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New Library World
Number of Followers: 665  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0307-4803 - ISSN (Online) 2398-5348
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • #BookTokMadeMeReadIt: young adult reading communities across an
           international, sociotechnical landscape

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      Authors: Marianne Martens , Gitte Balling , Kristen A. Higgason
      Abstract: This research article presents an exploratory case study of the sociotechnical landscape of BookTok, and how young people use it to connect with others around the books they love, or those they love to hate. By observing the interplay between young people, books, and the technology (TikTok) that connects them, this study aims to explore how blending analog and digital media tools makes reading social and fun. The authors selected three bestsellers available in English and Danish, and BookTokers who made related videos. This study used a qualitative, ethnographic (Pink, 2021) approach to explore interactions on the app. Inductive coding (Saldaña, 2021) helped the authors identify themes, and connect to areas of inquiry. During the pandemic, TikTok and BookTok offered young people opportunities for reading engagement in social, bookish communities by using technology to promote reading in print. In doing so, their actions made reading and being a reader highly entertaining. As an exploratory case study, this research is not generalizable. But the findings will apply to future work on reading, publishing, and connected learning in a sociotechnical landscape. BookTok connects print and digital formats, offering innovative possibilities for young people’s connected learning and reading promotion in schools and libraries. Because TikTok is a relatively new tool, and its sub-community BookTok became popular during the COVID-19 pandemic, research on this topic is still in its earliest stages.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-11-30
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-07-2022-0086
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Reflections on adolescent literacy as sociocultural practice

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      Authors: Denise E. Agosto
      Abstract: This paper aims to discuss the concept of “literacy” within the new literacy, new literacies and library and information science (LIS) discourses. It proposes widening the prevailing LIS conceptualization of adolescent literacy, which focuses largely on information literacy in academic settings, to a broader, information practice-based, sociocultural framing that encompasses the full range of adolescents’ everyday life contexts. The author presents a literature review and personal reflection on a series of adolescent information activities to show the value of framing the LIS discourse on adolescent literacy within a broader sociocultural perspective. Based on the discussion, the author proposes a framework for future investigations of adolescents’ literacy practices that views adolescent literacy as fundamentally social and communicative; multiformat; multicontextual; multigenerational; and culturally situated. A broader sociocultural approach to the LIS information literacy discourse can lead to deeper understanding of the co-constructed and collaborative nature of adolescents’ new literacies practices. It can also enable stronger recognition of the impact of power and privilege on adolescent literacy practices. Finally, this essay shows the value of reflecting on adolescent information activities for challenging narrow views of literacy and highlights the social embeddedness of new literacies activities in adolescents’ everyday lives.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-11-23
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-02-2022-0013
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Representational scaffolding in digital simulations – learning
           professional practices in higher education

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      Authors: Frank Fischer , Elisabeth Bauer , Tina Seidel , Ralf Schmidmaier , Anika Radkowitsch , Birgit J. Neuhaus , Sarah I. Hofer , Daniel Sommerhoff , Stefan Ufer , Jochen Kuhn , Stefan Küchemann , Michael Sailer , Jenna Koenen , Martin Gartmeier , Pascal Berberat , Anne Frenzel , Nicole Heitzmann , Doris Holzberger , Jürgen Pfeffer , Doris Lewalter , Frank Niklas , Bernhard Schmidt-Hertha , Mario Gollwitzer , Andreas Vorholzer , Olga Chernikova , Christian Schons , Amadeus J. Pickal , Maria Bannert , Tilman Michaeli , Matthias Stadler , Martin R. Fischer
      Abstract: To advance the learning of professional practices in teacher education and medical education, this conceptual paper aims to introduce the idea of representational scaffolding for digital simulations in higher education. This study outlines the ideas of core practices in two important fields of higher education, namely, teacher and medical education. To facilitate future professionals’ learning of relevant practices, using digital simulations for the approximation of practice offers multiple options for selecting and adjusting representations of practice situations. Adjusting the demands of the learning task in simulations by selecting and modifying representations of practice to match relevant learner characteristics can be characterized as representational scaffolding. Building on research on problem-solving and scientific reasoning, this article identifies leverage points for employing representational scaffolding. The four suggested sets of representational scaffolds that target relevant features of practice situations in simulations are: informational complexity, typicality, required agency and situation dynamics. Representational scaffolds might be implemented in a strategy for approximating practice that involves the media design, sequencing and adaptation of representational scaffolding. The outlined conceptualization of representational scaffolding can systematize the design and adaptation of digital simulations in higher education and might contribute to the advancement of future professionals’ learning to further engage in professional practices. This conceptual paper offers a necessary foundation and terminology for approaching related future research.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-11-09
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-06-2022-0076
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Experiences of the Ukrainian adolescents during the Russia-Ukraine 2022
           War

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      Authors: Irene Lopatovska , Kirtika Arora , Flita Veleny Fernandes , Anjali Rao , Simona Sivkoff-Livneh , Brianna Stamm
      Abstract: The study aims to explore the current experiences of Ukrainian adolescents affected by the Russia-Ukraine war. The study focused on the changes in adolescents’ lives caused by the war, adolescents’ emotional reactions to the disruptions caused by the war, coping strategies employed by adolescents in dealing with disruptions and the role of information technology in supporting new realities and coping strategies of adolescents. This study relied on semi-structured interviews conducted on Zoom with 27 Ukrainian adolescents ages 10-18. Participants were recruited using the snowball sample and came from various regions of Ukraine. The interview notes and partial transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis to identify the common and unique patterns in participant responses. The interview data revealed the signs of traumatic experiences and various stages and methods of coping with them. Participants’ resilience was supported by external factors, including families, communities, continuous schooling, ability to talk to friends, information technology, as well as internal skills, including social competence, problem-solving, critical consciousness, autonomy and a sense of purpose. Participants shared specific recommendations for improving information platforms and online content, e.g. making them more accessible and affordable for Ukrainian users, improving content curation and personalization, creating and promoting Ukrainian content and others. Research relied on convenience sample of participants who had access to information communication technology (ICT), were aware and had an ability to participate. Field work is needed to reach out to participants without access to ICT. This study contains broad recommendations for improving information technologies for the use of Ukrainian adolescents. This research offers three timely account of the first-hand experiences of Ukrainian adolescents affected by the Russia-Ukraine war and can inform future work aimed at improving life conditions for teen population. This study relied on first-hand reports of Ukrainian adolescents’ experiences, feelings and coping strategies during the first three months of Russia-Ukraine war. The study applied war trauma and resilience frameworks to interpret the findings and translate some of the findings into practical recommendations for the information science community.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-07-2022-0093
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • School enculturation discourse: a meta synthesis from research in the
           learning sciences

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      Authors: Yotam Hod , Ornit Sagy
      Abstract: Enculturation is a central and defining idea within socioculturally minded research that informs the design of school learning environments. Now, three decades since the idea has emerged in the field, the authors believe it is time to reflect on it because of several ambiguities that have emerged from its use, which is the purpose of this study The authors carried out a metasynthesis of learning scientists’ school enculturation discourse. This included reviewing the concept within 84 articles found in six leading and relevant learning sciences journals. This study’s findings show that school enculturation discourse is divided between those that view it unidirectionally, bidirectionally or both, and that three reifications of associated cultures (authentic, designed and traditional) together with various conduits frame the way learning environments are designed to facilitate enculturation. This metasynthesis can help advance sociocultural research in schools by clarifying the meaning and conceptualization of a central idea in the field. This study can help teachers and educational researchers clarify the role that culture has in the designs of their learning environments. Culture is a vital facet of learning; designers of learning environments need to understand the way culture interplays with learning. As this research shows, current school enculturation discourse is vague and often appears to be applied inconsistently. It is vital for any field to reflect on its own discourse to sharpen the conceptual tools that it uses so that it can advance.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-09-20
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-11-2021-0103
      Issue No: Vol. 123 , No. 9/10 (2022)
       
  • Exploring learning opportunities for students in open data portal use
           across data literacy levels

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      Authors: Ak Wai Li , Luanne S. Sinnamon , Rick Kopak
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to explore open data portals as data literacy learning environments. The authors examined the obstacles faced and strategies used by university students as non-expert open data portal users with different levels of data literacy, to inform the design of portals intended to scaffold informal and situated learning. The authors conducted an observational user study, in which 14 student participants grouped by self-reported data literacy measures carried out assigned tasks in an open data portal. Data were collected through screen capture, think-aloud protocols and post-session interviews. Participants experienced numerous challenges in finding and using data, with some variation shown between the different literacy groups. The higher data literacy group primarily faced challenges using unfamiliar tools, which may be addressed by improving system usability, while the lower data literacy group struggled due to gaps in basic understanding, which may be addressed by increasing point of need instruction and guidance. Participants used several learning strategies but primarily relied upon trial and error, which was less effective for low data literacy users. This study is unique in comparing open data portal use among adult students across data literacy levels through an empirical user study. It contributes methodologically by proposing an instrument for data literacy assessment. It offers a novel perspective on information systems as sites for informal learning and skills development, beyond the immediate goals of system use, and offers concrete suggestions for the future design of open data portals for students and non-expert, citizen users.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-09-15
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-01-2022-0003
      Issue No: Vol. 123 , No. 9/10 (2022)
       
  • The technical matters: young children debugging (with) tangible coding
           toys

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      Authors: Deborah Silvis , Victor R. Lee , Jody Clarke-Midura , Jessica F. Shumway
      Abstract: Much remains unknown about how young children orient to computational objects and how we as learning scientists can orient to young children as computational thinkers. While some research exists on how children learn programming, very little has been written about how they learn the technical skills needed to operate technologies or to fix breakdowns that occur in the code or the machine. The purpose of this study is to explore how children perform technical knowledge in tangible programming environments. The current study examines the organization of young children’s technical knowledge in the context of a design-based study of Kindergarteners learning to code using robot coding toys, where groups of children collaboratively debugged programs. The authors conducted iterative rounds of qualitative coding of video recordings in kindergarten classrooms and interaction analysis of children using coding robots. The authors found that as children repaired bugs at the level of the program and at the level of the physical apparatus, they were performing essential technical knowledge; the authors focus on how demonstrating technical knowledge was organized pedagogically and collectively achieved. Drawing broadly from studies of the social organization of technical work in professional settings, we argue that technical knowledge is easy to overlook but essential for learning to repair programs. The authors suggest how tangible programming environments represent pedagogically important contexts for dis-embedding young children’s essential technical knowledge from the more abstract knowledge of programming.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-07-26
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-12-2021-0109
      Issue No: Vol. 123 , No. 9/10 (2022)
       
  • The kids are alright: adolescents’ experiences during COVID-19
           disruption

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      Authors: Irene Lopatovska , Radhika Garg , Olivia Turpin , Ji Hee Yoon , Laura Vroom , Diedre Brown
      Abstract: This study aimed to understand adolescents’ experiences, negative feelings and coping mechanisms associated with the major disruption caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. The purpose of this study was to develop a baseline for understanding adolescents and their environment to assist future developments of technological and other solutions to mitigate adolescents’ loneliness, improve their wellbeing and strengthen their resilience. The data about adolescents’ experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic was collected through virtual interviews conducted via Zoom. A total of 39 adolescents (aged 12 through 18 years) primarily from the North East of the USA participated in the study. The transcripts of the interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis. This study found evidence of negative disruptions to adolescents’ social, learning and emotional routines. This study also found that in dealing with the effects of COVID-19 disruption, most of the participants exhibited five key attributes of individual resilience, including social competence, problem-solving, critical consciousness, autonomy and a sense of purpose. External factors supporting resilience were also mentioned, including technology resources, family, school and broader community. This study relied on first-hand adolescents’ reports of their experiences, feelings and coping strategies during the pandemic. This study applied a resilience framework to interpret the findings and translate them into recommendations for further development of support systems for adolescents.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-11-2021-0096
      Issue No: Vol. 123 , No. 9/10 (2022)
       
  • Can an angry pedagogical agent enhance mental effort and learning
           performance in a multimedia learning environment'

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      Authors: Tze Wei Liew , Su-Mae Tan , Si Na Kew
      Abstract: This study aims to examine if a pedagogical agent’s expressed anger, when framed as a feedback cue, can enhance mental effort and learning performance in a multimedia learning environment than expressed happiness. A between-subjects experiment was conducted in which learners engaged with a multimedia learning material that taught programming algorithms, featuring a pedagogical agent who expressed anger or happiness as a feedback cue in response to the learners’ prior performance. Learners completed a self-reported scale and post-test for measuring mental effort and learning performance, respectively. Female learners reported higher mental effort and had better learning performance when the pedagogical agent expressed anger than happiness. Male learners reported marginally lower mental effort when the pedagogical agent expressed anger than happiness. This study focuses on a pedagogical agent’s expressed emotion as social information to learners. Extending from research advocating a pedagogical agent’s positive emotional expression, this study highlights the potential benefits of a pedagogical agent’s negative emotional expression, such as anger, as a cue for learners to enhance learning effort and performance in a multimedia learning environment.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-09-2021-0079
      Issue No: Vol. 123 , No. 9/10 (2022)
       
  • Information and Learning Sciences

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