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The Physics Teacher
Number of Followers: 266  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0031-921X
Published by AAPT Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Magnetic Forces Between a Magnet and a Solenoid
    • Authors: Munho Kwon, Joongwoo Jung, Taehun Jang, Sangho Sohn
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 330-334, May 2020.
      Electromagnetism, along with mechanics, is one of the most fundamental disciplines in physics, and the magnetic force is one of the most easily accessible forces existing in nature. Magnets are often used as science teaching aids and are readily available from a young age; the forces of these magnets are first dealt with in NGSS (Next Generation Science Standards) in third grade, and are continuously presented in the secondary curriculum.
      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145528
       
  • Answer to May 2020 Figuring Physics Question
    • Authors: Paul Hewitt
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page A291-A291, May 2020.

      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:41Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145549
       
  • Thank You to Our Referees!: July 19, 2019 – March 30, 2020
    • Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 328-329, May 2020.
      If you’re like me, when you read through this list of TPT referees from the past year you will be gobsmacked by the number of people whose work you admire. TPT referees are among the most generous and savvy people that I know, and I am sincerely grateful for the privilege to be associated with them and to work with them to make the physics community a better thing. I especially feel that way today, as I write this from my basement, practicing social distancing and self-isolation and Zoom instruction and editing and physics with as much diligence as I can muster in these virus-laden times.
      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:40Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145527
       
  • Being a Token Black Female Faculty Member in Physics: Exploring Research
           on Gendered Racism, Identity Shifting as a Coping Strategy, and
           Inclusivity in Physics
    • Authors: Danielle Dickens, Maria Jones, Naomi Hall
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 335-337, May 2020.
      Although the United States is becoming racially diverse, the representation of marginalized groups in physics still remains low. Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have been successful in graduating Black physicists, such that HBCUs are nine of the top 10 physics departments in the United States that produce bachelor degrees. Despite these outcomes, Black women are disproportionately underrepresented in physics. In 2016, only 4% and 3% of Black women earned bachelor’s degrees and doctorate degrees in physics, respectively. Among faculty, Black women made up only 2% in physics doctorate programs and 3% in bachelor’s-only physics departments in 2016. Though the percentage of Latinas in physics has increased, the percentage of Black women in physics has not grown. Therefore, Black female physics faculty are often tokenized and experience gendered racism (intersection of racism and sexism). In this paper, we used an intersectional approach to examine the psychological discourse on Black female physics faculty’s experiences of gendered racism, identity shifting as a coping strategy, and we provide recommendations for creating an inclusive physics environment.
      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:40Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145529
       
  • The Elephant in the (Physics Class)Room: Discussing Gender Inequality in
           Our Class
    • Authors: Olivia Eickerman, Moses Rifkin
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 301-305, May 2020.
      Diversity strengthens science, but in most physics classrooms female students are disadvantaged both directly and indirectly: extensive research shows that they are undermined, viewed as less capable, and have less successful experiences both in terms of learning and identity formation. The following article was written in partnership between a male high school physics teacher (Rifkin) and a female student from his 2018-2019 12th-grade physics class (Eickerman). In this article, which we wrote by reflecting separately and then combining our writings, we describe a two-week period in which we worked together to try to change the culture of our physics class.
      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:39Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145520
       
  • What is a pink diode' Further experiments with LED technology
    • Authors: James Lincoln
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 364-365, May 2020.
      I have long been impressed with the extensive number of experiments that can be done with light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The ubiquity and affordability of LEDs continues to provide promise for new inquiry-style experiments. In this article, I describe a few innovations that I have added to the repertoire of the LED as physics equipment. Some of these experiments are on the physics of color, especially with concerns to unusually colored diodes, but mostly they are on new ways to help students and teachers get to know how diodes work and what makes them such special apparatus.
      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:39Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145542
       
  • Question 1: Animal excrement; Question 2: Traffic signal power
    • Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 363-363, May 2020.

      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:38Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145541
       
  • COVID-19 / Coronavirus models
    • Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 366-366, May 2020.

      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:38Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145544
       
  • Is It Simple to Explain Simple Experiments': An Unusual Version of the
           Magdeburg Experiment with a Kitchen Blender
    • Authors: Dragia Trifonov Ivanov, Stefan Nikolaev Nikolov
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 308-311, May 2020.
      There are many phenomena, interesting, simple experiments and effects, that await their in-depth explanation from the point of view of physics. Some of them have been well known for a long time but their numbers are increasing, especially with the introduction of new technology in everyday life. In this paper we consider a simple experiment that everyone can perform at home in their kitchen with a handheld blender and a glass of water. When the blender is turned on with the blade close to the bottom, it is possible to lift the glass without holding it in any other way. The explanation of this experiment, however, turned out to be unusually complicated, and we had to consider a large number of different effects. Some of the phenomena that seemed like favorites to explain the effect were ruled out through controlled experiments. The final (in our opinion) explanation turned out to be a variation of one of the famous early experiments in physics—the Magdeburg hemispheres. This experiment demonstrates that interesting physics effects can hide everywhere—even under a kitchen blender.
      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:37Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145522
       
  • Top online pandemic physics teaching recommendations from physPort.org
    • Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 366-366, May 2020.

      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:37Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145543
       
  • Chasing the Aurora Borealis
    • Authors: Richard P. Hechter
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 306-307, May 2020.
      Ihad been sitting in a coffee shop in Reykjavik, Iceland, cycling through my photographs of the aurora borealis from the night before in Njardvik, when a man at the next table struck up a conversation. Recognizing his familial ties to the location in my photographs, he began to share stories that his grandfather told him as a child regarding the often-seen, but still mysterious, northern lights. The story I was told that day, and stories shared with me while visiting northern and remote Indigenous communities in Canada, inspired me to write this paper.
      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:36Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145521
       
  • Franklin: Electric fields and potentials in 3D for Mac
    • Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 366-366, May 2020.

      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:36Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145546
       
  • Simple Steps to Promote Classroom Engagement and Inclusion: A Report from
           the Field
    • Authors: Roger G. Tobin
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 316-319, May 2020.
      Idescribe an effort to enhance student engagement and classroom inclusion in a sophomore Introduction to Modern Physics class, through the use of assigned student groups, cold-calling, and exposure to the work of female physicists of varied backgrounds. These approaches took minimal effort, appeared to have positive impacts, and had no discernible negative effects. They could readily be adapted to other physics classes at the college and high school levels. This work is not a research study and makes no generalizable claims. It reports on the experience of one instructor and the students, in one class at one institution, and may be of interest to others who are concerned with similar issues.
      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:35Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145524
       
  • Jeremy Fielding teaches practical motors (and more)
    • Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 366-366, May 2020.

      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:35Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145545
       
  • Supporting Inclusive Teaching in Introductory College Physics
    • Authors: Stephen Getty, Natalie Gosnell, Barbara Whitten, Joseph Taylor
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 312-315, May 2020.
      Even among the sciences, physics stands out as an unusually White- and male-dominated field. The American Institute of Physics (AIP) reports that only 19% of physics faculty are women, and less than 6% of physics faculty are African American or Hispanic. Particularly for female students, the transition from high school to a college major in physics has been identified as the most important point of attrition. As such, undergraduate physics education is a critical juncture where these trends can be interrupted. We approached this problem by using teaching strategies intended to promote inclusiveness in a calculus-based, introductory college physics course, a key requirement in many STEM majors and a gateway to the undergraduate physics major. Proponents of inclusive teaching strategies argue that using such strategies will benefit all students, particularly those from marginalized groups, increase the diversity of physics majors, and ultimately contribute to a more diverse community of physicists.
      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:34Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145523
       
  • Networks of Support: Investigating a Counterspace that Provides Identity
           Resources for Minoritized Students in Post-Secondary Physics
    • Authors: Allison J. Gonsalves, Hannah R. Chestnutt
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 324-327, May 2020.
      There is recent evidence suggesting that formal and informal support networks for minoritized students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) can contribute to their persistence in the field. These counterspaces can serve as “safe spaces” where deficit notions of minoritized students can be challenged and where a positive collegiate climate can be established. Generally, counterspaces are found outside of STEM departments: with mentors, in campus student groups, or in conferences focused on diversity in STEM. However, two participants in a study by Johnson and colleagues reported evidence suggesting that physics departments themselves can act as counterspaces. We are inspired by this finding to investigate the role that a network of support for minoritized students in a physics department of an Eastern Canadian university has on female students’ experiences in their physics program. In this paper, we present data suggesting that participation in this network can promote forms of participation that may be especially beneficial for minoritized students in physics. We argue that this network acts as a counterspace built into the structure of a university physics department. Furthermore, we suggest that access to counterspaces such as this one may be able to provide identity resources that minoritized students draw on to position themselves as insiders when entering physics programs.
      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:34Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145526
       
  • Physics Textbooks from 1960–2016: A History of Gender and Racial
           Bias
    • Authors: Timothy M. Lawlor, Timothy Niiler
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 320-323, May 2020.
      According to a report from the Statistical Research Center of the American Institute of Physics (AIP), 74% percent of BS physics degrees and 87% of PhD physics degrees were awarded to White recipients while Black recipients accounted for 3% and 2%, respectively. In 2016 only 2.5% of physics faculty members were African American. More striking, Palus reports that, “In the entire United States, of the thousands and thousands of college physics and astronomy faculty, only 75 are African American or Hispanic women.” AIP also reported that in 2012 the percent of physics BS degrees completed by female students of any race was less than 18% and the percent of physics PhD degrees awarded to females was less than 20%. Between 2002 and 2014 the percent of women faculty in physics only rose from 10% to 16%. At the assistant professor level, this is 23%; however, at higher ranks the percent of associate and full professor was 18% and 10%, respectively, which may indicate barriers to promotion. These trends are too often reflected in widely used educational resources.
      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:33Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145525
       
  • Constructing a model ground-effect vehicle
    • Authors: Doug Stith
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 362-363, May 2020.

      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:33Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145540
       
  • Summer Professional Development for Physics teachers
    • Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 366-366, May 2020.

      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:33Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145547
       
  • Learning the lens equation using water and smartphones/tablets
    • Authors: Jack Freeland, Venkata Rao Krishnamurthi, Yong Wang
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 360-361, May 2020.

      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:31Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145539
       
  • Physics from an Underrepresented Lens: What I Wish Others Knew
    • Authors: Sofia Herrera, Ikram A. Mohamed, Abigail R. Daane
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 294-296, May 2020.
      In this paper, I (SH) will apply a counter-storytelling method to highlight a perspective that is not often present in the physics culture. The counter-storytelling (or counter-narrative) method gives voice to people from traditionally marginalized groups to share their untold experiences. Counter-storytelling, as the name implies, challenges common social views and ideas, and, in this paper, highlights the need for changes in the current physics culture. At a young age, I was never encouraged to go into a STEM field. I have always leaned more towards math and science, but I never thought of a science-related career until my sister inspired me in high school. I later realized that in STEM fields, people can let their imaginations run wild, making new observations and discoveries every day. And yet, amid pursuing these wonderful opportunities, individuals from groups underrepresented in STEM fields face challenging situations imposed by those surrounding them in the field. My physics instructor once told me that some people have their lives set on a more difficult mode than others because of their background and identities. As a Latina student whose family is from México, I have come to know an unfortunate truth: my gender, ethnicity, cultural background, and status create barriers for me. This has been the case throughout my life, but most especially in my journey pursuing an undergraduate STEM degree. Because of this, I want others to know my challenging experiences in education and how they have affected me. By sharing my story, I hope to encourage others to work for change in the STEM fields and in the classroom.
      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:30Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145517
       
  • A second call-and-RESPONSE!
    • Authors: Geraldine L. Cochran, Gary D. White
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 292-293, May 2020.

      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:28Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145516
       
  • Where do I hope to be in 10 years'
    • Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 300-300, May 2020.

      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:27Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145519
       
  • May the charge grow large
    • Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 359-359, May 2020.

      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:27Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145538
       
  • Why Are There So Few Women in Physics' Reflections on the Experiences
           of Two Women
    • Authors: Danny Doucette, Chandralekha Singh
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 297-300, May 2020.
      Some of the reasons for the underrepresentation of women in physics are evident in the reflections of two undergraduate women. Leia is a chemistry major who loves college-level physical chemistry and quantum mechanics but does not identify with the discipline of physics, partly because she has low self-efficacy as a physicist and has received very little recognition for her work and learning in physics. Paulette is a physics major who loves physics but feels isolated by the current physics learning environment. She reluctantly dropped an honors introductory lab after being snubbed by her male classmates, who partnered with one another, leaving her to work alone. Paulette’s experiences with condescending male professors activated a stereotype threat about who can succeed in physics that caused her to disengage in class. In addition to these things, in this paper we discuss what these women felt has helped them so far and explore their suggestions for what would help women in physics courses as they pursue their quest for a physical science degree.
      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:26Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145518
       
  • Dry Friction Camouflaged in Viscous Drag
    • Authors: Dejan M. Djokić
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 340-341, May 2020.
      Here is presented an interesting problem that can be used to introduce students to a variety of physics topics including non-inertial frames and frictional forces, rotational dynamics, and damped oscillations; the normal force also appears, but not in its usual guises. The problem is a generalized version of problem 3.34 presented in the “Oscillations and Waves,” part of the collection of problems in general physics by I. E. Irodov. The formulation of the problem, now extended by the kinetic friction inclusion, is given in what follows. In the setup shown in Fig. 1, a massive sleeve is fixed between two long identical massless springs. The sleeve can slide over a long horizontal bar against the dry friction of kinetic friction coefficient μ, which emerges to oppose to the relative lateral motion of the two solid surfaces in contact. The horizontal bar rotates at a constant angular velocity about a vertical axis passing through the middle. Above what critical value of the angular velocity (ωC* = ') will there no longer be oscillations of the sleeve if in the absence of the friction that value amounts to ωC' Initially, the sleeve is given a velocity to start its motion from the center along the rotating bar. Gravitational effects are considered negligible here, but we do use N for the normal force of contact that the bar exerts on the sleeve in the x-y plane. The original problem by Irodov illustrates the same example in order to determine the critical value of angular velocity ωC, but specifically disregards friction (μ = 0).
      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:26Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145531
       
  • Determining the Acceleration Due to Gravity and Friction Using the Ticker
           Tape Timer Method
    • Authors: Ethan Fontana, Chuck Yeung, Jonathan C. Hall
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 338-339, May 2020.
      Measuring the acceleration due to gravity g is a part of most introductory physics classes. A standard method to do so is by using a ticker tape timer. However, frictional forces are usually not included in the analysis even though friction leads to an acceleration significantly smaller than g. In this note, we show how to obtain accurate values of both the gravitational acceleration and the friction force by making measurements with different masses. We also propose a way to organize the laboratory procedure to make the multiple measurements needed, to be more collaborative, and to require students to think more carefully about their results. Students are also exposed to the importance of accounting for the variability in measurements.
      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:25Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145530
       
  • Gender & Self-Efficacy: A Call to Physics Educators
    • Authors: Rachel Henderson, Vashti Sawtelle, Jayson Micheal Nissen
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 345-348, May 2020.
      Many students across the United States enter college with aspirations of becoming a successful career scientist within the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). However, the number of bachelor’s degrees awarded in physics has significantly lagged behind the number of bachelor’s degrees awarded in the other STEM disciplines. Of the physics bachelor’s degrees awarded nationally in 2014, only 20% were conferred to women. As a part of the conversation on recruitment, retention, and diversity in physics, researchers have focused on students’ self-efficacy (SE), or one’s personal beliefs in their capabilities to execute a specific task. Self-efficacy is highly correlated with performance and success, career aspirations, and student persistence, particularly in physics. In addition, many studies have shown that men and women evaluate their science SE differently with women, on average, reporting a lower SE toward science. This article will provide a robust literature review about the research reporting on the gender differences in science SE, specifically within the physics discipline. We will highlight common resources educators can use to measure students’ SE in their own physics classrooms, the standard findings that SE decreases in introductory physics courses but not in other science courses, and within physics the decreases tend to be larger for female students.
      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:25Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145533
       
  • Lessons from Research Exploring the Underrepresentation of Women in
           Physics
    • Authors: Chris Gosling, Allison J. Gonsalves
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 342-344, May 2020.
      Despite decades of research into the gender disparity in physics education and physics practice, the underrepresentation of women in physics persists today. In physics education research, this gender disparity has been constructed as problematic, and numerous approaches from a variety of perspectives have been taken to both research and address it. In this paper, we explore the framings that have been used to motivate study of the underrepresentation of women in physics and the implications these framings have for introductory physics educators. We wish to acknowledge in the framing of this paper that the use of the term “underrepresentation” has prompted a specific characterization of the issues women face in physics (one of low numbers) and the responses (attempts to increase numbers). As its use is pervasive in the research into sex, gender, and physics, we continue here with the term underrepresentation, but suggest that “minoritization” might more appropriately signal the history of structural and institutional actions in physics cultures that have limited access for White and racialized women.
      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:24Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145532
       
  • Changing Culture and Climate to Prevent Sexual Harassment in the Physics
           Educational Setting
    • Authors: Alexis V. Knaub, Steven J. Maier, Lin Ding
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 352-355, May 2020.
      The issue of sexual harassment in science is gaining much needed attention. In physics, a 2019 survey study found that 68% of female undergraduate respondents experienced sexual or sexist harassment in a physics environment. In 2018, the National Academy of Science released a report to address the prevalence of sexual harassment in sciences, engineering, and medicine. The report notes anyone can experience sexual harassment, but some demographics (e.g., women; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer [LGBTQ+)] individuals) may have higher rates, including those with multiple minoritized identities. While there are many important aspects to address regarding sexual harassment, in this article we focus on the third recommendation in the National Academies’ report: “Move beyond legal compliance to address culture and climate.” In the sections below, we discuss some of the limitations of policy and provide suggestions for how to create a culture and climate in the physics classroom and around the department that can work to prevent sexual harassment. We draw from research on sexual harassment from a variety of contexts, including outside of academia and STEM, as there are likely commonalities in experiences regardless of context.
      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:23Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145535
       
  • Solution to the March, 2020 Challenge, The discord of the rings
    • Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page A359-A360, May 2020.

      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:23Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145513
       
  • FORCE TO SLOW A CAR
    • Authors: Paul Hewitt
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 291-291, May 2020.

      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:21Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145515
       
  • The International Conferences for Women in Physics
    • Authors: Laura McCullough, Jessica Esquivel
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 349-351, May 2020.
      The International Conference for Women in Physics (ICWIP) meets every three years in locations around the globe. Under the auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), ICWIP draws female physicists (and a few males) from over two dozen countries to meet for three days and share stories and research, in order to promote a more equitable physics community. The first ICWIP was created to get a sense of the status of women in physics globally. This goal has been upheld with the following conferences. But the value of a meeting is not just for those who attend; sharing what is learned is in many cases even more valuable. In this paper, we share an overview of the ICWIP, focus on what will be useful for readers of The Physics Teacher, and highlight the fact that the proceedings of the ICWIP are all available for free through AIP Publishing, as part of the goal of sharing work that will help make physics a more diverse and equitable field.
      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:21Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145534
       
  • Answer to April Figuring Physics
    • Authors: Paul Hewitt
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 358-358, May 2020.

      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:21Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145537
       
  • The Search for Exoplanets: A Capstone Project in Service Learning and
           Outreach
    • Authors: Avery Archer, David Sederberg, Guna Kondapaneni, Philip Sands
      Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page 356-358, May 2020.
      The Search for Exoplanets is an interactive computer simulation, the product of a collaboration between the Departments of Physics and Astronomy and Computer Science at Purdue University. Our goal was to create a computer simulation that would introduce students to scientific principles, research methodology, and analysis of data with which planets in another solar systems are discovered and characterized. We sought to create a simulation that would be engaging, realistic, an accurate model of research, and appropriate to the level of knowledge and abilities for a monthly outreach program, Saturday Morning Astrophysics at Purdue.
      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:20Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145536
       
  • Solutions for Fermi Questions, May 2020
    • Abstract: The Physics Teacher, Volume 58, Issue 5, Page A363-A364, May 2020.

      Citation: The Physics Teacher
      PubDate: 2020-05-14T03:38:20Z
      DOI: 10.1119/1.5145514
       
 
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