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The Lancet Infectious Diseases
Journal Prestige (SJR): 9.963
Citation Impact (citeScore): 7
Number of Followers: 156  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1473-3099
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3163 journals]
  • Search for the optimal antimicrobial therapy of Clostridium
           difficile
    infection
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Herbert L DuPont
       
  • Interpretation of the switch in a childhood pneumococcal vaccination
           programme from PCV13 to PCV10 in Belgium
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Patricia Izurieta, Thomas Breuer
       
  • Switch in a childhood pneumococcal vaccination programme from PCV13 to
           PCV10: a defendable approach'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Stefanie Desmet, Jan Verhaegen, Marc Van Ranst, Willy Peetermans, Katrien Lagrou
       
  • Advancing the public health applications of Chlamydia trachomatis
           serology
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Sarah C Woodhall, Rachel J Gorwitz, Stephanie J Migchelsen, Sami L Gottlieb, Patrick J Horner, William M Geisler, Catherine Winstanley, Katrin Hufnagel, Tim Waterboer, Diana L Martin, Wilhelmina M Huston, Charlotte A Gaydos, Carolyn Deal, Magnus Unemo, J Kevin Dunbar, Kyle BernsteinSummaryGenital Chlamydia trachomatis infection is the most commonly diagnosed sexually transmitted infection. Trachoma is caused by ocular infection with C trachomatis and is the leading infectious cause of blindness worldwide. New serological assays for C trachomatis could facilitate improved understanding of C trachomatis epidemiology and prevention. C trachomatis serology offers a means of investigating the incidence of chlamydia infection and might be developed as a biomarker of scarring sequelae, such as pelvic inflammatory disease. Therefore, serological assays have potential as epidemiological tools to quantify unmet need, inform service planning, evaluate interventions including screening and treatment, and to assess new vaccine candidates. However, questions about the performance characteristics and interpretation of C trachomatis serological assays remain, which must be addressed to advance development within this field. In this Personal View, we explore the available information about C trachomatis serology and propose several priority actions. These actions involve development of target product profiles to guide assay selection and assessment across multiple applications and populations, establishment of a serum bank to facilitate assay development and evaluation, and development of technical and statistical methods for assay evaluation and analysis of serological findings. The field of C trachomatis serology will benefit from collaboration across the public health community to align technological developments with their potential applications.
       
  • Laboratory medicine in Africa since 2008: then, now, and the future
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): John N Nkengasong, Francois-Xavier Mbopi-Keou, Rosanna W Peeling, Katy Yao, Clement E Zeh, Miriam Schneidman, Renuka Gadde, Alash'le Abimiku, Philip Onyebujoh, Deborah Birx, Shannon HaderSummaryThe Maputo Declaration of 2008 advocated for commitment from global stakeholders and national governments to prioritise support and harmonisation of laboratory systems through development of comprehensive national laboratory strategies and policies in sub-Saharan Africa. As a result, HIV laboratory medicine in Africa has undergone a transformation, and substantial improvements have been made in diagnostic services, networks, and institutions, including the development of a competent workforce, introduction of point-of-care diagnostics, and innovative quality improvement programmes that saw more than 1100 laboratories enrolled and 44 accredited to international standards. These improved HIV laboratories can now be used to combat emerging continental and global health threats in the decades to come. For instance, the unprecedented Ebola virus disease outbreak in west Africa exposed the severe weaknesses in the overall national health systems in affected countries. It is now possible to build robust health-care systems in Africa and to combat emerging continental and global health threats in the future. In this Personal View, we aim to describe the remarkable transformation that has occurred in laboratory medicine to combat HIV/AIDS and improve global health in sub-Saharan Africa since 2008.
       
  • Eliminating cystic echinococcosis in the 21st century
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Ana Flisser
       
  • Public health surveillance of multidrug-resistant clones of Neisseria
           gonorrhoeae in Europe: a genomic survey
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Simon R Harris, Michelle J Cole, Gianfranco Spiteri, Leonor Sánchez-Busó, Daniel Golparian, Susanne Jacobsson, Richard Goater, Khalil Abudahab, Corin A Yeats, Beatrice Bercot, Maria José Borrego, Brendan Crowley, Paola Stefanelli, Francesco Tripodo, Raquel Abad, David M Aanensen, Magnus Unemo, Jacinta Azevedo, Eszter Balla, Christopher BarbaraSummaryBackgroundTraditional methods for molecular epidemiology of Neisseria gonorrhoeae are suboptimal. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) offers ideal resolution to describe population dynamics and to predict and infer transmission of antimicrobial resistance, and can enhance infection control through linkage with epidemiological data. We used WGS, in conjunction with linked epidemiological and phenotypic data, to describe the gonococcal population in 20 European countries. We aimed to detail changes in phenotypic antimicrobial resistance levels (and the reasons for these changes) and strain distribution (with a focus on antimicrobial resistance strains in risk groups), and to predict antimicrobial resistance from WGS data.MethodsWe carried out an observational study, in which we sequenced isolates taken from patients with gonorrhoea from the European Gonococcal Antimicrobial Surveillance Programme in 20 countries from September to November, 2013. We also developed a web platform that we used for automated antimicrobial resistance prediction, molecular typing (N gonorrhoeae multi-antigen sequence typing [NG-MAST] and multilocus sequence typing), and phylogenetic clustering in conjunction with epidemiological and phenotypic data.FindingsThe multidrug-resistant NG-MAST genogroup G1407 was predominant and accounted for the most cephalosporin resistance, but the prevalence of this genogroup decreased from 248 (23%) of 1066 isolates in a previous study from 2009–10 to 174 (17%) of 1054 isolates in this survey in 2013. This genogroup previously showed an association with men who have sex with men, but changed to an association with heterosexual people (odds ratio=4·29). WGS provided substantially improved resolution and accuracy over NG-MAST and multilocus sequence typing, predicted antimicrobial resistance relatively well, and identified discrepant isolates, mixed infections or contaminants, and multidrug-resistant clades linked to risk groups.InterpretationTo our knowledge, we provide the first use of joint analysis of WGS and epidemiological data in an international programme for regional surveillance of sexually transmitted infections. WGS provided enhanced understanding of the distribution of antimicrobial resistance clones, including replacement with clones that were more susceptible to antimicrobials, in several risk groups nationally and regionally. We provide a framework for genomic surveillance of gonococci through standardised sampling, use of WGS, and a shared information architecture for interpretation and dissemination by use of open access software.FundingThe European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, The Centre for Genomic Pathogen Surveillance, Örebro University Hospital, and Wellcome.
       
  • Pandemic 1918: The Story of the Deadliest Influenza in History, Catharine
           Arnold. Michael O'Mara Press (2018), 368, £12·31, ISBN: 978-1782438083
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Sheila Pinion
       
  • Spreading the blame, finding the solutions
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Peter Ranscombe
       
  • Research brief
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Dara Mohammadi
       
  • Infectious disease surveillance update
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Ruth Zwizwai
       
  • WHO launches Essential Diagnostics List
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Sanjeet Bagcchi
       
  • Neglecting childhood tuberculosis “a human rights violation”
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Talha Burki
       
  • Highlights from the 7th MIM Pan African Malaria Conference
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Alexandra York
       
  • Appropriate comparisons of tuberculosis latency structures with empiric
           data
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): James M Trauer, Romain Ragonnet, Emma S McBryde
       
  • Chronic Chagas disease: therapeutic protocols and efficacy endpoints
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Reggiani Vilela Gonçalves, Rômulo Dias Novaes
       
  • Gametocytocidal drugs: taking the population perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Patricia Graves, Hellen Gelband, Paul Garner, Leslie Choi
       
  • Emergence of recalcitrant dermatophytosis in India
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Shyam B Verma
       
  • Genetic characterisation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae resistant to both
           ceftriaxone and azithromycin
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): David M Whiley, Amy Jennison, Julie Pearson, Monica M Lahra
       
  • Testing for gonorrhoea should routinely include the pharynx
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Lilith K Whittles, Xavier Didelot, Yonatan H Grad, Peter J White
       
  • Mass screening for hepatitis B and C and HIV in sub-Saharan Africa
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Ginette Claude Mireille Kalla, Esther Voundi Voundi, Fru Angwafo, Laurent Bélec, Francois-Xavier Mbopi-Keou
       
  • Corrections
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s):
       
  • Corrections
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s):
       
  • Rotavirus vaccine: a single birth dose'
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Graeme L Barnes
       
  • Towards rubella elimination in Japan
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Kazuaki Jindai, Takanori Funaki, Takeshi Nishijima, Shunji Takakura, Hiroyuki Noda, Kuniaki Miyake
       
  • Advancing political will to end the tuberculosis epidemic
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Nick Herbert, Baroness Susan Masham, Baroness Alison Suttie, Virendra Sharma, Stephan Albani, Oxana Domenti, Rosanna Flurry, Matthew Oliver, Alimuddin Zumla
       
  • Concrete action now: UN High-Level Meeting on Tuberculosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Nick Herbert, Virendra Sharma, Baroness Susan Masham, Baroness Shaista Sheehan, Janika Hauser, Alimuddin Zumla
       
  • Out of the frying pan and into the fire
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Marc Mendelson, Davidson H Hamer
       
  • Urban transmission of tuberculosis in China
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Peter M Keller
       
  • Drug-resistant tuberculosis: the rise of the monos
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Ebrahim Variava, Neil Martinson
       
  • Development of vaccines against Zika virus
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Gregory A Poland, Richard B Kennedy, Inna G Ovsyannikova, Ricardo Palacios, Paulo Lee Ho, Jorge KalilSummaryZika virus is an emerging pathogen of substantial public health concern to human beings. Although most infections are asymptomatic or present with benign, self-limited symptoms, a small percentage of patients have complications, such as congenital anomalies in the developing fetus of pregnant women infected with the virus and neurological complications (eg, Guillain-Barré syndrome). To date, there is no vaccine, antiviral drug, or other modality available to prevent or treat Zika virus infection. In this Review, we examine vaccine development efforts for Zika virus to date and research gaps in the development of candidate vaccines against Zika virus. Top research priorities should include development of a better understanding of immunity to Zika virus to establish clear correlates of protection; determination of what effect, if any, Zika vaccine-induced immune responses will have on subsequent dengue virus infection; evaluation of vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy in healthy adults and in the various subpopulations affected by Zika virus infection (children, pregnant women, women of childbearing age, and eldery people); and identification of the molecular mechanisms that underlie birth defects and neurological sequelae related to Zika virus.
       
  • Resistant gonorrhoea: east meets west
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Peter A Rice, Xiao-Hong Su
       
  • Hib combination vaccines: efficient and effective
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Cheryl Cohen, Anne von Gottberg
       
  • Ebola virus vaccination and the longevity of total versus neutralising
           antibody response—is it enough'
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Zachary A Bornholdt, Steven B Bradfute
       
  • Soil-transmitted helminth treatment: multiple-drug regimens
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Simon J Brooker
       
  • How to be ready for the next influenza pandemic
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): The Lancet Infectious Diseases
       
  • The eyes have it: influenza virus infection beyond the respiratory tract
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Jessica A Belser, R Ryan Lash, Shikha Garg, Terrence M Tumpey, Taronna R MainesSummaryAvian and human influenza A viruses alike have shown a capacity to use the eye as a portal of entry and cause ocular disease in human beings. However, whereas influenza viruses generally represent a respiratory pathogen and only occasionally cause ocular complications, the H7 virus subtype stands alone in possessing an ocular tropism. Clarifying what confers such non-respiratory tropism to a respiratory virus will permit a greater ability to identify, treat, and prevent zoonotic human infection following ocular exposure to influenza viruses; especially those within the H7 subtype, which continue to cause avian epidemics on many continents.
       
  • Kerion celsi caused by Trichophyton tonsurans in a child
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Giuseppe Lapergola, Luciana Breda, Pierluigi Lelli Chiesa, Angelika Mohn, Cosimo Giannini
       
  • Tuberculosis: advances and challenges in development of new diagnostics
           and biomarkers
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 7Author(s): Gerhard Walzl, Ruth McNerney, Nelita du Plessis, Matthew Bates, Timothy D McHugh, Novel N Chegou, Alimuddin ZumlaSummaryTuberculosis remains the leading cause of death from an infectious disease worldwide. Early and accurate diagnosis and detection of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant tuberculosis is essential for achieving global tuberculosis control. Despite the introduction of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay as the first-line rapid tuberculosis diagnostic test, the gap between global estimates of incidence and new case notifications is 4·1 million people. More accurate, rapid, and cost-effective screening tests are needed to improve case detection. Diagnosis of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and tuberculosis in children, people living with HIV, and pregnant women remains particularly problematic. The diagnostic molecular technology landscape has continued to expand, including the development of tests for resistance to several antituberculosis drugs. Biomarkers are urgently needed to indicate progression from latent infection to clinical disease, to predict risk of reactivation after cure, and to provide accurate endpoints for drug and vaccine trials. Sophisticated bioinformatic computational tools and systems biology approaches are being applied to the discovery and validation of biomarkers, with substantial progress taking place. New data have been generated from the study of T-cell responses and T-cell function, serological studies, flow cytometric-based assays, and protein and gene expression studies. Alternative diagnostic strategies under investigation as potential screening and triaging tools include non-sputum-based detection with breath-based tests and automated digital radiography. We review developments and key achievements in the search for new tuberculosis diagnostics and biomarkers. We highlight gaps and challenges in evaluation and rollout of new diagnostics and biomarkers, and prioritise areas needing further investment, including impact assessment and cost–benefit studies.
       
  • Viral meningitis in the UK: time to speed up
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Matthijs C Brouwer, Diederik van de Beek
       
  • Diagnosis, treatment, and control of scabies: can we do better'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Daniel Engelman, Andrew C Steer
       
  • Preventing urinary tract infections in patients with neurogenic bladder
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Florian M E Wagenlehner, Adrian Pilatz
       
  • Corrections
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s):
       
  • Unanswered questions about the 1918 influenza pandemic: origin, pathology,
           and the virus itself
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): John S Oxford, Douglas GillSummaryThe influenza epidemic of 1918 represented the greatest failure of medical science in the 20th century. Fortunately, research throughout subsequent years has been making amends. Some studies have applied RT-PCR to the tissue samples from that time, whereas others have reconstructed the pathogen in its virulent state. But the resurrection of the 1918 influenza virus leaves questions unanswered: although more virulent than contemporary H1N1 epidemic viruses in animal models, this increased virulence of the 1918 influenza virus is not sufficient to have been the sole cause of the high mortality rates recorded in humans during the epidemic. Thus, other hypotheses have been investigated. The immune history of the different age groups exposed at the time to the pandemic virus could be a factor, and the notion of original antigenic sin provides an explanation for the unusual pattern of deaths. The presence, or absence, of a cytokine storm in the lungs of young adults might also be involved. The time and location that the 1918 influenza pandemic first emerged from its avian reservoir is contentious, with arguments for China, Europe, and the USA, at various dates. Novel vaccines were tested during 1918, which are the precursors of the universal influenza vaccines that might offer protection in a future pandemic.
       
  • Unexpected outbreaks of arbovirus infections: lessons learned from the
           Pacific and tropical America
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Didier Musso, Alfonso J Rodriguez-Morales, José Eduardo Levi, Van-Mai Cao-Lormeau, Duane J GublerSummaryPandemic arboviruses have emerged as a major global health problem in the past four decades. Predicting where and when the next arbovirus epidemic will occur is a challenge, but history suggests that arboviral black swan events (epidemics that are difficult to predict and that have an extreme effect) will continue to occur as urban growth and globalisation expand. We briefly review unexpected arbovirus epidemics that have occurred in the past 50 years, with emphasis on the American and Pacific regions, to illustrate their unpredictability, and to highlight the need for improved global preparedness, including laboratory-based surveillance, prevention, and control programmes.
       
  • Following the roadmap toward an effective Ebola virus treatment
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Trina Racine
       
  • Corrections
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s):
       
  • The respiratory syncytial virus vaccine landscape: lessons from the
           graveyard and promising candidates
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Natalie I Mazur, Deborah Higgins, Marta C Nunes, José A Melero, Annefleur C Langedijk, Nicole Horsley, Ursula J Buchholz, Peter J Openshaw, Jason S McLellan, Janet A Englund, Asuncion Mejias, Ruth A Karron, Eric AF Simões, Ivana Knezevic, Octavio Ramilo, Pedro A Piedra, Helen Y Chu, Ann R Falsey, Harish Nair, Leyla Kragten-TabatabaieSummaryThe global burden of disease caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is increasingly recognised, not only in infants, but also in older adults (aged ≥65 years). Advances in knowledge of the structural biology of the RSV surface fusion glycoprotein have revolutionised RSV vaccine development by providing a new target for preventive interventions. The RSV vaccine landscape has rapidly expanded to include 19 vaccine candidates and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in clinical trials, reflecting the urgency of reducing this global health problem and hence the prioritisation of RSV vaccine development. The candidates include mAbs and vaccines using four approaches: (1) particle-based, (2) live-attenuated or chimeric, (3) subunit, (4) vector-based. Late-phase RSV vaccine trial failures highlight gaps in knowledge regarding immunological protection and provide lessons for future development. In this Review, we highlight promising new approaches for RSV vaccine design and provide a comprehensive overview of RSV vaccine candidates and mAbs in clinical development to prevent one of the most common and severe infectious diseases in young children and older adults worldwide.
       
  • Experimental infection of human volunteers
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Meta Roestenberg, Marie-Astrid Hoogerwerf, Daniela M Ferreira, Benjamin Mordmüller, Maria YazdanbakhshSummaryControlled human infection (CHI) trials, in which healthy volunteers are experimentally infected, can accelerate the development of novel drugs and vaccines for infectious diseases of global importance. The use of CHI models is expanding from around 60 studies in the 1970s to more than 120 publications in this decade, primarily for influenza, rhinovirus, and malaria. CHI trials have provided landmark data for several registered drugs and vaccines, and have generated unprecedented scientific insights. Because of their invasive nature, CHI studies demand critical ethical review according to established frameworks. CHI-associated serious adverse events are rarely reported. Novel CHI models need standardised safety data from comparable CHI models to facilitate evidence-based risk assessments, as well as funds to produce challenge inoculum according to regulatory requirements. Advances such as the principle of controlled colonisation, the expansion of models to endemic areas, and the use of genetically attenuated strains will further broaden the scope of CHI trials.
       
  • DSM265: a novel drug for single-dose cure of Plasmodium
           falciparum
    malaria
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Sabine Bélard, Michael Ramharter
       
  • Corrections
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s):
       
  • Punishing Disease: HIV and the Criminalization of Sickness, Trevor Hoppe.
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Vijay Balakrishnan
       
  • Reappraising the cardiosafety of dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Pere Millat-Martínez, Quique Bassat
       
  • Bloodstream infection and occlusion of central venous catheters in
           children
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Claire M Rickard, Amanda J Ullman
       
  • Enhanced terminal room disinfection and the need for multimodal
           collaboration
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Matthew P Crotty, Marie H Wilson
       
  • Multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae: implications for
           future treatment strategies
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Derek R MacFadden, Marc Lipsitch, Scott W Olesen, Yonatan Grad
       
  • Corrections
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s):
       
  • What is missing in surveillance for control of antimicrobial
           resistance'
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Yanhong Jessika Hu, Benjamin J Cowling, Keiji Fukuda
       
  • Use of co-primary outcomes for trials of antimicrobial stewardship
           interventions
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): David Gillespie, Nick A Francis, Enitan D Carrol, Emma Thomas-Jones, Christopher C Butler, Kerenza Hood
       
  • Predicting outcome and improving treatment for Lassa fever
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Thomas W Geisbert
       
  • Population monitoring for drug-resistant tuberculosis: is genomics the
           answer'
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Grant A Hill-Cawthorne
       
  • Cholera control: one dose at a time
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Louise C Ivers
       
  • Eradicating polio with a vaccine we must stop using
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Nicholas C Grassly
       
  • Surgery for Buruli ulcer in the antibiotic era
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Paul D R Johnson
       
  • Measuring the effect of insecticide resistance: are we making
           progress'
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Emmanuel Chanda
       
  • Drugs that reduce transmission of falciparum malaria
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Ric N Price, Nicholas J White
       
  • Ivermectin: repurposing an old drug to complement malaria vector control
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): N Regina Rabinovich
       
  • Azithromycin to prevent deaths in children
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): The Lancet Infectious Diseases
       
  • Horn-like tumour on the dorsal hand
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Hideyuki Kosumi, Teruki Yanagi, Takuya Maeda, Tatsuro Sugai, Keisuke Imafuku, Hiroo Hata, Hiroshi Shimizu
       
  • Elimination of lymphatic filariasis in west African urban areas: is
           implementation of mass drug administration necessary'
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Benjamin G Koudou, Dziedzom K de Souza, Nana-Kwadwo Biritwum, Roland Bougma, Meite Aboulaye, Elizabeth Elhassan, Simon Bush, David H MolyneuxSummaryLymphatic filariasis in Africa is caused by the parasite Wuchereria bancrofti and remains a major cause of morbidity and disability in 74 countries globally. A key strategy of the Global Programme for the Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis, which has a target elimination date of 2020, is the treatment of entire endemic communities through mass drug administration of albendazole in combination with either ivermectin or diethylcarbamazine. Although the strategy of mass drug administration in combination with other interventions, such as vector control, has led to elimination of the infection and its transmission in many rural communities, urban areas in west Africa present specific challenges to achieving the 2020 targets. In this Personal View, we examine these challenges and the relevance of mass drug administration in urban areas, exploring the rationale for a reassessment of policy in these settings. The community-based mass treatment approach is best suited to rural areas, is challenging and costly in urban areas, and cannot easily achieve the 65% consistent coverage required for elimination of transmission. In our view, the implementation of mass drug administration might not be essential to interrupt transmission of lymphatic filariasis in urban areas in west Africa. Evidence shows that transmission levels are low and that effective mass drug distribution is difficult to implement, with assessments suggesting that specific control measures against filariasis in such dynamic settings is not an effective use of limited resources. Instead, we recommend that individuals who have clinical disease or who test positive for W bancrofti infection in surveillance activities should be offered antifilarial drugs through a passive surveillance approach, as well as morbidity management for their needs. We also recommend that more precise studies are done, so that mass drug administration in urban areas is considered if sustainable transmission is found to be ongoing. Otherwise, the limited resources should be directed towards other elements of the lymphatic filariasis programme.
       
  • Use of mathematical modelling to assess the impact of vaccines on
           antibiotic resistance
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Katherine E Atkins, Erin I Lafferty, Sarah R Deeny, Nicholas G Davies, Julie V Robotham, Mark JitSummaryAntibiotic resistance is a major global threat to the provision of safe and effective health care. To control antibiotic resistance, vaccines have been proposed as an essential intervention, complementing improvements in diagnostic testing, antibiotic stewardship, and drug pipelines. The decision to introduce or amend vaccination programmes is routinely based on mathematical modelling. However, few mathematical models address the impact of vaccination on antibiotic resistance. We reviewed the literature using PubMed to identify all studies that used an original mathematical model to quantify the impact of a vaccine on antibiotic resistance transmission within a human population. We reviewed the models from the resulting studies in the context of a new framework to elucidate the pathways through which vaccination might impact antibiotic resistance. We identified eight mathematical modelling studies; the state of the literature highlighted important gaps in our understanding. Notably, studies are limited in the range of pathways represented, their geographical scope, and the vaccine–pathogen combinations assessed. Furthermore, to translate model predictions into public health decision making, more work is needed to understand how model structure and parameterisation affects model predictions and how to embed these predictions within economic frameworks.
       
  • Schistosomiasis in the first 1000 days
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Joseph B Freer, Claire D Bourke, Gunn H Durhuus, Eyrun F Kjetland, Andrew J PrendergastSummaryInfections during the first 1000 days—the period from conception to a child's second birthday—can have lifelong effects on health, because this is a crucial phase of growth and development. There is increasing recognition of the burden and potential effects of schistosomiasis in women of reproductive age and young children. Exposure to schistosomes during pregnancy can modulate infant immune development and schistosomiasis can occur from early infancy, such that the high disease burden found in adolescents is often due to accumulation of infections with long-lived schistosomes from early life. Women of reproductive age and young children are largely neglected in mass drug administration programmes, but early treatment could avert subsequent disease. We evaluate the evidence that early schistosomiasis has adverse effects on birth, growth, and development. We also discuss the case for expanding public health interventions for schistosomiasis in women of reproductive age and preschool-age children, and the need for further research to evaluate the potential of treating women pre-conception to maximise health across the life course.
       
  • The Leishmaniases: Old Neglected Tropical Diseases, Fabrizio Bruschi,
           Luigi Gradoni. Springer (2018), 245, £135·00, ISBN: 978-3319723853
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Gláucia Cota
       
  • In the shadow of Venus. Vignettes from the venereal world, John Potterat,
           Nancy Spencer. Stephen MuthCreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
           (2017), 248, £11·56, ISBN: 978-1976200175
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2018Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 18, Issue 6Author(s): Charlotte Leigh
       
 
 
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