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Journal Cover The Lancet Oncology
  [SJR: 13.94]   [H-I: 197]   [153 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1470-2045 - ISSN (Online) 1474-5488
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3118 journals]
  • Carfilzomib for relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma
    • Authors: Tetsuya Tanimoto; Kenji Tsuda; Kumi Oshima; Jinichi Mori; Hiroaki Shimmura
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Tetsuya Tanimoto, Kenji Tsuda, Kumi Oshima, Jinichi Mori, Hiroaki Shimmura


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30859-8
       
  • Carfilzomib for relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma – Authors'
           reply
    • Authors: Meletios A Dimopoulos; Amy S Kimball
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Meletios A Dimopoulos, Amy S Kimball


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30920-8
       
  • Implementation of a community-based breast cancer management programme
    • Authors: Germán Málaga; Sofia Cuba-Fuentes; Zoila Romero-Albino
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Germán Málaga, Sofia Cuba-Fuentes, Zoila Romero-Albino


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30858-6
       
  • Dacomitinib in NSCLC: a positive trial with little clinical impact
    • Authors: Alfredo Addeo
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Alfredo Addeo


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30923-3
       
  • Dacomitinib in NSCLC: a positive trial with little clinical impact –
           Authors' reply
    • Authors: Yi-Long Wu; Tony S Mok
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Yi-Long Wu, Tony S Mok


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30924-5
       
  • PD-1 inhibition in sarcoma still needs investigation
    • Authors: Maud Toulmonde; Antoine Italiano
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Maud Toulmonde, Antoine Italiano


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30921-x
       
  • PD-1 inhibition in sarcoma still needs investigation –
           Authors’ reply
    • Authors: Hussein A Tawbi; Vanessa Bolejack; Melissa Burgess; Scott Schuetze
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Hussein A Tawbi, Vanessa Bolejack, Melissa Burgess, Scott Schuetze


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30922-1
       
  • 131I radiation exposure and thyroid cancer
    • Authors: Talha Khan Burki
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Talha Khan Burki


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30892-6
       
  • Osimertinib improves progression-free survival in NSCLC
    • Authors: Robert Stirrups
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Robert Stirrups


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30893-8
       
  • Durvalumab boosts progression-free survival in NSCLC
    • Authors: Elizabeth Gourd
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Elizabeth Gourd


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30895-1
       
  • Lenalidomide plus dexamethasone in multiple myeloma
    • Authors: Manjulika Das
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Manjulika Das


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30894-x
       
  • Identifying precursor lesions of pancreatic cancer
    • Authors: Priya Venkatesan
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Priya Venkatesan


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30898-7
       
  • Upfront resection of pancreatic intraductal neoplasms
    • Authors: Elizabeth Gourd
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Elizabeth Gourd


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30897-5
       
  • The NHS: failing to deliver on Beveridge's promise'
    • Authors: The Lancet Oncology
      First page: 1
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): The Lancet Oncology


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30918-x
       
  • EGFR monoclonal antibody biomarkers in advanced NSCLC: from translational
           research to clinical implementation
    • Authors: Robert Pirker
      Pages: 10 - 12
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Robert Pirker


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30873-2
       
  • Early HER2-positive breast cancers: time for a new revolution'
    • Authors: Joseph Gligorov
      Pages: 12 - 13
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Joseph Gligorov


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30874-4
       
  • Complexity of intermittent letrozole adjuvant therapy
    • Authors: Rowan T Chlebowski; Kathy Pan
      Pages: 13 - 15
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Rowan T Chlebowski, Kathy Pan


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30854-9
       
  • Lung cancer's real adjuvant EGFR targeted therapy questions
    • Authors: Terry L Ng; D Ross Camidge
      Pages: 15 - 17
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Terry L Ng, D Ross Camidge


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30875-6
       
  • Complications during minimal invasive thoracic surgery: are new surgeons
           prepared'
    • Authors: Marcelo Cypel; Kazuhiro Yasufuku
      Pages: 17 - 19
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Marcelo Cypel, Kazuhiro Yasufuku


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30915-4
       
  • Perspectives: call for papers
    • Authors: Yaiza del Pozo Martín
      First page: 19
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Yaiza del Pozo Martín


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30931-2
       
  • Introduction to the Yale Precision Medicine Tumor Board
    • Authors: Michael Cecchini; Zenta Walther; Jeffrey L Sklar; Ranjit S Bindra; Daniel P Petrylak; Joseph P Eder; Sarah B Goldberg
      Pages: 19 - 20
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Michael Cecchini, Zenta Walther, Jeffrey L Sklar, Ranjit S Bindra, Daniel P Petrylak, Joseph P Eder, Sarah B Goldberg


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30919-1
       
  • Yale Cancer Center Precision Medicine Tumor Board: two patients, one
           targeted therapy, different outcomes
    • Authors: Michael Cecchini; Zenta Walther; Jeffrey L Sklar; Ranjit S Bindra; Daniel P Petrylak; Joseph P Eder; Sarah B Goldberg
      Pages: 23 - 24
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Michael Cecchini, Zenta Walther, Jeffrey L Sklar, Ranjit S Bindra, Daniel P Petrylak, Joseph P Eder, Sarah B Goldberg


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30916-6
       
  • Embracing the imperfect: new beginnings after cancer
    • Authors: Catherine Lucas
      First page: 25
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Catherine Lucas


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30851-3
       
  • A rare case of osteoblastoma from medieval Tuscany
    • Authors: Giulia Riccomi; Gino Fornaciari; Simona Minozzi; Giacomo Aringhieri; Valentina Giuffra
      First page: 26
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Giulia Riccomi, Gino Fornaciari, Simona Minozzi, Giacomo Aringhieri, Valentina Giuffra


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30917-8
       
  • Avelumab in metastatic urothelial carcinoma after platinum failure
           (JAVELIN Solid Tumor): pooled results from two expansion cohorts of an
           open-label, phase 1 trial
    • Authors: Manish R Patel; John Ellerton; Jeffrey R Infante; Manish Agrawal; Michael Gordon; Raid Aljumaily; Carolyn D Britten; Luc Dirix; Keun-Wook Lee; Mathew Taylor; Patrick Schöffski; Ding Wang; Alain Ravaud; Arnold B Gelb; Junyuan Xiong; Galit Rosen; James L Gulley; Andrea B Apolo
      Pages: 51 - 64
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Manish R Patel, John Ellerton, Jeffrey R Infante, Manish Agrawal, Michael Gordon, Raid Aljumaily, Carolyn D Britten, Luc Dirix, Keun-Wook Lee, Mathew Taylor, Patrick Schöffski, Ding Wang, Alain Ravaud, Arnold B Gelb, Junyuan Xiong, Galit Rosen, James L Gulley, Andrea B Apolo
      Background The approval of anti-programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) and anti-programmed death 1 agents has expanded treatment options for patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Avelumab, a human monoclonal anti-PD-L1 antibody, has shown promising antitumour activity and safety in this disease. We aimed to assess the safety profile in patients (both post-platinum therapy and cisplatin-naive) treated with avelumab and to assess antitumour activity of this drug in post-platinum patients. Methods In this pooled analysis of two cohorts from the phase 1 dose-expansion JAVELIN Solid Tumor study, patients aged 18 years and older with histologically or cytologically confirmed locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma that had progressed after at least one previous platinum-based chemotherapy were enrolled from 80 cancer treatment centres or hospitals in the USA, Europe, and Asia. Eligible patients had adequate end-organ function, an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 or 1, life expectancy of at least 3 months, and at least one measurable lesion. Cisplatin-ineligible patients who might have been previously treated in the perioperative setting, including platinum-naive patients, were also eligible. Patients unselected for PD-L1 expression received avelumab (10 mg/kg, 1 h intravenous infusion) every 2 weeks until confirmed disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, or other criterion for withdrawal. The primary endpoint for this efficacy expansion cohort was confirmed best overall response (according to RECIST version 1.1), adjudicated by independent review. Safety analysis was done in all patients who received at least one dose of avelumab. Antitumour activity was assessed in post-platinum patients who received at least one dose of avelumab. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01772004; enrolment in this cohort of patients with metastatic urothelial carcinoma is closed and the trial is ongoing. Findings Between Sept 3, 2014, and March 15, 2016, 329 patients with advanced metastatic urothelial carcinoma were screened for enrolment into this study; 249 patients were eligible and received treatment with avelumab for a median of 12 weeks (IQR 6·0–19·7) and followed up for a median of 9·9 months (4·3–12·1). Safety and antitumour activity were evaluated at data cutoff on June 9, 2016. In 161 post-platinum patients with at least 6 months of follow-up, a best overall response of complete or partial response was recorded in 27 patients (17%; 95% CI 11–24), including nine (6%) complete responses and 18 (11%) partial responses. The most frequent treatment-related adverse events (any grade in ≥10% patients) were infusion-related reaction (73 [29%]; all grade 1–2) and fatigue (40 [16%]). Grade 3 or worse treatment-related adverse events occurred in 21 (8%) of 249 patients, the most common of which were fatigue (four [2%]), and asthenia, elevated lipase, hypophosphataemia, and pneumonitis in two (1%) patients each. 19 (8%) of 249 patients had a serious adverse event related to treatment with avelumab, and one treatment-related death occurred (pneumonitis). Interpretation Avelumab showed antitumour activity in the treatment of patients with platinum-refractory metastatic urothelial carcinoma; a manageable safety profile was reported in all avelumab-treated patients. These data provide the rationale for therapeutic use of avelumab in metastatic urothelial carcinoma and it has received accelerated US FDA approval in this setting on this basis. Funding Merck KGaA, and Pfizer Inc.

      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30900-2
       
  • A new option for remission induction in acute myeloid leukaemia
    • Authors: Carsten Müller-Tidow; Richard F Schlenk
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): Carsten Müller-Tidow, Richard F Schlenk


      PubDate: 2018-01-15T03:14:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(18)30012-3
       
  • Safety and preliminary efficacy of venetoclax with decitabine or
           azacitidine in elderly patients with previously untreated acute myeloid
           leukaemia: a non-randomised, open-label, phase 1b study
    • Authors: Courtney D DiNardo; Keith W Pratz; Anthony Letai; Brian A Jonas; Andrew H Wei; Michael Thirman; Martha Arellano; Mark G Frattini; Hagop Kantarjian; Relja Popovic; Brenda Chyla; Tu Xu; Martin Dunbar; Suresh K Agarwal; Rod Humerickhouse; Mack Mabry; Jalaja Potluri; Marina Konopleva; Daniel A Pollyea
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): Courtney D DiNardo, Keith W Pratz, Anthony Letai, Brian A Jonas, Andrew H Wei, Michael Thirman, Martha Arellano, Mark G Frattini, Hagop Kantarjian, Relja Popovic, Brenda Chyla, Tu Xu, Martin Dunbar, Suresh K Agarwal, Rod Humerickhouse, Mack Mabry, Jalaja Potluri, Marina Konopleva, Daniel A Pollyea
      Background Elderly patients (aged ≥65 years) with acute myeloid leukaemia have poor outcomes and no effective standard-of-care therapy exists. Treatment with hypomethylating agents such as azacitidine and decitabine is common, but responses are modest and typically short-lived. The oral anti-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 protein inhibitor, venetoclax, has shown promising single-agent activity in patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukaemia and preclinical data suggested synergy between hypomethylating agents and venetoclax, which led to this combination phase 1b study. Methods Previously untreated patients aged 65 years and over with acute myeloid leukaemia who were ineligible for standard induction therapy were enrolled into this non-randomised, open-label, phase 1b study. Patients were required to have an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0–2 and either intermediate-risk or poor-risk cytogenetics. Patients were enrolled into one of three groups for the dose-escalation phase of this study: group A (venetoclax and intravenous decitabine 20 mg/m2 [days 1–5 of each 28-day cycle]), group B (venetoclax and subcutaneous or intravenous azacitidine 75 mg/m2 [days 1–7 of each 28-day cycle]), and group C (a venetoclax and decitabine substudy with the oral CYP3A inhibitor posaconazole, 300 mg twice on cycle 1, day 21, and 300 mg once daily from cycle 1, days 22–28, to assess its effect on venetoclax pharmacokinetics). Dose escalation followed a standard 3 + 3 design with at least three evaluable patients enrolled per cohort; daily target doses of venetoclax for groups A and B were 400 mg (cohort 1), 800 mg (cohorts 2 and 3), and 1200 mg (cohort 4), and 400 mg for group C. The primary endpoints were the safety and pharmacokinetics of venetoclax plus decitabine or azacitidine, and to determine the maximum tolerated dose and recommended phase 2 dose. Secondary endpoints included the preliminary anti-leukaemic activity of venetoclax with decitabine or azacitidine through the analysis of overall response, duration of response, and overall survival. We analysed safety, pharmacokinetics, and anti-leukaemic activity in all patients who received one or more venetoclax doses. The expansion phase of the study is ongoing but is closed to accrual. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02203773. Findings 57 patients were enrolled in the study. 23 patients in group A and 22 patients in group B were enrolled between Nov 19, 2014, and Dec 15, 2015, and 12 patients in group C were enrolled between June 14, 2015, and Jan 16, 2016. As of data cutoff on June 15, 2016, the most common grade 3–4 treatment-emergent adverse events were thrombocytopenia (27 [47%] of 57 patients; nine in group A, 13 in group B, and five in group C), febrile neutropenia (24 [42%] of 57; 11 in group A, ten in group B, and three in group C), and neutropenia (23 [40%] of 57; 12 in group A, eight in group B, and three in group C). The most common serious treatment-emergent adverse event in groups A and B was febrile neutropenia (seven [30%] of 23 patients vs seven [32%] of 22), whereas in group C it was lung infection (four [33%] of 12 patients). 49 (86%) of 57 patients had treatment-related adverse events; the most common in groups A and B included nausea (12 [52%] patients vs seven [32%] patients), fatigue (six [26%] patients vs seven [32%]), and decreased neutrophil count (six [26%] patients vs six [27%]), whereas in group C the most common were nausea (seven [58%] of 12 patients), leucopenia (six [50%]), vomiting (five [42%]), and decreased platelet count (five [42%]). The maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The recommended phase 2 dose was 400 mg once a day or 800 mg with an interrupted dosing schedule (safety expansion). In total, four (7%) of 57 patients had died within 30 days of the first venetoclax dose caused by sepsis (group B), bacteraemia (group A), lung infection (group C), and respiratory failure (group A). Tumour lysis syndrome was not observed. Decitabine and azacitidine did not substantially affect venetoclax exposures. Overall, 35 (61%; 95% CI 47·6–74·0) of 57 patients achieved complete remission or complete remission with incomplete marrow recovery. In groups A and B, 27 (60%; 95% CI 44·3–74·3) of 45 patients had complete remission...
      PubDate: 2018-01-15T03:14:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(18)30010-x
       
  • Breast cancer in young women: do BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations matter'
    • Authors: Peter A Fasching
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): Peter A Fasching


      PubDate: 2018-01-15T03:14:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(18)30008-1
       
  • Germline BRCA mutation and outcome in young-onset breast cancer (POSH): a
           prospective cohort study
    • Authors: Ellen R Copson; Tom C Maishman; Will J Tapper; Ramsey I Cutress; Stephanie Greville-Heygate; Douglas G Altman; Bryony Eccles; Sue Gerty; Lorraine T Durcan; Louise Jones; D Gareth Evans; Alastair M Thompson; Paul Pharoah; Douglas F Easton; Alison M Dunning; Andrew Hanby; Sunil Lakhani; Ros Eeles; Fiona J Gilbert; Hisham Hamed; Shirley Hodgson; Peter Simmonds; Louise Stanton; Diana M Eccles
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): Ellen R Copson, Tom C Maishman, Will J Tapper, Ramsey I Cutress, Stephanie Greville-Heygate, Douglas G Altman, Bryony Eccles, Sue Gerty, Lorraine T Durcan, Louise Jones, D Gareth Evans, Alastair M Thompson, Paul Pharoah, Douglas F Easton, Alison M Dunning, Andrew Hanby, Sunil Lakhani, Ros Eeles, Fiona J Gilbert, Hisham Hamed, Shirley Hodgson, Peter Simmonds, Louise Stanton, Diana M Eccles
      Background Retrospective studies provide conflicting interpretations of the effect of inherited genetic factors on the prognosis of patients with breast cancer. The primary aim of this study was to determine the effect of a germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation on breast cancer outcomes in patients with young-onset breast cancer. Methods We did a prospective cohort study of female patients recruited from 127 hospitals in the UK aged 40 years or younger at first diagnosis (by histological confirmation) of invasive breast cancer. Patients with a previous invasive malignancy (except non-melanomatous skin cancer) were excluded. Patients were identified within 12 months of initial diagnosis. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations were identified using blood DNA collected at recruitment. Clinicopathological data, and data regarding treatment and long-term outcomes, including date and site of disease recurrence, were collected from routine medical records at 6 months, 12 months, and then annually until death or loss to follow-up. The primary outcome was overall survival for all BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA-positive) versus all non-carriers (BRCA-negative) at 2 years, 5 years, and 10 years after diagnosis. A prespecified subgroup analysis of overall survival was done in patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Recruitment was completed in 2008, and long-term follow-up is continuing. Findings Between Jan 24, 2000, and Jan 24, 2008, we recruited 2733 women. Genotyping detected a pathogenic BRCA mutation in 338 (12%) patients (201 with BRCA1, 137 with BRCA2). After a median follow-up of 8·2 years (IQR 6·0–9·9), 651 (96%) of 678 deaths were due to breast cancer. There was no significant difference in overall survival between BRCA-positive and BRCA-negative patients in multivariable analyses at any timepoint (at 2 years: 97·0% [95% CI 94·5–98·4] vs 96·6% [95·8–97·3]; at 5 years: 83·8% [79·3–87·5] vs 85·0% [83·5–86·4]; at 10 years: 73·4% [67·4–78·5] vs 70·1% [67·7–72·3]; hazard ratio [HR] 0·96 [95% CI 0·76–1·22]; p=0·76). Of 558 patients with triple-negative breast cancer, BRCA mutation carriers had better overall survival than non-carriers at 2 years (95% [95% CI 89–97] vs 91% [88–94]; HR 0·59 [95% CI 0·35–0·99]; p=0·047) but not 5 years (81% [73–87] vs 74% [70–78]; HR 1·13 [0·70–1·84]; p=0·62) or 10 years (72% [62–80] vs 69% [63–74]; HR 2·12 [0·82–5·49]; p= 0·12). Interpretation Patients with young-onset breast cancer who carry a BRCA mutation have similar survival as non-carriers. However, BRCA mutation carriers with triple-negative breast cancer might have a survival advantage during the first few years after diagnosis compared with non-carriers. Decisions about timing of additional surgery aimed at reducing future second primary-cancer risks should take into account patient prognosis associated with the first malignancy and patient preferences. Funding Cancer Research UK, the UK National Cancer Research Network, the Wessex Cancer Trust, Breast Cancer Now, and the PPP Healthcare Medical Trust Grant.

      PubDate: 2018-01-15T03:14:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30891-4
       
  • A new era for treatment development in HER2-positive breast cancer
    • Authors: Xavier Pivot; David G Cox
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): Xavier Pivot, David G Cox


      PubDate: 2018-01-15T03:14:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(18)30002-0
       
  • Neoadjuvant treatment with trastuzumab and pertuzumab plus palbociclib and
           fulvestrant in HER2-positive, ER-positive breast cancer (NA-PHER2): an
           exploratory, open-label, phase 2 study
    • Authors: Luca Gianni; Giancarlo Bisagni; Marco Colleoni; Lucia Del Mastro; Claudio Zamagni; Mauro Mansutti; Milvia Zambetti; Antonio Frassoldati; Raffaella De Fato; Pinuccia Valagussa; Giuseppe Viale
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): Luca Gianni, Giancarlo Bisagni, Marco Colleoni, Lucia Del Mastro, Claudio Zamagni, Mauro Mansutti, Milvia Zambetti, Antonio Frassoldati, Raffaella De Fato, Pinuccia Valagussa, Giuseppe Viale
      Background In the neoadjuvant setting, blockade of HER2 plus use of an aromatase inhibitor in patients with HER2-positive and oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer leads to a pathological complete response in 21% of patients. Convergence of HER2 and ER signals on RB1 suggests that a combined pharmacological intervention directed to these targets could be synergistic. To test this approach, we combined palbociclib to block RB1, fulvestrant to block ER, and trastuzumab with pertuzumab to block HER2 in patients with HER2-positive, ER-positive breast cancer. Methods NA-PHER2 is a multicohort, open-label, exploratory, phase 2 study done at seven sites in Italy. Patients were eligible for the first cohort if they had previously untreated, histologically confirmed, unilateral, invasive, HER2-positive, ER-positive breast cancer and were suitable for neoadjuvant therapy. Patients were treated every 3 weeks with intravenous trastuzumab (8 mg/kg loading dose followed by 6 mg/kg) and intravenous pertuzumab (840 mg loading dose in the first cycle and then at 420 mg) for six cycles plus oral palbociclib (125 mg once a day for 21 days in a 4-week cycle) and intramuscular fulvestrant (500 mg) every 4 weeks for five cycles. The coprimary endpoints were change from baseline in Ki67 expression at 2 weeks of treatment and at surgery (16 weeks after treatment) and changes in apoptosis from baseline to surgery. Secondary endpoints were clinical objective response (according to modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) and pathological complete response. All patients who met eligibility criteria were assessed for the primary and secondary endpoints. All patients who received at least one cycle of therapy were assessed for safety. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02530424. The trial is ongoing and two further cohorts are being enrolled. Findings Between May 20, 2015, and Feb 8, 2016, we enrolled 36 patients, of whom one was deemed ineligible for the study and five were found to be HER2-negative on retrospective analysis. Thus, 35 patients were included in safety analyses and 30 were assessed for the primary and secondary endpoints. At baseline, geometric mean Ki67 expression was 31·9 (SD 15·7), versus 4·3 (15·0) at week 2 (n=25; p<0·0001) and 12·1 (20·0) at time of surgery (n=22; p=0·013). The geometric mean for apoptosis was 1·2 (SD 0·3) at baseline versus 0·4 (0·4; p=0·019) at surgery. A clinical objective response immediately before surgery was achieved by 29 (97%; 95% CI 83–100) of 30 patients. At surgery, eight (27%; 95% CI 12–46) patients had a pathological complete response in breast and axillary nodes. The most frequent grade 3 adverse events were neutropenia (ten [29%]), diarrhoea (five [14%]), and stomatitis, increased alanine aminotransferase, and hypersensitivity reactions (one [3%] of each event). No grade 4 or serious adverse events were recorded in the study and there were no deaths. Interpretation The combination of palbociclib, fulvestrant, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab had a significant effect on the expression of Ki67 at 2 weeks and at surgery. Triple targeting of ER, HER2, and RB1 in HER2-positive and ER-positive breast cancer could be an effective chemotherapy-free treatment strategy. Further clinical testing and additional molecular characterisation is necessary, not only in hormone receptor-positive tumours but also in tumours without HER2 amplification. Funding Pfizer and Roche.

      PubDate: 2018-01-15T03:14:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(18)30001-9
       
  • Considering quantity and quality of life in metastatic castration-naive
           prostate cancer
    • Authors: David F Penson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): David F Penson


      PubDate: 2018-01-15T03:14:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30908-7
       
  • Patient-reported outcomes following abiraterone acetate plus prednisone
           added to androgen deprivation therapy in patients with newly diagnosed
           metastatic castration-naive prostate cancer (LATITUDE): an international,
           randomised phase 3 trial
    • Authors: Kim N Chi; Andrew Protheroe; Alfredo Rodríguez-Antolín; Gaetano Facchini; Henrik Suttman; Nobuaki Matsubara; Zhangqun Ye; Bhumsuk Keam; Ronaldo Damião; Tracy Li; Kelly McQuarrie; Bin Jia; Peter De Porre; Jason Martin; Mary B Todd; Karim Fizazi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): Kim N Chi, Andrew Protheroe, Alfredo Rodríguez-Antolín, Gaetano Facchini, Henrik Suttman, Nobuaki Matsubara, Zhangqun Ye, Bhumsuk Keam, Ronaldo Damião, Tracy Li, Kelly McQuarrie, Bin Jia, Peter De Porre, Jason Martin, Mary B Todd, Karim Fizazi
      Background In the LATITUDE trial, addition of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) improved overall survival compared with placebos plus ADT in patients with newly diagnosed, high-risk, metastatic castration-naive prostate cancer. Understanding the effects of treatments on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is important for treatment decisions; therefore we aimed to analyse the effects of ADT plus abiraterone acetate and prednisone versus ADT plus placebos on PROs and HRQOL in patients in the LATITUDE study. Methods In the multicentre, international, randomised, phase 3 LATITUDE trial, eligible patients were aged 18 years or older, had newly diagnosed, high-risk, metastatic castration-naive prostate cancer confirmed by bone scan (bone metastases) or by CT or MRI (visceral, soft tissue, or nodal metastases), and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status score of 2 or less. Patients from 235 clinical sites in 34 countries were randomly assigned (1:1) following a country-by-country scheme done by permuted block randomisation (with two blocks) and stratified by the presence of visceral metastasis and ECOG performance status to receive ADT plus 1000 mg oral abiraterone acetate and 5 mg oral prednisone once daily or ADT plus placebos. Selection of ADT, chemical or surgical, was at the investigator's discretion. The co-primary endpoints of the trial, overall survival and radiographic progression-free survival, have been published. PRO data were collected directly on electronic tablet devices at the clinical sites during screening and before any other visit procedure on day 1 of cycles 1–3, monthly during cycles 4–13, and then every 2 months until the end of treatment, by use of the Brief Pain Inventory—Short Form (BPI-SF), Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy Prostate scale (FACT-P), and the EuroQol (EQ-5D-5L) questionnaires. PRO analyses were an exploratory endpoint. Analyses were by intention-to-treat. Results from the first pre-planned interim analysis (Oct 31, 2016), are presented here. This ongoing study is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov, number NCT01715285. Findings Between Feb 12, 2013, and Dec 11, 2014, 1199 patients were randomly assigned: 597 to ADT plus abiraterone acetate and prednisone and 602 to ADT plus placebos. Median follow-up was 30·9 months (IQR 21·2–33·2) in the ADT plus abiraterone acetate and prednisone group versus 29·7 months (1·4–43·5; 16·1–31·3) in the ADT plus placebos group. Median time to worst pain intensity progression assessed by the BPI-SF score was not reached in either group (ADT plus abiraterone acetate and prednisone, not reached [95% CI not reached to not reached]; 25th percentile 11·07 months [95% CI 9·23–18·43]; ADT plus placebos group, not reached [95% CI not reached to not reached]; 25th percentile 5·62 [95% CI 4·63–7·39]; hazard ratio [HR] 0·63 [95% CI 0·52–0·77]; p<0·0001). Median time to worst fatigue intensity was not reached in either the ADT plus abiraterone acetate and prednisone group (not reached [95% CI not reached to not reached]; 25th percentile 18·4 months [95% CI 12·9–27·7]) or the ADT plus placebos group (not reached [95% CI not reached to not reached]; 25th percentile 6·5 months [95% CI 5·6–9·2]; HR 0·65 [95% CI 0·53–0·81], p=0·0001). Median time to deterioration of functional status assessed by the FACT-P total score scale was 12·9 months (95% CI 9·0–16·6) in the ADT plus abiraterone acetate and prednisone group versus 8·3 months (7·4–11·1) in the ADT plus placebos group (HR 0·85 [95% CI 0·74–0·99]; p=0·032). Interpretation The addition of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone to ADT in patients with newly diagnosed, high-risk metastatic castration-naive prostate cancer improved overall PROs by consistently showing a clinical benefit in the progression of pain, prostate cancer symptoms, fatigue, functional decline, and overall HRQOL. ...
      PubDate: 2018-01-15T03:14:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30911-7
       
  • Smoking cessation medications ineffective in US smokers
    • Authors: Manjulika Das
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): Manjulika Das


      PubDate: 2018-01-15T03:14:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(18)30014-7
       
  • Correction to Lancet Oncol 2017; 18: 1493–501
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
       
  • Correction to Lancet Oncol 2017; 18: 1565–66
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
       
  • Long-term outcomes for neoadjuvant versus adjuvant chemotherapy in early
           breast cancer: meta-analysis of individual patient data from ten
           randomised trials
    • Authors: Early Breast; Cancer Trialists Collaborative Group CharlesCoombesCandaceCorreaJoeCostantinoJackCuzickDavidDanforthNancyDavidsonChristinaDaviesLucyDaviesAngeloDi VeldeJosvan der HageGiuseppeVialeGuntervon
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:The Lancet Oncology, Volume 19, Issue 1
      Author(s): Early Breast Cancer Trialists' Collaborative Group (EBCTCG)BernardAsselainWilliamBarlowJohnBartlettJonasBerghElizabethBergsten-NordströmJudithBlissFrancescoBoccardoClareBoddingtonJanBogaertsGianniBonadonnaRosieBradleyEtienneBrainJeremyBraybrookePhilippeBroetJohnBryantJulieBurrettDavidCameronMikeClarkeAlanCoatesRobertColemanRaoul CharlesCoombesCandaceCorreaJoeCostantinoJackCuzickDavidDanforthNancyDavidsonChristinaDaviesLucyDaviesAngeloDi LeoDavidDodwellMitchDowsettFranDuaneVaughanEvansMarianneEwertzBernardFisherJohnForbesLeslieFordJean-ClaudeGazetRichardGelberLucyGettinsLucaGianniMichaelGnantJonGodwinAronGoldhirschPamelaGoodwinRichardGrayDanielHayesCatherineHillJamesIngleReshmaJagsiRaimundJakeszSamJamesWolfgangJanniHuiLiuZulianLiuCarolineLohrischSibylleLoiblLizMacKinnonAndreasMakrisEleftheriosMamounasGurdeepMannuMiguelMartínSimoneMathoulinLouisMauriacPaulMcGaleTheresaMcHughPhilipMorrisHirofumiMukaiLarryNortonYasuoOhashiIvoOlivottoSoonPaikHongchaoPanRichardPetoMartinePiccartLoriPiercePhilipPoortmansTrevorPowlesKathyPritchardJosephRagazVinodRainaPeterRavdinSimonReadMeredithReganJohnRobertsonEmielRutgersSuzySchollDennisSlamonLidijaSölknerJosephSparanoSethSteinbergRosemarySutcliffeSandraSwainCarolynTaylorAndrewTuttPinucciaValagussaCornelisvan de VeldeJosvan der HageGiuseppeVialeGuntervon MinckwitzYaochenWangZheWangXiangWangTimWhelanNicholasWilckenEricWinerNormanWolmarkWilliamWoodMilviaZambettiJo AnneZujewski
      Background Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) for early breast cancer can make breast-conserving surgery more feasible and might be more likely to eradicate micrometastatic disease than might the same chemotherapy given after surgery. We investigated the long-term benefits and risks of NACT and the influence of tumour characteristics on outcome with a collaborative meta-analysis of individual patient data from relevant randomised trials. Methods We obtained information about prerandomisation tumour characteristics, clinical tumour response, surgery, recurrence, and mortality for 4756 women in ten randomised trials in early breast cancer that began before 2005 and compared NACT with the same chemotherapy given postoperatively. Primary outcomes were tumour response, extent of local therapy, local and distant recurrence, breast cancer death, and overall mortality. Analyses by intention-to-treat used standard regression (for response and frequency of breast-conserving therapy) and log-rank methods (for recurrence and mortality). Findings Patients entered the trials from 1983 to 2002 and median follow-up was 9 years (IQR 5–14), with the last follow-up in 2013. Most chemotherapy was anthracycline based (3838 [81%] of 4756 women). More than two thirds (1349 [69%] of 1947) of women allocated NACT had a complete or partial clinical response. Patients allocated NACT had an increased frequency of breast-conserving therapy (1504 [65%] of 2320 treated with NACT vs 1135 [49%] of 2318 treated with adjuvant chemotherapy). NACT was associated with more frequent local recurrence than was adjuvant chemotherapy: the 15 year local recurrence was 21·4% for NACT versus 15·9% for adjuvant chemotherapy (5·5% increase [95% CI 2·4–8·6]; rate ratio 1·37 [95% CI 1·17–1·61]; p=0·0001). No significant difference between NACT and adjuvant chemotherapy was noted for distant recurrence (15 year risk 38·2% for NACT vs 38·0% for adjuvant chemotherapy; rate ratio 1·02 [95% CI 0·92–1·14]; p=0·66), breast cancer mortality (34·4% vs 33·7%; 1·06 [0·95–1·18]; p=0·31), or death from any cause (40·9% vs 41·2%; 1·04 [0·94–1·15]; p=0·45). Interpretation Tumours downsized by NACT might have higher local recurrence after breast-conserving therapy than might tumours of the same dimensions in women who have not received NACT. Strategies to mitigate the increased local recurrence after breast-conserving therapy in tumours downsized by NACT should be considered—eg, careful tumour localisation, detailed pathological assessment, and appropriate radiotherapy. Funding Cancer Research UK, British Heart Foundation, UK Medical Research Council, and UK Department of Health.

      PubDate: 2018-01-03T17:39:37Z
       
  • Bipolar androgen therapy: an intriguing paradox
    • Authors: Christopher P Evans
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 December 2017
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): Christopher P Evans


      PubDate: 2017-12-18T11:42:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30907-5
       
  • CAR T-cell therapy in refractory large B-cell lymphoma
    • Authors: Robert Stirrups
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 December 2017
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): Robert Stirrups


      PubDate: 2017-12-18T11:42:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30928-2
       
  • TAS-102 in metastatic colorectal cancer
    • Authors: Talha Khan Burki
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 December 2017
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): Talha Khan Burki


      PubDate: 2017-12-18T11:42:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30927-0
       
  • 2017 ASH Meeting
    • Authors: Farhat Yaqub
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 December 2017
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): Farhat Yaqub


      PubDate: 2017-12-18T11:42:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30929-4
       
  • San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 2017
    • Authors: Roxanne Nelson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 December 2017
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): Roxanne Nelson


      PubDate: 2017-12-18T11:42:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30930-0
       
  • Venetoclax: a chance for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia
           previously treated with ibrutinib
    • Authors: Francesca R Mauro; Robin Foà
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 December 2017
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): Francesca R Mauro, Robin Foà


      PubDate: 2017-12-18T11:42:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30910-5
       
  • Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer: more than just downsizing
    • Authors: Marloes G M Derks; Cornelis J H van de Velde
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 December 2017
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): Marloes G M Derks, Cornelis J H van de Velde


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T11:37:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30914-2
       
  • Tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes and prognosis in different subtypes of
           breast cancer: a pooled analysis of 3771 patients treated with neoadjuvant
           therapy
    • Authors: Carsten Denkert; Gunter von Minckwitz; Silvia Darb-Esfahani; Bianca Lederer; Barbara I Heppner; Karsten E Weber; Jan Budczies; Jens Huober; Frederick Klauschen; Jenny Furlanetto; Wolfgang D Schmitt; Jens-Uwe Blohmer; Thomas Karn; Berit M Pfitzner; Sherko Kümmel; Knut Engels; Andreas Schneeweiss; Arndt Hartmann; Aurelia Noske; Peter A Fasching; Christian Jackisch; Marion van Mackelenbergh; Peter Sinn; Christian Schem; Claus Hanusch; Michael Untch; Sibylle Loibl
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2017
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): Carsten Denkert, Gunter von Minckwitz, Silvia Darb-Esfahani, Bianca Lederer, Barbara I Heppner, Karsten E Weber, Jan Budczies, Jens Huober, Frederick Klauschen, Jenny Furlanetto, Wolfgang D Schmitt, Jens-Uwe Blohmer, Thomas Karn, Berit M Pfitzner, Sherko Kümmel, Knut Engels, Andreas Schneeweiss, Arndt Hartmann, Aurelia Noske, Peter A Fasching, Christian Jackisch, Marion van Mackelenbergh, Peter Sinn, Christian Schem, Claus Hanusch, Michael Untch, Sibylle Loibl
      Background Tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are predictive for response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and HER2-positive breast cancer, but their role in luminal breast cancer and the effect of TILs on prognosis in all subtypes is less clear. Here, we assessed the relevance of TILs for chemotherapy response and prognosis in patients with TNBC, HER2-positive breast cancer, and luminal–HER2-negative breast cancer. Methods Patients with primary breast cancer who were treated with neoadjuvant combination chemotherapy were included from six randomised trials done by the German Breast Cancer Group. Pretherapeutic core biopsies from 3771 patients included in these studies were assessed for the number of stromal TILs by standardised methods according to the guidelines of the International TIL working group. TILs were analysed both as a continuous parameter and in three predefined groups of low (0–10% immune cells in stromal tissue within the tumour), intermediate (11–59%), and high TILs (≥60%). We used these data in univariable and multivariable statistical models to assess the association between TIL concentration and pathological complete response in all patients, and between the amount of TILs and disease-free survival and overall survival in 2560 patients from five of the six clinical trial cohorts. Findings In the luminal–HER2-negative breast cancer subtype, a pathological complete response (pCR) was achieved in 45 (6%) of 759 patients with low TILs, 48 (11%) of 435 with intermediate TILs, and 49 (28%) of 172 with high TILs. In the HER2-positive subtype, pCR was observed in 194 (32%) of 605 patients with low TILs, 198 (39%) of 512 with intermediate TILs, and 127 (48%) of 262 with high TILs. Finally, in the TNBC subtype, pCR was achieved in 80 (31%) of 260 patients with low TILs, 117 (31%) of 373 with intermediate TILs, and 136 (50%) of 273 with high TILs (p<0·0001 for each subtype, χ2 test for trend). In the univariable analysis, a 10% increase in TILs was associated with longer disease-free survival in TNBC (hazard ratio [HR] 0·93 [95% CI 0·87–0·98], p=0·011) and HER2-positive breast cancer (0·94 [0·89–0·99], p=0·017), but not in luminal–HER2-negative tumours (1·02 [0·96–1·09], p=0·46). The increase in TILs was also associated with longer overall survival in TNBC (0·92 [0·86–0·99], p=0·032), but had no association in HER2-positive breast cancer (0·94 [0·86–1·02], p=0·11), and was associated with shorter overall survival in luminal–HER2-negative tumours (1·10 [1·02–1·19], p=0·011). Interpretation Increased TIL concentration predicted response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in all molecular subtypes assessed, and was also associated with a survival benefit in HER2-positive breast cancer and TNBC. By contrast, increased TILs were an adverse prognostic factor for survival in luminal–HER2-negative breast cancer, suggesting a different biology of the immunological infiltrate in this subtype. Our data support the hypothesis that breast cancer is immunogenic and might be targetable by immune-modulating therapies. In light of the results in luminal breast cancer, further research investigating the interaction of the immune system with different types of endocrine therapy is warranted. Funding Deutsche Krebshilfe and European Commission.

      PubDate: 2017-12-09T11:32:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30904-x
       
  • Tumour infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer: increasing clinical
           relevance
    • Authors: Roberto Salgado; Sherene Loi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2017
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): Roberto Salgado, Sherene Loi


      PubDate: 2017-12-09T11:32:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30905-1
       
  • Combined androgen blockade for salivary gland carcinoma
    • Authors: Elizabeth Gourd
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2017
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): Elizabeth Gourd


      PubDate: 2017-12-09T11:32:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30903-8
       
  • BGJ398 for FGFR-altered advanced cholangiocarcinoma
    • Authors: Judith A Gilbert
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2017
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): Judith A Gilbert


      PubDate: 2017-12-09T11:32:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30902-6
       
  • Soft-tissue sarcoma risk in childhood cancer survivors
    • Authors: Manjulika Das
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 December 2017
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): Manjulika Das


      PubDate: 2017-12-09T11:32:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30896-3
       
  • JAVELIN: avelumab another spear to fight urothelial carcinoma
    • Authors: Aly-Khan A Lalani; Bradley A McGregor; Guru P Sonpavde; Toni K Choueiri
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 December 2017
      Source:The Lancet Oncology
      Author(s): Aly-Khan A Lalani, Bradley A McGregor, Guru P Sonpavde, Toni K Choueiri


      PubDate: 2017-12-09T11:32:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1470-2045(17)30901-4
       
 
 
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