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Journal Cover The Lancet Infectious Diseases
  [SJR: 11.233]   [H-I: 161]   [139 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1473-3099
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3043 journals]
  • Infectious disease surveillance update
    • Authors: Ruth Zwizwai
      First page: 485
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Ruth Zwizwai


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30201-3
       
  • Research brief
    • Authors: Dara Mohammadi
      First page: 486
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Dara Mohammadi


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30199-8
       
  • Global epidemiology of non-influenza RNA respiratory viruses: data gaps
           and a growing need for surveillance
    • Authors: Julian W Tang; Tommy T Lam; Hassan Zaraket; W Ian Lipkin; Steven J Drews; Todd F Hatchette; Jean-Michel Heraud; Marion P Koopmans; Ashta Mary Abraham; Amal Baraket; Seweryn Bialasiewicz; Miguela A Caniza; Paul KS Chan; Cheryl Cohen; André Corriveau; Benjamin J Cowling; Steven J Drews; Marcela Echavarria; Ron Fouchier; Pieter LA Fraaij; Todd F Hachette; Jean-Michel Heraud; Hamid Jalal; Lance Jennings; Alice Kabanda; Herve A Kadjo; Mohammed Rafiq Khanani; Evelyn SC Koay; Marion P Koopmans; Mel Krajden; Tommy T Lam; Hong Kai Lee; W. Ian Lipkin; Julius Lutwama; David Marchant; Hidekazu Nishimura; Pagbajabyn Nymadawa; Benjamin A Pinsky; Sanjiv Rughooputh; Joseph Rukelibuga; Taslimarif Saiyed; Anita Shet; Theo Sloots; JJ Muyembe Tamfum; Julian W Tang; Stefano Tempia; Sarah Tozer; Florette Treurnicht; Matti Waris; Aripuana Watanabe; Emile Okitolonda Wemakoy
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Julian W Tang, Tommy T Lam, Hassan Zaraket, W Ian Lipkin, Steven J Drews, Todd F Hatchette, Jean-Michel Heraud, Marion P Koopmans
      Together with influenza, the non-influenza RNA respiratory viruses (NIRVs), which include respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza viruses, coronavirus, rhinovirus, and human metapneumovirus, represent a considerable global health burden, as recognised by WHO's Battle against Respiratory Viruses initiative. By contrast with influenza viruses, little is known about the contemporaneous global diversity of these viruses, and the relevance of such for development of pharmaceutical interventions. Although far less advanced than for influenza, antiviral drugs and vaccines are in different stages of development for several of these viruses, but no interventions have been licensed. This scarcity of global genetic data represents a substantial knowledge gap and impediment to the eventual licensing of new antiviral drugs and vaccines for NIRVs. Enhanced genetic surveillance will assist and boost research and development into new antiviral drugs and vaccines for these viruses. Additionally, understanding the global diversity of respiratory viruses is also part of emerging disease preparedness, because non-human coronaviruses and paramyxoviruses have been listed as priority concerns in a recent WHO research and development blueprint initiative for emerging infectious diseases. In this Personal View, we explain further the rationale for expanding the genetic database of NIRVs and emphasise the need for greater investment in this area of research.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30238-4
       
  • Latent tuberculosis infection: the final frontier of tuberculosis
           elimination in the USA
    • Authors: Philip A LoBue; Jonathan H Mermin
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Philip A LoBue, Jonathan H Mermin
      Since 1989, the USA has been pursuing the goal of tuberculosis elimination. After substantial progress during the past two decades, the rate of tuberculosis cases in the USA each year has now levelled off and remains well above the elimination threshold. Both epidemiological data and modelling underline the necessity of addressing latent tuberculosis infection if further progress is to be made in eliminating the disease. In this Personal View we explore next steps towards elimination. Given the estimated prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection, compared with the limited testing and treatment that currently occur, a major new effort is required. This effort should consist of a surveillance system or registry to monitor progress, scale-up of targeted testing for latent tuberculosis infection in at-risk populations, scale-up of short-course treatment regimens, engagement of affected communities and medical providers who serve those communities, and increased public health staffing for implementation and oversight. Such an effort would benefit greatly from the development of new tools, such as tests that better indicate reactivation risk, and even shorter latent tuberculosis infection treatment regimens than currently exist.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30248-7
       
  • Vaccine against Zika virus must remain a priority
    • Authors: The Lancet Infectious Diseases
      First page: 1003
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): The Lancet Infectious Diseases


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30534-0
       
  • Mycobacterium chimaera: unraveling a mystery through genomics
    • Authors: Jennifer L Gardy
      Pages: 1004 - 1005
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Jennifer L Gardy


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30356-0
       
  • Patterns of bacteraemia aetiology
    • Authors: Alan Cross; Myron M Levine
      Pages: 1005 - 1006
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Alan Cross, Myron M Levine


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30491-7
       
  • Latent tuberculosis infection in rural China: who will develop
           tuberculosis'
    • Authors: Jean-Pierre Zellweger
      Pages: 1007 - 1008
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Jean-Pierre Zellweger


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30441-3
       
  • New anti-HCV drug combinations: who will benefit'
    • Authors: Peter Ferenci
      Pages: 1008 - 1009
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Peter Ferenci


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30486-3
       
  • High population immunity reduces poliovirus community transmission
    • Authors: Julie Garon; Roland W Sutter; Walter Orenstein
      Pages: 1009 - 1011
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Julie Garon, Roland W Sutter, Walter Orenstein


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30417-6
       
  • Oral cholera vaccines: exploring the farrago of evidence
    • Authors: Suman Kanungo; Pranab Chatterjee
      Pages: 1012 - 1013
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Suman Kanungo, Pranab Chatterjee


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30420-6
       
  • What will it take to end human suffering from measles'
    • Authors: Kimberly M Thompson
      Pages: 1013 - 1014
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Kimberly M Thompson


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30451-6
       
  • Zika virus and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes: a tenuous link
    • Authors: Andrew F van den Hurk; Sonja Hall-Mendelin; Cassie C Jansen; Stephen Higgs
      Pages: 1014 - 1016
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Andrew F van den Hurk, Sonja Hall-Mendelin, Cassie C Jansen, Stephen Higgs


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30518-2
       
  • Hand, foot, and mouth disease in mainland China before it was listed as
           category C disease in May, 2008
    • Authors: Jie Li; Jinfeng Wang; Chengdong Xu; Qian Yin; Maogui Hu; Zhaojun Sun; Dewang Shao
      Pages: 1017 - 1018
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Jie Li, Jinfeng Wang, Chengdong Xu, Qian Yin, Maogui Hu, Zhaojun Sun, Dewang Shao


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30471-1
       
  • Evidence that Mycobacterium chimaera aerosols penetrate laminar airflow
           and result in infections at the surgical field
    • Authors: Jimmy T Walker; Theresa Lamagni; Meera Chand
      First page: 1019
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Jimmy T Walker, Theresa Lamagni, Meera Chand


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30519-4
       
  • Timing of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis
    • Authors: Yoshiaki Kanemoto; Tetsuya Tanimoto; Yuto Maeda; Tomohiro Kurokawa; Giichiro Tsurita
      Pages: 1019 - 1020
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Yoshiaki Kanemoto, Tetsuya Tanimoto, Yuto Maeda, Tomohiro Kurokawa, Giichiro Tsurita


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30520-0
       
  • Combination therapy for bloodstream infections with
           carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae
    • Authors: Bernd Salzberger; Gerd Fätkenheuer
      First page: 1020
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Bernd Salzberger, Gerd Fätkenheuer


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30521-2
       
  • Combination therapy for bloodstream infections with
           carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae – Authors' reply
    • Authors: Belén Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez; Robert A Bonomo; Yehuda Carmeli; David L Paterson; Alvaro Pascual; Jesús Rodríguez-Baño
      Pages: 1020 - 1021
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Belén Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Robert A Bonomo, Yehuda Carmeli, David L Paterson, Alvaro Pascual, Jesús Rodríguez-Baño


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30522-4
       
  • High mortality in non-Ebola virus disease cases: need to provide timely
           and effective care
    • Authors: Robert Colebunders; Shevin T Jacob; Kevin K Ariën; Anja De Weggheleire; Tom Decroo
      Pages: 1021 - 1022
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Robert Colebunders, Shevin T Jacob, Kevin K Ariën, Anja De Weggheleire, Tom Decroo


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30523-6
       
  • Spread of a single multidrug resistant malaria parasite lineage (PfPailin)
           to Vietnam
    • Authors: Mallika Imwong; Tran T Hien; Nguyen T Thuy-Nhien; Arjen M Dondorp; Nicholas J White
      Pages: 1022 - 1023
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Mallika Imwong, Tran T Hien, Nguyen T Thuy-Nhien, Arjen M Dondorp, Nicholas J White


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30524-8
       
  • WHO's recommendation for surgical skin antisepsis is premature
    • Authors: Matthias Maiwald; Andreas F Widmer
      Pages: 1023 - 1024
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Matthias Maiwald, Andreas F Widmer


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30448-6
       
  • WHO's recommendation for surgical skin antisepsis is premature –
           Authors' reply
    • Authors: Benedetta Allegranzi; Matthias Egger; Didier Pittet; Peter Bischoff; Peter Nthumba; Joseph Solomkin
      Pages: 1024 - 1025
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Benedetta Allegranzi, Matthias Egger, Didier Pittet, Peter Bischoff, Peter Nthumba, Joseph Solomkin


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30526-1
       
  • Counterfeit and substandard malaria drugs in Africa
    • Authors: Vicki Brower
      Pages: 1026 - 1027
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Vicki Brower


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30528-5
       
  • Illnesses of isolation: detention of asylum seekers
    • Authors: Georgina Kenyon
      Pages: 1028 - 1029
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Georgina Kenyon


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30529-7
       
  • Simon Hay: mapping the world's ills
    • Authors: Tony Kirby
      First page: 1031
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Tony Kirby


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30532-7
       
  • Unseen enemy
    • Authors: Talha Burki
      First page: 1032
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Talha Burki


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30533-9
       
  • Measles immunity gaps and the progress towards elimination: a
           multi-country modelling analysis
    • Authors: Filippo Trentini; Piero Poletti; Stefano Merler; Alessia Melegaro
      Pages: 1089 - 1097
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Filippo Trentini, Piero Poletti, Stefano Merler, Alessia Melegaro
      Background The persistent circulation of measles in both low-income and high-income countries requires a better characterisation of present epidemiological trends and existing immunity gaps across different sociodemographic settings. Serological surveys, which provide direct measures of population protection against the infection, are underexploited and often supply fragmentary estimates of population immunity. This study aims to investigate how measles immunity has changed over time across different socioeconomic settings, as a result of demographic changes and past immunisation policies. Methods For this multi-country modelling analysis, we developed a transmission model to simulate measles circulation during the past 65 years in nine countries with distinct demographic and vaccination histories. The model was calibrated on historical serological data and used to estimate the reduction of disease burden as a result of vaccination and present age-specific residual susceptibility. Findings Our model shows that estimated residual susceptibility to measles ranges from 3% in the UK to more than 10% in Kenya and Ethiopia. In high-income countries, such as Italy, Singapore, and South Korea, where routine first-dose administration produced more than 90% of immunised individuals, only about 20% of susceptible individuals are younger than 5 years. We also observed that the reduction in fertility that has occurred during the past decades in high-income countries has contributed to almost half of the reduction in measles incidence. In low-income countries, where fertility is high, the population is younger and routine vaccination has been suboptimum. Susceptible individuals are concentrated in early childhood, with about 60% of susceptible individuals in Ethiopia younger than 10 years. In these countries, Supplementary Immunization Activities (SIAs) were responsible for more than 25% of immunised individuals (up to 45% in Ethiopia), mitigating the consequences of suboptimum routine vaccination coverage. Interpretation Future vaccination strategies in high-fertility countries should focus on increasing childhood immunisation rates, either by raising first-dose coverage or by making erratic SIAs more frequent and regular. Immunisation campaigns targeting adolescents and adults are required in low-fertility countries, where the susceptibility in these age groups will otherwise sustain measles circulation. Funding European Research Council.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30421-8
       
  • Mycobacterium abscessus glossitis
    • Authors: Jae-Hoon Ko; Cheol-In Kang; Sun Young Cho; Young Eun Ha; Nam Yong Lee; Seok Jin Kim; Doo Ryeon Chung; Kyong Ran Peck; Jae-Hoon Song
      First page: 1098
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Jae-Hoon Ko, Cheol-In Kang, Sun Young Cho, Young Eun Ha, Nam Yong Lee, Seok Jin Kim, Doo Ryeon Chung, Kyong Ran Peck, Jae-Hoon Song


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30525-x
       
  • Corrections
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases


      PubDate: 2017-10-11T21:07:44Z
       
  • Antimicrobial resistance among children in sub-Saharan Africa
    • Authors: Phoebe Williams; David Isaacs James Berkley
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases
      Author(s): Phoebe C M Williams, David Isaacs, James A Berkley
      Antimicrobial resistance is an important threat to international health. Therapeutic guidelines for empirical treatment of common life-threatening infections depend on available information regarding microbial aetiology and antimicrobial susceptibility, but sub-Saharan Africa lacks diagnostic capacity and antimicrobial resistance surveillance. We systematically reviewed studies of antimicrobial resistance among children in sub-Saharan Africa since 2005. 18 of 1075 articles reviewed met inclusion criteria, providing data from 67 451 invasive bacterial isolates from inconsistently defined populations in predominantly urban tertiary settings. Among neonates, Gram-negative organisms were the predominant cause of early-onset neonatal sepsis, with a high prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing organisms. Gram-positive bacteria were responsible for a high proportion of infections among children beyond the neon atal period, with high reported prevalence of non-susceptibility to treatment advocated by the WHO therapeutic guidelines. There are few up-to-date or representative studies given the magnitude of the problem of antimicrobial resistance, especially regarding community-acquired infections. Research should focus on differentiating resistance in community-acquired versus hospital-acquired infections, implementation of standardised reporting systems, and pragmatic clinical trials to assess the efficacy of alternative treatment regimens.

      PubDate: 2017-10-11T21:07:44Z
       
  • An effective and safe vaccine will not be enough to prepare us for the
           next Ebola outbreak
    • Authors: John Schieffelin
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases
      Author(s): John S Schieffelin


      PubDate: 2017-10-11T21:07:44Z
       
  • Changes in the prevalence of human papillomavirus following a national
           bivalent human papillomavirus vaccination programme in Scotland: a 7-year
           cross-sectional study
    • Authors: Kimberley Kavanagh; Kevin G Pollock; Kate Cuschieri; Tim Palmer; Ross L Cameron; Cameron Watt; Ramya Bhatia; Catherine Moore; Heather Cubie; Margaret Cruickshank; Chris Robertson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 September 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases
      Author(s): Kimberley Kavanagh, Kevin G Pollock, Kate Cuschieri, Tim Palmer, Ross L Cameron, Cameron Watt, Ramya Bhatia, Catherine Moore, Heather Cubie, Margaret Cruickshank, Chris Robertson
      Background On Sept 1, 2008, Scotland launched routine vaccination for human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18, targeted at 12–13-year-old girls, of whom 92·4% were fully vaccinated in 2008–09. In this study, we report on vaccine effectiveness of the bivalent vaccine in these vaccinated women who attended for routine cervical screening at age 20–21 years. Methods In this 7-year cross-sectional study (covering birth cohorts 1988–1995), we sampled approximately 1000 samples per year from those attending cervical screening at age 20–21 years and tested each for HPV. By linkage to vaccination records we ascertained prevalence by birth cohort and vaccination status. Estimates of vaccine effectiveness for HPV types 16 and 18, HPV types 31, 33, and 45, other high-risk types, and any HPV were calculated using logistic regression. Findings In total, 8584 samples were HPV genotyped. Prevalence of HPV types 16 and 18 reduced substantially from 30·0% (95% CI 26·9–33·1) in the 1988 cohort to 4·5% (3·5–5·7) in the 1995 cohort, giving a vaccine effectiveness of 89·1% (85·1–92·3) for those vaccinated at age 12–13 years. All cross-protective types showed significant vaccine effectiveness (HPV type 31, 93·8% [95% CI 83·8–98·5]; HPV type 33, 79·1% [64·2–89·0]; HPV type 45, 82·6% [61·5–93·9]). Unvaccinated individuals born in 1995 had a reduced odds of HPV types 16 and 18 infection compared with those born in 1988 (adjusted odds ratio 0·13 [95% CI 0·06–0·28]) and reduced odds of HPV types 31, 33, and 45 (odds ratio 0·45 [0·23–0·89]). Interpretation Bivalent vaccination has led to a startling reduction in vaccine and cross-protective HPV types 7 years after vaccination. There is also evidence of herd protection against the vaccine-specific and cross-protective types in unvaccinated individuals born in 1995. These findings should be considered in cost-effectiveness models informing vaccine choice and models to shape the future of cervical screening programmes. Funding Scottish Government and Chief Scientists Office.

      PubDate: 2017-10-03T20:34:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30468-1
       
  • Confirming cross-protection of bivalent HPV vaccine
    • Authors: Julia M L Brotherton
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 September 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases
      Author(s): Julia M L Brotherton


      PubDate: 2017-10-03T20:34:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30539-x
       
  • A case for retraction'
    • Authors: Lucy Bailey
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 17, Issue 10
      Author(s): Lucy Bailey


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
       
  • Finding the right combination antiviral therapy for influenza
    • Authors: Michael G Ison
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 September 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases
      Author(s): Michael G Ison


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30537-6
       
  • Scratching the itch: is scabies a truly neglected disease'
    • Authors: Olivier Chosidow; L Claire Fuller
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 September 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases
      Author(s): Olivier Chosidow, L Claire Fuller


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30469-3
       
  • Xpert MTB/RIF Ultra: a gamechanger for tuberculous meningitis'
    • Authors: Margaret Khonga; Mark Patrick Nicol
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 September 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases
      Author(s): Margaret Khonga, Mark Patrick Nicol


      PubDate: 2017-09-15T08:05:21Z
       
  • Corrections
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 September 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases


      PubDate: 2017-09-15T08:05:21Z
       
  • Treating malaria: new drugs for a new era
    • Authors: G Dennis Shanks; Jörg J Möhrle
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 September 2017
      Source:The Lancet Infectious Diseases
      Author(s): G Dennis Shanks, Jörg J Möhrle


      PubDate: 2017-09-15T08:05:21Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1473-3099(17)30475-9
       
 
 
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