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JAMA Internal Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 8.032
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 269  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2168-6106 - ISSN (Online) 2168-6114
Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [14 journals]
  • July 2018 Issue Highlights
    • Pages: 881 - 883
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.5219
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • JAMA Internal Medicine
    • Pages: 884 - 884
      Abstract: Mission Statement: To promote the art and science of medicine and the betterment of human health by publishing manuscripts of interest and relevance to internists practicing as generalists or as medical subspecialists.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.5220
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • The Shortage of Normal Saline in the Wake of Hurricane Maria
    • Authors: Sacks CA; Kesselheim AS, Fralick M.
      Pages: 885 - 886
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the US shortage of normal saline after Hurricane Maria crippled pharmaceutical manufacturing in Puerto Rico and how to prevent similar shortages in the future.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.1936
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • How Better Communication Skills May Lessen the Need for Physician-Assisted
           Death
    • Authors: Brokaw J.
      Pages: 887 - 888
      Abstract: This article explores the experience of a physician advocate in communicating about end-of-life care and physician-assisted suicide with a patient with stage 4 lung cancer.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2118
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Implications of the New USPSTF Prostate Cancer Screening Guideline
    • Authors: Hoffman RM.
      Pages: 889 - 891
      Abstract: In abandoning its 2012 objection to prostate-specific antigen (PSA)–based screening for prostate cancer (D recommendation), the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) now supports individualized decision making for men aged 55 to 69 years (C recommendation). The new Task Force recommendation, supported by an evidence report and systematic review, now aligns the USPSTF with the American Cancer Society and the American Urological Association. The USPSTF recommendations, which have consistently been evidence based, appear to have a large influence on practice patterns. Following the 2008 recommendation against screening men older than 75 years, prostate cancer screening and cancer incidence rates markedly declined for older men. In the year following the 2011 release of a draft recommendation against any screening (D recommendation; final version published in May 2012), the number of men diagnosed with prostate cancer decreased by over 33 000. Prostate cancer screening rates also subsequently decreased among all age groups by 2013. The new C recommendation may well be associated with a resurgence in prostate cancer screening and increased numbers of prostate cancer cases diagnosed, especially if the new guidelines are misunderstood to be endorsing screening rather than offering a more nuanced message about decision making.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.1982
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • New Prevention Guidelines for Falls and Fractures
    • Authors: Reuben DB.
      Pages: 892 - 893
      Abstract: In this week’s issue of JAMA are the updated US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations on vitamin D, calcium, or combined supplementation for the primary prevention of fractures in community-dwelling adults and for falls prevention in community-dwelling adults, as well as accompanying evidence reports. Overall, the summary recommendations have not changed much compared with previous recommendations released in 2013 and 2012. The major change is the downgrade of the vitamin D supplementation recommendation for preventing falls from being a B grade (recommended based on high certainty of moderate benefit or on moderate certainty of moderate to substantial benefit) to a D grade (recommended against based on moderate or high certainty of no benefit or that harms outweigh the benefit). For falls prevention, exercise remains a B grade recommendation, and multifactorial interventions remains a C grade (selectively offer) recommendation. Both falls prevention recommendations are consistent with a 2017 meta-analysis of falls prevention interventions. Recommendations for fracture prevention have not changed, including insufficient evidence to make recommendations on calcium and vitamin D to prevent fractures in men and premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Although it is unclear whether supplementation with more than 400 IU of vitamin D and more than 1000 mg of calcium in postmenopausal women is beneficial for preventing fractures, the USPSTF recommends against (D grade) supplementing postmenopausal women with doses of 400 IU or less of vitamin D and 1000 mg or less of calcium. Of note, the USPSTF supplementation recommendations do not apply to those with previous osteoporotic fracture, with osteoporosis, or who are at risk of falls.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.1809
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • State Alcohol Policies and Alcohol-Related Motor Vehicle Crash Fatalities
           Among US Adults
    • Authors: Naimi TS; Xuan Z, Sarda V, et al.
      Pages: 894 - 901
      Abstract: This repeated cross-sectional study examines the association between the restrictiveness of state alcohol policies with the likelihood of alcohol involvement among adults dying in motor vehicle crashes in the United States.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.1406
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Effective Alcohol Policies—Saving Lives on US Roadways
    • Authors: Rosekind MR.
      Pages: 901 - 902
      Abstract: Every day, almost 100 people die on US roadways going to work, school, health care appointments, and social and athletic events. In 2016, there were 37 461 lives lost on US roadways, with alcohol-impaired driving fatalities accounting for 10 497 (28.0%) of those lost lives. These 2016 alcohol-impaired driving fatalities represent a 1.7% increase from 2015.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.1399
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Association of Metformin Use With Risk of Lactic Acidosis Across the Range
           of Kidney Function
    • Authors: Lazarus B; Wu A, Shin J, et al.
      Pages: 903 - 910
      Abstract: This large cohort study quantifies the association between metformin use and hospitalization with acidosis across the range of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), accounting for change in eGFR stage over time.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.0292
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Metformin for Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease
    • Authors: Good CB; Pogach LM.
      Pages: 911 - 912
      Abstract: There are now 11 drug classes in addition to multiple insulin options from which to choose to treat patients presenting with new-onset type 2 diabetes (T2DM). In an era of individualizing glycemic target ranges using shared decision making, patients must choose among medication options based on their understanding of their own potential benefits and harms, costs, and impact of adverse effects on their quality of life.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.0301
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Aldosterone Antagonist Therapy and Mortality in Patients With STEMI
           Without Heart Failure
    • Authors: Dahal K; Hendrani A, Sharma SP, et al.
      Pages: 913 - 920
      Abstract: This systematic review and meta-analysis of 10 randomized clinical trials explores the role of treatment with aldosterone antagonists in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) without heart failure or left ventricular ejection fraction greater than 40%.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.0850
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists in ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial
           Infarction
    • Authors: Pitt B; Zannad F.
      Pages: 920 - 921
      Abstract: Therapy for patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) has been the focus of considerable investigation over the past decade. Our improved understanding of the adequacy, timing, consequences, and extent of early reperfusion and the development of new anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs have resulted in improved clinical outcomes. Although the incidence of STEMI has decreased relative to the incidence of myocardial infarction without ST-segment elevation, it continues to be associated with substantial morbidity and mortality.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.1940
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Prognostic Estimates and Burdensome Interventions in Nursing Home
           Residents With Dementia
    • Authors: Loizeau AJ; Shaffer ML, Habtemariam DA, et al.
      Pages: 922 - 929
      Abstract: This analysis of 2 cohort studies examines the accuracy of proxies’ prognostic estimates for nursing home residents with advanced dementia and the association of their estimates with use of burdensome interventions.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.1413
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Effect of Communication-Priming Intervention on Patient-Clinician
           Goals-of-Care Discussions
    • Authors: Curtis J; Downey L, Back AL, et al.
      Pages: 930 - 940
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial evaluates the effect of a communication-priming intervention designed to increase patient-reported goals-of-care discussions between patients with serious illness and clinicians vs usual care.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2317
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Precision Communication—A Path Forward to Improve Goals-of-Care
           Communication
    • Authors: Paladino J; Bernacki R.
      Pages: 940 - 942
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2307
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Reservoir, Central Park, New York City
    • Pages: 942 - 942
      Abstract: Courtesy of: Manfred Hauben, MD, MPH, Pfizer Inc, Worlwide Safety Strategy, 235 E 42nd St, New York, NY 10017
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2432
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • P2Y 12 Inhibitor Use Among Antiplatelet-Naive Patients After Percutaneous
           Coronary Intervention
    • Authors: Dayoub EJ; Seigerman M, Tuteja S, et al.
      Pages: 943 - 950
      Abstract: This population-based cohort study examines claims data in a large US insurer to assess changes in prescribing and adherence to platelet adenosine diphosphate P2Y12 receptor inhibitors by patients after percutaneous coronary intervention and after introduction of newer, more expensive agents.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.0783
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • A Call for a Systems-Thinking Approach to Medication Adherence
    • Authors: Lauffenburger JC; Choudhry NK.
      Pages: 950 - 951
      Abstract: The writing of a prescription has long been one of the most expected steps to occur at the end of a physician-patient encounter. The subsequent events are assumed to follow a natural order: patients fill their prescriptions at a pharmacy and then continue to use their medications as prescribed. Unfortunately, these assumptions often do not hold. The challenges of consistent medication use, often called secondary adherence or persistence, have been well characterized by decades of research estimating that, on average, fewer than half of patients use their medications as prescribed over the long-term and many stop using their medications within months of beginning. Much less well appreciated has been primary nonadherence, where patients do not fill the initial prescriptions they are given.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.0790
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Effect of Increased Supervision on Medical Errors, Patient Safety, and
           Resident Education
    • Authors: Finn KM; Metlay JP, Chang Y, et al.
      Pages: 952 - 959
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial investigates the effect of increased attending physician supervision on an inpatient resident general medical service on patient safety and educational outcomes.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.1244
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Optimizing the Balance Between Supervision and Autonomy in Training
    • Authors: Happel J; Ritter JB, Neubauer BE.
      Pages: 959 - 960
      Abstract: Graduate medical education continues to evolve. The current epoch has focused heavily on maturation of our systems of assessment, redefining our role in health care teams, and increased efforts to improve quality of care, as well as patient and trainee safety. It is imperative that we remain mindful of the social contract between society and the medical profession, and by extension, the contract between patients and physicians as trainees, as a guiding frame of reference. In this contract, what is the ideal balance between supervision and trainee autonomy' In the path to independent practice, there are a myriad of competing factors (eg, cost, patient safety, continuity, learning efficiency, work hour restrictions) that affect this balance. As graduate medical education continues to adopt a competency-based medical education framework, whereby thresholds of advancement are determined by reliable performance rather than time-based milestones, there are even further concerns about the impact on patient safety and quality, as well as the adequacy of trainee education.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.1250
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Advance Care Planning Video Decision Support Tool for Nursing Home
           Residents With Advanced Dementia
    • Authors: Mitchell SL; Shaffer ML, Cohen S, et al.
      Pages: 961 - 969
      Abstract: This cluster randomized clinical trial tests whether an advance care planning video (vs usual care) has an effect on documented advance directives, level of care preferences, goals-of-care discussions, and burdensome treatments among nursing home residents with advanced dementia.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.1506
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • The Complexities of Advance Care Planning in Individuals With Advanced
           Dementia
    • Authors: Goldstein NE; Mather H.
      Pages: 969 - 970
      Abstract: In this issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, Mitchell and colleagues present their findings from a randomized clinical trial of a video-assisted decision support tool to improve advance care planning in nursing home residents with advanced dementia. They performed a cluster randomized trial of 402 residents with advanced dementia in the setting of 64 Boston-area nursing homes. Proxies of dyads in the intervention arm watched a brief video depicting scenarios for treatment options within 3 care levels—comfort, basic, and intensive. Preferences for care were then elicited and communicated to the patient’s health care team. The investigators examined the relationship of the video intervention to the primary outcome of do-not-hospitalize (DNH) orders, with secondary outcomes including preference for comfort care, documented directives to withhold tube-feeding and intravenous hydration, documented goals-of-care discussions, and burdensome treatments (hospital transfers, tube-feeding, or parenteral therapy). The intervention did not increase DNH directive completion, change care preferences, increase directives to withhold parenteral hydration, or reduce use of burdensome treatments. Residents in the intervention arm were more likely to have directives to withhold tube-feeding.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.1490
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Eliminating Inappropriate Telemetry Monitoring—An Evidence-Based
           Implementation Guide
    • Authors: Yeow RY; Strohbehn GW, Kagan CM, et al.
      Pages: 971 - 978
      Abstract: This evidence review and implementation guide reviews the evidence and formulates a process for implementing procedures to avoid unnecessary electrocardiographic monitoring.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2409
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Continuing to Improve Appropriateness of Continuous Electrocardiographic
           Monitoring (Telemetry)
    • Authors: Dhruva SS.
      Pages: 978 - 979
      Abstract: Less is More
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2400
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • A Near-Disaster in Rescuing Wide Complex Tachycardia—Can We Always Trust
           External Defibrillators'
    • Authors: Ali Amghaiab I; Abozguia K, Ali FI.
      Pages: 980 - 981
      Abstract: This case report presents the elecrocardiographic findings of a man in his 50s with dizziness, shortness of breath, and tachycardia in whom electrical cardioversion was unsuccessful until the sixth attempt.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.1962
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • A Wide QRS Complex Illusion
    • Authors: Thomashow MA; Goldschlager N.
      Pages: 982 - 983
      Abstract: A woman in her 20s presented with a medical history of multiple, unwitnessed, nonexertional syncopal events in the previous 24 hours that were preceded by palpitations, and associated with loss of consciousness lasting 30 minutes. What is your diagnosis'
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2095
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Public Health Consequences of e-Cigarette Use
    • Authors: St. Helen G; Eaton DL.
      Pages: 984 - 986
      Abstract: This review summarizes the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s report on the public health consequences of e-cigarette use.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.1600
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Surveilance Data on Severe Hypoglycemic Events
    • Authors: Karter AJ; Moffet HH, Liu JY, et al.
      Pages: 987 - 988
      Abstract: This study examines the proportion of all severe hypoglycemic events that are captured by surveillance based on health care utilization alone among pharmacologically treated patients with diabetes.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.1014
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Advanced Practice Clinician Employment in Physician Practices
    • Authors: Martsolf GR; Barnes H, Richards MR, et al.
      Pages: 988 - 990
      Abstract: This study examines trends in advanced practice clinician employment across different physician practices in the United States.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.1515
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Results Reporting for Trials With the Same Sponsor, Drug, and Condition
    • Authors: Fain KM; Rajakannan T, Tse T, et al.
      Pages: 990 - 992
      Abstract: This study examines the extent to which trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov by individual sponsors for the same drug and condition were available publicly in ClinicalTrials.gov and/or PubMed.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.0263
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Antibiotic Therapy Duration in US Adults With Sinusitis
    • Authors: King LM; Sanchez GV, Bartoces M, et al.
      Pages: 992 - 994
      Abstract: This study evaluates the duration of antibiotic therapy prescribed for US adults with sinusitis.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.0407
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Clinical Usefulness of Imaging and Blood Cultures in Cellulitis Evaluation
    • Authors: Ko LN; Garza-Mayers AC, St John J, et al.
      Pages: 994 - 996
      Abstract: This cohort study examines the clinical usefulness and cost of blood cultures and imaging in patients with presumed cellulitis.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.0625
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • COIs of Public Speakers at Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory
           Committee Meetings
    • Authors: McCoy MS; Pagán O, Donohoe G, et al.
      Pages: 996 - 997
      Abstract: This data review investigates the characteristics and conflicts of interest of public speakers at Anesthetic and Analgesic Drug Products Advisory Committee meetings.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.1325
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Suggestions for Improving COIs in US Food and Drug Administration Advisory
           Committees—Past Imperfect
    • Authors: Lurie P.
      Pages: 997 - 998
      Abstract: The effect of financial conflicts of interest on voting behavior in US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Advisory Committee meetings is frequently discussed, with research generally identifying small effects. This limited body of research justifies the FDA’s current approach to such conflicts. Members with conflicts of interest meeting the FDA’s criteria are excluded from meetings, unless “the need for the individual’s services outweighs the potential for a conflict of interest created by the financial interest involved.” In such cases, a waiver is issued, permitting participation in that meeting.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.1324
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Web-Based Platform vs Genetic Counselors in Educating Patients About
           Carrier Results From Exome Sequencing
    • Authors: Yen Y; Luh F.
      Pages: 998 - 999
      Abstract: To the Editor In an Original Investigation published in a recent issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, Biesecker et al conducted a randomized trial testing whether web-based platform was noninferior to genetic counselors in educating patients about carrier results from exome sequencing. No significant difference between genetic counselors and web-based platforms was detected. The authors concluded that a web-based approach might be an acceptable, cost-effective alternative to genetic counselors.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2239
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Web-Based Platform vs Genetic Counselors in Educating Patients About
           Carrier Results From Exome Sequencing—Reply
    • Authors: Biesecker BB; Lewis KL, Biesecker LG.
      Pages: 999 - 999
      Abstract: In Reply We are strong proponents of the value of in-person counseling. However, the shortage of genetic counselors and geneticists and the costs of their services cannot scale to meet the growing demand, so it is essential to develop affordable and effective alternatives. Yen and Luh posit that alternative delivery modes are not appropriate for the return of common disease risk, without evidence to support their claim. Indeed, several randomized controlled trials have shown that telegenetic counseling is equivalent or noninferior to in-person counseling for cancer risks. We suggest that rigorous studies are needed to assess when alternative delivery modes may be effective, which was a main objective of our trial.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2236
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Correlates and Outcomes of Physician Burnout
    • Authors: Chang EY; Bakinde N, Umar A.
      Pages: 999 - 1000
      Abstract: To the Editor We read with great interest the article by Windover et al regarding physician burnout in a large academic medical center. The authors note that in their study, burnout was associated with outcomes such as an increase in ombudsmen complaints, loss of productivity, and physicians leaving the organization.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2384
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Correlates and Outcomes of Physician Burnout—Reply
    • Authors: Martinez K; Windover AK, Rothberg MB.
      Pages: 1000 - 1000
      Abstract: In Reply We agree with Chang et al that anxiety and depression among physicians is common, and there is ample evidence of underdiagnosis and undertreatment. However, burnout and depression are distinct. Conflating the 2 has consequences for physician well-being, health care quality, and patient safety.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2403
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Regulation of Cosmetics
    • Authors: Janetos TM; Kwa M, Xu S.
      Pages: 1000 - 1001
      Abstract: Letter to the Editor We applaud Senators Feinstein and Collins’ efforts to modernize and improve the regulation of cosmetics by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Two additional policy points should be considered.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2452
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Ethical Issues Related to Breastfeeding for US Physicians Who Are Mothers
    • Authors: Perumalswami CR; Laventhal NT.
      Pages: 1001 - 1002
      Abstract: To the Editor US physicians who are mothers may be at particularly high risk for not successfully meeting their breastfeeding goals, despite federal policy specifying the need for lactation breaks and adequate space to pump.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2559
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Ethical Issues Related to Breastfeeding for US Physicians Who are
           Mothers—Reply
    • Authors: Melnitchouk N; Scully RE, Davids JS.
      Pages: 1002 - 1002
      Abstract: In Reply It takes a village to raise a child. For physicians who are mothers, that village must include the workplace. As Drs Perumalswami and Laventhal noted, there is a critical need for institutional lactation support for physicians who are mothers to optimize health and well-being for both mother and child. As surgeons who are mothers, we acknowledge the considerable challenge of meeting lactation needs without compromising the quality of patient care, often in high-acuity situations.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2569
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Standardization of Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy
    • Authors: Chang EY; Odebunmi I, Umar A.
      Pages: 1002 - 1003
      Abstract: To the Editor We read with great interest the article by Tseng et al discussing the importance in taking an evidence-based approach to treating critically ill patients with renal failure. We would like to laud the authors for pursuing high-value care with a resource-intensive treatment modality such as continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT).
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2686
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Standardization of Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy—Reply
    • Authors: Alban RF; Tseng J, Rodriguez H.
      Pages: 1003 - 1003
      Abstract: In Reply We thank Chang et al for their interest and insight regarding our evidence-based approach to improve continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) utilization at our institution.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2676
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Incomplete Conflict of Interest Disclosures
    • Pages: 1003 - 1003
      Abstract: The Invited Commentary titled “Maryland’s All-Payer Health Reform—A Promising Work in Progress,” published in the February 2018 issue if JAMA Internal Medicine, did not include a comprehensive Conflicts of Interest Disclosure statement for author Joshua M. Sharfstein, MD. The full disclosure statement should read as follows: “Dr Sharfstein reports serving as Secretary of Maryland’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene from 2011 through 2014, during which time he led the state’s efforts in the development of the global budgeting model; since 2015, he has consulted with large health systems for Sachs Policy Group, including explaining how global hospital budgeting works.” This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2498
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
  • Incorrect Numbers of Adverse Events Reported
    • Pages: 1003 - 1003
      Abstract: The Original Investigation titled “Azithromycin for Acute Exacerbations of Asthma: The AZALEA Randomized Clinical Trial,” published in the November 2016 issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, reported incorrect numbers of adverse events owing to a recently discovered error in the AZALEA clinical trial database. In the last paragraph of the Results section, “a reduced frequency of respiratory, thoracic, and mediastinal (63 of 64 respiratory) adverse events (27 vs 37, respectively)” should read “a reduced frequency of respiratory, thoracic, and mediastinal (61 of 62 respiratory) adverse events (26 vs 36, respectively).” In the online-only Supplement, numbers of adverse events were reported incorrectly in eTables 16 through 19. This article and its supplement have been corrected online.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2967
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 7 (2018)
       
 
 
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