direct and indirect costs. If you’re interested in knowing how your costs compare to those of other publishers, you can simply take your total costs for a fixed period of time and divide them by the number of books, journal articles, pages, or other metric, comparing with other publishers regardless of how those publishers count direct and indirect costs.Ithaka S+R, with the support of the Mellon Foundation, published a study earlier this year based on data about publishing scholarly monographs from about twenty university presses. In the study, the accounting of direct and indirect costs was harmonize...
      PubDate: Summer 2017
      DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.213
      Issue No: Vol. http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.213
       
  • Research Management: Combining Platforms, Practices, and Policies

    • Authors: Shawn Martin
      Abstract: This is the article version of the author’s presentation given at IFLA 2016. View the video recording of the author’s presentation. The presentation begins at 57:34.Research management is about more than open access and it is about more than creating online publishing platforms. It is about creating online publishing platforms that meet the needs of all of the stakeholders in the higher education enterprise, most notably faculty. Technological infrastructure needs to be combined with policies that reflect the career needs of faculty members. So far, the goal of combining open scholarship policies with online infrastructure has been elusive. The answer may be to rethink how the career structure of faculty members is structured and how research managers and librarians can be a part of the solution.
      PubDate: Summer 2017
      DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.212
      Issue No: Vol. http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.212
       
  • Using Skyepack Technology to Deliver an Interactive Parasitology
           E-Textbook

    • Authors: Heather Todd
      Abstract: This is the extended abstract version of the authors’s presentation given at IFLA 2016. View the video recording of the authors’s presentation. The presentation begins at 22:13.Download Speaker Notes (PDF)
      PubDate: Summer 2017
      DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.211
      Issue No: Vol. http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.211
       
  • Where Do We Go From Here' Starting Up an Academic Journal In a Smaller
           Institution

    • Authors: Richard Saunders
      Abstract: This is the article length version of the author’s presentation given at IFLA 2016. View the video recording of the author’s presentation. The presentation begins at 47:47.There is no reliable formula for starting or sustaining a scholarly journal. This essay encourages readers to develop and address sustainable editorial and publication processes, addressing five key elements that increase the likelihood that a journal can be successfully sustained over time.Adding one’s voice to the slow, measured conversation that is professional literature is one of the key functions of academic life. Disseminating advances in knowledge and understanding has traditionally been a function of academic institutions and professional organizations. For five hundred years that conversation has involved printed matter, first in the form of books and then scholarly journals. Within a handful of years from 1450 the number of printers and publishers in operation skyrocketed from one press to over two hundred. Many presses were associated formally or informally with universities, creating an explosion in the availability and expectations of scholarship, inquiry, and creativity from which we are still feeling the repercussions five centuries later. Printing became thereafter a commercial enterprise requiring heavy investments in equipment, supplies, and expertise. During the industrial age universities exploited the widespread availability of printing to begin publications targeted at small and focused readerships in particular fields. Only in the past two centuries has peer review added rigor to the process of scholarly communication. By the mid-twentieth century, the rise of commercial publishers began to aggregate the publication functions, taking over journals from universities and professional societies. One result has been a continuous spiral of journal subscription costs. The digital revolution once again puts the capacity for a “printing press” within the reach of academic institutions and levels the field for scholarship. What we have lost in the intervening years is familiarity with the decisions and procedures of publication within the academic support structure, and within libraries specifically. This essay illustrates decisions and opportunities which need definition when establishing and disseminating a viable scholarly journal. Each concern and issue should be considered and resolved; each decision will lead to other decisions as academic institutions once again transcend being merely warehouses for knowledge and become again disseminators of it. The comments here are drawn from lessons learned over several years working in the publishing industry and as an author myself. It is not a how-to guide, nor does it guarantee success. The observations are prompts intended to help librarians as would-be publishers think carefully. The goal for this article is not to encourage library publishing per se, but rather to help readers understand the moving parts involved in establishing a flexible, resilient process that can sustain a publication in the long term and independent of the personalities driving its creation. I presume that libraries will be required to start small and bootstrap their journals into existence, for the sort of investment capital start-up common to the tech and software industries is typically lacking in academia. I also presume that institutions will craft a scholarly journal rather than a trade journal or non-specialist magazine. Comments are grouped into five broad sections or processes for convenience. Key points are rendered in italics for convenience and clarity within paragraphs.
      PubDate: Summer 2017
      DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.209
      Issue No: Vol. http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.209
       
  • Sustaining and Growing the Vision of an Academic Library’s Fine
           Press

    • Authors: Emily Tipps
      Abstract: This is the speaker notes of the authors’s presentation given at IFLA 2016. View the video recording of the authors’s presentation. The presentation begins at 26:22.
      PubDate: Summer 2017
      DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.208
      Issue No: Vol. http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.208
       
  • Small Public Libraries as Publishers

    • Authors: Dijana Sabolović-Krajina
      Abstract: This is the article version of the author’s presentation given at IFLA 2016. View the video recording of the author’s presentation. The presentation begins at 13:02.The aim of this paper is to stress the importance of small public libraries as publishers. The case study will be the library network of the Koprivnica-Križevci County in the Republic of Croatia. Among five public libraries, three of them are publishers. Although publishing is not their core business, they use it as a tool in: (i) protecting and promoting richness of local cultural heritage; (ii) contributing to library collections with specific local topics; (iii) empowering local identity; (iv) positioning themselves better as important culture, education and information centres of their local communities; and (v) creating new, added value of libraries in society. Publishing profiles, topics, and formats will be stressed, as well as these public libraries' creative efforts to find finances in alliances with private and public sectors. The models show that these libraries use both print and digital opportunities in publishing. Collaboration with all stakeholders who participate in the publishing process is also stressed. We conclude that publishing activities relating to collection development policies and practices do not primarily depend on type, size, and financial means of libraries, but on library policy and strategic orientation that includes also publishing as a business model.Keywords: Small public libraries, publishing activities, Public library „Fran Galović“ in Koprivica - Croatia, Town library „Franjo Marković“ in Križevci - Croatia, Town library in Đurđevac – Croatia
      PubDate: Summer 2017
      DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.207
      Issue No: Vol. http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.207
       
  • Libraries as Publishers: Implementing the Vision at the Georgetown Law
           Library

    • Authors: Diana R. Donahoe
      Abstract: View the video recording of the author’s presentation.
      PubDate: Summer 2017
      DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.206
      Issue No: Vol. http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.206
       
  • One of the Noblest Duties of a University: Planning the Concordia
           University Press

    • Authors: Geoffry Little
      Abstract: View the video recording of the author’s presentation. The presentation begins at 1:13:31.Every study of scholarly publishing includes Daniel Coit Gilman’s 1878 exhortation that “It is one of the noblest duties of a university to advance knowledge, and to diffuse it...far and wide.” During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries academic trailblazers like Gilman, the first president of Johns Hopkins University, and others established scholarly presses, many of them within their universities’ libraries. More recently, a number of university presses in North America have come under the remit of the library system. This has taken place within two contexts: a recognition that academic libraries no longer simply acquire materials for researchers but manage information throughout complex life cycles and wider financial pressures that demand organizational efficiency on campuses everywhere.Since 2012 Concordia University in Montreal has been working to create a scholarly press that will be based in its library. Concordia University Press, which will publish high-quality, peer-reviewed print and open access monographs starting in 2017, is only the second university press to be created in Canada since the early 1980s and will bring the total number of scholarly publishers in the country to seventeen.This paper will describe why Concordia decided to establish a press and the three years of visioning, research, and planning that have gone into it. It will touch on the obvious and not-so-obvious opportunities and challenges facing scholarly publishers, librarians, authors, readers, and others within the scholarly communications circuit, as well as how Concordia has formed relationships and partnerships with other university presses, service providers, university administrators, and funders. This paper is not so much as a case study as a report on a press-in-progress and a description of how librarians and faculty have worked to turn a scholarly publishing vision into a reality.
      PubDate: Summer 2017
      DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.205
      Issue No: Vol. http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.205
       
  • Sustainable Open Access Publishing: Preconditions, Dialog, and Continuous
           Adaptation: The Stockholm University Press Case

    • Authors: Birgitta Hellmark Lindgren
      Abstract: This is the speaker notes of the author’s presentation given at IFLA 2016. View the video recording of the author’s presentation. The presentation begins at 48:57.Download Slides (PPTX)
      PubDate: Summer 2017
      DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.204
      Issue No: Vol. http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.204
       
  • Library as Publisher: From an African Lens

    • Authors: Reggie Raju
      Abstract: This is the article length version of the authors’s presentation given at IFLA 2016. View the video recording of the authors’s presentation. The presentation begins at 24:20.Africa is trapped in two paradoxical situations. The first is that the production of research is dependent on access to research - African researchers have been hamstrung by limited access to relevant and authentic scholarly literature to support the growth in their research output. It has been mooted that the saviour is improved access to open content. This gives rise to the second paradox - open access removes the financial barriers to the end user. In this new paradigm, the cash-cow for publishers is now the author via the payment of article processing charges (APCs). However, African researchers, in the main, cannot afford these exorbitant APCs, limiting their capacity to publish excellent research in leading international journals that have an OA publishing option.Hence, it is incumbent on research intensive institutions on the African continent to take the lead in sharing scholarly output to engender and nurture a culture of research at those African institutions that are overwhelmed by low research output. To support the dissemination of trusted and relevant scholarly content, African libraries need to provide proactive ‘library as publisher’ services. These services must be delivered for non-profit purposes and must be underpinned by ‘philanthropic-social justice’ principles.Some South African academic institutions, via their libraries, have stepped-up to the plate to make scholarly freely content accessible to both users and authors via suite of diamond open access services. The library as a publisher must gain traction quickly as a mainstream service provided by the higher education libraries in South Africa. This paper will examine the new trend of library as a publisher from a developing world perspective. The benefits for the provision of ‘library as publisher’ service is colossal for development in the global South.
      PubDate: Summer 2017
      DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.203
      Issue No: Vol. http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.203
       
  • Approaches to Library Publishing Services in Latin America

    • Authors: Julio Santillán-Aldana
      Abstract: This is the speaker notes of the author’s presentation given at IFLA 2016, which is also available as video below.
      PubDate: Summer 2017
      DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.202
      Issue No: Vol. http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.202
       
  • Introduction to IFLA Special Issue

    • Authors: Ann Okerson
      Abstract: As publishing reconfigures itself, as indeed the very nature of what it means to publish is challenged, libraries are increasingly finding roles for themselves in this expanding space. Where it sometimes seems that anybody can publish anything anywhere and anytime, the value of libraries' entrance to the publishing arena is in their brand, their integrity, and their commitment to mission rather than commercial advantage. Libraries' alignment with particular communities of responsible producers of what it's now fashionable to call "content" gives them a particular advantage in access to providers – at the same time as libraries' alignment with the audience of their users gives a complementary and important advantage.
      PubDate: Summer 2017
      DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.201
      Issue No: Vol. http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/3336451.0020.201
       
 
 
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