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Journal Cover Nurse Education Today
  [SJR: 0.958]   [H-I: 49]   [137 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0260-6917
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3089 journals]
  • An ethical exploration of standardized testing in nursing education
    • Authors: Diane A. Young
      Pages: 1 - 2
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Diane A. Young


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T07:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.10.012
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • Facilitating learning through an international virtual collaborative
           practice: A case study
    • Authors: Monne Wihlborg; Elizabeth E. Friberg; Karen M. Rose; Linda Eastham
      Pages: 3 - 8
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Monne Wihlborg, Elizabeth E. Friberg, Karen M. Rose, Linda Eastham
      Background Internationalisation of higher education involving information and communication technology such as e-learning opens opportunities for innovative learning approaches across nations and cultures. Objectives Describe a case in practice of collaborative and transformative learning in relation to ‘internationalisation on home grounds’ with the broader learning objective of ‘becoming aware and knowledgeable’. Design A mutually developed project established a virtual international collaborative exchange for faculty and students using a course management software (MOODLE) and open access technology (Adobe CONNECT). Settings Two research universities in Sweden and the United States. Participants Approximately 90 nursing students from each university per semester over several semesters. Methods A collaborative process to develop a joint learning community to construct a virtual module and learning activity involving academics and nursing students in two countries using principles of meaning construction and negotiated learning. Results Developed possibilities for dealing with the challenges and finding strategies for a future higher education system that opens dialogues worldwide. Conclusions Virtual international exchanges open innovative communication and learning contexts across nations and cultures. Internationalisation is so much more than students and teachers' mobility. ‘Internationalisation on home grounds’ (internationalisation for all) should receive more attention to support faculty and student collaboration, learning, and professional development.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T07:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.10.007
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • Factors associated with final year nursing students' desire to work in the
           primary health care setting: Findings from a national cross-sectional
           survey
    • Authors: Jacqueline G. Bloomfield; Christina Aggar; Tamsin H.T. Thomas; Christopher J. Gordon
      Pages: 9 - 14
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Jacqueline G. Bloomfield, Christina Aggar, Tamsin H.T. Thomas, Christopher J. Gordon
      Background Registered nurses are under-represented in the primary health care setting both internationally and in Australia, and this shortage is predicted to worsen. To address the increasingly complex healthcare needs of an ageing population, it is vital to develop and sustain a primary health care nursing workforce, yet attracting nurses is challenging. In Australia, registered nurses graduating from university typically commence their careers in hospital-based transition to professional practice programs. Similar programs in primary health care settings may be a valuable strategy for developing the primary health care nursing workforce, yet little is known about nursing students desire to work in this setting, factors that influence this, or their expectations of primary health care-focused transition to professional practice programs. Objectives This study sought to identify factors associated with final year nursing students' desire to work in primary health care setting including demographic factors, expectations of future employment conditions, and job content. It also explored expectations of graduate transition programs based in primary health care. Design A cross-sectional survey design comprising a quantitative online survey. Setting 14 Australian universities from all states/territories, both rural and urban. Participants 530 final-year nursing students. Methods Binary logistic regression identifying factors contributing to desire to work in primary health care. Results The desire of nursing students to work in primary health care is associated with older age, greater perceived value of employment conditions including flexibility, and less perceived importance of workplace support. Conclusions Collaborative efforts from primary health care nurses, health professionals, academics and policy makers are needed to attract new graduate nurses to primary health care.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T07:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.10.001
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • Face-to-face instruction combined with online resources improves retention
           of clinical skills among undergraduate nursing students
    • Authors: Victoria R. Terry; Peter C. Terry; Clint Moloney; Les Bowtell
      Pages: 15 - 19
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Victoria R. Terry, Peter C. Terry, Clint Moloney, Les Bowtell
      Background There is growing evidence that online resources used to develop clinical skills among students in the healthcare professions can produce equivalent learning outcomes to traditional face-to-face training methods. Whether clinical competence is retained equally well for online and face-to-face training methods is not yet established. Objectives The objective of the study was to compare retention of competence in using an IV infusion pump among nursing students trained in its use using three different protocols. Design A quasi-experimental design was used. Setting The study was conducted in the School of Nursing and Midwifery at a regional university in Queensland, Australia. Participants Participants were 102 first year nursing students (female=89, male=13) enrolled in a medications course, ranging in age from 18 to 44years. Methods Three groups of participants were trained in the use of an IV infusion pump and competence was assessed following a 26-week period of no access to the pump. Group 1 participants (ONL; n =34) were trained online using an Intravenous Pump Emulator (IVPE); Group 2 participants (ONC; n =38) were trained on campus using an actual IV pump in a traditional face-to-face setting; Group 3 participants (ONL+ONC; n =30) were trained both on campus using the actual IV pump and online using the IVPE. Results As hypothesised, no significant differences in learning outcomes, measured by assessment scores out of 80 points, were found between the ONL (M =68.7±5.9) and ONC (M =65.5±11.5; p >0.05) groups. The ONL+ONC group recorded the highest mean assessment score (M =70.0±5.0) and completed the assessment task significantly faster (p <0.001) than the other two groups. Conclusions This study suggests that nursing students retained clinical competence in preparing and administrating IV infusions better when face-to-face and online learning were combined.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T07:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.10.014
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • Beliefs and perceptions of mentorship among nursing faculty and
           traditional and accelerated undergraduate nursing students
    • Authors: Ann-Margaret Navarra; Amy Witkoski Stimpfel; Karla Rodriguez; Fidelindo Lim; Noreen Nelson; Larry Z. Slater
      Pages: 20 - 24
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Ann-Margaret Navarra, Amy Witkoski Stimpfel, Karla Rodriguez, Fidelindo Lim, Noreen Nelson, Larry Z. Slater
      Background In order to meet the demands of a dynamic and complex health care landscape, nursing education must develop and implement programming to produce a highly educated nursing workforce. Interprofessional honors education in nursing with targeted mentorship is one such model. Purpose To describe undergraduate nursing student and faculty perceptions and beliefs of mentorship in the context of interprofessional honors education, and compare and contrast the perceptions and beliefs about mentorship in interprofessional honors education between undergraduate nursing students and faculty. Methods The study used a cross-sectional, descriptive design. Data were collected at an urban university in the northeast US, using a researcher-developed electronic survey. The sample included 24 full-time nursing faculty, and 142 undergraduate nursing students. Results Perceptions and beliefs regarding mentorship in the context of interprofessional honors education were similar for faculty and students, with both ranking mentorship among the most important components of a successful honors program. Conclusions Honors education with a dedicated mentorship component may be implemented to improve the undergraduate education experience, facilitate advanced degree attainment, and develop future nursing leaders.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T07:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.10.009
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • Could we remedy the ‘crisis of care’ by incorporating mandatory group
           psychotherapy in nurse education'
    • Authors: Suzanne Bliss
      Pages: 25 - 27
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Suzanne Bliss
      This paper suggests a tentative proposal for nurse education that may go some way to remedying the ‘crisis of care’ described by Judge Francis and others. Any viable strategy to improve caring attitudes in nursing students must involve activities across the curriculum that foster self-awareness and empathy. It is suggested that the best way to do this is for all undergraduate nursing students to participate in regular, supervised group psychotherapy sessions as a mandated requirement for registration. This strategy would be helpful in at least two main ways. First, it would be enormously beneficial in terms of promoting emotional intelligence — a necessary requirement for providing ethical, person-centred care. Second, it would also serve as an excellent form of student support, which would likely improve student retention rates. This is because individuals with strong group support systems are less likely to become mentally or physically ill and are, therefore, more resilient. Finally, some possible objections to this proposal are considered.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T07:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.001
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • The role of personal resilience and personality traits of healthcare
           students on their attitudes towards interprofessional collaboration
    • Authors: Michal Avrech Bar; Michal Katz Leurer; Sigalit Warshawski; Michal Itzhaki
      Pages: 36 - 42
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Michal Avrech Bar, Michal Katz Leurer, Sigalit Warshawski, Michal Itzhaki
      Background Interprofessional collaboration (IPC) improves communication between healthcare workers and healthcare delivery. Interprofessional education (IPE) is essential in preparing healthcare students for cooperating with other healthcare disciplines in a real work setting. Although higher education settings have a responsibility to provide collaborative healthcare practice to students, IPE has not yet been prompted worldwide as a formal division in health professional education and in Israel IPE among health professions students is scarce. Objective To examine the attitudes of health professions students towards IPC in correlation with their personal resilience and personality traits. Design A descriptive cross-sectional design was used. Setting and Participants Participants were fourth year nursing, occupational therapy (OT), and physical therapy students studying in an academic undergraduate program at a School of Health Professions in a central university in Israel. Methods Attitudes were assessed with a questionnaire consisting of the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale, the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, the Big Five Inventory of personality dimensions, and a question evaluating students' experience with the PBL (Problem-Based Learning) method. Results Questionnaires were completed by 184 health professions students. Nursing students' perception of actual cooperation with other professions and their perceived competency and autonomy in their profession were slightly lower than those of other students. Among nursing students, positive correlations were found between competency & autonomy and resilience (p <0.01) and between competency & autonomy and agreeableness (p <0.05). Positive correlations were also found between their perception of actual cooperation with other professions and: resilience (p <0.01), agreeableness (p <0.05), conscientiousness (p <0.05), and openness (p <0.05). Only OT students were familiar with and experienced in the PBL method. This experience with PBL was found correlated with more positive attitudes towards competency and autonomy in the profession and higher positive perception of actual cooperation with other professions. Conclusions IPE, including PBL, should be integrated in health professions students' training.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T07:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.005
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • Effects of a service learning experience on confidence and clinical skills
           in baccalaureate nursing students
    • Authors: Jennifer Saylor; Lindsey Hertsenberg; Malissa McQuillan; Ashley O'Connell; Kimberly Shoe; Christina J. Calamaro
      Pages: 43 - 48
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Jennifer Saylor, Lindsey Hertsenberg, Malissa McQuillan, Ashley O'Connell, Kimberly Shoe, Christina J. Calamaro
      Background Camp programs yield positive and lasting benefits for children. Integrating a summer camp into a nurse course with a service learning design fosters learning beyond the classroom and enhances community engagement. Objective The purpose of this study is to describe the nursing students' experience and perceived confidence after completing a service learning nursing course. Design This is a descriptive, qualitative research study that used reflection and a perceived confidence questionnaire. Setting The study was conducted in a school of nursing and surrounding university campus facilities during the diabetes camp. Participants The participants (n =23) were nursing students who enrolled in the nursing course. Methods As part of the course requirements, students completed an eight item question confidence survey before and after the diabetes camp related to diabetes and camp management, and interpersonal abilities with patients, families, and healthcare professionals. Within 48–72h after diabetes camp, the students completed the reflection paper. The pre and post Confidence Surveys were analyzed using a t-test and thematic analysis was used to analyze the reflection paper. Results Overall, perceived confidence levels increased after completing the service learning course (t =−9.91, p =0.001). Four themes emerged from the qualitative analysis: pre-camp assumptions and fears, growth in confidence, understanding diabetes management in the community, and appreciation for learning beyond the classroom and hospital setting. Conclusions This service learning course provided nursing students the ability to not only develop diabetes clinical skills and perceived confidence, but also life skills including teamwork, leadership, and conflict resolution.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T07:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.009
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • Development of a group work assessment pedagogy using constructive
           alignment theory
    • Authors: Suzanne R. Croy
      Pages: 49 - 53
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Suzanne R. Croy
      The purpose of this paper is to explore group work assessment underpinned by constructive alignment theory to develop a new assessment pedagogy. A review was undertaken of an existing module ‘Mental Health Nursing 1’, with student nurses participating in the BSc (Hons) Nursing Programme. Constructive alignment theory requires teachers to adopt a deep approach to learning where module learning outcomes are aligned with the teaching environment and modes of assessment. As the module progressed, reviewing the Mental Health Nursing 1 module became an excellent opportunity to begin to understand how constructive alignment theory can inform a group work assessment pedagogy. Working using a constructively aligned assessment process became a valuable learning experience for the module leader whilst at the same time revealed a gap in the research around the impact of constructively aligned teaching and group work assessment.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T07:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.006
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • Language-specific skills in intercultural healthcare communication:
           Comparing perceived preparedness and skills in nurses' first and second
           languages
    • Authors: Jessica Gasiorek; Kris van de Poel
      Pages: 54 - 59
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Jessica Gasiorek, Kris van de Poel
      Background Interactions between people from different cultures are becoming increasingly commonplace in contemporary healthcare settings. To date, most research evaluating cross-cultural preparedness has assumed that medical professionals are speaking their first language (L1). However, as healthcare workers are increasingly mobile and patient populations are increasingly diverse, more and more interactions are likely to occur in a professional's non-native language (L2). Objectives This study assessed and compared nurses' perceived cross-cultural preparedness and skillfulness in their interactions with patients from other cultures when speaking both their L1 and L2. The goal of this project was to inform the creation of a communication skills training program. Design Nurses reported their perceived cross-cultural preparedness and skillfulness (scales adapted from Park et al., 2009) in their L1 and L2 via an online questionnaire. Settings This questionnaire was distributed among nurses working in Vienna, Austria, through the Vienna Hospital Association (VHA). Participants Nurses and nurses-in-training working in VHA hospitals participated. Most participants who provided demographic information were currently nurses (n =179) with an average of 16.88years (SD=11.50) of professional experience (range: 0–40); n =40 were nurses-in-training with an average of 2.13years (SD=0.88) of experience (range: 1–5). Methods Descriptive statistics for each cross-cultural preparedness and skillfulness (in each language) are reported; comparisons between L1 and L2 responses were also conducted. Multiple regression analyses were used to identify predictors of preparedness and L1/L2 skillfulness. Results Nurses reported feeling significantly less confident in their skills when working in an L2, across a range of culture-related issues. Having had previous communication skills training predicted (better) self-reported L2 skillfulness, although it did not predict L1 skillfulness. Conclusions These results indicate that there is a language-specific component to cross-cultural skillfulness. Thus, there is a need for language-specific skills training to address L2 skill deficits.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T07:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.008
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • Reflective seminaries grounded in caring science and lifeworld theory –
           A phenomenological study from the perspective of nursing students
    • Authors: Elisabeth Lindberg; Pernilla Karlsson; Susanne Knutsson
      Pages: 60 - 65
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Elisabeth Lindberg, Pernilla Karlsson, Susanne Knutsson


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T07:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.016
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • An evaluation into the impact of undergraduate nursing students classroom
           attendance and engagement with online tasks on overall academic
           achievement
    • Authors: Carolyn Mackintosh-Franklin
      Pages: 89 - 93
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Carolyn Mackintosh-Franklin


      PubDate: 2017-12-02T11:47:23Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.017
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • Effects of using mobile device-based academic electronic medical records
           for clinical practicum by undergraduate nursing students: A
           quasi-experimental study
    • Authors: Mona Choi; HyeongSuk Lee; Joon Ho Park
      Pages: 112 - 119
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Mona Choi, HyeongSuk Lee, Joon Ho Park
      Introduction The academic electronic medical record (AEMR) system is applied with the expectation that nursing students will be able to attain competence in healthcare decision-making and nursing informatics competencies. However, there is insufficient evidence regarding the advantage of applying mobile devices to clinical practicum. Objectives This study aimed to examine the effect of an experiment that introduced a mobile AEMR application for undergraduate nursing students in their practicum. Methods A quasi-experimental design was used. The subjects were 75 third-year nursing students enrolled in clinical practicum and were divided into an experimental (practicum with AEMR) and a control (conventional practicum) group. Nursing informatics competencies, critical thinking disposition, and satisfaction with clinical practicum were measured before and after the clinical practicum for each group. The usability of the AEMR application was also examined for the experimental group after the experiment. Results After the experiment, the experimental group showed a significant increase in the informatics knowledge domain of nursing informatics competencies in the post-test. The difference in critical thinking between the experimental and control groups was not statistically significant. Regarding satisfaction with the clinical practicum, the experimental group exhibited a significantly higher level of satisfaction in “preparation of a diagnostic test or laboratory test and understanding of the results” and “nursing intervention and documentation” than the control group. Students who participated in the practicum using the AEMR application considered it useful. Conclusions The AEMR application was an effective educational method for practicing the immediate documentation of students' observations and interventions and was available at the patients' bedsides. To improve critical thinking, it is necessary to apply a variety of approaches when solving clinical problems.

      PubDate: 2017-12-02T11:47:23Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.018
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • A mixed methods evaluation of team-based learning for applied
           pathophysiology in undergraduate nursing education
    • Authors: Jonathan Branney; Jacqueline Priego-Hernández
      Pages: 127 - 133
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Jonathan Branney, Jacqueline Priego-Hernández
      Background It is important for nurses to have a thorough understanding of the biosciences such as pathophysiology that underpin nursing care. These courses include content that can be difficult to learn. Team-based learning is emerging as a strategy for enhancing learning in nurse education due to the promotion of individual learning as well as learning in teams. Objectives In this study we sought to evaluate the use of team-based learning in the teaching of applied pathophysiology to undergraduate student nurses. Design A mixed methods observational study. Methods In a year two, undergraduate nursing applied pathophysiology module circulatory shock was taught using Team-based Learning while all remaining topics were taught using traditional lectures. After the Team-based Learning intervention the students were invited to complete the Team-based Learning Student Assessment Instrument, which measures accountability, preference and satisfaction with Team-based Learning. Students were also invited to focus group discussions to gain a more thorough understanding of their experience with Team-based Learning. Exam scores for answers to questions based on Team-based Learning-taught material were compared with those from lecture-taught material. Results Of the 197 students enrolled on the module, 167 (85% response rate) returned the instrument, the results from which indicated a favourable experience with Team-based Learning. Most students reported higher accountability (93%) and satisfaction (92%) with Team-based Learning. Lectures that promoted active learning were viewed as an important feature of the university experience which may explain the 76% exhibiting a preference for Team-based Learning. Most students wanted to make a meaningful contribution so as not to let down their team and they saw a clear relevance between the Team-based Learning activities and their own experiences of teamwork in clinical practice. Exam scores on the question related to Team-based Learning-taught material were comparable to those related to lecture-taught material. Conclusions Most students had a preference for, and reported higher accountability and satisfaction with Team-based Learning. Through contextualisation and teamwork, Team-based Learning appears to be a strategy that confers strong pedagogical benefits for teaching applied pathophysiology (bioscience) to student nurses.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T07:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.014
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • Organizational learning in a college of nursing: A learning history
    • Authors: Bret Lyman; Lisa A. Cowan; Hannah C. Hoyt
      Pages: 134 - 139
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Bret Lyman, Lisa A. Cowan, Hannah C. Hoyt
      Background College of nursing leaders can foster organizational learning as a means of achieving their desired organizational outcomes. Organizational learning has not previously been studied in colleges of nursing, leaving college administrators and faculty little guidance as they strive to improve outcomes in their own colleges. Objectives The purpose of this study was to discover new insights related to organizational learning in a college of nursing. Design The learning history method was used to document and describe organizational learning in a college of nursing. Setting This study was conducted with a college of nursing situated in a private, religious-based university in the western United States. Participants Six stakeholders and 16 individuals familiar with the college's history were purposively recruited for this study. Participants included college administrators, faculty, students, alumni, and individuals with university-level responsibilities related to the college. Methods Semi-structured interviews and college artifacts were used to gather data. Data was reviewed and themes identified through a process called “distillation.” Findings The college's vision, “Learning the Healer's Art” provides purpose and motivation within the college. Four themes provide additional insight into how the college established a learning culture and fosters behavior conducive to organizational learning: (1) Character and Quality, (2) Long-Term Perspective, (3) Collaborative Leadership and Adaptation, and (4) Mentoring. Conclusion College of nursing leaders can foster organizational learning and pursue improvement within their colleges. Recommended actions include developing a shared vision for the college, building a cadre of qualified faculty and students who have strong personal character, maintaining a long-term perspective, using a collaborative approach to leadership and adaptation, and facilitating mentoring.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T07:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.004
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • Action research and millennials: Improving pedagogical approaches to
           encourage critical thinking
    • Authors: Gwen Erlam; Liz Smythe; Valerie Wright-St Clair
      Pages: 140 - 145
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Gwen Erlam, Liz Smythe, Valerie Wright-St Clair
      Background This article examines the effects of intergenerational diversity on pedagogical practice in nursing education. While generational cohorts are not entirely homogenous, certain generational features do emerge. These features may require alternative approaches in educational design in order to maximize learning for millennial students. Method Action research is employed with undergraduate millennial nursing students (n=161) who are co-researchers in that they are asked for changes in current simulation environments which will improve their learning in the areas of knowledge acquisition, skill development, critical thinking, and communication. These changes are put into place and a re-evaluation of the effectiveness of simulation progresses through three action cycles. Results Millennials, due to a tendency for risk aversion, may gravitate towards more supportive learning environments which allow for free access to educators. This tendency is mitigated by the educator modeling expected behaviors, followed by student opportunity to repeat the behavior. Millennials tend to prefer to work in teams, see tangible improvement, and employ strategies to improve inter-professional communication. Conclusion This research highlights the need for nurse educators working in simulation to engage in critical discourse regarding the adequacy and effectiveness of current pedagogy informing simulation design. Pedagogical approaches which maximize repetition, modeling, immersive feedback, and effective communication tend to be favored by millennial students.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T07:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.023
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • The first clinical practice experiences of psychiatric nursing students: A
           phenomenological study
    • Authors: Satı Demir; Feride Ercan
      Pages: 146 - 152
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Satı Demir, Feride Ercan
      Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate student nurses clinical experiences during their first clinical contacts with psychiatric patients by using a qualitative phenomenological approach. Design A phenomenological approach was used. Face-to-face interviews were conducted to collect data focusing on the reality of student nurses' experience. Settings This study was conducted at a university in the capital city of Turkey. Participants The participants were undergraduate nursing students. A purposive sampling of 15 students who had completed their first psychiatric clinical practicum was used in this study. Methods The data were collected by using unstructured interviews. The data were analysed by using Colaizzi's seven-step phenomenological method. Results Four themes were identified: theoretical information insufficient to break the stigma; breaking down the mental illness stigma; communication: the medication of mental illness; and personal development. Conclusion At the end of clinical practice, stigma towards mental illness was reduced with empathy through the development of therapeutic relationships. The students stated that communication had a very important place in the treatment of mental illnesses and that psychiatric clinical practice helped them develop interpersonal relations. The results of this study can provide guidance for educators on the planning and development of clinical education.

      PubDate: 2017-12-02T11:47:23Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.019
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • Nursing students' experiences with refugees with mental health problems in
           Jordan: A qualitative content analysis
    • Authors: Camilla Dotevall; Elin Winberg; Kristina Rosengren
      Pages: 155 - 161
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Camilla Dotevall, Elin Winberg, Kristina Rosengren
      Objectives The aim of this study was to describe Jordanian nursing students' experience of caring for refugees with mental health problems. Background According to refugees' experiences of crisis, a well-educated staff is needed to provide high quality of care due to mental health problems. Therefore, health professionals play an important role in creating an environment that promotes human rights regardless of ethnic origin. Settings, Participants, Method The study comprised eight interviews and was analysed using content analysis, a qualitative method that involves an inductive approach, to increase our understanding of nursing students' perspective and thoughts regarding caring for refugees with mental health problems. Results The results formed one category: to be challenged by refugees' mental health issues and three subcategories: managing refugees' mental health needs, affected by refugees' mental health, and improve mental healthcare for refugees. Conclusion Language problems could be managed by using interpreters to decrease cultural clashes to facilitate equal healthcare. In addition, well-educated (theoretical knowledge) and trained (practical knowledge) nursing students have potential to fulfil refugees' care needs regardless of ethnicity or background by using nursing interventions built on communication skills and cultural competences (theory, practice) to facilitate high quality of healthcare.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T07:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.025
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • Adaptation and pretesting of the College Persistence Questionnaire V3
           (Short Form) for measuring intention to persist among Aboriginal Diploma
           of Nursing students
    • Authors: Judith D. Pugh; Jennifer H. Cramer; Susan Slatyer; Diane E. Twigg; Melanie Robinson
      Pages: 162 - 168
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Judith D. Pugh, Jennifer H. Cramer, Susan Slatyer, Diane E. Twigg, Melanie Robinson
      Background Culturally appropriate health care delivery is essential to improve health outcomes for Aboriginal peoples. There is a shortage of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander nurses partly due to disproportionately high non-completion rates among tertiary sector students. The College Persistence Questionnaire V3 (Short Form) provides scales for gauging major predictors of retention. Objective To adapt an instrument for measuring intention to persist among Aboriginal Diploma of Nursing students. Design Instrument adaptation and pretesting. Participants A convenience sample of Aboriginal Diploma of Nursing students (N =21) at a registered training organisation in Australia. Methods The instrument was mapped against the domain of interest and modified. Ten experts reviewed its content validity; its reading ease and educational grade reading level were assessed. Results The expert panel endorsed individual items as valid (item-level Content Validity Index 0.90–1.00) and scale-level validation was acceptable (average scale-level Content Validity Index=0.98). The minimally-adapted instrument was ‘fairly easy’ to read and suitable for general adult audiences (Flesch Reading Ease score 71.3) and was below the United States 8th grade reading level (Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level 6.7). Students took <30min to complete the questionnaire. All understood its purpose, found instructions clear, and questions easy to answer. Most rated its length ‘Just right’. Conclusion The College Persistence Questionnaire – Registered Training Organisation Version appears suitable for assessing factors influencing retention/attrition among Aboriginal Diploma of Nursing students. Piloting and psychometric evaluation is recommended.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T07:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.021
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • Measuring critical thinking in pre-registration midwifery students: A
           multi-method approach
    • Authors: Amanda G. Carter; Debra K. Creedy; Mary Sidebotham
      Pages: 169 - 174
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Amanda G. Carter, Debra K. Creedy, Mary Sidebotham
      Objective Test the concurrent validity of three newly developed tools (student self-rating, preceptor rating, and reflective writing) that aim to measure critical thinking in midwifery practice. Design A descriptive matched cohort design was used. Setting Australian research intensive university offering a three year Bachelor of Midwifery programme. Sample Fifty-five undergraduate midwifery students. Methods Students assessed their ability to apply critical thinking in midwifery practice using a 25-item tool and a 5-item subscale in Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire. Clinical preceptors completed a 24-item tool assessing the students' application of critical thinking in practice. Reflective writing by students was assessed by midwifery academics using a 15-item tool. Internal reliability, and concurrent validity were assessed. Correlations, t-tests, multiple regression and confidence levels were calculated for the three scales and associations with student characteristics. Results The three scales achieved good internal reliability with a Cronbach's alpha coefficient between 0.93 and 0.97. Matched total scores for the three critical thinking scales were moderately correlated; student/preceptor (r =0.36, p <0.01); student/reflective writing (r =0.38, p <0.01); preceptor/reflective writing (r =0.30, p <0.05). All critical thinking mean scores were higher for students with a previous degree, but only significant for reflective writing (t (53)=−2.35, p =0.023). Preceptor ratings were predictive of GPA (beta =0.50, p <0.001, CI=0.10 to 0.30). Students' self-rating scores were predictive of year level (beta =0.32, p <0.05, CI=0.00 to 0.03). Conclusion The student, preceptor, and reflective writing tools were found to be reliable and valid measures of critical thinking. The three tools can be used individually or in combination to provide students with various sources of feedback to improve their practice. The tools allow formative measurement of critical thinking over time. Further testing of the tools with larger, diverse samples is recommended.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T07:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.026
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • Nursing students learning the pharmacology of diabetes mellitus with
           complexity-based computerized models: A quasi-experimental study
    • Authors: Ilana Dubovi; Efrat Dagan; Ola Sader Mazbar; Laila Nassar; Sharona T. Levy
      Pages: 175 - 181
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Ilana Dubovi, Efrat Dagan, Ola Sader Mazbar, Laila Nassar, Sharona T. Levy
      Background Pharmacology is a crucial component of medications administration in nursing, yet nursing students generally find it difficult and self-rate their pharmacology skills as low. Objectives To evaluate nursing students learning pharmacology with the Pharmacology Inter-Leaved Learning-Cells environment, a novel approach to modeling biochemical interactions using a multiscale, computer-based model with a complexity perspective based on a small set of entities and simple rules. This environment represents molecules, organelles and cells to enhance the understanding of cellular processes, and combines these cells at a higher scale to obtain whole-body interactions. Participants Sophomore nursing students who learned the pharmacology of diabetes mellitus with the Pharmacology Inter-Leaved Learning-Cells environment (experimental group; n =94) or via a lecture-based curriculum (comparison group; n =54). Methods A quasi-experimental pre- and post-test design was conducted. The Pharmacology-Diabetes-Mellitus questionnaire and the course's final exam were used to evaluate students' knowledge of the pharmacology of diabetes mellitus. Results Conceptual learning was significantly higher for the experimental than for the comparison group for the course final exam scores (unpaired t =−3.8, p <0.001) and for the Pharmacology-Diabetes-Mellitus questionnaire (U =942, p <0.001). The largest effect size for the Pharmacology-Diabetes-Mellitus questionnaire was for the medication action subscale. Analysis of complex-systems component reasoning revealed a significant difference for micro-macro transitions between the levels (F(1, 82)=6.9, p <0.05). Conclusions Learning with complexity-based computerized models is highly effective and enhances the understanding of moving between micro and macro levels of the biochemical phenomena, this is then related to better understanding of medication actions. Moreover, the Pharmacology Inter-Leaved Learning-Cells approach provides a more general reasoning scheme for biochemical processes, which enhances pharmacology learning beyond the specific topic learned. The present study implies that deeper understanding of pharmacology will support nursing students' clinical decisions and empower their proficiency in medications administration.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T07:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.022
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • Utilisation of academic nursing competence in Europe — A survey among
           members of the European Academy of Nursing Science
    • Authors: Tove Aminda Hanssen; Pia Riis Olsen
      Pages: 187 - 193
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Tove Aminda Hanssen, Pia Riis Olsen
      Background In line with national and international strategies in Europe, the number of nurses with a doctoral degree has increased. The European Academy of Nursing Science (EANS) has for 18years delivered a three-year doctoral summer school for nurses. Questions have been raised in terms of how academic nurses' competencies are used and in what positions. Aim To understand the progression of nurses' academic careers following completion of the EANS Summer School and to picture how research and academic skills of the nurses are being used for research and/or other fields in nursing. Methods We commenced a cross-sectional survey. Former EANS Summer School participants were invited to take part in the online survey with questions developed specifically for this study. The study conformed to the principle of good clinical research practice and was reviewed and approved by the EANS Board. Results Of 380 former participants, 308 were eligible for participating in the survey. A total of 140 (45%) responded. The respondents originated from 21 countries. Sixty-nine percent had their main position in universities or university colleges and 25% in healthcare organisations. More than 80% were involved in research, teaching and supervision, and 26% were involved in direct client/patients care while 71% reported doing postdoctoral research where descriptive research designs dominated. The research topics covered a large variety of aspects in clinical nursing, education, development and theory. Conclusion The EANS Summer School is an example of an effort to improve nurses' academic competencies. The survey indicates that the competencies of academically trained nurses in Europe primarily are used in universities and educational institutions. However, a large proportion is working close to and in collaboration with clinical practice. Evidence of the legacy of having undergone the EANS Summer School includes using advanced research methods and collaboration with the international EANS network.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T07:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.020
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • Helping nursing students unblock empathy: A big idea from William James
    • Authors: Christine Sorrell Dinkins
      Pages: 194 - 196
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 61
      Author(s): Christine Sorrell Dinkins


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T07:05:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.027
      Issue No: Vol. 61 (2017)
       
  • Teaching global health using crowd-sourcing with Missing Maps
    • Authors: Patricia Schwerdtle; Benjamin Herfort
      Pages: 1 - 2
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 60
      Author(s): Patricia Schwerdtle, Benjamin Herfort


      PubDate: 2017-10-11T08:51:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.09.013
      Issue No: Vol. 60 (2017)
       
  • Using reusable learning objects (RLOs) in wound care education:
           Undergraduate student nurse's evaluation of their learning gain
    • Authors: Catherine Redmond; Carmel Davies; Deirdre Cornally; Ewa Adam; Orla Daly; Marianne Fegan; Margaret O'Toole
      Pages: 3 - 10
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 60
      Author(s): Catherine Redmond, Carmel Davies, Deirdre Cornally, Ewa Adam, Orla Daly, Marianne Fegan, Margaret O'Toole
      Background Both nationally and internationally concerns have been expressed over the adequacy of preparation of undergraduate nurses for the clinical skill of wound care. This project describes the educational evaluation of a series of Reusable Learning Objects (RLOs) as a blended learning approach to facilitate undergraduate nursing students learning of wound care for competence development. Constructivism Learning Theory and Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning informed the design of the RLOs, promoting active learner approaches. Clinically based case studies and visual data from two large university teaching hospitals provided the authentic learning materials required. Interactive exercises and formative feedback were incorporated into the educational resource. Methods Evaluation of student perceived learning gains in terms of knowledge, ability and attitudes were measured using a quantitative pre and posttest Wound Care Competency Outcomes Questionnaire. The RLO CETL Questionnaire was used to identify perceived learning enablers. Statistical and deductive thematic analyses inform the findings. Results Students (n =192) reported that their ability to meet the competency outcomes for wound care had increased significantly after engaging with the RLOs. Students rated the RLOs highly across all categories of perceived usefulness, impact, access and integration. Conclusion These findings provide evidence that the use of RLOs for both knowledge-based and performance-based learning is effective. RLOs when designed using clinically real case scenarios reflect the true complexities of wound care and offer innovative interventions in nursing curricula.

      PubDate: 2017-10-11T08:51:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.09.014
      Issue No: Vol. 60 (2017)
       
  • Evaluating best educational practices, student satisfaction, and
           self-confidence in simulation: A descriptive study
    • Authors: Karen A. Zapko; Mary Lou Gemma Ferranto; Rachael Blasiman; Debra Shelestak
      Pages: 28 - 34
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 60
      Author(s): Karen A. Zapko, Mary Lou Gemma Ferranto, Rachael Blasiman, Debra Shelestak
      Background The National League for Nursing (NLN) has endorsed simulation as a necessary teaching approach to prepare students for the demanding role of professional nursing. Questions arise about the suitability of simulation experiences to educate students. Empirical support for the effect of simulation on patient outcomes is sparse. Most studies on simulation report only anecdotal results rather than data obtained using evaluative tools. Objectives The aim of this study was to examine student perception of best educational practices in simulation and to evaluate their satisfaction and self-confidence in simulation. Design This study was a descriptive study designed to explore students' perceptions of the simulation experience over a two-year period. Using the Jeffries framework, a Simulation Day was designed consisting of serial patient simulations using high and medium fidelity simulators and live patient actors. Setting The setting for the study was a regional campus of a large Midwestern Research 2 university. Participants The convenience sample consisted of 199 participants and included sophomore, junior, and senior nursing students enrolled in the baccalaureate nursing program. Methods The Simulation Days consisted of serial patient simulations using high and medium fidelity simulators and live patient actors. Participants rotated through four scenarios that corresponded to their level in the nursing program. Data was collected in two consecutive years. Participants completed both the Educational Practices Questionnaire (Student Version) and the Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning Scale. Results Results provide strong support for using serial simulation as a learning tool. Students were satisfied with the experience, felt confident in their performance, and felt the simulations were based on sound educational practices and were important for learning. Conclusions Serial simulations and having students experience simulations more than once in consecutive years is a valuable method of clinical instruction. When conducted well, simulations can lead to increased student satisfaction and self-confidence.

      PubDate: 2017-12-02T11:47:23Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.09.006
      Issue No: Vol. 60 (2017)
       
  • Glimpses into the transition world: New graduate nurses' written
           reflections
    • Authors: Jo Ann Walton; Natalie Lindsay; Caz Hales; Helen Rook
      Pages: 62 - 66
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 60
      Author(s): Jo Ann Walton, Natalie Lindsay, Caz Hales, Helen Rook
      Background This study was born out of our reflections as educators responsible for helping new graduate nurses transition into their first year of professional practice through a formal education programme. Finding ourselves wondering about many of the questions the students raised with us, we set about looking more closely at what could be gleaned from the students' experience, captured in their written work over the course of a year. Objectives To identify the challenges and learning experiences revealed in reflective assignments written by new graduate nurses undertaking a postgraduate course as part of their transition to registered nurse practice. Study Design, Setting and Participants Data consisted of the written work of two cohorts of students who had completed a postgraduate university course as part of their transition to new graduate practice in New Zealand. Fifty four reflective essays completed by twenty seven participating students were collected and their contents analysed thematically. Results Five key themes were identified. The students' reflections noted individual attributes - personal and professional strengths and weaknesses; professional behaviour - actions such as engaging help and support, advocating for patients' needs and safety and putting their own feelings aside; situational challenges such as communication difficulties, both systemic and interpersonal, and the pressure of competing demands. Students also identified rewards - results they experienced such as achieving the nursing outcomes they desired, and commented on reflection as a useful tool. Conclusions The findings shed light on the experiences of new graduates, and how they fare through this critical phase of career development. Challenges relating to the emotional labour of nursing work are particularly evident. In addition the reflective essay is shown to be a powerful tool for assisting both new graduate nurses and their lecturers to reflect on the learning opportunities inherent in current clinical practice environments.

      PubDate: 2017-12-02T11:47:23Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.09.022
      Issue No: Vol. 60 (2017)
       
  • Haiku to enhance student learning: Experiences from a pathophysiology
           classroom
    • Authors: Heather A. Lewis
      Pages: 98 - 100
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 60
      Author(s): Heather A. Lewis


      PubDate: 2017-10-24T14:31:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.09.018
      Issue No: Vol. 60 (2017)
       
  • Antibiotic stewardship: The role of clinical nurses and nurse educators
    • Authors: Sharon Sumner; Sandra Forsyth; Katreena Collette-Merrill; Caroline Taylor; Todd Vento; John Veillette; Brandon Webb
      Pages: 157 - 160
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 60
      Author(s): Sharon Sumner, Sandra Forsyth, Katreena Collette-Merrill, Caroline Taylor, Todd Vento, John Veillette, Brandon Webb


      PubDate: 2017-11-12T16:25:47Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.10.011
      Issue No: Vol. 60 (2017)
       
  • Academic misconduct – helping students retain their moral compass
    • Authors: Steve Tee; Kathy Curtis
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 December 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Steve Tee, Kathy Curtis


      PubDate: 2017-12-02T11:47:23Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.030
       
  • Supporting those who work and learn: A phenomenological research study
    • Authors: Claire Thurgate
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Claire Thurgate
      Aim With a shift in the United Kingdom's National Health Service to organisational learning and the local introduction of the Assistant Practitioner role to support the nursing workforce there was a broad need to understand the lived experiences of those who work and learn. Method Hermeneutic phenomenology was the chosen methodology. A purposive sample of eight trainee assistant practitioners, four matrons, seven mentors and the practice development nurse participated in conversational interviews at intermittent points in the journey. Results A stepped process of analysis produced three over-arching super-ordinate themes which indicated that the transition to assistant practitioner is non-linear and complex necessitating a change in knowledge and behaviour and the workplace culture must enable learning and role development. This paper focuses on supporting the journey which encompassed learning at university and learning in the workplace. Conclusion Participants' stories demonstrated the presence of knowledgeable mentors and a learning culture enabled new roles to be supported.

      PubDate: 2017-11-18T11:07:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.010
       
  • Psychometric Evaluation of the Environmental Reality Shock-Related Issues
           and Concerns Instrument for Newly Graduated Nurses
    • Authors: Eun-Young Kim; Jung Hee Yeo; Hyunjeong Park; Kyung Mi Sin; Cheryl B. Jones
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Eun-Young Kim, Jung Hee Yeo, Hyunjeong Park, Kyung Mi Sin, Cheryl B. Jones
      Background Reality shock is a critical representation of the gap between nursing education and clinical practice and it is important to explore the level of reality shock among nurses. However, there is no relevant instrument to assess the level of reality shock in South Korea. Objectives The purpose of this is to determine the validity and reliability of the Korean version of the Environmental Reality Shock-Related Issues and Concerns instrument. Design A cross-sectional study design was used in this study. Settings. The data collection was conducted in selected 15 hospitals in South Korea. Participants A convenience sample of 216 newly graduated nurses participated in the study. Methods The Korean version of the Environmental Reality Shock-Related Issues and Concerns instrument was developed through the forward-backward translation technique, and revision based on feedback from expert groups. The internal consistency reliability was assessed using Cronbach's alpha, and the construct validity was determined via exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Results The Korean version of the Environmental Reality Shock-Related Issues and Concerns has reliable internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.91). Exploratory factor analysis revealed five factors including job, relationships, expectations, private life, and performance, which explained 61.92% of variance. The factor loadings ranged from 0.451 to 0.832. The five-factor structure was validated by confirmatory factor analysis (RMR<0.05, CFI>0.9). Conclusion It was concluded that the Korean version of the Environmental Reality Shock-Related Issues and Concerns instrument has satisfactory construct validity and reliability to measure the reality shock of newly graduated nurses in South Korea.

      PubDate: 2017-11-18T11:07:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.003
       
  • Experiences of nursing undergraduates on a redesigned blended
           communication module: A descriptive qualitative study
    • Authors: Shefaly Shorey; An Ling Siew; Emily Ang
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Shefaly Shorey, An Ling Siew, Emily Ang
      Background Education is going through accelerated changes to accommodate the needs of contemporary students. However, there are ongoing concerns regarding the quality of education in communication skills for nurses and other healthcare professionals. Many studies have been conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a blended learning pedagogical tool in enhancing the learning of nursing undergraduates. However, little is known about students’ experiences of a blended learning model for teaching communication skills. Objective To explore first year nursing students’ experiences of the blended learning design adopted in a communication module. Design A descriptive qualitative design was adopted. Settings and Participants Data were collected in the form of written reflections from 74 first year nursing undergraduates who were enrolled in a university-affiliated nursing school. Methods Students were asked to complete an online reflective exercise regarding an undergraduate communication module on their last day of class, and the submitted reflections were analyzed. A thematic analysis was conducted and ethics approval was obtained for this study. Results Six overarching themes and fifteen subthemes were generated. The six overarching themes were: 1) Helpful and engaging classroom experience, 2) Valuable online activities, 3) Meaningful assessment, 4) Appreciation for interprofessional education, 5) Personal enrichment, and 6) Overall feedback and recommendations. Conclusions The students in this study felt that the blended pedagogy communication module enhanced their learning and boosted their confidence in facing similar situations. Interprofessional education was well-accepted among students as they attained a deeper understanding on the importance of interprofessional learning and an appreciation towards other professionals. Blended pedagogy can be used in teaching communication skills to nursing students to provide a holistic and up-to-date learning experience. Future studies should consider engaging students in face-to-face interviews to obtain a deeper understanding on their experiences of a blended pedagogy incorporated communication module.

      PubDate: 2017-11-18T11:07:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.012
       
  • Influence of undergraduate nursing student teaching methods on learning
           standard precautions and transmission-based precautions: Experimental
           research
    • Authors: Maria Soledad Kappes Ramirez
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Maria Soledad Kappes Ramirez
      Objectives An experimental study was performed with undergraduate nursing students in order to determine, between two methodologies, which is the best for learning standard precautions and precautions based on disease transmission mechanisms. Methods Students in the sample are stratified by performance, with the experimental group (49 students) being exposed to self-instruction and clinical simulation on the topic of standard precautions and special precautions according to disease transmission mechanisms. Conventional classes on the same topics were provided to the control group (49 students). Results The experimental group showed the best performance in the multiple-choice post-test of knowledge (p=0.002) and in the assessment of essay questions (p=0.043), as well as in the evaluation of a simulated scenario, in relation to the control group. Conclusions This study demonstrates that it is possible to transfer some teaching subjects on the prevention of Healthcare Associated Infections (HAIs) to self-learning by means of virtual teaching strategies with good results. This allows greater efficiency in the allocation of teachers to clinical simulation or learning situations in the laboratory, where students can apply what they have learned in the self-instruction module.

      PubDate: 2017-11-18T11:07:15Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.007
       
  • The development and testing of the nursing student perceptions of
           dishonesty scale
    • Authors: Emily L. McClung; Joanne Kraenzle Schneider
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 November 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Emily L. McClung, Joanne Kraenzle Schneider
      Background Dishonesty in the classroom suggests dishonesty in practice. There is need to better understand nursing students’ perceptions of dishonest behaviors in the classroom and clinical setting. There is currently no instrument to assess perceptions in the classroom and clinical setting. Objective The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument to assess nursing students’ perceptions of academically dishonest behaviors in the classroom and clinical setting. Design Mixed Methods Instrument Development Study Participants 971 BSN students Method Using the results from a content synthesis of the literature and a small qualitative study, we created the Nursing Student Perceptions of Dishonesty Scale (NSPDS) and examined its psychometric properties. Results Factor analysis suggests strong loading of subscales in both settings with two comparable categories allow for correlation of perceptions in the classroom and clinical settings. Cronbach’s alpha values begin to establish reliability and PAF with Promax rotation and correlational analysis begin to establish validity. Conclusion This NSPDS can help researchers and educators understand more clearly nursing students’ perceptions of dishonesty. This will allow for the creation of individualized, and therefore more effective, interventions to reduce dishonest behaviors of nursing students. Further work is needed to strengthen reliability and validity.

      PubDate: 2017-11-12T16:25:47Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.11.002
       
  • Design principles for simulation games for learning clinical reasoning: A
           design-based research approach
    • Authors: J.-M. Koivisto; E. Haavisto; H. Niemi; P. Haho; S. Nylund; J. Multisilta
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 October 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): J.-M. Koivisto, E. Haavisto, H. Niemi, P. Haho, S. Nylund, J. Multisilta
      Background Nurses sometimes lack the competence needed for recognising deterioration in patient conditions and this is often due to poor clinical reasoning. There is a need to develop new possibilities for learning this crucial competence area. In addition, educators need to be future oriented; they need to be able to design and adopt new pedagogical innovations. The purpose of the study is to describe the development process and to generate principles for the design of nursing simulation games. Method A design-based research methodology is applied in this study. Iterative cycles of analysis, design, development, testing and refinement were conducted via collaboration among researchers, educators, students, and game designers. Results The study facilitated the generation of reusable design principles for simulation games to guide future designers when designing and developing simulation games for learning clinical reasoning. Conclusion This study makes a major contribution to research on simulation game development in the field of nursing education. The results of this study provide important insights into the significance of involving nurse educators in the design and development process of educational simulation games for the purpose of nursing education.

      PubDate: 2017-10-24T14:31:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.nedt.2017.10.002
       
  • Concept mapping to promote meaningful learning, help relate theory to
           practice and improve learning self-efficacy in Asian mental health nursing
           students: A mixed-methods pilot study
    • Authors: Daniel Bressington; Wai-kit Wong Kar Kei Claire Lam Wai Tong
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Nurse Education Today, Volume 60
      Author(s): Daniel T. Bressington, Wai-kit Wong, Kar Kei Claire Lam, Wai Tong Chien
      Objectives Student nurses are provided with a great deal of knowledge within university, but they can find it difficult to relate theory to nursing practice. This study aimed to test the appropriateness and feasibility of assessing Novak's concept mapping as an educational strategy to strengthen the theory-practice link, encourage meaningful learning and enhance learning self-efficacy in nursing students. Design This pilot study utilised a mixed-methods quasi-experimental design. Setting The study was conducted in a University school of Nursing in Hong Kong. Participants A total of 40 third-year pre-registration Asian mental health nursing students completed the study; 12 in the concept mapping (CM) group and 28 in the usual teaching methods (UTM) group. Methods The impact of concept mapping was evaluated thorough analysis of quantitative changes in students' learning self-efficacy, analysis of the structure and contents of the concept maps (CM group), a quantitative measure of students' opinions about their reflective learning activities and content analysis of qualitative data from reflective written accounts (CM group). Results There were no significant differences in self-reported learning self-efficacy between the two groups (p=0.38). The concept mapping helped students identify their current level of understanding, but the increased awareness may cause an initial drop in learning self-efficacy. The results highlight that most CM students were able to demonstrate meaningful learning and perceived that concept mapping was a useful reflective learning strategy to help them to link theory and practice. Conclusions The results provide preliminary evidence that the concept mapping approach can be useful to help mental health nursing students visualise their learning progress and encourage the integration of theoretical knowledge with clinical knowledge. Combining concept mapping data with quantitative measures and qualitative reflective journal data appears to be a useful way of assessing and understanding the effectiveness of concept mapping. Future studies should utilise a larger sample size and consider using the approach as a targeted intervention immediately before and during clinical learning placements.

      PubDate: 2017-10-11T08:51:55Z
       
  • Service user engagement in healthcare education as a mechanism for value
           based recruitment: An evaluation study
    • Authors: Vanessa Heaslip; Janet Scammell Anne Mills Ashley Spriggs Andrea Addis
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 October 2017
      Source:Nurse Education Today
      Author(s): Vanessa Heaslip, Janet Scammell, Anne Mills, Ashley Spriggs, Andrea Addis, Mandy Bond, Carolyn Latchford, Angela Warren, Juliet Borwell, Stephen Tee
      Aim Within the United Kingdom (UK) there is an increasing focus on Values Based Recruitment (VBR) of staff working in the National Health Service (NHS) in response to public inquiries criticising the lack of person-centred care. All NHS employees are recruited on the basis of a prescribed set of values. This is extended to the recruitment of student healthcare professionals, yet there is little research of how to implement this. Involving Service Users in healthcare educational practice is gaining momentum internationally, yet involvement of service users in VBR of ‘would be’ healthcare professionals remains at an embryonic phase. Adult nurses represent the largest healthcare workforce in the UK, yet involvement of service users in their recruitment has received scant attention. This paper is an evaluation of the inclusion of service users in a VBR of 640 adult student nurses. Background Design. This study used a participatory mixed methods approach, with service users as co-researchers in the study. Methods The study consisted of mixed methods design. Quantitative data via an online questionnaire to ascertain candidates' perspectives (n =269 response rate of 42%), and academic/clinical nurses (n =35 response rate 34.65%). Qualitative data were gathered using focus groups and one to one interviews with service users (n =9). Data analysis included descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. Findings. 4 overarching themes were identified; increasing sense of humanness, substantiating care values; impact of involvement; working together and making it work, a work in progress. Conclusion the findings from the study highlight that involving service users in VBR of student healthcare professionals has benefits to candidates, service users and local health services. Appreciating the perceptions of healthcare professionals is fundamental in the UK and internationally to implementing service users' engagement in service enhancement and delivery. Findings from this study identify there may be a dissonance between the policy, the nurses' thoughts and their practice.

      PubDate: 2017-10-11T08:51:55Z
       
 
 
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