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Journal Cover Trends in Ecology & Evolution
  [SJR: 11.087]   [H-I: 255]   [226 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0169-5347
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3089 journals]
  • Plant States and Fates: Response to Pimm and Raven
    • Authors: Eimear Nic Lughadha; Steven P. Bachman; Rafaël Govaerts
      Pages: 887 - 889
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Volume 32, Issue 12
      Author(s): Eimear Nic Lughadha, Steven P. Bachman, Rafaël Govaerts


      PubDate: 2017-11-22T13:53:40Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.09.005
       
  • Reply to Nic Lughadha et al.
    • Authors: Peter H. Raven; Stuart L. Pimm
      First page: 889
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Volume 32, Issue 12
      Author(s): Peter H. Raven, Stuart L. Pimm


      PubDate: 2017-11-22T13:53:40Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.09.002
       
  • Publishing with Objective Charisma: Breaking Science’s Paradox
    • Authors: Zoë A. Doubleday; Sean D. Connell
      Pages: 803 - 805
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Volume 32, Issue 11
      Author(s): Zoë A. Doubleday, Sean D. Connell
      Good writing takes time, but in a research environment where speed is master, is it a superfluous pursuit' Scientists spend most of their working life writing, yet our writing style obstructs its key purpose: communication. We advocate more accessible prose that boosts the influence of our publications. For those who change, the proof of their success will be science that is read, understood, and remembered.

      PubDate: 2017-10-19T16:11:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.06.011
       
  • A 2018 Horizon Scan of Emerging Issues for Global Conservation and
           Biological Diversity
    • Authors: William J. Sutherland; Stuart H.M. Butchart; Ben Connor; Caroline Culshaw; Lynn V. Dicks; Jason Dinsdale; Helen Doran; Abigail C. Entwistle; Erica Fleishman; David W. Gibbons; Zhigang Jiang; Brandon Keim; Xavier Le Roux; Fiona A. Lickorish; Paul Markillie; Kathryn A. Monk; Diana Mortimer; James W. Pearce-Higgins; Lloyd S. Peck; Jules Pretty; Colleen L. Seymour; Mark D. Spalding; Femke H. Tonneijck; Rosalind A. Gleave
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 December 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): William J. Sutherland, Stuart H.M. Butchart, Ben Connor, Caroline Culshaw, Lynn V. Dicks, Jason Dinsdale, Helen Doran, Abigail C. Entwistle, Erica Fleishman, David W. Gibbons, Zhigang Jiang, Brandon Keim, Xavier Le Roux, Fiona A. Lickorish, Paul Markillie, Kathryn A. Monk, Diana Mortimer, James W. Pearce-Higgins, Lloyd S. Peck, Jules Pretty, Colleen L. Seymour, Mark D. Spalding, Femke H. Tonneijck, Rosalind A. Gleave
      This is our ninth annual horizon scan to identify emerging issues that we believe could affect global biological diversity, natural capital and ecosystem services, and conservation efforts. Our diverse and international team, with expertise in horizon scanning, science communication, as well as conservation science, practice, and policy, reviewed 117 potential issues. We identified the 15 that may have the greatest positive or negative effects but are not yet well recognised by the global conservation community. Themes among these topics include new mechanisms driving the emergence and geographic expansion of diseases, innovative biotechnologies, reassessments of global change, and the development of strategic infrastructure to facilitate global economic priorities.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T09:25:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.11.006
       
  • Sympatric Speciation in the Genomic Era
    • Authors: Andrew D. Foote
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 November 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Andrew D. Foote
      Sympatric speciation has been of key interest to biologists investigating how natural and sexual selection drive speciation without the confounding variable of geographic isolation. The advent of the genomic era has provided a more nuanced and quantitative understanding of the different and often complex modes of speciation by which sympatric sister taxa arose, and a reassessment of some of the most compelling empirical case studies of sympatric speciation. However, I argue that genomic studies based on contemporary populations may never be able to provide unequivocal evidence of true primary sympatric speciation, and there is a need to incorporate palaeogenomic studies into this field. This inability to robustly distinguish cases of primary and secondary ‘divergence with gene flow’ may be inconsequential, as both are useful for understanding the role of large effect barrier loci in the progression from localised genic isolation to genome-wide reproductive isolation. I argue that they can be of equivalent interest due to shared underlying mechanisms driving divergence and potentially leaving similar patterns of coalescence.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T09:25:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.11.003
       
  • Moving Character Displacement beyond Characters Using Contemporary
           Coexistence Theory
    • Authors: Rachel M. Germain; Jennifer L. Williams; Dolph Schluter; Amy L. Angert
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 November 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Rachel M. Germain, Jennifer L. Williams, Dolph Schluter, Amy L. Angert
      Character displacement is one of the most studied phenomena in evolutionary biology, yet research has narrowly focused on demonstrating whether or not displacement has occurred. We propose a new experimental approach, adopted from the coexistence literature, that directly measures interspecific competition among sympatric and allopatric populations of species. Doing so allows increased ability to (i) test predictions of character displacement without biases inherent to character-centric tests, (ii) quantify its effect on the stability of coexistence, (iii) resolve the phenotypic pathways through which competitive divergence is achieved, and (iv) perform comparative tests. Our approach extends research to forms of character displacement not readily identified by past methods and will lead to a broader understanding of its consequences for community structure.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T09:25:43Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.11.002
       
  • Editorial Board and Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Volume 32, Issue 12


      PubDate: 2017-11-22T13:53:40Z
       
  • Movers and Stayers: Novel Assemblages in Changing Environments
    • Authors: Richard J. Hobbs; Leonie E. Valentine; Rachel J. Standish; Stephen T. Jackson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 November 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Richard J. Hobbs, Leonie E. Valentine, Rachel J. Standish, Stephen T. Jackson
      Increased attention to species movement in response to environmental change highlights the need to consider changes in species distributions and altered biological assemblages. Such changes are well known from paleoecological studies, but have accelerated with ongoing pervasive human influence. In addition to species that move, some species will stay put, leading to an array of novel interactions. Species show a variety of responses that can allow movement or persistence. Conservation and restoration actions have traditionally focused on maintaining or returning species in particular places, but increasingly also include interventions that facilitate movement. Approaches are required that incorporate the fluidity of biotic assemblages into the goals set and interventions deployed.

      PubDate: 2017-11-22T13:53:40Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.11.001
       
  • Predicting Chronic Climate-Driven Disturbances and Their Mitigation
    • Authors: Nate G. McDowell; Sean T. Michaletz; Katrina E. Bennett; Kurt C. Solander; Chonggang Xu; Reed M. Maxwell; Craig D. Allen; Richard S. Middleton
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 November 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Nate G. McDowell, Sean T. Michaletz, Katrina E. Bennett, Kurt C. Solander, Chonggang Xu, Reed M. Maxwell, Craig D. Allen, Richard S. Middleton
      Society increasingly demands the stable provision of ecosystem resources to support our population. Resource risks from climate-driven disturbances, including drought, heat, insect outbreaks, and wildfire, are growing as a chronic state of disequilibrium results from increasing temperatures and a greater frequency of extreme events. This confluence of increased demand and risk may soon reach critical thresholds. We explain here why extreme chronic disequilibrium of ecosystem function is likely to increase dramatically across the globe, creating no-analog conditions that challenge adaptation. We also present novel mechanistic theory that combines models for disturbance mortality and metabolic scaling to link size-dependent plant mortality to changes in ecosystem stocks and fluxes. Efforts must anticipate and model chronic ecosystem disequilibrium to properly prepare for resilience planning.

      PubDate: 2017-11-22T13:53:40Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.10.002
       
  • Predicting Predator Recognition in a Changing World
    • Authors: Alexandra J.R. Carthey; Daniel T. Blumstein
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 November 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Alexandra J.R. Carthey, Daniel T. Blumstein
      Through natural as well as anthropogenic processes, prey can lose historically important predators and gain novel ones. Both predator gain and loss frequently have deleterious consequences. While numerous hypotheses explain the response of individuals to novel and familiar predators, we lack a unifying conceptual model that predicts the fate of prey following the introduction of a novel or a familiar (reintroduced) predator. Using the concept of eco-evolutionary experience, we create a new framework that allows us to predict whether prey will recognize and be able to discriminate predator cues from non-predator cues and, moreover, the likely persistence outcomes for 11 different predator–prey interaction scenarios. This framework generates useful and testable predictions for ecologists, conservation scientists, and decision-makers.

      PubDate: 2017-11-22T13:53:40Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.10.009
       
  • Information Theory Broadens the Spectrum of Molecular Ecology and
           Evolution
    • Authors: W.B. Sherwin; A. Chao; L. Jost; P.E. Smouse
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 November 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): W.B. Sherwin, A. Chao, L. Jost, P.E. Smouse
      Information or entropy analysis of diversity is used extensively in community ecology, and has recently been exploited for prediction and analysis in molecular ecology and evolution. Information measures belong to a spectrum (or q profile) of measures whose contrasting properties provide a rich summary of diversity, including allelic richness (q =0), Shannon information (q =1), and heterozygosity (q =2). We present the merits of information measures for describing and forecasting molecular variation within and among groups, comparing forecasts with data, and evaluating underlying processes such as dispersal. Importantly, information measures directly link causal processes and divergence outcomes, have straightforward relationship to allele frequency differences (including monotonicity that q =2 lacks), and show additivity across hierarchical layers such as ecology, behaviour, cellular processes, and nongenetic inheritance.

      PubDate: 2017-11-10T15:58:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.09.012
       
  • Planetary Boundaries for Biodiversity: Implausible Science, Pernicious
           Policies
    • Authors: José M. Montoya; Ian Donohue; Stuart L. Pimm
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 November 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): José M. Montoya, Ian Donohue, Stuart L. Pimm
      The notion of a ‘safe operating space for biodiversity’ is vague and encourages harmful policies. Attempts to fix it strip it of all meaningful content. Ecology is rapidly gaining insights into the connections between biodiversity and ecosystem stability. We have no option but to understand ecological complexity and act accordingly.

      PubDate: 2017-11-10T15:58:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.10.004
       
  • Using Biological Insight and Pragmatism When Thinking about
           Pseudoreplication
    • Authors: Nick Colegrave; Graeme D. Ruxton
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Nick Colegrave, Graeme D. Ruxton
      Pseudoreplication is controversial across experimental biology. Researchers in the same field can disagree on whether a given study suffers from pseudoreplication and on to what extent any pseudoreplication undermines the value of a study. A recent survey indicated that concerns about pseudoreplication can strongly impact peer review of manuscripts submitted for publication. Here we explore controversies around pseudoreplication, identify issues requiring resolution, and in each case offer a resolution. We emphasise that having non-independence in data points and pseudoreplicating are not the same thing. Researchers should be able to demonstrate that in a given experiment they have minimised and controlled the risk of non-independence weakening their study. If they do that to the satisfaction of others, they have avoided pseudoreplication.

      PubDate: 2017-11-10T15:58:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.10.007
       
  • Environmental Filtering, Niche Construction, and Trait Variability: The
           Missing Discussion
    • Authors: Madhav P. Thakur; Alexandra J. Wright
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 November 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Madhav P. Thakur, Alexandra J. Wright


      PubDate: 2017-11-10T15:58:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.09.014
       
  • The Dangerous Battles Over Sex and Gender
    • Authors: Gillian R. Brown
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 November 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Gillian R. Brown


      PubDate: 2017-11-10T15:58:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.10.003
       
  • Embracing Colonizations: A New Paradigm for Species Association Dynamics
    • Authors: Sören Nylin; Salvatore Agosta; Staffan Bensch; Walter A. Boeger; Mariana P. Braga; Daniel R. Brooks; Matthew L. Forister; Peter A. Hambäck; Eric P. Hoberg; Tommi Nyman; Alexander Schäpers; Alycia L. Stigall; Christopher W. Wheat; Martin Österling; Niklas Janz
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 November 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Sören Nylin, Salvatore Agosta, Staffan Bensch, Walter A. Boeger, Mariana P. Braga, Daniel R. Brooks, Matthew L. Forister, Peter A. Hambäck, Eric P. Hoberg, Tommi Nyman, Alexander Schäpers, Alycia L. Stigall, Christopher W. Wheat, Martin Österling, Niklas Janz
      Parasite–host and insect–plant research have divergent traditions despite the fact that most phytophagous insects live parasitically on their host plants. In parasitology it is a traditional assumption that parasites are typically highly specialized; cospeciation between parasites and hosts is a frequently expressed default expectation. Insect–plant theory has been more concerned with host shifts than with cospeciation, and more with hierarchies among hosts than with extreme specialization. We suggest that the divergent assumptions in the respective fields have hidden a fundamental similarity with an important role for potential as well as actual hosts, and hence for host colonizations via ecological fitting. A common research program is proposed which better prepares us for the challenges from introduced species and global change.

      PubDate: 2017-11-10T15:58:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.10.005
       
  • Earth Observation Networks (EONs): Finding the Right Balance
    • Authors: David B. Lindenmayer; Gene E. Likens; Jerry F. Franklin
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 November 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): David B. Lindenmayer, Gene E. Likens, Jerry F. Franklin
      Earth observation networks (EONs) are an emerging, surveillance-based approach to environmental monitoring and research that are fundamentally different than traditional question-driven, experimentally designed approaches. There is an urgent need to find an optimal balance between these approaches and to develop new integrated initiatives that take advantage of key features of them both.

      PubDate: 2017-11-04T00:46:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.10.008
       
  • Meta-Ecosystems 2.0: Rooting the Theory into the Field
    • Authors: Isabelle Gounand; Eric Harvey; Chelsea J. Little; Florian Altermatt
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 November 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Isabelle Gounand, Eric Harvey, Chelsea J. Little, Florian Altermatt
      The meta-ecosystem framework demonstrates the significance of among-ecosystem spatial flows for ecosystem dynamics and has fostered a rich body of theory. The high level of abstraction of the models, however, impedes applications to empirical systems. We argue that further understanding of spatial dynamics in natural systems strongly depends on dense exchanges between field and theory. From empiricists, more and specific quantifications of spatial flows are needed, defined by the major categories of organismal movement (dispersal, foraging, life-cycle, and migration). In parallel, the theoretical framework must account for the distinct spatial scales at which these naturally common spatial flows occur. Integrating all levels of spatial connections among landscape elements will upgrade and unify landscape and meta-ecosystem ecology into a single framework for spatial ecology.

      PubDate: 2017-11-04T00:46:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.10.006
       
  • A Common Toolbox to Understand, Monitor or Manage Rarity' A Response
           to Carmona et al.
    • Authors: Cyrille Violle; Wilfried Thuiller; Nicolas Mouquet; François Munoz; Nathan J.B. Kraft; Marc W. Cadotte; Stuart W. Livingstone; Matthias Grenie; David Mouillot
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 November 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Cyrille Violle, Wilfried Thuiller, Nicolas Mouquet, François Munoz, Nathan J.B. Kraft, Marc W. Cadotte, Stuart W. Livingstone, Matthias Grenie, David Mouillot


      PubDate: 2017-11-04T00:46:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.10.001
       
  • Upward Adaptive Radiation Cascades: Predator Diversification Induced by
           Prey Diversification
    • Authors: Jakob Brodersen; David M. Post; Ole Seehausen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 October 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Jakob Brodersen, David M. Post, Ole Seehausen
      The value of biodiversity is widely appreciated, but we are only beginning to understand the interplay of processes that generate biodiversity and their consequences for coevolutionary interactions. Whereas predator–prey coevolution is most often analyzed in the context of evolutionary arms races, much less has been written about how predators are affected by, and respond to, evolutionary diversification in their prey. We hypothesize here that adaptive radiation of prey may lead to diversification and potentially speciation in predators, a process that we call an upwards adaptive radiation cascade. In this paper we lay out the conceptual basis for upwards adaptive radiation cascades, explore evidence for such cascades, and finally advocate for intensified research.

      PubDate: 2017-11-04T00:46:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.09.016
       
  • Embracing the Nonindependence of the Environmental Filter: A Reply to
           Responses
    • Authors: Marc W. Cadotte; Caroline M. Tucker
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 October 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Marc W. Cadotte, Caroline M. Tucker


      PubDate: 2017-10-26T15:16:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.09.015
       
  • How Green is ‘Green’ Energy'
    • Authors: Luke Gibson; Elspeth Wilman William Laurance
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 October 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Luke Gibson, Elspeth N. Wilman, William F. Laurance
      Renewable energy is an important piece of the puzzle in meeting growing energy demands and mitigating climate change, but the potentially adverse effects of such technologies are often overlooked. Given that climate and ecology are inextricably linked, assessing the effects of energy technologies requires one to consider their full suite of global environmental concerns. We review here the ecological impacts of three major types of renewable energy – hydro, solar, and wind energy – and highlight some strategies for mitigating their negative effects. All three types can have significant environmental consequences in certain contexts. Wind power has the fewest and most easily mitigated impacts; solar energy is comparably benign if designed and managed carefully. Hydropower clearly has the greatest risks, particularly in certain ecological and geographical settings. More research is needed to assess the environmental impacts of these ‘green’ energy technologies, given that all are rapidly expanding globally.

      PubDate: 2017-10-26T15:16:38Z
       
  • Editorial Board and Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Volume 32, Issue 11


      PubDate: 2017-10-19T16:11:05Z
       
  • Why Might Bacterial Pathogens Have Small Genomes'
    • Authors: Lucy A. Weinert; John J. Welch
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 October 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Lucy A. Weinert, John J. Welch
      Bacteria that cause serious disease often have smaller genomes, and fewer genes, than their nonpathogenic, or less pathogenic relatives. Here, we review evidence for the generality of this association, and summarise the various reasons why the association might hold. We focus on the population genetic processes that might lead to reductive genome evolution, and show how several of these could be connected to pathogenicity. We find some evidence for most of the processes having acted in bacterial pathogens, including several different modes of genome reduction acting in the same lineage. We argue that predictable processes of genome evolution might not reflect any common underlying process.

      PubDate: 2017-10-19T16:11:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.09.006
       
  • Environmental Filtering Is a Relic. A Response to Cadotte and Tucker
    • Authors: Carlos A. Aguilar-Trigueros; Matthias C. Rillig; Max-Bernhard Ballhausen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 October 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Carlos A. Aguilar-Trigueros, Matthias C. Rillig, Max-Bernhard Ballhausen


      PubDate: 2017-10-19T16:11:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.09.013
       
  • Genomic Quantitative Genetics to Study Evolution in the Wild
    • Authors: Phillip Gienapp; Simone Fior; Frédéric Guillaume; Jesse R. Lasky; Victoria L. Sork; Katalin Csilléry
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 October 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Phillip Gienapp, Simone Fior, Frédéric Guillaume, Jesse R. Lasky, Victoria L. Sork, Katalin Csilléry
      Quantitative genetic theory provides a means of estimating the evolutionary potential of natural populations. However, this approach was previously only feasible in systems where the genetic relatedness between individuals could be inferred from pedigrees or experimental crosses. The genomic revolution opened up the possibility of obtaining the realized proportion of genome shared among individuals in natural populations of virtually any species, which could promise (more) accurate estimates of quantitative genetic parameters in virtually any species. Such a ‘genomic’ quantitative genetics approach relies on fewer assumptions, offers a greater methodological flexibility, and is thus expected to greatly enhance our understanding of evolution in natural populations, for example, in the context of adaptation to environmental change, eco-evolutionary dynamics, and biodiversity conservation.

      PubDate: 2017-10-19T16:11:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.09.004
       
  • Evolutionary Trade-Off between Secondary Sexual Traits and Ejaculates
    • Authors: Leigh W. Simmons; Stefan Lüpold; John L. Fitzpatrick
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 October 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Leigh W. Simmons, Stefan Lüpold, John L. Fitzpatrick
      Recent theoretical models predict that the evolutionary diversification of the weapons and ornaments of pre-mating sexual selection should be influenced by trade-offs with male expenditure on ejaculates. However, the patterns of association between secondary sexual traits and ejaculate expenditure are frequently inconsistent in their support of this prediction. We show why consideration of additional life-history, ecological, and mating-system variables is crucial for the interpretation of associations between secondary sexual traits and ejaculate production. Incorporation of these ‘missing variables’ provides evidence that interactions between pre- and post-mating sexual selection can underlie broad patterns of diversification in male weapons and ornaments. We call for more experimental and genetic approaches to uncover trade-offs, as well as for studies that consider the costs of mate-searching.

      PubDate: 2017-10-19T16:11:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.09.011
       
  • Towards a Common Toolbox for Rarity: A Response to Violle et al.
    • Authors: Carlos P. Carmona; Francesco de Bello; Takehiro Sasaki; Kei Uchida; Meelis Pärtel
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 October 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Carlos P. Carmona, Francesco de Bello, Takehiro Sasaki, Kei Uchida, Meelis Pärtel


      PubDate: 2017-10-19T16:11:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.09.010
       
  • Creativity: The Stronger, Blacker Sheep behind Great Papers – A
           Reply to Falkenberg and Tubb
    • Authors: Zoë A. Doubleday; Sean D. Connell; Scott L. Montgomery
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 October 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Zoë A. Doubleday, Sean D. Connell, Scott L. Montgomery


      PubDate: 2017-10-19T16:11:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.09.008
       
  • Undisciplined Thinking Facilitates Accessible Writing: A Response to
           Doubleday and Connell
    • Authors: Laura J. Falkenberg; Adeline Tubb
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 October 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Laura J. Falkenberg, Adeline Tubb


      PubDate: 2017-10-19T16:11:05Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.09.009
       
  • The ‘Evo-Demo’ Implications of Condition-Dependent Mortality
    • Authors: Victor Ronget; Michael Garratt; Jean-François Lemaître; Jean-Michel Gaillard
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Victor Ronget, Michael Garratt, Jean-François Lemaître, Jean-Michel Gaillard
      Animals in the wild die from a variety of different mortality sources, including predation, disease, and starvation. Different mortality sources selectively remove individuals with different body condition in different ways, and this variation in the condition dependence of mortality has evolutionary and demographic implications. Subsequent population dynamics are influenced by the strength of condition-dependent mortality during specific periods, with population growth impacted in different ways in short- versus long-lived species. The evolution of lifespan is strongly influenced by condition-dependent mortality, with strikingly different outcomes expected in senescence rates when the relationship between condition and mortality is altered. A coupling of field and laboratory studies is now required to further reveal the evolutionary implications of condition-dependent mortality.

      PubDate: 2017-10-12T18:40:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.09.003
       
  • Editorial Board and Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Volume 32, Issue 10


      PubDate: 2017-09-21T16:48:12Z
       
  • Evolution of Visual Processing in the Human Retina
    • Authors: Trevor D. Price; Rebia Khan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 September 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Trevor D. Price, Rebia Khan
      Motion detection in humans is based on luminance differences, now shown likely to be processed by a specialized set of cone cells, separate from the cone cells that process color. Humans appear to have evolved a mechanism analogous to that proposed for the double cones of other vertebrates, lost as vision simplified in our nocturnal ancestors.

      PubDate: 2017-09-21T16:48:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.09.001
       
  • Transformative Research Is Not Easily Predicted
    • Authors: Sarah A. Gravem; Silke M. Bachhuber; Heather K. Fulton-Bennett; Zachary H. Randell; Alissa J. Rickborn; Jenna M. Sullivan; Bruce A. Menge
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 September 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Sarah A. Gravem, Silke M. Bachhuber, Heather K. Fulton-Bennett, Zachary H. Randell, Alissa J. Rickborn, Jenna M. Sullivan, Bruce A. Menge
      Transformative research (TR) statements in scientific grant proposals have become mainstream. However, TR is defined as radically changing our understanding of a concept, causing a paradigm shift, or opening new frontiers. We argue that it is rarely possible to predict the transformative nature of research. Interviews and surveys of 78 transformative ecologists suggest that most TR began with incremental goals, while transformative potential was recognized later. Most respondents thought TR is unpredictable and should not be prioritized over ‘incremental’ research that typically leads to breakthroughs. Importantly, TR directives might encourage scientists to overstate the importance of their research. We recommend that granting agencies (i) allocate only a subset of funds to TR and (ii) solicit more realistic proposal statements.

      PubDate: 2017-09-16T10:22:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.08.012
       
  • Process, Mechanism, and Modeling in Macroecology
    • Authors: Sean R. Connolly; Sally A. Keith; Robert K. Colwell; Carsten Rahbek
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 September 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Sean R. Connolly, Sally A. Keith, Robert K. Colwell, Carsten Rahbek
      Macroecology has traditionally relied on descriptive characterization of large-scale ecological patterns to offer narrative explanations for the origin and maintenance of those patterns. Only recently have macroecologists begun to employ models termed ‘process-based’ and ‘mechanistic’, in contrast to other areas of ecology, where such models have a longer history. Here, we define and differentiate between process-based and mechanistic features of models, and we identify and discuss important advantages of working with models possessing such features. We describe some of the risks associated with process-based and mechanistic model-centered research programs, and we propose ways to mitigate these risks. Giving process-based and mechanistic models a more central role in research programs can reinvigorate macroecology by strengthening the link between theory and data.

      PubDate: 2017-09-16T10:22:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.08.011
       
  • Understanding the Processes Underpinning Patterns of Phylogenetic
           Regionalization
    • Authors: Barnabas H. Daru; Tammy L. Elliott; Daniel S. Park; T. Jonathan Davies
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 September 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Barnabas H. Daru, Tammy L. Elliott, Daniel S. Park, T. Jonathan Davies
      A key step in understanding the distribution of biodiversity is the grouping of regions based on their shared elements. Historically, regionalization schemes have been largely species centric. Recently, there has been interest in incorporating phylogenetic information into regionalization schemes. Phylogenetic regionalization can provide novel insights into the mechanisms that generate, distribute, and maintain biodiversity. We argue that four processes (dispersal limitation, extinction, speciation, and niche conservatism) underlie the formation of species assemblages into phylogenetically distinct biogeographic units. We outline how it can be possible to distinguish among these processes, and identify centers of evolutionary radiation, museums of diversity, and extinction hotspots. We suggest that phylogenetic regionalization provides a rigorous and objective classification of regional diversity and enhances our knowledge of biodiversity patterns.

      PubDate: 2017-09-16T10:22:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.08.013
       
  • Deconstructing Superorganisms and Societies to Address Big Questions in
           Biology
    • Authors: Patrick Kennedy; Gemma Baron; Bitao Qiu; Dalial Freitak; Heikki Helanterä; Edmund R. Hunt; Fabio Manfredini; Thomas O’Shea-Wheller; Solenn Patalano; Christopher D. Pull; Takao Sasaki; Daisy Taylor; Christopher D.R. Wyatt; Seirian Sumner
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 September 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Patrick Kennedy, Gemma Baron, Bitao Qiu, Dalial Freitak, Heikki Helanterä, Edmund R. Hunt, Fabio Manfredini, Thomas O’Shea-Wheller, Solenn Patalano, Christopher D. Pull, Takao Sasaki, Daisy Taylor, Christopher D.R. Wyatt, Seirian Sumner
      Social insect societies are long-standing models for understanding social behaviour and evolution. Unlike other advanced biological societies (such as the multicellular body), the component parts of social insect societies can be easily deconstructed and manipulated. Recent methodological and theoretical innovations have exploited this trait to address an expanded range of biological questions. We illustrate the broadening range of biological insight coming from social insect biology with four examples. These new frontiers promote open-minded, interdisciplinary exploration of one of the richest and most complex of biological phenomena: sociality.

      PubDate: 2017-09-10T13:04:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.08.004
       
  • Is Reintroduction Biology an Effective Applied Science'
    • Authors: Gemma Taylor; Stefano Canessa; Rohan H. Clarke; Dean Ingwersen; Doug P. Armstrong; Philip J. Seddon; John G. Ewen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 September 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Gemma Taylor, Stefano Canessa, Rohan H. Clarke, Dean Ingwersen, Doug P. Armstrong, Philip J. Seddon, John G. Ewen
      Reintroduction biology is a field of scientific research that aims to inform translocations of endangered species. We review two decades of published literature to evaluate whether reintroduction science is evolving in its decision-support role, as called for by advocates of evidence-based conservation. Reintroduction research increasingly addresses a priori hypotheses, but remains largely focused on short-term population establishment. Similarly, studies that directly assist decisions by explicitly comparing alternative management actions remain a minority. A small set of case studies demonstrate full integration of research in the reintroduction decision process. We encourage the use of tools that embed research in decision-making, particularly the explicit consideration of multiple management alternatives because this is the crux of any management decisions.

      PubDate: 2017-09-10T13:04:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.08.002
       
  • The Nebulous Ecology of Native Invasions
    • Authors: Lloyd L. Nackley; Adam G. West; Andrew L. Skowno; William J. Bond
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 September 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Lloyd L. Nackley, Adam G. West, Andrew L. Skowno, William J. Bond
      In the Anthropocene, alien species are no longer the only category of biological organism establishing and rapidly spreading beyond historical boundaries. We review evidence showing that invasions by native species are a global phenomenon and present case studies from Southern Africa, and elsewhere, that reveal how climate-mediated expansions of native plants into adjacent communities can emulate the functional and structural changes associated with invasions by alien plant species. We conclude that integrating native invasions into ecological practice and theory will improve mechanistic models and better inform policy and adaptive ecological management in the 21st century.

      PubDate: 2017-09-10T13:04:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.08.003
       
  • Reply to Eberhard. Cryptic Female Choice: A General Phenomenon
    • Authors: Renée C. Firman; Clelia Gasparini; Mollie K. Manier; Tommaso Pizzari
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 September 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Renée C. Firman, Clelia Gasparini, Mollie K. Manier, Tommaso Pizzari


      PubDate: 2017-09-10T13:04:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.08.010
       
  • Cryptic Female Choice Revisited: A Response to Firman et al.
    • Authors: William G. Eberhard
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 September 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): William G. Eberhard


      PubDate: 2017-09-10T13:04:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.08.009
       
  • The Conventional Versus Alternative Agricultural Divide: A Response to
           Garibaldi et al.
    • Authors: Zia Mehrabi; Verena Seufert; Navin Ramankutty
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 September 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Zia Mehrabi, Verena Seufert, Navin Ramankutty


      PubDate: 2017-09-04T21:21:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.07.011
       
  • Invasion Science in the Developing World: A Response to Ricciardi et al.
    • Authors: Rafael D. Zenni; Sílvia R. Ziller; Anibal Pauchard; Mariano Rodriguez-Cabal; Martin A. Nuñez
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 August 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Rafael D. Zenni, Sílvia R. Ziller, Anibal Pauchard, Mariano Rodriguez-Cabal, Martin A. Nuñez


      PubDate: 2017-09-04T21:21:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.08.006
       
  • Invasion Science: Looking Forward Rather Than Revisiting Old Ground
           – A Reply to Zenni et al.
    • Authors: Anthony Ricciardi; Tim M. Blackburn; James T. Carlton; Jaimie T.A. Dick; Philip E. Hulme; Josephine C. Iacarella; Jonathan M. Jeschke; Andrew M. Liebhold; Julie L. Lockwood; Hugh J. MacIsaac; Petr Pyšek; David M. Richardson; Gregory M. Ruiz; Daniel Simberloff; William J. Sutherland; David A. Wardle; David C. Aldridge
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 August 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Anthony Ricciardi, Tim M. Blackburn, James T. Carlton, Jaimie T.A. Dick, Philip E. Hulme, Josephine C. Iacarella, Jonathan M. Jeschke, Andrew M. Liebhold, Julie L. Lockwood, Hugh J. MacIsaac, Petr Pyšek, David M. Richardson, Gregory M. Ruiz, Daniel Simberloff, William J. Sutherland, David A. Wardle, David C. Aldridge


      PubDate: 2017-09-04T21:21:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.08.007
       
  • Ecologists Winning Arguments: Ends Don’t Justify the Means. A
           Response to Begon
    • Authors: Wolf-Christian Saul; Ross T. Shackleton; Florencia A. Yannelli
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 August 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Wolf-Christian Saul, Ross T. Shackleton, Florencia A. Yannelli


      PubDate: 2017-09-04T21:21:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.08.005
       
  • Dipterocarp Biology, Ecology, and Conservation by Jaboury Ghazoul, Oxford
           University Press, 2016. US$89.95, hbk (320 pp.) ISBN 978-0-199-63965-6.
    • Authors: Richard B. Primack
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 August 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Richard B. Primack


      PubDate: 2017-09-04T21:21:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.07.009
       
  • Multidimensional Performance of Farming Approaches: A Reply to Mehrabi et
           al.
    • Authors: Lucas A. Garibaldi; Barbara Gemmill-Herren; Raffaele D’Annolfo; Benjamin E. Graeub; Saul A. Cunningham; Tom D. Breeze
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 August 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Lucas A. Garibaldi, Barbara Gemmill-Herren, Raffaele D’Annolfo, Benjamin E. Graeub, Saul A. Cunningham, Tom D. Breeze


      PubDate: 2017-09-04T21:21:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.07.010
       
  • A Tree-Thinker’s Guide to Genomics
    • Authors: Brian S. Arbogast
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 August 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Brian S. Arbogast


      PubDate: 2017-09-04T21:21:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.07.008
       
  • Future Benefits from Contemporary Evosystem Services: A Response to Rudman
           et al.
    • Authors: Daniel P. Faith; Susana Magallón; Andrew P. Hendry; Michael J. Donoghue
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 August 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Daniel P. Faith, Susana Magallón, Andrew P. Hendry, Michael J. Donoghue


      PubDate: 2017-09-04T21:21:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.07.005
       
  • Contemporary Evosystem Services: A Reply to Faith et al.
    • Authors: Seth M. Rudman; Maayan Kreitzman; Kai M.A. Chan; Dolph Schluter
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 August 2017
      Source:Trends in Ecology & Evolution
      Author(s): Seth M. Rudman, Maayan Kreitzman, Kai M.A. Chan, Dolph Schluter


      PubDate: 2017-09-04T21:21:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2017.07.006
       
 
 
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