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Journal Cover British Journal of Psychiatry
  [SJR: 2.674]   [H-I: 178]   [183 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0007-1250 - ISSN (Online) 1472-1465
   Published by Royal College of Psychiatrists Homepage  [3 journals]
  • Highlights of this issue [Highlights of this issue]
    • Authors: Dean K.
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.211.6.A23
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Outcome and recovery in first-episode psychosis [EDITORIALS]
    • Authors: Power P.
      Pages: 331 - 333
      Abstract: There is now a good body of evidence about factors that determine outcome and recovery in a first episode of psychosis. However, so far, this is of limited benefit when making predictions at an individual level. Treatment protocols are one size fits all and the recommended duration of medication remains unclear. What is needed is a more sophisticated approach to predicting outcomes and tailoring treatment options to the individual. Removing predisposing factors is an important aspect of this.
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.117.205492
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Idles: 'Stendhal Syndrome - psychiatry in music [Extras]
    • Authors: Woods G.
      Pages: 333 - 333
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.117.200006
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Network meta-analysis: drawing conclusions regarding trials of
           psychosocial interventions for bipolar disorder [EDITORIALS]
    • Authors: Miklowitz, D. J; Cipriani, A, Goodwin, G. M.
      Pages: 334 - 336
      Abstract: Network meta-analysis (NMA) is a statistical technique for making direct and indirect comparisons between different treatment and control groups. Despite its many advantages, NMA may be misleading when evaluating networks that are disconnected, inconsistent or of low reliability and validity. We review how well the analysis of trials of adjunctive psychosocial treatment in bipolar disorder is served by NMA. We conclude with recommendations for future treatment trials in bipolar disorder and guidelines for NMAs.
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.117.202739
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Prison mental health in-reach teams in England: the care programme
           approach and sexual abuse/violence [EDITORIALS]
    • Authors: Brooker, C. G. D; Forrester, A.
      Pages: 337 - 338
      Abstract: Prison mental health in-reach teams have doubled in size over the past decade and case-loads have reduced. Since 2010 it has been mandatory for keyworkers to ask whether prisoners with serious mental illness being treated under the care programme approach have experienced sexual or physical abuse. This is known as routine enquiry and should take place for these prisoners but NHS England, the commissioners, do not audit this activity. It is time to review current interventions and their associated outcomes.
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.117.200428
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Cholesterol and triglyceride levels in first-episode psychosis: systematic
           review and meta-analysis [Review articles]
    • Authors: Pillinger, T; Beck, K, Stubbs, B, Howes, O. D.
      Pages: 339 - 349
      Abstract: BackgroundThe extent of metabolic and lipid changes in first-episode psychosis (FEP) is unclear.AimsTo investigate whether individuals with FEP and no or minimal antipsychotic exposure show lipid and adipocytokine abnormalities compared with healthy controls.MethodWe conducted a meta-analysis of studies examining lipid and adipocytokine parameters in individuals with FEP and no or minimal antipsychotic exposure v. a healthy control group. Studies reported fasting total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides and leptin levels.ResultsOf 2070 citations retrieved, 20 case-control studies met inclusion criteria including 1167 patients and 1184 controls. Total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels were significantly decreased in patients v. controls, corresponding to an absolute reduction of 0.26 mmol/L and 0.15 mmol/L respectively. Triglyceride levels were significantly increased in the patient group, corresponding to an absolute increase of 0.08 mmol/L. However, HDL cholesterol and leptin levels were not altered in patients v. controls.ConclusionsTotal and LDL cholesterol levels are reduced in FEP, indicating that hypercholesterolaemia in patients with chronic disorder is secondary and potentially modifiable. In contrast, triglycerides are elevated in FEP. Hypertriglyceridaemia is a feature of type 2 diabetes mellitus, therefore this finding adds to the evidence for glucose dysregulation in this cohort. These findings support early intervention targeting nutrition, physical activity and appropriate antipsychotic prescription.
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.117.200907
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • T2 Trainspotting: addiction in a digital age - psychiatry in the movies
           [Extras]
    • Authors: Byrne P.
      Pages: 349 - 349
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.117.199455
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Remission and recovery from first-episode psychosis in adults: systematic
           review and meta-analysis of long-term outcome studies [Review articles]
    • Authors: Lally, J; Ajnakina, O, Stubbs, B, Cullinane, M, Murphy, K. C, Gaughran, F, Murray, R. M.
      Pages: 350 - 358
      Abstract: BackgroundRemission and recovery rates for people with first-episode psychosis (FEP) remain uncertain.AimsTo assess pooled prevalence rates of remission and recovery in FEP and to investigate potential moderators.MethodWe conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess pooled prevalence rates of remission and recovery in FEP in longitudinal studies with more than 1 year of follow-up data, and conducted meta-regression analyses to investigate potential moderators.ResultsSeventy-nine studies were included representing 19072 patients with FEP. The pooled rate of remission among 12301 individuals with FEP was 58% (60 studies, mean follow-up 5.5 years). Higher remission rates were moderated by studies from more recent years. The pooled prevalence of recovery among 9642 individuals with FEP was 38% (35 studies, mean follow-up 7.2 years). Recovery rates were higher in North America than in other regions.ConclusionsRemission and recovery rates in FEP may be more favourable than previously thought. We observed stability of recovery rates after the first 2 years, suggesting that a progressive deteriorating course of illness is not typical. Although remission rates have improved over time recovery rates have not, raising questions about the effectiveness of services in achieving improved recovery.
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.117.201475
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • High intelligence and the risk of ADHD and other psychopathology [PAPERS]
    • Authors: Rommelse, N; Antshel, K, Smeets, S, Greven, C, Hoogeveen, L, Faraone, S. V, Hartman, C. A.
      Pages: 359 - 364
      Abstract: BackgroundHigh intelligence may be associated with positive (adaptive, desired) outcomes, but may also come with disadvantages.AimsTo contribute empirically to the debate concerning whether a trade-off in IQ scores exists in relation to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and related problems, suggesting that high intelligence – like low intelligence – increases the risk of ADHD.MethodCurves of the relation between IQ score and ADHD problems were fitted to questionnaire data (parent, teacher, self-report} in a population-based study of 2221 children and adolescents aged 10–12 years. Externalising and internalising problems were included for comparison purposes.ResultsHigher IQ score was most strongly related to fewer attention problems, with more rater discrepancy in the high v. average IQ range. Attention problems – but only minimally hyperactivity/impulsivity problems – predicted functional impairment at school, also in the higher IQ range.ConclusionsAttention problems in highly intelligent children are exceptional and affect school performance; they are therefore a reason for clinical concern.
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.116.184382
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Sensitive periods for the effect of childhood interpersonal violence on
           psychiatric disorder onset among adolescents [PAPERS]
    • Authors: Dunn, E. C; Wang, Y, Tse, J, McLaughlin, K. A, Fitzmaurice, G, Gilman, S. E, Susser, E. S.
      Pages: 365 - 372
      Abstract: BackgroundAlthough childhood adversity is a strong determinant of psychopathology, it remains unclear whether there are ‘sensitive periods’ when a first episode of adversity is most harmful.AimsTo examine whether variation in the developmental timing of a first episode of interpersonal violence (up to age 18) associates with risk for psychopathology.MethodUsing cross-sectional data, we examined the association between age at first exposure to four types of interpersonal violence (physical abuse by parents, physical abuse by others, rape, and sexual assault/molestation) and onset of four classes of DSM-IV disorders (distress, fear, behaviour, substance use) (n = 9984). Age at exposure was defined as: early childhood (ages 0–5), middle childhood (ages 6–10) and adolescence (ages 11–18).ResultsExposure to interpersonal violence at any age period about doubled the risk of a psychiatric disorder (odds ratios (ORs) = 1.51–2.52). However, few differences in risk were observed based on the timing of first exposure. After conducting 20 tests of association, only three significant differences in risk were observed based on the timing of exposure; these results suggested an elevated risk of behaviour disorder among youth first exposed to any type of interpersonal violence during adolescence (OR = 2.37, 95% CI 1.69–3.34), especially being beaten by another person (OR = 2.44; 95% CI 1.57–3.79), and an elevated risk of substance use disorder among youth beaten by someone during adolescence (OR = 2.77, 95% CI 1.94–3.96).ConclusionsChildren exposed to interpersonal violence had an elevated risk of psychiatric disorder. However, age at first episode of exposure was largely unassociated with psychopathology risk.
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.117.208397
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Trauma and psychotic experiences: transnational data from the World Mental
           Health Survey [PAPERS]
    • Authors: McGrath, J. J; Saha, S, Lim, C. C. W, Aguilar-Gaxiola, S, Alonso, J, Andrade, L. H, Bromet, E. J, Bruffaerts, R, Caldas de Almeida, J. M, Cardoso, G, de Girolamo, G, Fayyad, J, Florescu, S, Gureje, O, Haro, J. M, Kawakami, N, Koenen, K. C, Kovess-Masfety, V, Lee, S, Lepine, J.-P, McLaughlin, K. A, Medina-Mora, M. E, Navarro-Mateu, F, Ojagbemi, A, Posada-Villa, J, Sampson, N, Scott, K. M, Tachimori, H, ten Have, M, Kendler, K. S, Kessler, R. C, on behalf of the WHO World Mental Health Survey Collaborators
      Pages: 373 - 380
      Abstract: BackgroundTraumatic events are associated with increased risk of psychotic experiences, but it is unclear whether this association is explained by mental disorders prior to psychotic experience onset.AimsTo investigate the associations between traumatic events and subsequent psychotic experience onset after adjusting for post-traumatic stress disorder and other mental disorders.MethodWe assessed 29 traumatic event types and psychotic experiences from the World Mental Health surveys and examined the associations of traumatic events with subsequent psychotic experience onset with and without adjustments for mental disorders.ResultsRespondents with any traumatic events had three times the odds of other respondents of subsequently developing psychotic experiences (OR = 3.1, 95% CI 2.7–3.7), with variability in strength of association across traumatic event types. These associations persisted after adjustment for mental disorders.ConclusionsExposure to traumatic events predicts subsequent onset of psychotic experiences even after adjusting for comorbid mental disorders.
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.117.205955
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Kathleen Jones' Asylums and After. A Revised History of the Mental Health
           Services: From the Early 18th Century to the 1990s (1993) - reflection
           [Extras]
    • Authors: Ikkos G.
      Pages: 380 - 380
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.117.201293
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Associations between residual depressive symptoms, cognition, and
           functioning in patients with euthymic bipolar disorder: results from the
           FACE-BD cohort [PAPERS]
    • Authors: Roux, P; Raust, A, Cannavo, A.-S, Aubin, V, Aouizerate, B, Azorin, J.-M, Bellivier, F, Belzeaux, R, Bougerol, T, Cussac, I, Courtet, P, Etain, B, Gard, S, Job, S, Kahn, J.-P, Leboyer, M, Olie, E, the FondaMental Advanced Centers of Expertise in Bipolar Disorders (FACE-BD) Collaborators, Henry, C, Passerieux, C.
      Pages: 381 - 387
      Abstract: BackgroundThe relationship between residual depressive symptoms, cognition and functioning in patients with euthymic bipolar disorder is a subject of debate.AimsTo assess whether cognition mediates the association between residual depressive symptoms and functioning in patients with bipolar disorder who were euthymic.MethodWe included 241 adults with euthymic bipolar disorder in a multicentre cross-sectional study. We used a battery of tests to assess six cognition domains. A path analysis was then used to perform a mediation analysis of the relationship between residual depressive symptoms, cognitive components and functioning.ResultsOnly verbal and working memory were significantly associated with better functioning. Residual depressive symptoms were associated with poorer functioning. No significant relationship was found between residual depressive symptoms and any cognitive component.ConclusionsCognition and residual depressive symptoms appear to be two independent sources of variation in the functioning of people with euthymic bipolar disorder.
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.117.201335
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Impact of co-located welfare advice in healthcare settings: prospective
           quasi-experimental controlled study [PAPERS]
    • Authors: Woodhead, C; Khondoker, M, Lomas, R, Raine, R.
      Pages: 388 - 395
      Abstract: BackgroundEvaluations of primary healthcare co-located welfare advice services have been methodologically limited.AimsTo examine the impact and cost-consequences of co-located benefits and debt advice on mental health and service use.MethodProspective, controlled quasi-experimental study in eight intervention and nine comparator sites across North Thames. Changes in the proportion meeting criteria for common mental disorder (CMD, 12-item General Health Questionnaire); well-being scores (Shortened Warwick and Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale), 3-month GP consultation rate and financial strain were measured alongside funding costs and financial gains.ResultsRelative to controls, CMD reduced among women (ratio of odds ratios (rOR) = 0.37, 95% CI 0.20–0.70) and Black advice recipients (rOR = 0.09, 95% CI 0.03–0.28). Individuals whose advice resulted in positive outcomes demonstrated improved well-being scores (β coefficient 1.29, 95% CI 0.25–2.32). Reductions in financial strain (rOR = 0.42, 95% CI 0.23–0.77) but no changes in 3-month consultation rate were found. Per capita, advice recipients received £15 per £1 of funder investment.ConclusionsCo-located welfare advice improves short-term mental health and well-being, reduces financial strain and generates considerable financial returns.
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.117.202713
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Punk rock made me a psycho-therapissed - psychiatry in music [Extras]
    • Authors: Meagher D.
      Pages: 395 - 395
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.117.203166
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • The evidence for lithium in suicide prevention [Correspondence]
    • Pages: 396 - 396
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.211.6.396
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Authors' reply [Correspondence]
    • Pages: 396 - 397
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.211.6.396a
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Where is the argument for the conceptual slippery slope'
           [Correspondence]
    • Pages: 397 - 397
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.211.6.397
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Author's reply [Correspondence]
    • Pages: 397 - 397
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.211.6.397a
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Authors' reply [Correspondence]
    • Pages: 397 - 398
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.211.6.397b
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • The Pool judgment has not changed the law of expert evidence
           [Correspondence]
    • Pages: 398 - 398
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.211.6.398
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Authors' reply [Correspondence]
    • Pages: 398 - 398
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.211.6.398a
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Conflating sexual orientation and gender identity [Correspondence]
    • Pages: 398 - 399
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.211.6.398b
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Authors' reply [Correspondence]
    • Pages: 399 - 399
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.211.6.399
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Authors' reply [Correspondence]
    • Pages: 399 - 400
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.211.6.399a
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • The medical profession and stigma against people who use drugs
           [Correspondence]
    • Pages: 400 - 400
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.211.6.400
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Authors' reply [Correspondence]
    • Pages: 400 - 401
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.211.6.400a
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Corrections [Corrections]
    • Pages: 401 - 401
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.211.6.401
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • The Pill That Steals Lives [Book reviews]
    • Pages: 402 - 402
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.116.191023
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • The Outrun [Book reviews]
    • Pages: 402 - 402
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.116.189480
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • Kaleidoscope [Kaleidoscope]
    • Authors: Tracy, D. K; Joyce, D. W, Shergill, S. S.
      Pages: 404 - 405
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.211.6.404
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
  • The Psychiatry Ashes: I can't believe it's not cricket! [From the Editor's
           desk]
    • Authors: Bhui, K; Malhi, G. S.
      Pages: 406 - 406
      PubDate: 2017-12-01T00:05:21-08:00
      DOI: 10.1192/bjp.211.6.406
      Issue No: Vol. 211, No. 6 (2017)
       
 
 
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