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Journal Cover Nurse Education Today
  [SJR: 0.958]   [H-I: 49]   [127 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0260-6917
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3043 journals]
  • Teaching global health using crowd-sourcing with Missing Maps
    • Authors: Patricia Schwerdtle; Benjamin Herfort
      Pages: 1 - 2
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 60
      Author(s): Patricia Schwerdtle, Benjamin Herfort


      PubDate: 2017-10-11T08:51:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.09.013
      Issue No: Vol. 60 (2017)
       
  • Using reusable learning objects (RLOs) in wound care education:
           Undergraduate student nurse's evaluation of their learning gain
    • Authors: Catherine Redmond; Carmel Davies; Deirdre Cornally; Ewa Adam; Orla Daly; Marianne Fegan; Margaret O'Toole
      Pages: 3 - 10
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 60
      Author(s): Catherine Redmond, Carmel Davies, Deirdre Cornally, Ewa Adam, Orla Daly, Marianne Fegan, Margaret O'Toole
      Background Both nationally and internationally concerns have been expressed over the adequacy of preparation of undergraduate nurses for the clinical skill of wound care. This project describes the educational evaluation of a series of Reusable Learning Objects (RLOs) as a blended learning approach to facilitate undergraduate nursing students learning of wound care for competence development. Constructivism Learning Theory and Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning informed the design of the RLOs, promoting active learner approaches. Clinically based case studies and visual data from two large university teaching hospitals provided the authentic learning materials required. Interactive exercises and formative feedback were incorporated into the educational resource. Methods Evaluation of student perceived learning gains in terms of knowledge, ability and attitudes were measured using a quantitative pre and posttest Wound Care Competency Outcomes Questionnaire. The RLO CETL Questionnaire was used to identify perceived learning enablers. Statistical and deductive thematic analyses inform the findings. Results Students (n =192) reported that their ability to meet the competency outcomes for wound care had increased significantly after engaging with the RLOs. Students rated the RLOs highly across all categories of perceived usefulness, impact, access and integration. Conclusion These findings provide evidence that the use of RLOs for both knowledge-based and performance-based learning is effective. RLOs when designed using clinically real case scenarios reflect the true complexities of wound care and offer innovative interventions in nursing curricula.

      PubDate: 2017-10-11T08:51:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.09.014
      Issue No: Vol. 60 (2017)
       
  • A systematic review of online learning programs for nurse preceptors
    • Authors: Xi Vivien Wu; Yah Shih Chan; Kimberlyn Hui Shing Tan; Wenru Wang
      Pages: 11 - 22
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 60
      Author(s): Xi Vivien Wu, Yah Shih Chan, Kimberlyn Hui Shing Tan, Wenru Wang
      Background Nurse preceptors guide students to integrate theory into practice, teach clinical skills, assess clinical competency, and enhance problem solving skills. Managing the dual roles of a registered nurse and preceptor poses tremendous challenges to many preceptors. Online learning is recognized as an effective learning approach for enhancing nursing knowledge and skills. Objective The systematic review aims to review and synthesise the online learning programs for preceptors. Design A systematic review was designed based on the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Programs. Data Sources Articles published between January 2000 and June 2016 were sought from six electronic databases: CINAHL, Medline OVID, PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus, and Web of Science. Methods All papers were reviewed and quality assessment was performed. Nine studies were finally selected. Data were extracted, organized and analysed using a narrative synthesis. Results The review identified five overarching themes: development of the online learning programs for nurse preceptors, major contents of the programs, uniqueness of each program, modes of delivery, and outcomes of the programs. Conclusion The systematic review provides insightful information on educational programs for preceptors. At this information age, online learning offers accessibility, convenience, flexibility, which could of great advantage for the working adults. In addition, the online platform provides an alternative for preceptors who face challenges of workload, time, and support system. Therefore, it is paramount that continuing education courses need to be integrated with technology, increase the flexibility and responsiveness of the nursing workforce, and offer alternative means to take up courses.

      PubDate: 2017-10-11T08:51:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.09.010
      Issue No: Vol. 60 (2017)
       
  • The development and psychometric testing of a Disaster Response
           Self-Efficacy Scale among undergraduate nursing students
    • Authors: Hong-Yan Li; Rui-Xue Bi; Qing-Ling Zhong
      Pages: 16 - 20
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 59
      Author(s): Hong-Yan Li, Rui-Xue Bi, Qing-Ling Zhong
      Background Disaster nurse education has received increasing importance in China. Knowing the abilities of disaster response in undergraduate nursing students is beneficial to promote teaching and learning. However, there are few valid and reliable tools that measure the abilities of disaster response in undergraduate nursing students. Objectives To develop a self-report scale of self-efficacy in disaster response for Chinese undergraduate nursing students and test its psychometric properties. Participants and Settings Nursing students (N =318) from two medical colleges were chosen by purposive sampling. Methods The Disaster Response Self-Efficacy Scale (DRSES) was developed and psychometrically tested. Reliability and content validity were studied. Construct validity was tested by exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Reliability was tested by internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Results The DRSES consisted of 3 factors and 19 items with a 5-point rating. The content validity was 0.91, Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.912, and the intraclass correlation coefficient for test-retest reliability was 0.953. The construct validity was good (χ2/df=2.440, RMSEA=0.068, NFI=0.907, CFI=0.942, IFI=0.430, p <0.001). Conclusions The newly developed DRSES has proven good reliability and validity. It could therefore be used as an assessment tool to evaluate self-efficacy in disaster response for Chinese undergraduate nursing students.

      PubDate: 2017-09-16T12:42:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.07.009
      Issue No: Vol. 59 (2017)
       
  • Guided university debate: Effect of a new teaching-learning strategy for
           undergraduate nursing students
    • Authors: Marta Arrue; Saloa Unanue; David Merida
      Pages: 26 - 32
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 59
      Author(s): Marta Arrue, Saloa Unanue, David Merida
      Background A number of studies have shown that the traditional lecture suffers from limitations in the development of many important competencies such as reasoning ability for nursing professionals. Objectives In view of this issue, the authors present a promising alternative to the traditional lecture: the Guided University Debate (GUD). With regard to this aim a teaching-learning sequence of schizophrenia is described based on the GUD. Next, the improvement in the argumentative and declarative knowledge of the students who have participated in the said methodology is demonstrated. Methods Quasi-experimental study with pre-test and post-test design to measure differences in the improvement of declarative and argumentative knowledge. To determine if there is a statistically significant difference in the score obtained in the pre-test and in the post-test score a parametric t-tests was carried. 64 students participated in the study. Implementation of the study took place during the 2015–2016 academic year in the third year of the Nursing undergraduate degree course in the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU) as part of the Mental Health class. Results The results showed a statistically-significant improvement in the students' scores for all learning outcomes analysed: Identifies symptoms of schizophrenia (p ≤0.001), identifies the nursing interventions (p ≤0.001), provides a rationale for nursing interventions (p≤0.001) and provides evidence of nursing interventions (p≤0.001). That is, the declarative and argumentative capacity of the group improved significantly with the Guided University Debate methodology. Conclusions Although the teaching design feasibility and outcomes may vary in different contexts, based on this studies' positive outcome, the authors call today's educators to be able to use GUD as a teaching method.

      PubDate: 2017-10-03T08:11:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.08.011
      Issue No: Vol. 59 (2017)
       
  • An integrative review on conflict management styles among nursing
           students: Implications for nurse education
    • Authors: Leodoro J. Labrague; Denise M. McEnroe – Petitte
      Pages: 45 - 52
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 59
      Author(s): Leodoro J. Labrague, Denise M. McEnroe – Petitte
      Objectives Nurse education plays a critical role in the achievement of conflict management skills in nursing students. However, a wider perspective on this concept has not been explored. This paper is a report of a review appraising and synthesizing existing empirical studies describing conflict management styles among nursing students. Design An integrative review method guided this review. Data Sources Five (5) bibliographic databases (CINAHL, Medline, Psych Info, Embase and SCOPUS) were searched to locate relevant articles. Review Methods An electronic database search was performed in December 2016 to locate studies published from 2007 onwards. The search words included: ‘conflict’, ‘management resolution’, ‘management style’, ‘management strategy’, ‘nursing’, ‘student’. Thirteen (13) articles met the inclusion criteria. Results Nursing students preferred ‘constructive/positive conflict management styles’ when handling conflicts. However, more studies are needed to identify factors that may affect their choice of styles. Further, this review emphasizes the need for empirical studies to identify appropriate interventions that would effectively enhance nursing students' skills in managing conflicts using rigorous methods. Conclusions Nursing faculty play a critical role in teaching, training, and modeling constructive conflict resolution styles in nursing students. Simulation scenarios, reflective exercises, and role playing may be useful to facilitate such learning in choosing constructive conflict management styles. Structured training programme on conflict management will assist nursing students develop positive conflict management styles.

      PubDate: 2017-10-03T08:11:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.09.001
      Issue No: Vol. 59 (2017)
       
  • Transition experiences, intrapersonal resources, and job retention of new
           graduate nurses from accelerated and traditional nursing programs: A
           cross-sectional comparative study
    • Authors: Emily Read; Heather K.S. Laschinger
      Pages: 53 - 58
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 59
      Author(s): Emily Read, Heather K.S. Laschinger
      Background With increasing numbers of new graduate nurses from accelerated nursing programs entering the workforce, it is important to understand their transition experiences, as they may differ from those of traditional graduates. Objectives The aim of this study was to describe and compare the intrapersonal resources, transition experiences, and retention outcomes of these two groups. Design A descriptive cross-sectional comparison study was conducted. Participants A random sample of 3655 registered nurses with <3years of nursing experience were invited to participate from across Canada; 1020 responded (27.9%). The final sample included 230 nurses from accelerated programs and 768 from four-year programs (total n=998). Methods Following ethics approval, participants were mailed a questionnaire to their home address. One month later non-responders were sent a reminder letter, followed by a second questionnaire one month later (January to March, 2013). Descriptive statistics were conducted using SPSS. Group differences were assessed using independent samples t-tests for continuous variables and χ2 tests for categorical variables. Results Overall, there were few significant differences between new graduate nurses from accelerated and traditional programs. Nurses in both groups had high levels of intrapersonal resources, positive transition experiences, were satisfied with their jobs and their choice of nursing as a career, and their intentions to leave were low. Conclusions All new graduate nurses need to have a strong educational preparation and transition support, regardless of their age and previous work and career experiences.

      PubDate: 2017-10-03T08:11:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.08.014
      Issue No: Vol. 59 (2017)
       
  • Efficacy of empathy training in nursing students: A quasi-experimental
           study
    • Authors: Pilar Bas-Sarmiento; Martina Fernández-Gutiérrez; María Baena-Baños; Jose Manuel Romero-Sánchez
      Pages: 59 - 65
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 59
      Author(s): Pilar Bas-Sarmiento, Martina Fernández-Gutiérrez, María Baena-Baños, Jose Manuel Romero-Sánchez
      Background Empathy is a competency to be learned by nurses and a therapeutic tool in the helping relationship that has repercussions on the health of both patients and professionals. Objectives To determine the efficacy of an experiential training for improving the empathy of nursing students in terms of capacity building, empathic performance and increased learning perception and retention of the material. Design A quasi-experimental study of a single group with pretest-posttest measurements of the educational intervention and follow-up at one month after the training. Settings Faculty of Nursing, University of Cádiz, Spain. Participants Forty-eight second-year undergraduate university nursing students. Methods The educational intervention was conducted during a single semester, with 20h of training. The methodology of role-playing, behavior assay, and a flipped classroom was followed. Measurements of student performance were collected before and after the intervention. The Reynolds Empathy Scale was used to evaluate the student's perception of his/her performance; The Consultation and Relational Empathy Measure was used to evaluate the patient's perception of the student's behavior during the simulation; and three independent external observers assessed the student's behavior, guided by The Carkhuff Scale. Descriptive analysis and non-parametric contrast tests were performed to compare the scores before and after the training (Mann-Whitney U and Wilcoxon rank-sum). Spearman's correlation coefficient was used for the correlation between the measurements. Results The mean scores improved for all of the variables, with the differences being statistically significant. The students assessed their learning positively. Conclusions The training was shown to be effective for improving the empathy of the university students in the study. The results are promising in terms of the students retaining the competencies adquired. Therefore, this type of experiential training is recommended for empathy training of future health professionals.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:08:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.08.012
      Issue No: Vol. 59 (2017)
       
  • Widening participation in nurse education: An integrative literature
           review
    • Authors: Vanessa Heaslip; Michele Board; Vicky Duckworth; Liz Thomas
      Pages: 66 - 74
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 59
      Author(s): Vanessa Heaslip, Michele Board, Vicky Duckworth, Liz Thomas
      Background Widening participation into higher education is espoused within educational policy in the UK, and internationally, as a mechanism to promote equality and social mobility. As nurse education is located within higher education it has a responsibility to promote widening participation within pre-registration educational programmes. It could also be argued that the profession has a responsibility to promote equality to ensure its' workforce is as diverse as possible in order to best address the health needs of diverse populations. Objectives To undertake an integrative review on published papers exploring Widening Participation in undergraduate, pre-registration nurse education in the UK. Design A six step integrative review methodology was utilised, reviewing papers published in English from 2013–2016. Data Sources Search of CINAHL, Education Source, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, SocINDEX, Science Direct, Business Source Complete, ERIC, British Library ETOS, Teacher Reference Centre, Informit Health Collection and Informit Humanities and Social Science Collection which highlighted 449 citations; from these 14 papers met the review inclusion criteria. Review Methods Both empirical studies and editorials focusing upon widening participation in pre-registration nurse education in the UK (2013–2016) were included. Papers excluded were non UK papers or papers not focussed upon widening participation in pre-registration nursing education. Research papers included in the review were assessed for quality using appropriate critical appraisal tools. Results 14 papers were included in the review; these were analysed thematically identifying four themes; knowledge and identification of WP, pedagogy and WP, attrition and retention and career prospects. Conclusions Whilst widening participation is a key issue for both nurse education and the wider profession there is a lack of conceptualisation and focus regarding mechanisms to both encourage and support a wider diversity of entrant. Whilst there are some studies, these focus on particular individual widening participation groups rather than a wider strategic focus across the student lifecycle.

      PubDate: 2017-10-03T08:11:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.08.016
      Issue No: Vol. 59 (2017)
       
  • The visibility of QSEN competencies in clinical assessment tools in
           Swedish nurse education
    • Authors: Annette Nygårdh; Gwen Sherwood; Therese Sandberg; Jeanette Rehn; Susanne Knutsson
      Pages: 110 - 117
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 59
      Author(s): Annette Nygårdh, Gwen Sherwood, Therese Sandberg, Jeanette Rehn, Susanne Knutsson
      Background Prospective nurses need specific and sufficient knowledge to be able to provide quality care. The Swedish Society of Nursing has emphasized the importance of the six quality and safety competencies (QSEN), originated in the US, in Swedish nursing education. Purpose To investigate the visibility of the QSEN competencies in the assessment tools used in clinical practice Method A quantitative descriptive method was used to analyze assessment tools from 23 universities. Results and Conclusion: Teamwork and collaboration was the most visible competency. Patient-centered care was visible to a large degree but was not referred to by name. Informatics was the least visible, a notable concern since all nurses should be competent in informatics to provide quality and safety in care. These results provide guidance as academic and clinical programs around the world implement assessment of how well nurses have developed these essential quality and safety competencies.

      PubDate: 2017-10-11T08:51:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.09.003
      Issue No: Vol. 59 (2017)
       
  • To embed or not to embed' A longitudinal study exploring the impact of
           curriculum design on the evidence-based practice profiles of UK
           pre-registration nursing students
    • Authors: Laura Scurlock-Evans; Penney Upton; Joanne Rouse; Dominic Upton
      Pages: 12 - 18
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 58
      Author(s): Laura Scurlock-Evans, Penney Upton, Joanne Rouse, Dominic Upton
      Background The use of Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) is increasingly emphasized within healthcare. However, little research has focused on nurses' pre-registration training; particularly regarding the impact of curriculum-design on learning EBP. Objectives This study compared the impact of embedding EBP throughout the curriculum, with modular-based teaching, on pre-registration nursing students' EBP profiles. Design A longitudinal panel study. Settings and Participants A convenience sample of fifty-six pre-registration nursing students (55.4% studying an embedded EBP-curriculum and 44.6% studying a modular EBP-curriculum), were recruited from a UK University between 2011 and 2014. Methods Participants completed the Student Evidence-Based Practice Questionnaire (S-EBPQ) in the first, second and third year of their course. This questionnaire measures four EBP domains: frequency of use, attitude, knowledge and skills in retrieving and reviewing evidence, and knowledge and skills in applying and sharing evidence. Results Two-way mixed between-within Analyses of Variance revealed significant improvements across all domains, except attitude (which remained broadly positive across all years), for both curriculum-groups. No significant differences in this improvement were identified between the two curricula overall. However, the direction and rate of change of scores on the retrieving and applying subscales (but not frequency of use) for the two groups differed across time; specifically those on the embedded curriculum showed a dip in scores on these subscales in year 2. This appeared to be related to associated features of the course such as the timing of placements and delivery of theory. Conclusions Taking a modular or embedded approach to EBP may have little impact on students' final EBP profiles. However, careful consideration should be given to the timing of related course features which may play a key role in students' perceptions of their knowledge and skills in its application. Further research should explore how curriculum-design might build on students' initial positive attitudes towards EBP and its use in their practice.

      PubDate: 2017-10-03T08:11:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.07.011
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2017)
       
  • Non-technical skills assessment for prelicensure nursing students: An
           integrative review
    • Authors: Sara Pires; Sara Monteiro; Anabela Pereira; Daniela Chaló; Elsa Melo; Alexandre Rodrigues
      Pages: 19 - 24
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 58
      Author(s): Sara Pires, Sara Monteiro, Anabela Pereira, Daniela Chaló, Elsa Melo, Alexandre Rodrigues
      Background In nursing, non-technical skills are recognized as playing an important role to increase patient safety and successful clinical outcomes (Pearson and McLafferty, 2011). Non-technical skills are cognitive and social resource skills that complement technical skills and contribute to safe and efficient task performance (Flin et al., 2008). In order to effectively provide non-technical skills training, it is essential to have an instrument to measure these skills. Methodology An online search was conducted. Articles were selected if they referred to and/or described instruments assessing non-technical skills for nurses and/or prelicensure nursing students in educational, clinical and/or simulated settings with validation evidence (inclusion criteria). Results Of the 53 articles located, 26 met the inclusion criteria. Those referred to and/or described 16 instruments with validation evidence developed to assess non-technical skills in multidisciplinary teams including nurses. Conclusion Although articles have shown 16 valid and reliable instruments, to our knowledge, no instrument has been published or developed and validated for the assessment of non-technical skills of only nurses in general, relevant for use in high-fidelity simulation-based training for prelicensure nursing students. Therefore, there is a need for the development of such an instrument.

      PubDate: 2017-08-18T11:56:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.07.015
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2017)
       
  • Interprofessional simulation of birth in a non-maternity setting for
           pre-professional students
    • Authors: Gayle McLelland; Chantal Perera; Julia Morphet; Lisa McKenna; Helen Hall; Brett Williams; Robyn Cant; Jill Stow
      Pages: 25 - 31
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 58
      Author(s): Gayle McLelland, Chantal Perera, Julia Morphet, Lisa McKenna, Helen Hall, Brett Williams, Robyn Cant, Jill Stow
      Background Simulation-based learning is an approach recommended for teaching undergraduate health professionals. There is a scarcity of research around interprofessional simulation training for pre-professional students in obstetric emergencies that occur prior to arrival at the maternity ward. Objectives The primary aims of the study were to examine whether an interprofessional team-based simulated birth scenario would improve undergraduate paramedic, nursing, and midwifery students' self-efficacy scores and clinical knowledge when managing birth in an unplanned location. The secondary aim was to assess students' satisfaction with the newly developed interprofessional simulation. Design Quasi-experimental descriptive study with repeated measures. Setting Simulated hospital emergency department. Participants Final year undergraduate paramedic, nursing, and midwifery students. Methods Interprofessional teams of five students managed a simulated unplanned vaginal birth, followed by debriefing. Students completed a satisfaction with simulation survey. Serial surveys of clinical knowledge and self-efficacy were conducted at three time points. Results Twenty-four students participated in one of five simulation scenarios. Overall, students' self-efficacy and confidence in ability to achieve a successful birth outcome was significantly improved at one month (p <0.001) with a magnitude of increase (effect) of 40% (r =0.71) and remained so after a further three months. Clinical knowledge was significantly increased in only one of three student groups: nursing (p =0.04; r =0.311). Students' satisfaction with the simulation experience was high (M =4.65/5). Conclusions Results from this study indicate that an interprofessional simulation of a birth in an unplanned setting can improve undergraduate paramedic, nursing and midwifery students' confidence working in an interprofessional team. There was a significant improvement in clinical knowledge of the nursing students (who had least content about managing birth in their program). All students were highly satisfied with the interprofessional simulation experience simulation.

      PubDate: 2017-08-18T11:56:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.07.016
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2017)
       
  • The effect of an interprofessional simulation-based education program on
           perceptions and stereotypes of nursing and medical students: A
           quasi-experimental study
    • Authors: Kelly S. Lockeman; Nital P. Appelbaum; Alan W. Dow; Shelly Orr; Tanya A. Huff; Christopher J. Hogan; Brenda A. Queen
      Pages: 32 - 37
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 58
      Author(s): Kelly S. Lockeman, Nital P. Appelbaum, Alan W. Dow, Shelly Orr, Tanya A. Huff, Christopher J. Hogan, Brenda A. Queen
      Background Interprofessional education is intended to train practitioners to collaboratively address challenges in healthcare delivery, and interprofessional simulation-based education (IPSE) provides realistic, contextual learning experiences in which roles, responsibilities, and professional identity can be learned, developed, and assessed. Reducing negative stereotypes within interprofessional relationships is a prime target for IPSE. Objectives We sought to understand whether perceptions of interprofessional education and provider stereotypes change among nursing and medical students after participating in IPSE. We also sought to determine whether changes differed based on the student's discipline. Design This was a quasi-experimental pretest-posttest study. Setting The study took place at a large mid-Atlantic public university with a comprehensive health science campus. Participants 147 senior Bachelors of Science in Nursing students and 163 fourth-year medical students participated. Methods Students were grouped into interprofessional teams for a two-week period and participated in three two-hour simulations focused on collaboration around acutely ill patients. At the beginning of the first session, they completed a pretest survey with demographic items and measures of their perceptions of interprofessional clinical education, stereotypes about doctors, and stereotypes about nurses. They completed a posttest with the same measures after the third session. Results 251 students completed both the pretest and posttest surveys. On all three measures, students showed an overall increase in scores after the IPSE experience. In comparing the change by student discipline, medical students showed little change from pretest to posttest on stereotypes of doctors, while nursing students had a significant increase in positive perceptions about doctors. No differences were noted between disciplines on changes in stereotypes of nurses. Conclusions This study demonstrated that a short series of IPSE experiences resulted in improved perceptions of interprofessional practice and changes in stereotypical views of each profession even when the experience was not directly designed to address these issues. Differences observed between nursing and medical students should be explored further.

      PubDate: 2017-08-18T11:56:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.07.013
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2017)
       
  • The effects of nursing education on professional values: A longitudinal
           study
    • Authors: Filiz Kantek; Ayla Kaya; Nurdan Gezer
      Pages: 43 - 46
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 58
      Author(s): Filiz Kantek, Ayla Kaya, Nurdan Gezer
      Background It is considered to be extremely important to ensure that nurses adopt professional values during their education in order to improve nursing practices and develop a professional identity. Objectives The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of nursing education on development of professional values. Design This study was designed as a longitudinal study. Settings The study was conducted in a nursing department at a nursing school in the western Turkey. Participants The population of the study consisted of nursing students who were enrolled in the nursing department in academic year of 2011–2012. The data of the study were collected from 59 first-year students in 2011 and 83 fourth-year students in 2015. Methods The data of the study were collected using Personal Information Form and Nursing Professional Values Scale-NPVS. The participants responded to the same questionnaire in their first and fourth years in the department. Results The scale mean score of the students in their first year was 3.44±0.635. The highest scores were obtained from the subscales of responsibility, security, and autonomy. Their scale mean score in their fourth year was 3.93±0.727. The highest scores were obtained from the subscales of dignity and autonomy. The difference between the mean scores was statistically significant (p =0.001). Conclusions It was concluded that nursing education had a significant effect on development of professional values.

      PubDate: 2017-10-03T08:11:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.08.004
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2017)
       
  • The learner as co-creator: A new peer review and self-assessment feedback
           form created by student nurses
    • Authors: Lorraine E. Duers
      Pages: 47 - 52
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 58
      Author(s): Lorraine E. Duers
      Background Engagement with peer review and self-assessment is not always regarded by student nurses as an activity that results in a positive learning experience. Literature indicates that withdrawal from the learning process becomes attractive to individuals affected by a negative experience of peer review. Literature also provides examples of student nurses' feeling ‘torn to shreds’ during the process of peer review, resulting in loss of confidence and self-esteem. An influencing factor in such situations appears to be the absence of specific learner-driven criteria against which student nurses can assess peer and self-performance. The idea was thus ignited, that creation and utilisation of a learner-driven feedback form might potentially prevent, or at least minimise, the possibility of negative peer review experience. Context Set within the context of a pre-registration nursing programme, within a Higher Education institution, student nurses (n =25), created a peer review/self-assessment feedback form. Its potential cross-discipline, global applicability is reasonably speculated. Methods Purposive sampling, followed by Stratified Random sampling, maximised participant variation. Data collection took place on 34 occasions, utilising focus group discussions using Nominal Group Technique, a practical task which was video recorded for mediating artefact purposes, and individual interviews. Analysis was concept and theme driven. Findings The study found that participants desired a new feedback form that specifically asks the evaluator to judge human qualities, such as ‘compassion’ and ‘kindness’, in addition to the skills and knowledge criteria that any peer review or self-assessment form used currently had incorporated. Conclusion Providing the participants with the opportunity to develop criteria, against which performance could be measured, with emphasis being afforded to student inclusivity and resultant shift in power balance from the educator to the learner, embraces the idea of teaching and learning in the 21st Century.

      PubDate: 2017-09-06T09:28:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.08.002
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2017)
       
  • What do we know about student resilience in health professional
           education' A scoping review of the literature
    • Authors: Brooke Sanderson; Margo Brewer
      Pages: 65 - 71
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 58
      Author(s): Brooke Sanderson, Margo Brewer
      Objectives Resilience has been identified as a key capability to thrive in the complex changing work environment of the 21st century. Therefore, the aim of this scoping review was to investigate how resilience is understood in the context of pre-qualifying health education, if there is a need to build student resilience, and what approaches to enhancing student resilience are described in the literature. Design and Data Sources Arksey and O'Malley's (2005) literature scoping review design was adopted as it enables researchers to review, summarise and analyse the literature on a given topic. The databases searched were Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Scopus, Proquest, Medline, Science Direct, and Education Resources Information Centre. Review Method Four research questions informed the literature review: (1) how is resilience conceptualised in the literature', (2) what evidence exists for the need for resilience enhancement', (3) what resilience factors should inform resilience enhancement', and (4) what resilience enhancement programs are described in the literature' Results A total of 36 papers were reviewed in detail. Whilst the need for a focus on resilience across the health professions was evident an array of definitions and conceptualisations of resilience were described. A small number of approaches to enhancing resilience were identified. Conclusion Whilst widespread recognition of the importance of resilience in the health professions exists the area remains under theorised with limited conceptual models and robust interventions published to date.

      PubDate: 2017-09-16T12:42:58Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.07.018
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2017)
       
  • Time for TIGER to ROAR! Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform
    • Authors: Siobhan O'Connor; Ursula Hubner; Toria Shaw; Rachelle Blake; Marion Ball
      Pages: 78 - 81
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 58
      Author(s): Siobhan O'Connor, Ursula Hubner, Toria Shaw, Rachelle Blake, Marion Ball
      Information Technology (IT) continues to evolve and develop with electronic devices and systems becoming integral to healthcare in every country. This has led to an urgent need for all professions working in healthcare to be knowledgeable and skilled in informatics. The Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER) Initiative was established in 2006 in the United States to develop key areas of informatics in nursing. One of these was to integrate informatics competencies into nursing curricula and life-long learning. In 2009, TIGER developed an informatics competency framework which outlines numerous IT competencies required for professional practice and this work helped increase the emphasis of informatics in nursing education standards in the United States. In 2012, TIGER expanded to the international community to help synthesise informatics competencies for nurses and pool educational resources in health IT. This transition led to a new interprofessional, interdisciplinary approach, as health informatics education needs to expand to other clinical fields and beyond. In tandem, a European Union (EU) - United States (US) Collaboration on eHealth began a strand of work which focuses on developing the IT skills of the health workforce to ensure technology can be adopted and applied in healthcare. One initiative within this is the EU*US eHealth Work Project, which started in 2016 and is mapping the current structure and gaps in health IT skills and training needs globally. It aims to increase educational opportunities by developing a model for open and scalable access to eHealth training programmes. With this renewed initiative to incorporate informatics into the education and training of nurses and other health professionals globally, it is time for educators, researchers, practitioners and policy makers to join in and ROAR with TIGER.

      PubDate: 2017-10-03T08:11:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.07.014
      Issue No: Vol. 58 (2017)
       
  • The use of a Competence Fair to validate nursing competence
    • Authors: Tom O'Connor; Usama Saleh; Tareq Afaneh; Zena Moore; Declan Patton; Rosemarie Derwin
      Pages: 1 - 7
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 57
      Author(s): Tom O'Connor, Usama Saleh, Tareq Afaneh, Zena Moore, Declan Patton, Rosemarie Derwin
      Strategies to ensure that nursing competence is maintained and validated are of increasing importance and are much discussed in the nursing literature. Professional bodies, employers, nurses themselves and most importantly patients need to have reassurance that competence across the profession is uniform and is maintained. This is of particular concern in the increasingly globalised and multinational workforces which exist in many health care institutions. This paper describes an educational initiative, and the evaluation thereof, which aimed to validate and enhance nurse competency in a multinational workforce in a medical city in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Results indicate that there was variability in competencies across the organisation which allowed for targeted educational interventions. The initiative was well received by the nurses in the organisation and the evaluation points to the need for ongoing strategies to ensure that competence in maintained.

      PubDate: 2017-07-04T10:50:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.06.007
      Issue No: Vol. 57 (2017)
       
  • Social media in nurse education: Utilization and E-professionalism
    • Authors: Valda J.A. Duke; Allan Anstey; Sandra Carter; Natalie Gosse; Karen M. Hutchens; Janice A. Marsh
      Pages: 8 - 13
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 57
      Author(s): Valda J.A. Duke, Allan Anstey, Sandra Carter, Natalie Gosse, Karen M. Hutchens, Janice A. Marsh
      Objective To explore faculty and student utilization of social media and its professional implications in nurse education. Methods A descriptive study. Five hundred six Bachelor of Nursing students, 112 Practical Nursing students and 74 faculty members were invited to complete a questionnaire of 28 questions relating to social media. Results Three hundred thirty-seven students and 29 faculty responded. Students spent significantly more time using social media compared to faculty and both groups used it mainly for personal use. However, almost twice as many students used social media for educational purposes than did faculty (58.5% vs 27.6%, p <0.001). While almost 96% of students used social media to talk about academic related problems, only 28% of faculty did so (p <0.000). Almost 60% of faculty expressly disagreed with using social media to discuss academic related problems. YouTube and text messaging were popular platforms for educational purposes. While Facebook was also a popular educational site for students (95% used it for informal learning; 67% for formal learning), it was much less commonly used by faculty (45% used it for informal learning; 17% for formal learning). More students than faculty felt that they were aware of privacy features, and of the professional behavior expected when using social media. In addition, more students (90.7%) than faculty (71.43%) used these privacy features (p <0.000). However, 100% of students compared to only 13.79% of faculty reported that they had posted information that they would not want a prospective employer/member of academic staff to view (p =0.003). Conclusion There is a high reported usage of social media among students and faculty. Utilization of public platforms, while potentially beneficial, can have professional implications if not used appropriately with both personal and academic use. Developing best practice approaches for using social media in nurse education is essential to ensure that faculty and students are informed of e-professionalism.

      PubDate: 2017-07-04T10:50:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.06.009
      Issue No: Vol. 57 (2017)
       
  • Exorcising the ghost of the Sputnik crisis
    • Authors: Espen Skarstein Kolberg; Heidi Marie Holt; Ingvild Klevan
      Pages: 14 - 16
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 57
      Author(s): Espen Skarstein Kolberg, Heidi Marie Holt, Ingvild Klevan
      Drug calculation is not immune to the undesirable impact of math anxiety and negative attitudes on test outcomes in nursing studies, and several studies indicate that math anxiety is present in the student population at such a degree that it is likely to interfere with these students' mathematical ability. Examining the educational system through the lens of history and adding a dash of cultural theory, a contributing cause to the math anxiety may be found in the Sputnik Crisis of the late 1950s, the ghostly remnants of which are still present in the stereotypes of mathematics promoted by mass media. In an effort to reshape the culturally conditioned attitudes which may be responsible for math anxiety, we suggest using elements from popular culture to diversify the perception and image of mathematics in drug calculation.

      PubDate: 2017-07-12T11:02:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.06.013
      Issue No: Vol. 57 (2017)
       
  • The effectiveness of a simulated scenario to teach nursing students how to
           perform a bed bath: A randomized clinical trial
    • Authors: Renata Pinto Ribeiro Miranda; Érika de Cássia Lopes Chaves; Rogério Silva Lima; Cristiane Giffoni Braga; Ivandira Anselmo Ribeiro Simões; Silvana Maria Coelho Leite Fava; Denise Hollanda Iunes
      Pages: 17 - 23
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 57
      Author(s): Renata Pinto Ribeiro Miranda, Érika de Cássia Lopes Chaves, Rogério Silva Lima, Cristiane Giffoni Braga, Ivandira Anselmo Ribeiro Simões, Silvana Maria Coelho Leite Fava, Denise Hollanda Iunes
      Background Simulation allows students to develop several skills during a bed bath that are difficult to teach only in traditional classroom lectures, such as problem-solving, student interactions with the simulator (patient), reasoning in clinical evaluations, evaluation of responses to interventions, teamwork, communication, security and privacy. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a simulated bed bath scenario on improving cognitive knowledge, practical performance and satisfaction among nursing students. Design Randomized controlled clinical trial. Setting Nursing students that were in the fifth period from two educational institutions in Brazil. Participants Nursing students (n=58). Method The data were collected using the assessments of cognitive knowledge, practical performance and satisfaction were made through a written test about bed baths, an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) and a satisfaction questionnaire. Results We identified that the acquisition and assimilation of cognitive knowledge was significantly higher in the simulation group (p=0.001). The performance was similar in both groups regardless of the teaching strategy (p=0.435). At follow-up, the simulation group had significantly more satisfaction with the teaching method than the control group (p=0.007). Conclusion The teaching strategy based on a simulated scenario of a bed bath proved to be effective for the acquisition of cognitive knowledge regarding bed baths in clinical practice and improved student satisfaction with the teaching process.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2017-07-12T11:02:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.06.008
      Issue No: Vol. 57 (2017)
       
  • Specialty satisfaction, positive psychological capital, and nursing
           professional values in nursing students: A cross-sectional survey
    • Authors: Chung Hee Woo; Ju Young Park
      Pages: 24 - 28
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 57
      Author(s): Chung Hee Woo, Ju Young Park
      Background Ideally, college majors should be chosen to achieve self-realization and correspond to self-concept. However, some students select a major based on extrinsic factors, rather than aptitude or interests, because of a lack of employment opportunities. If they have negative college experiences with an unsatisfactory major, they might not engage fully in their occupation following graduation. Objective This study aimed to identify factors affecting specialty satisfaction in preclinical practice nursing-college students. Design A cross-sectional descriptive survey. Setting A nonprobability convenience sample of 312 nursing-college students at colleges in Deajeon City, South Korea. The survey questionnaire was distributed to those who agreed to participate. Participants Freshmen and sophomore nursing students (n=312). Methods Participants were 312 students at colleges in Deajeon City. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data, which were analyzed using SPSS/WIN. Results Positive psychological capital and nursing professional values were positively correlated with specialty satisfaction. Significant predictors for specialty satisfaction included hope and optimism (as components of positive psychological capital), the roles of nursing service and originality of nursing (as nursing professional values), and aptitude/interests and job value (as motives for selecting a major). Conclusion The findings suggested that nursing students' specialty satisfaction was partially linked to positive psychological capital and professional values. Therefore, the promotion of positive factors should be useful in enhancing specialty satisfaction in preclinical-practice nursing-college students.

      PubDate: 2017-07-12T11:02:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.06.010
      Issue No: Vol. 57 (2017)
       
  • Including the online feedback site, Patient Opinion, in the nursing
           curriculum: Exploratory study
    • Authors: Ray Jones; Kim Young; James Munro; Heather Miller; Stephanie Brelsford; Jennie Aronsson; Benny Goodman; Jane Peters
      Pages: 40 - 46
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 57
      Author(s): Ray Jones, Kim Young, James Munro, Heather Miller, Stephanie Brelsford, Jennie Aronsson, Benny Goodman, Jane Peters
      Background Globally, universities aim to involve people who use health services to enrich the nursing curriculum for students, but there can be barriers to this involvement. Many also want students to contribute to local communities. Online communication can help connect students to service users to achieve these aims. The online British patient feedback site, Patient Opinion, gathers comments from service users about services and encourages service responses to the comments. Objectives To explore the feasibility and acceptability of five ways of including Patient Opinion in the undergraduate nursing curriculum. Design Five case studies using mixed data collection methods. Settings British University with nursing students across two campuses, accustomed to using webinars, video presentations and social media. Participants Students from different years participated in the five approaches of making use of Patient Opinion in the curriculum; 18 students took part in an online forum to discuss Patient Opinion in the curriculum. Methods We trialled timetabled webinars, video-linked lectures, optional enhanced access for self-study, optional audit of service user comments for two local hospitals, and optional Twitter and Tweetchat. Students discussed the aims and approaches in an online forum. Results Of the five approaches trialled, webinars seemed effective in ensuring that all nursing students engaged with the topic. Video-linked lectures provided an alternative when timetabling did not allow webinars, but were less interactive. The three optional approaches (Tweetchats, audit exercise, self-directed study) provided opportunities for some students to enhance their learning but students needed guidance. Sending a summary of student reviews of patients' feedback to local hospitals illustrated how students might be agents of change in local health services. Conclusions Experience from these case studies suggests that webinars followed by use of Patient Opinion preparing for placements may be a sustainable way of embedding feedback sites in the nursing curriculum.

      PubDate: 2017-07-23T15:06:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.07.002
      Issue No: Vol. 57 (2017)
       
  • Can nurses rise to the public health challenge' How a novel solution
           in nurse education can address this contemporary question
    • Authors: Angela L. Turner-Wilson; Anne M. Mills; Karen Rees
      Pages: 65 - 67
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 57
      Author(s): Angela L. Turner-Wilson, Anne M. Mills, Karen Rees
      This paper raises the problem of how improvements in health outcomes, a key component in many governments' strategies, can be achieved. The work highlights a novel undergraduate educational approach which offers solutions to public health challenges within nursing. Against the backdrop of one UK university institution it discusses approaches that can guide nursing students towards a deeper understanding and engagement within the principles of public health. It then proposes how nurses can use their learning to become leaders of health improvement.

      PubDate: 2017-07-23T15:06:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.06.015
      Issue No: Vol. 57 (2017)
       
  • Preparing for an international student cohort: Making a global impact on
           nursing
    • Authors: Kathleen C. Spadaro; Debra Wolf; Huixin Wu; Diane F. Hunker
      Pages: 88 - 94
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 57
      Author(s): Kathleen C. Spadaro, Debra Wolf, Huixin Wu, Diane F. Hunker


      PubDate: 2017-07-30T15:16:07Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.06.014
      Issue No: Vol. 57 (2017)
       
  • Student nurses experience of a “fairy garden” healing haven
           garden for sick children
    • Authors: Pamela van der Riet; Chaweewan Jitsacorn; Piyatida Junlapeeya; Erin Thursby; Peter Thursby
      Pages: 165 - 173
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 59
      Author(s): Pamela van der Riet, Chaweewan Jitsacorn, Piyatida Junlapeeya, Peter Thursby
      Background The concept and philosophy of healing environments in health care is not new and there has been recent research into the experience of nurses and families experience of healing environments producing positive outcomes in relieving stress and improving quality of life. However, there is little in-depth information about student nurse's experience of healing environments in support of patients. Aim To report on the stories of student nurses who participated in formal and informal activities in a healing haven environment called a Fairy Garden (FG) within a hospital in northern Thailand. Their beliefs about the care of sick children in an environment designed to provide educational and recreational activity during hospital care are explored. Methods Narrative inquiry, a qualitative methodology was selected to capture the main threads of the participants' experience. Clandinin's narrative inquiry framework involving the three commonality dimensions of sociality, temporality and place were used in analysing the data. Sixty-two student nurses from a Thai College of Nursing and from an Australian university were interviewed. Results In this study the place of a FG has been investigated as a non-clinical environment providing sick children with exposure to nature, play activities and spaces to explore. Findings include three main threads: freedom to be a child not a sick child, engaging in care and professionalism, a moment in time of living fantasy. Conclusions Student nurses in this study had a broader understanding of health care other than the biomedical model. It transformed their learning and opened their eyes to a more holistic approach to humanising care of sick children.

      PubDate: 2017-10-03T08:11:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.colegn.2015.11.006
      Issue No: Vol. 24, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Effect of simulation on the ability of first year nursing students to
           learn vital signs
    • Authors: Evrim Eyikara; Zehra Göçmen Baykara
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 October 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Evrim Eyikara, Zehra Göçmen Baykara
      Background The acquisition of cognitive, affective and psychomotor knowledge and skills are required in nursing, made possible via an interactive teaching method, such as simulation. Objective and Design This study conducted to identify the impact of simulation on first-year nursing students' ability to learn vital signs. Setting and Participants A convenience sample of 90 first-year nursing students enrolled at a University, Ankara, in 2014–2015. Method Ninety students enrolled for lessons on the fundamentals of nursing were identified using a simple random sampling method. The students were taught vital signs theory via traditional methods. They were grouped into experimental 1, experimental 2 and control group, of 30 students each. Students in the experimental 1 group attended sessions on simulation and those in the experimental 2 group sessions on laboratory work, followed by simulation. The control group were taught via traditional methods and only attended the laboratory work sessions. The students' cognitive knowledge acquisition was evaluated using a knowledge test before and after the lessons. The ability to measure vital signs in adults (healthy ones and patients) was evaluated using a skill control list. Results A statistically significant difference was not observed between the groups in terms of the average pre-test scores on knowledge (p >0.050). Groups exposed to simulation obtained statistically significantly higher scores than the control group in post-test knowledge (p <0.050). The ability of the groups exposed to simulation to measure vital signs in healthy adults and patients was more successful than that the control group (p <0.050). This was statistically significant. Conclusion Simulation had a positive effect on the ability of nursing students to measure vital signs. Thus, simulation should be included in the mainstream curriculum in order to effectively impart nursing knowledge and skills.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T08:55:04Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.09.023
       
  • Concept mapping to promote meaningful learning, help relate theory to
           practice and improve learning self-efficacy in Asian mental health nursing
           students: A mixed-methods pilot study
    • Authors: Daniel Bressington; Wai-kit Wong Kar Kei Claire Lam Wai Tong
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 60
      Author(s): Daniel T. Bressington, Wai-kit Wong, Kar Kei Claire Lam, Wai Tong Chien
      Objectives Student nurses are provided with a great deal of knowledge within university, but they can find it difficult to relate theory to nursing practice. This study aimed to test the appropriateness and feasibility of assessing Novak's concept mapping as an educational strategy to strengthen the theory-practice link, encourage meaningful learning and enhance learning self-efficacy in nursing students. Design This pilot study utilised a mixed-methods quasi-experimental design. Setting The study was conducted in a University school of Nursing in Hong Kong. Participants A total of 40 third-year pre-registration Asian mental health nursing students completed the study; 12 in the concept mapping (CM) group and 28 in the usual teaching methods (UTM) group. Methods The impact of concept mapping was evaluated thorough analysis of quantitative changes in students' learning self-efficacy, analysis of the structure and contents of the concept maps (CM group), a quantitative measure of students' opinions about their reflective learning activities and content analysis of qualitative data from reflective written accounts (CM group). Results There were no significant differences in self-reported learning self-efficacy between the two groups (p=0.38). The concept mapping helped students identify their current level of understanding, but the increased awareness may cause an initial drop in learning self-efficacy. The results highlight that most CM students were able to demonstrate meaningful learning and perceived that concept mapping was a useful reflective learning strategy to help them to link theory and practice. Conclusions The results provide preliminary evidence that the concept mapping approach can be useful to help mental health nursing students visualise their learning progress and encourage the integration of theoretical knowledge with clinical knowledge. Combining concept mapping data with quantitative measures and qualitative reflective journal data appears to be a useful way of assessing and understanding the effectiveness of concept mapping. Future studies should utilise a larger sample size and consider using the approach as a targeted intervention immediately before and during clinical learning placements.

      PubDate: 2017-10-11T08:51:55Z
       
  • Glimpses into the transition world: new graduate nurses' written
           reflections
    • Authors: Ann Walton; Natalie Lindsay Caz Hales Helen Rook
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 October 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Jo Ann Walton, Natalie Lindsay, Caz Hales, Helen Rook
      Background This study was born out of our reflections as educators responsible for helping new graduate nurses transition into their first year of professional practice through a formal education programme. Finding ourselves wondering about many of the questions the students raised with us, we set about looking more closely at what could be gleaned from the students' experience, captured in their written work over the course of a year. Objectives To identify the challenges and learning experiences revealed in reflective assignments written by new graduate nurses undertaking a postgraduate course as part of their transition to registered nurse practice. Study design, setting and participants. Data consisted of the written work of two cohorts of students who had completed a postgraduate university course as part of their transition to new graduate practice in New Zealand. Fifty four reflective essays completed by twenty seven participating students were collected and their contents analysed thematically. Results Five key themes were identified. The students' reflections noted individual attributes - personal and professional strengths and weaknesses; professional behaviour - actions such as engaging help and support, advocating for patients' needs and safety and putting their own feelings aside; situational challenges such as communication difficulties, both systemic and interpersonal, and the pressure of competing demands. Students also identified rewards - results they experienced such as achieving the nursing outcomes they desired, and commented on reflection as a useful tool. Conclusions The findings shed light on the experiences of new graduates, and how they fare through this critical phase of career development. Challenges relating to the emotional labour of nursing work are particularly evident. In addition the reflective essay is shown to be a powerful tool for assisting both new graduate nurses and their lecturers to reflect on the learning opportunities inherent in current clinical practice environments.

      PubDate: 2017-10-11T08:51:55Z
       
  • Service user engagement in healthcare education as a mechanism for value
           based recruitment: An evaluation study
    • Authors: Vanessa Heaslip; Janet Scammell Anne Mills Ashley Spriggs Andrea Addis
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 October 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Vanessa Heaslip, Janet Scammell, Anne Mills, Ashley Spriggs, Andrea Addis, Mandy Bond, Carolyn Latchford, Angela Warren, Juliet Borwell, Stephen Tee
      Aim Within the United Kingdom (UK) there is an increasing focus on Values Based Recruitment (VBR) of staff working in the National Health Service (NHS) in response to public inquiries criticising the lack of person-centred care. All NHS employees are recruited on the basis of a prescribed set of values. This is extended to the recruitment of student healthcare professionals, yet there is little research of how to implement this. Involving Service Users in healthcare educational practice is gaining momentum internationally, yet involvement of service users in VBR of ‘would be’ healthcare professionals remains at an embryonic phase. Adult nurses represent the largest healthcare workforce in the UK, yet involvement of service users in their recruitment has received scant attention. This paper is an evaluation of the inclusion of service users in a VBR of 640 adult student nurses. Background Design. This study used a participatory mixed methods approach, with service users as co-researchers in the study. Methods The study consisted of mixed methods design. Quantitative data via an online questionnaire to ascertain candidates' perspectives (n =269 response rate of 42%), and academic/clinical nurses (n =35 response rate 34.65%). Qualitative data were gathered using focus groups and one to one interviews with service users (n =9). Data analysis included descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. Findings. 4 overarching themes were identified; increasing sense of humanness, substantiating care values; impact of involvement; working together and making it work, a work in progress. Conclusion the findings from the study highlight that involving service users in VBR of student healthcare professionals has benefits to candidates, service users and local health services. Appreciating the perceptions of healthcare professionals is fundamental in the UK and internationally to implementing service users' engagement in service enhancement and delivery. Findings from this study identify there may be a dissonance between the policy, the nurses' thoughts and their practice.

      PubDate: 2017-10-11T08:51:55Z
       
  • Perceptions of community care and placement preferences in first-year
           nursing students: A multicentre, cross-sectional study
    • Authors: Margriet van Iersel; Corine H.M. Latour; Rien de Vos; Paul A. Kirschner; Wilma J.M. Scholte op Reimer
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 October 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Margriet van Iersel, Corine H.M. Latour, Rien de Vos, Paul A. Kirschner, Wilma J.M. Scholte op Reimer
      Background Despite increasing shortages of highly educated community nurses, far too few nursing students choose community care. This means that a strong societal problem is emerging that desperately needs resolution. Objectives To acquire a solid understanding of the causes for the low popularity of community care by exploring first-year baccalaureate nursing students' perceptions of community care, their placement preferences, and the assumptions underlying these preferences. Design A quantitative cross-sectional design. Settings Six universities of applied sciences in the Netherlands. Participants Nursing students in the first semester of their 4-year programme (n = 1058). Methods Data were collected in September-December 2014. The students completed the ‘Scale on Community Care Perceptions’ (SCOPE), consisting of demographic data and three subscales measuring the affective component of community care perception, perceptions of a placement and a profession in community care, and students’ current placement preferences. Descriptive statistics were used. Results For a practice placement, 71.2% of first-year students prefer the general hospital and 5.4% community care, whereas 23.4% opt for another healthcare area. Students consider opportunities for advancement and enjoyable relationships with patients as most important for choosing a placement. Community care is perceived as a ‘low-status-field’ with many elderly patients, where students expect to find little variety in caregiving and few opportunities for advancement. Students’ perceptions of the field are at odds with things they believe to be important for their placement. Conclusion Due to misconceptions, students perceive community care as offering them few challenges. Strategies to positively influence students’ perceptions of community nursing are urgently required to halt the dissonance between students’ preference for the hospital and society’s need for highly educated community nurses.

      PubDate: 2017-10-11T08:51:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.09.016
       
  • The lived experience of first year undergraduate student nurses: A
           hermeneutic phenomenological study
    • Authors: Debra J. Porteous; Alison Machin
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Debra J. Porteous, Alison Machin
      Introduction This study gives insight into the experiences and perceptions of one group of undergraduate nursing students as they make the transition into Higher Education and the nursing profession, during the first year, of their three-year programme. Research has shown that first year undergraduate experience is complex and challenging for any student. For undergraduate nursing students, the process of achieving additional professional practice competencies required for United Kingdom nursing registration adds additional responsibility and potentially, more pressure. Few studies have considered student nurses' lived experiences during their first year of study in any depth. Study aim This study aimed to understand how one group of undergraduate nursing students' perceived their experiences of the transition into higher education and nursing profession. Design Framed within an interpretive philosophical paradigm, a hermeneutic phenomenological approach enabled the exploration of participants' lived experiences. Setting and Participants The study took place at a Higher Education Institution approved nurse education provider in the North of England, United Kingdom (UK). Following ethical approval, ten first year student nurses from a range of different backgrounds gave informed consent to participate. Methods Over a one year period between 2013 and 2014 participants provided data at three points during their first year (four months, eight months and twelve months) via semi-structured, digitally recorded individual interviews (n =30) and digital recordings of critical incident accounts as they occurred (n=30). Data was transcribed verbatim, systematically thematically analysed drawing on hermeneutic phenomenological principles and verified for thematic accuracy by participants in 2015. Findings Five themes emerged from the data: uncertainty; expectations; learning to survive; seeking support; and moving forward. Findings identify that the participants had developed skills to survive however considerable variation in their experience, influenced motivation and behaviour. They developed their own skills of coping to deal with the demands of academic life and those of the practice setting. An explanatory student journey model demonstrated that developing self-efficacy was key to their successful transition through the first year of undergraduate study. Conclusions Understanding the first year student nurse perspective and insight into their coping strategies are key to supporting a positive learning journey. Positive feedback from nurse educators, a growing sense of nursing community and motivation to succeed facilitates their internalisation of nursing identity, norms and values and an active pursuit of learning towards graduate status and becoming a nurse.

      PubDate: 2017-10-11T08:51:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.09.017
       
  • Effective Strategies for Successful Online Students
    • Authors: Crystal Dodson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 September 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Crystal Dodson


      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:08:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.06.016
       
  • Managing medical emergencies in mental health settings using an
           interprofessional in-situ simulation training programme: a mixed methods
           evaluation study
    • Authors: Mary Lavelle; Chris Attoe; Christina Tritschler; Sean Cross
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 September 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Mary Lavelle, Chris Attoe, Christina Tritschler, Sean Cross
      Background In the UK, people with severe mental illness die up to 20 years earlier than the general population, prompting increased focus on physical health in mental illness. However, training for mental health inpatient staff to meet patients' physical health needs has not received the same attention, with physical health training often being reactive and lacking evidence of effectiveness. Objectives To evaluate an interprofessional, in situ, simulation training intervention for managing medical deterioration in mental health settings. Investigating the impact of training on: 1. Participants' knowledge, confidence, and attitudes towards managing medical deterioration; and 2. Incident reporting, as an objective index of incident management. Participants' perceptions of the impact on their practice were qualitatively explored. Design This evaluation employed a mixed-methods pre-post intervention design. Participants & Settings Fifty-three healthcare professionals participated including: mental health nurses, psychiatrists, healthcare assistants, and activity co-ordinators from two busy psychiatric triage wards in South London, UK. Methods The intervention comprised eight half-day sessions delivered weekly across two wards. Structured surveys assessed participants' knowledge, confidence, and attitudes towards medical deterioration pre and post training. Participants' experience of training was qualitatively captured through post-course surveys and focus groups three months post training. Incident reporting rates for seven-month periods pre and post training were compared. Results Following training, participants showed significant improvement in knowledge (p <.001), confidence (p <.001), and attitudes towards (p <.02) managing medical deterioration. Incident reporting increased by 33% following training. Participants' reported improved confidence in managing medical deterioration, better understanding of effective communication, improved self-reflection and team working, and an increased sense of responsibility for patients' physical health. Conclusions Interprofessional, in situ simulation training for medical deterioration yielded promising outcomes for individuals and teams. Simulation is an under-used training modality in mental health, offering a holistic training approach with the potential to provide educational and clinical benefits while supporting workforce resilience.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T20:08:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.09.009
       
  • Cultural competence education for health professionals from pre-graduation
           to licensure delivered using facebook: Twelve-month follow-up on a
           randomized control trial
    • Authors: Li-Chun Chang; Jong Long Guo; Hui-Ling Lin
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 September 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Li-Chun Chang, Jong Long Guo, Hui-Ling Lin
      Background Cultural competence (CC) training is widely recognized as a crucial component of the professional development of healthcare providers. There is no study on the effect of Facebook (FB) as a strategy to promote continual learning to enhance CC among students in health professions. Objectives To test the effects of cultural competence education using FB as a delivery platform on knowledge, awareness, self-efficacy, and skill related to CC in health students from pre-graduation to licensed professional stages. Design A randomized controlled trial. Participants We recruited students from professional nursing, pharmacy, and nutrition programs at six medical universities and randomly assigned them to study groups. Methods Between T1 and T2 (months 1–3), the intervention group (IG) received pre-graduation education in CC while the control group (CG) received their regular educational program. Between T2 and T3 (months 6–9), IG received on-the-job education in CC while CG received the regular program. An online self-report questionnaire assessing CC knowledge, awareness, self-efficacy, and skill was analyzed at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. Results Of 180 participants who completed the pretest, 120 (65 IG and 55 CG) completed both follow-ups. Changes over time were mixed; the only statistical difference between groups was an improvement in awareness in IG but not in CG. At 12 months, intervention and control participants had different levels of awareness of CC (β=2.56, p < .001), but other outcomes did not differ between groups. Conclusion Health profession educators can adopt Facebook as an education delivery platform to offer personalized, social learning incorporating cultural competency curricula into ongoing education and training in rising awareness on CC.

      PubDate: 2017-09-21T14:09:40Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.09.005
       
  • Measuring the impact of a ‘point of view’ disability simulation on
           nursing students' empathy using the comprehensive state empathy scale
    • Authors: Tracy Levett-Jones; Samuel Lapkin; Natalie Govind; Jacqueline Pich; Kerry Hoffman; Sarah Yeun-Sim Jeong; Carol Anne Norton; Danielle Noble; Lorna Maclellan; Melissa Robinson-Reilly; Naleya Everson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 September 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Tracy Levett-Jones, Samuel Lapkin, Natalie Govind, Jacqueline Pich, Kerry Hoffman, Sarah Yeun-Sim Jeong, Carol Anne Norton, Danielle Noble, Lorna Maclellan, Melissa Robinson-Reilly, Naleya Everson
      Background Although empathy is an integral component of professional practice and person-centred care, a body of research has identified that vulnerable patients groups frequently experience healthcare that is less than optimal and often lacking in empathy. Aim The aim of this study was to examine the impact of an immersive point-of-view simulation on nursing students' empathy towards people with an Acquired Brain Injury. Setting and participants. A convenience sample of 390 nursing students from a cohort of 488 participated in the study, giving a response rate of 80%. Students undertook the simulation in pairs and were randomly allocated to the role of either a person with acquired brain injury or a rehabilitation nurse. The simulated ‘patients’ wore a hemiparesis suit that replicated the experience of dysphasia, hemianopia and hemiparesis. Design Characteristics of the sample were summarised using descriptive statistics. A two-group pre-test post-test design was used to investigate the impact of the simulation using the Comprehensive State Empathy Scale. t-tests were performed to analyse changes in empathy pre post and between simulated ‘patients’ and ‘rehabilitation nurses’. Results On average, participants reported significantly higher mean empathy scores post simulation (3.75, SD=0.66) compared to pre simulation (3.38 SD=0.61); t (398)=10.33, p <0.001. However, this increase was higher for participants who assumed the role of a ‘rehabilitation nurse’ (mean=3.86, SD=0.62) than for those who took on the ‘patient’ role (mean=3.64, SD=0.68), p <0.001. Conclusion The results from this study attest to the potential of point-of-view simulations to positively impact nursing students' empathy towards people with a disability. Research with other vulnerable patient groups, student cohorts and in other contexts would be beneficial in taking this work forward.

      PubDate: 2017-09-21T14:09:40Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.09.007
       
  • Daytime sleepiness and related factors in nursing students
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 59
      Author(s): Gökçe DEMİR
      Background Evaluation of the frequency and causes of daytime sleepiness in nursing students because it is an important factor in improving the health status of the students, controlling sleep problems, improving students' academic achievements, and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Aim The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of daytime sleepiness in nursing students and the factors associated with it. Design A cross-sectional research design was used in this study. Participants Nursing students (n =382). Method Data were collected using a questionnaire prepared by the authors to assess socio-demographic characteristics, sleep habits, and problems of nursing students and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), which assesses daytime sleepiness. Descriptive statistics included numbers, percentages, mean, median, and standard deviation. Mann–Whitney U test (Z) and Kruskal–Wallis (KW) analysis of variance were used for evaluating the relationship between ESS scores and independent variables. Results The prevalence of daytime sleepiness in the students was found to be 10.5%. Those in the 2nd grade, who were married, who did not consume coffee or tea, lived alone, regarded their own academic achievement as poor, and used the Internet during morning hours experienced increased daytime sleepiness. Moreover, students who talk in their sleep, grind their teeth, feel restless before sleep, experience problems in falling asleep, and wake up at night were found to experience increased daytime sleepiness. Conclusions Daytime sleepiness is a considerably common health problem in nursing students. This study found that daytime sleepiness is associated with individual characteristics, lifestyle and consumption habits, and sleep habits.

      PubDate: 2017-09-16T12:42:58Z
       
  • Changes in nursing students' expectations of nursing clinical faculties'
           competences: A longitudinal, mixed methods study
    • Authors: Robert Lovrić; Nada Prlić; Dragana Milutinović; Igor Marjanac; Boštjan Žvanut
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 September 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Robert Lovrić, Nada Prlić, Dragana Milutinović, Igor Marjanac, Boštjan Žvanut
      Background Changes in nursing students' expectations of their clinical nursing faculty competences over the course of time are an insufficiently researched phenomenon. Objectives To explore what competences BSc nursing students expect from their clinical faculties during their clinical training, and whether their expectations changed during their three-year studies. Furthermore, to survey factors which influenced their expectations and whether the fulfilment levels of their expectations influenced their feelings, learning, and behaviour. Design A two-phase, mixed-methods design was used. Settings The Higher Nursing Education Institution in Osijek, Croatia, European Union. Participants A cohort of 34 BSc nursing students, who were followed over the course of their three-year studies. Methods In Phase I, in each year, prior to their clinical training, participants responded to the same modified Nursing Clinical Teacher Effectiveness Inventory questionnaire about their expectations of clinical faculties' competences (52 items representing six categories of competences). In Phase II, seven days after their graduation, participants wrote reflections on the aforementioned expectations during their studies. Results The results show that Clinical faculties' evaluation of student was the category in which participants had the highest expectations in all three years. Results of Wilcoxon signed rank test indicate a significant increase of participants' expectations in all categories of clinical nursing faculties' competences during their study. Participants' reflections confirm these results and indicate that actual competences of clinical faculties and behaviour have the most significant effects on the change in these expectations. Participants reported that expectations, if fulfilled, facilitate their learning and motivation for better performance. Conclusions BSc nursing students' expectations of clinical nursing faculty competences represent an important concept, as they obviously determine the quality of faculty practice. Hence, they should be considered in the preparation, implementation, and evaluation phase of this vital part of nursing education.

      PubDate: 2017-09-10T12:34:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.08.013
       
  • Nursing students collaborating to develop multiple-choice exam revision
           questions: A student engagement study
    • Authors: Judy A. Craft; Martin Christensen; Natasha Shaw; Shannon Bakon
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 September 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Judy A. Craft, Martin Christensen, Natasha Shaw, Shannon Bakon
      Background Nursing students find bioscience subjects challenging. Bioscience exams pose particular concerns for these students, which may lead to students adopting a surface-approach to learning. Objectives To promote student collective understanding of bioscience, improve their confidence for the final exam, and improve deeper understanding of bioscience. Design In order to address exam anxiety, and improve student understanding of content, this student engagement project involved nursing students collaborating in small groups to develop multiple-choice questions and answers, which became available to the entire student cohort. Settings This study was conducted at two campuses of an Australian university, within a first year bioscience subject as part of the undergraduate nursing programme. Participants All students enrolled in the subject were encouraged to attend face-to-face workshops, and collaborate in revision question writing. Online anonymous questionnaires were used to invite student feedback on this initiative; 79 respondents completed this feedback. Methods Students collaborated in groups to write revision questions as part of in-class activities. These questions were made available on the student online learning site for revision. An online feedback survey was deployed at the conclusion of all workshops for this subject, with questions rated using a Likert scale. Results Participants indicated that they enjoyed the opportunity to collaborate in this activity, and almost all of these respondents used these questions in their exam preparation. There was strong agreement that this activity improved their confidence for the final exam. Importantly, almost two-thirds of respondents agreed that writing questions improved their understanding of content, and assisted in their active reflection of content. Conclusions Overall, this initiative revealed various potential benefits for the students, including promoting bioscience understanding and confidence. This may improve their long-term understanding of bioscience for nursing practice, as registered nurses' bioscience knowledge can impact on patient outcomes.

      PubDate: 2017-09-06T09:28:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.08.009
       
  • Reconciling professional identity: A grounded theory of nurse academics'
           role modelling for undergraduate students
    • Authors: A. Baldwin; J. Mills; M. Birks; L. Budden
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 September 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): A. Baldwin, J. Mills, M. Birks, L. Budden


      PubDate: 2017-09-06T09:28:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.08.010
       
  • The deepest personal truth - why the ability to detect it is useful for
           nurses: big ideas
    • Authors: Andrzej Brodziak; Agnieszka Wolińska; Alicja Różyk – Myrta
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 September 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Andrzej Brodziak, Agnieszka Wolińska, Alicja Różyk – Myrta


      PubDate: 2017-09-06T09:28:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.08.008
       
  • Uncontrolled variables in standardized psychiatric patient methodology
    • Authors: K. Ramos Dinsmore; L. Lee Glenn
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 September 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): K. Ramos Dinsmore, L. Lee Glenn


      PubDate: 2017-09-06T09:28:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.08.007
       
  • Crossing the Gender Boundaries: The Gender Experiences of Male Nursing
           Students in Initial Nursing Clinical Practice in Taiwan
    • Authors: Hsing-Yuan Liu; Yun Ling Li
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 September 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Hsing-Yuan Liu, Yun Ling Li
      Background The initial nursing clinical practice is the necessary practicum required for nursing students. Because of the changing learning style, many of them are under great pressure for environmental change and therefore their daily routine is severe affected. Interacting directly with patients in a female-dominated occupation, along with the general gender stereotypes, the impact is especially significant to male nursing students than to female nursing students. Purpose The purpose of this preliminary qualitative study is to explore the gendered experiences of male nursing students during their first initial nursing clinical practice. Methods Both focus group interviews and individual interviews are conducted with twenty-two sophomore nursing students from a university of technology in northern Taiwan, with ten male students and twelve female students. Results Two main themes emerge from the gendered experiences shared by the nursing students: Gender consciousness awakening and thus maintaining masculinity, and male advantage in the learning environments. Conclusions The results identify the specific gendered experiences of nursing students, providing implications for future nursing education and counseling service. Further, this study may serve to promote an active yet gender-sensitive nursing education for training nursing professionals.

      PubDate: 2017-09-06T09:28:52Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.08.006
       
  • Developing and Testing transferability and feasibility of a Model for
           Educators Using Simulation-Based Learning – A European Collaboration
    • Authors: Rikke Buus Bøje; Andrew Bland; Andrew Sutton; Tina Hartvigsen; Leena Hannula; Jaana Maija Koivisto; Eija Raussi-Lehto; Stephen Prescott
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 August 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Rikke Buus Bøje, Andrew Bland, Andrew Sutton, Tina Hartvigsen, Leena Hannula, Jaana Maija Koivisto, Eija Raussi-Lehto, Stephen Prescott
      Background There is a pragmatic and often inconsistent approach of embedding simulation-based learning into nursing programmes. This paper details a European collaboration that designed a model for educator facilitation for educators utilizing simulation-based education. Objectives The objectives of the study were to develop a model to educate the educators who deliver simulation-based learning and to test to which extent this model could be transferred to education providers in different national settings. Methods This model, its transferability and feasibility, was tested across three European countries. Educators from three Schools of Nursing participated in the study. Design-based Research was used as an overall methodology. Data were collected by the use of pre- and post- programme questionnaires and focus groups. Results The content of the NESTLED model is consistent with the needs of the participants. The testing also demonstrated that the model is transferable across-countries. Additionally, the participants´ preferences regarding amount of time and pre- reading for the different sessions varies depending on the background and level of seniority of the individual participant. Conclusion The testing of the NESTLED model demonstrated that participants gained confidence and knowledge from undertaking the programme. Delivering the NESTLED model across-countries was found to be feasible, but flexibility is required in terms of logistical delivery of the programme.

      PubDate: 2017-08-28T12:20:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.08.005
       
  • Experiences of Service Users Involved in Recruitment for Nursing Courses:
           A Phenomenological Research Study
    • Authors: Katie Stevens; Cathy Bernal; Kate Devis; Andrew Southgate
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 August 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Katie Stevens, Cathy Bernal, Kate Devis, Andrew Southgate
      The aim of this study was to gain insight into service users' experiences of participating in recruitment for Adult, Mental Health and Child nursing studies at the authors' university; to establish potential motivations behind such participation; and to make suggestions for improved future practice. The involvement of service users in nurse education and recruitment has for some years been required by the Nursing and Midwifery Council, but there is a dearth of publications on the meaning of that involvement to participating service users. It is hoped that this study will contribute to this body of knowledge. A phenomenological approach was selected, field-specific focus groups of service users being facilitated using a semi-structured interview format; these were audio recorded and transcribed. The data was analysed using thematic analysis. Participation was subject to the service users having been involved in recruitment to nursing studies at the authors' university and the focus groups took place either at the university or at the child participants' school. Themes identified demonstrated largely positive experiences and a sense of meaningful involvement for all concerned. Findings indicated a close link between the values of the participants and those of the wider NHS, benefits to a sense of wellbeing and achievement, as well as the need for greater ownership of the recruitment process by service users. Potential lessons for academics wishing to promote greater service user involvement in student recruitment are articulated.

      PubDate: 2017-08-18T11:56:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.08.001
       
  • Factors affecting nursing students' intention to report medication errors:
           An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior
    • Authors: Merav Ben Natan; Ira Sharon; Marlen Mahajna; Sara Mahajna
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 August 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Merav Ben Natan, Ira Sharon, Marlen Mahajna, Sara Mahajna
      Background Medication errors are common among nursing students. Nonetheless, these errors are often underreported. Objectives To examine factors related to nursing students' intention to report medication errors, using the Theory of Planned Behavior, and to examine whether the theory is useful in predicting students' intention to report errors. Design This study has a descriptive cross-sectional design. Settings Study population was recruited in a university and a large nursing school in central and northern Israel.

      PubDate: 2017-08-18T11:56:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.07.017
       
  • A research-based mantra for compassionate caring
    • Authors: Louise Terry; Roger Newham; Sinéad Hahessy; Siobhan Atherley; Yolanda Babenko-Mould; Marilyn Evans; Karen Ferguson; Graham Carr; S.H. Cedar
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 August 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Louise Terry, Roger Newham, Sinéad Hahessy, Siobhan Atherley, Yolanda Babenko-Mould, Marilyn Evans, Karen Ferguson, Graham Carr, S.H. Cedar
      Background The United Kingdom introduced the Six C′s strategy to help address deficits in approaching nursing care in a compassionate and caring manner. Objective To identify the book, article, poem, film or play that most influenced nurse educators' understanding of care and compassion and to articulate a clearer understanding of compassionate caring. Design A qualitative study applying discourse analysis to respondents' questionnaires and their nominated narrative. Settings and Participants 41 nurse educators working in 5 universities in the UK (n =3), Republic of Ireland and Canada participated. 39 items (10 books, 2 journal articles, 10 poems, 15 films and 2 plays) were nominated. Findings The desire to understand others and how to care compassionately characterised choices. Three main themes emerged. Abandonment of, and failure to see, the suffering person was evident in 25 narratives. Connecting with others was shown in 25 narratives as being able to truly seeing the other person. Comforting others was supported by 37 narratives with examples of kindness and compassion. Conclusion Published narratives are valuable in developing compassionate responses. An annotated list is provided with suggestions for educational uses to help develop compassionate caring in student nurses. Compassionate, caring nurses recognise that patients need them to: “See who I am; Be present with me; Do not abandon me.”

      PubDate: 2017-08-07T14:53:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.07.012
       
 
 
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