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New Library World
Number of Followers: 714  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 3 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 0307-4803 - ISSN (Online) 2398-5348
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Teaching data storytelling as data literacy

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      Authors: Kate McDowell, Matthew J. Turk
      Abstract: Data storytelling courses position students as agents in creating stories interpreted from data about a social problem or social justice issue. The purpose of this study is to explore two research questions: What themes characterized students’ iterative development of data story topics' Looking back at six years of iterative feedback, what categories of data literacy pedagogy did instructors engage for these themes'. This project examines six years of data storytelling final projects using thematic analysis and three years of instructor feedback. Ten themes in final projects align with patterns in feedback. Reflections on pedagogical approaches to students’ topic development suggest extending data literacy pedagogy categories – formal, personal and folk (Pangrazio and Sefton-Green, 2020). Data storytelling can develop students’ abilities to move from being consumers to creators of data and interpretations. The specific topic of personal data exposure or risk has presented some challenges for data literacy instruction (Bowler et al., 2017). What “personal” means in terms of data should be defined more broadly. Extending the data literacy pedagogy categories of formal, personal and folk (Pangrazio and Sefton-Green, 2020) could more effectively center social justice in data literacy instruction. Implications for practice include positioning students as producers of data interpretation, such as role-playing data analysis or decision-making scenarios. Data storytelling has the potential to address current challenges in data literacy pedagogy and in teaching critical data literacy. Course descriptions provide a template for future data literacy pedagogy involving data storytelling, and findings suggest implications for expanding definitions and applications of personal and folk data literacies.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2024-04-30
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-06-2023-0068
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Critical pedagogy and disability in participatory research: a review

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      Authors: Emma May
      Abstract: The literature review explores how multidisciplinary approaches based on critical pedagogy and participatory research can provide frameworks for equitable partnerships and genuine participation in educational design and research practices. Additionally, the essay aims to expand understandings of equitable engagement within educational research and design based on principles from critical pedagogy. The essay draws from diverse literature in the learning sciences, health informatics, industrial design, disability studies, ethnic studies, rehabilitation science, and to a lesser extent HCI research to understand how critical pedagogy and participatory research methods can provide useful frameworks for disabled peoples' equitable engagement and genuine participation in educational research and design. The literature reviewed in the paper concern topics such as participatory approaches to community development with disabled adults, the implementation of university-initiated community partnerships, participatory research with students and disabled people, and the importance of culturally-responsive research practices. The design literature in this review explores various arenas such as the co-design of assistive technologies with disabled children and adults and the design of curricula for students with and without disabilities. This review focuses on research practices that engender disabled peoples' participation in educational research and design, with focus on developing multidisciplinary frameworks for such research. The literature review concludes that participatory research methods and critical pedagogy provide useful frameworks for disabled peoples’ participation in educational design and research practices. Critical pedagogy and participatory design allow for the genuine participation of disabled people in the research process. Emphases on collaboration and collective knowledge-building in social transformation are present in scholarship concerning critical pedagogy, participatory research, and disability studies. However, these connections have been routinely underexplored in the literature. This paper aims to underscore these integral connections as a means to build solidarity between disabled and other marginalized people. The connections between participatory research methods, critical pedagogy, and disability studies have been previously underexplored. The literature review proposes a combined approach, which has the potential to radically transform multiple realms of research beyond the learning and information sciences.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2024-02-28
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-02-2023-0021
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • High school teachers’ data set aesthetics

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      Authors: Victoria Delaney, Victor R. Lee
      Abstract: With increased focus on data literacy and data science education in K-12, little is known about what makes a data set preferable for use by classroom teachers. Given that educational designers often privilege authenticity, the purpose of this study is to examine how teachers use features of data sets to determine their suitability for authentic data science learning experiences with their students. Interviews with 12 practicing high school mathematics and statistics teachers were conducted and video-recorded. Teachers were given two different data sets about the same context and asked to explain which one would be better suited for an authentic data science experience. Following knowledge analysis methods, the teachers’ responses were coded and iteratively reviewed to find themes that appeared across multiple teachers related to their aesthetic judgments. Three aspects of authenticity for data sets for this task were identified. These include thinking of authentic data sets as being “messy,” as requiring more work for the student or analyst to pore through than other data sets and as involving computation. Analysis of teachers’ aesthetics of data sets is a new direction for work on data literacy and data science education. The findings invite the field to think critically about how to help teachers develop new aesthetics and to provide data sets in curriculum materials that are suited for classroom use.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-06-2023-0063
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Data literacy in the new EU DigComp 2.2 framework how DigComp defines
           competences on artificial intelligence, internet of things and data

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Leo Van Audenhove, Lotte Vermeire, Wendy Van den Broeck, Andy Demeulenaere
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to analyse data literacy in the new Digital Competence Framework for Citizens (DigComp 2.2). Mid-2022 the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission published a new version of the DigComp (EC, 2022). This new version focusses more on the datafication of society and emerging technologies, such as artificial intelligence. This paper analyses how DigComp 2.2 defines data literacy and how the framework looks at this from a societal lens. This study critically examines DigComp 2.2, using the data literacy competence model developed by the Knowledge Centre for Digital and Media Literacy Flanders-Belgium. The examples of knowledge, skills and attitudes focussing on data literacy (n = 84) are coded and mapped onto the data literacy competence model, which differentiates between using data and understanding data. Data literacy is well-covered in the framework, but there is a stronger emphasis on understanding data rather than using data, for example, collecting data is only coded once. Thematically, DigComp 2.2 primarily focusses on security and privacy (31 codes), with less attention given to the societal impact of data, such as environmental impact or data fairness. Given the datafication of society, data literacy has become increasingly important. DigComp is widely used across different disciplines and now integrates data literacy as a required competence for citizens. It is, thus, relevant to analyse its views on data literacy and emerging technologies, as it will have a strong impact on education in Europe.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2024-02-08
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-06-2023-0072
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Community-based learning and data literacy: the role of the public library

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      Authors: Sein Oh, Lorri Mon
      Abstract: By examining types of literacies taught by public libraries and the modes through which these programs were offered, this study aims to explore how public libraries might integrate data literacy training for the general public into existing library educational programs. This study examined programs offered in 30 US public libraries during 2019 and 2020 to better understand types of literacy education announced to the public through library website listings and Facebook Events pages. While public libraries offered educational programs in literacy areas ranging from basic reading and writing to technology, vocational skills, health literacy and more, data literacy training was not widely offered. However, this study identified many already-existing programs highly compatible for integrating with data literacy training. This study offered new insights into both the literacies taught in public library programs as well as ways for public libraries to integrate data literacy training into existing educational programming, in order to better provide data literacy education for the general public.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2024-01-12
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-06-2023-0078
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2024)
       
  • Guest editorial: Special issue – perspectives on data literacies

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      Authors: Amelia Acker, Leanne Bowler, Luci Pangrazio
      Abstract: Guest editorial: Special issue – perspectives on data literacies
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2024-04-08
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-03-2024-266
      Issue No: Vol. 125, No. 3/4 (2024)
       
  • Orienting privacy literacy toward social change
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Priya C. Kumar
      Abstract: This article advocates that privacy literacy research and praxis mobilize people toward changing the technological and social conditions that discipline subjects toward advancing institutional, rather than community, goals. This article analyzes theory and prior work on datafication, privacy, data literacy, privacy literacy and critical literacy to provide a vision for future privacy literacy research and praxis. This article (1) explains why privacy is a valuable rallying point around which people can resist datafication, (2) locates privacy literacy within data literacy, (3) identifies three ways that current research and praxis have conceptualized privacy literacy (i.e. as knowledge, as a process of critical thinking and as a practice of enacting information flows) and offers a shared purpose to animate privacy literacy research and praxis toward social change and (4) explains how critical literacy can help privacy literacy scholars and practitioners orient their research and praxis toward changing the conditions that create privacy concerns. This article uniquely synthesizes existing scholarship on data literacy, privacy literacy and critical literacy to provide a vision for how privacy literacy research and praxis can go beyond improving individual understanding and toward enacting social change.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2023-12-29
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-06-2023-0061
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Engaging elementary students in data science practices

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      Authors: Ibrahim Oluwajoba Adisa, Danielle Herro, Oluwadara Abimbade, Golnaz Arastoopour Irgens
      Abstract: This study is part of a participatory design research project and aims to develop and study pedagogical frameworks and tools for integrating computational thinking (CT) concepts and data science practices into elementary school classrooms. This paper describes a pedagogical approach that uses a data science framework the research team developed to assist teachers in providing data science instruction to elementary-aged students. Using phenomenological case study methodology, the authors use classroom observations, student focus groups, video recordings and artifacts to detail ways learners engage in data science practices and understand how they perceive their engagement during activities and learning. Findings suggest student engagement in data science is enhanced when data problems are contextualized and connected to students’ lived experiences; data analysis and data-based decision-making is practiced in multiple ways; and students are given choices to communicate patterns, interpret graphs and tell data stories. The authors note challenges students experienced with data practices including conflict between inconsistencies in data patterns and lived experiences and focusing on data visualization appearances versus relationships between variables. Data science instruction in elementary schools is an understudied, emerging and important area of data science education. Most elementary schools offer limited data science instruction; few elementary schools offer data science curriculum with embedded CT practices integrated across disciplines. This research assists elementary educators in fostering children's data science engagement and agency while developing their ability to reason, visualize and make decisions with data.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2023-12-29
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-06-2023-0062
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • A critical (theory) data literacy: tales from the field

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      Authors: Annette Markham, Riccardo Pronzato
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore how critical digital and data literacies are facilitated by testing different methods in the classroom, with the ambition to find a pedagogical framework for prompting sustained critical literacies. This contribution draws on a 10-year set of critical pedagogy experiments conducted in Denmark, USA and Italy, and engaging more than 1,500 young adults. Multi-method pedagogical design trains students to conduct self-oriented guided autoethnography, situational analysis, allegorical mapping, and critical infrastructure analysis. The techniques of guided autoethnography for facilitating sustained data literacy rely on inviting multiple iterations of self-analysis through sequential prompts, whereby students move through stages of observation, critical thinking, critical theory-informed critique around the lived experience of hegemonic data and artificial intelligence (AI) infrastructures. Critical digital/data literacy researchers should continue to test models for building sustained critique that not only facilitate changes in behavior over time but also facilitate citizen social science, whereby participants use these autoethnographic techniques with friends and families to build locally relevant critique of the hegemonic power of data/AI infrastructures. The proposed literacy model adopts a critical theory stance and shows the value of using multiple modes of intervention at micro and macro levels to prompt self-analysis and meta-level reflexivity for learners. This framework places critical theory at the center of the pedagogy to spark more radical stances, which is contended to be an essential step in moving students from attitudinal change to behavioral change.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2023-12-26
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-06-2023-0087
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The data awareness framework as part of data literacies in K-12 education

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      Authors: Lukas Höper, Carsten Schulte
      Abstract: In today’s digital world, data-driven digital artefacts pose challenges for education, as many students lack an understanding of data and feel powerless when interacting with them. This paper aims to address these challenges and introduces the data awareness framework. It focuses on understanding data-driven technologies and reflecting on the role of data in everyday life. The paper also presents an empirical study on young school students’ data awareness. The study involves a teaching unit on data awareness framed by a pre- and post-test design using a questionnaire on students’ awareness and understanding of and reflection on data practices of data-driven digital artefacts. The study’s findings indicate that the data awareness framework supports students in understanding data practices of data-driven digital artefacts. The findings also suggest that the framework encourages students to reflect on these data practices and think about their daily behaviour. Students learn a model about interactions with data-driven digital artefacts and use it to analyse data-driven applications. This approach appears to enable students to understand these artefacts from everyday life and reflect on these interactions. The work contributes to research on data and artificial intelligence literacies and suggests a way to support students in developing self-determination and agency during interactions with data-driven digital artefacts.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-06-2023-0075
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Promoting students’ informal inferential reasoning through
           arts-integrated data literacy education

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      Authors: Camillia Matuk, Ralph Vacca, Anna Amato, Megan Silander, Kayla DesPortes, Peter J. Woods, Marian Tes
      Abstract: Arts-integration is a promising approach to building students’ abilities to create and critique arguments with data, also known as informal inferential reasoning (IIR). However, differences in disciplinary practices and routines, as well as school organization and culture, can pose barriers to subject integration. The purpose of this study is to describe synergies and tensions between data science and the arts, and how these can create or constrain opportunities for learners to engage in IIR. The authors co-designed and implemented four arts-integrated data literacy units with 10 teachers of arts and mathematics in middle school classrooms from four different schools in the USA. The data include student-generated artwork and their written rationales, and interviews with teachers and students. Through maximum variation sampling, the authors identified examples from the data to illustrate disciplinary synergies and tensions that appeared to support different IIR processes among students. Aspects of artistic representation, including embodiment, narrative and visual image; and aspects of the culture of arts, including an emphasis on personal experience, the acknowledgement of subjectivity and considerations for the audience’s perspective, created synergies and tensions that both offered and hindered opportunities for IIR (i.e. going beyond data, using data as evidence and expressing uncertainty). This study answers calls for humanistic approaches to data literacy education. It contributes an interdisciplinary perspective on data literacy that complements other context-oriented perspectives on data science. This study also offers recommendations for how designers and educators can capitalize on synergies and mitigate tensions between domains to promote successful IIR in arts-integrated data literacy education.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2023-12-18
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-07-2023-0088
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • “For students shall not live by Zoom alone”: psychological factors
           explaining the engagement of students during the COVID-19

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      Authors: Tali Gazit
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to obtain valuable insights into students’ engagement and experiences within the virtual learning environment, especially in the context of crises. Among the innumerable challenges people throughout the world faced during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, those of students in institutions of higher education needing to engage in online academic studies are of special interest. Using an online survey, this study could predict students’ online engagement during the COVID-19 pandemic through three theoretical frameworks: the students’ academic motivation to study, the Big Five personality traits, and loneliness, and with a new tool measuring the participation in the Zoom platform. To examine the psychological and technological factors predicting the students’ engagement, this study surveyed 547 students from different academic institutions of higher learning. Findings show that the less lonely the students felt, the less neurotic they were, and the higher they scored in levels of extroversion, agreeableness, consciousnesses and openness to experience, the greater their engagement in their academic studies. In addition, students who were older, more educated, with higher intrinsic motivation and lower lack of motivation were more engaged in their online academic studies. Finally, participating in classes through the Zoom platform and experiencing it positively was a significant predictor of higher academic engagement. Recognizing these factors can enable educators, institutions of higher learning, counselling services and students to obtain tools for higher engagement in online learning.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2023-12-07
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-02-2023-0019
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Teen-adult interactions during the co-design of data literacy activities
           for the public library: insights from a natural language processing
           analysis of linguistic patterns

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      Authors: Leanne Bowler, Irene Lopatovska, Mark S. Rosin
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to explore teen-adult dialogic interactions during the co-design of data literacy activities in order to determine the nature of teen thinking, their emotions, level of engagement, and the power of relationships between teens and adults in the context of data literacy. This study conceives of co-design as a learning space for data literacy. It investigates the teen–adult dialogic interactions and what these interactions say about the nature of teen thinking, their emotions, level of engagement and the power relationships between teens and adults. The study conceives of co-design as a learning space for teens. Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC-22), a natural language processing (NLP) software tool, was used to examine the linguistic measures of Analytic Thinking, Clout, Authenticity, and Emotional Tone using transcriptions of recorded Data Labs with teens and adults. Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC-22), a natural language processing (NLP) software tool, was used to examine the linguistic measures of Analytic Thinking, Clout, Authenticity and Emotional Tone using transcriptions of recorded Data Labs with teens and adults. LIWC-22 scores on the linguistic measures Analytic Thinking, Clout, Authenticity and Emotional Tone indicate that teens had a high level of friendly engagement, a relatively low sense of power compared with the adult co-designers, medium levels of spontaneity and honesty and the prevalence of positive emotions during the co-design sessions. This study provides a concrete example of how to apply NLP in the context of data literacy in the public library, mapping the LIWC-22 findings to STEM-focused informal learning. It adds to the understanding of assessment/measurement tools and methods for designing data literacy education, stimulating further research and discussion on the ways to empower youth to engage more actively in informal learning about data. This study applies a novel approach for exploring teen engagement within a co-design project tasked with the creation of youth-oriented data literacy activities.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2023-12-07
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-06-2023-0076
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Using network visualizations to engage elementary students in locally
           relevant data literacy

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      Authors: Mengxi Zhou, Selena Steinberg, Christina Stiso, Joshua A. Danish, Kalani Craig
      Abstract: This study aims to explore how network visualization provides opportunities for learners to explore data literacy concepts using locally and personally relevant data. The researchers designed six locally relevant network visualization activities to support students’ data reasoning practices toward understanding aggregate patterns in data. Cultural historical activity theory (Engeström, 1999) guides the analysis to identify how network visualization activities mediate students’ emerging understanding of aggregate data sets. Pre/posttest findings indicate that this implementation positively impacted students’ understanding of network visualization concepts, as they were able to identify and interpret key relationships from novel networks. Interaction analysis (Jordan and Henderson, 1995) of video data revealed nuances of how activities mediated students’ improved ability to interpret network data. Some challenges noted in other studies, such as students’ tendency to focus on familiar concepts, are also noted as teachers supported conversations to help students move beyond them. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study the authors are aware of that supported elementary students in exploring data literacy through network visualization. The authors discuss how network visualizations and locally/personally meaningful data provide opportunities for learning data literacy concepts across the curriculum.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2023-12-06
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-06-2023-0069
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Critical datafication literacy – a framework for educating about
           datafication

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      Authors: Ina Sander
      Abstract: In light of a need for more critical education about datafication, this paper aims to develop a framework for critical datafication literacy that is grounded in theoretical and empirical research. The framework draws upon existing critical data literacies, an in-depth analysis of three well-established educational approaches – media literacy, the German “(politische) Bildung” and Freirean “critical pedagogy” – and empirical analyses of online educational resources about datafication. The study interconnects theoretical analyses with an empirical mixed methods investigation that includes expert interviews with creators of online educational resources about datafication and a qualitative survey with educators interested in teaching about data technologies. The research identified novel findings on the goals of resource creators and educators, such as a focus on empowering and emancipatory approaches, fostering systemic understanding of datafication and encouraging collective action. Such perspectives are rare in existing critical data literacy conceptualisations but show resemblance to traditional education scholarship. This highlights how much can be learnt from practitioners and from these more established educational approaches. Based on these findings, a framework for critical datafication literacy is suggested that aims for systemic understanding of datafication, encouraging critical thinking and enabling learners to make enlightened choices and take different forms of action. The study is unique in its interconnection of theoretical and empirical research, and it advances previous research by suggesting a grounded framework for critical datafication literacy.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2023-11-30
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-06-2023-0064
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • The beginning of ChatGPT – a systematic and bibliometric review of
           the literature

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      Authors: Hasnan Baber, Kiran Nair, Ruchi Gupta, Kuldeep Gurjar
      Abstract: This paper aims to present a systematic literature review and bibliometric analysis of research papers published on chat generative pre-trained transformer (ChatGPT), an OpenAI-developed large-scale generative language model. The study’s objective is to provide a comprehensive assessment of the present status of research on ChatGPT and identify current trends and themes in the literature. A total of 328 research article data was extracted from Scopus for bibliometric analysis, to investigate publishing trends, productive countries and keyword analysis around the topic and 34 relevant research publications were selected for an in-depth systematic literature review. The findings indicate that ChatGPT research is still in its early stages, with the current emphasis on applications such as natural language processing and understanding, dialogue systems, speech processing and recognition, learning systems, chatbots and response generation. The USA is at the forefront of publishing on this topic and new keywords, e.g. “patient care”, “medical”, “higher education” and so on are emerging themes around the topic. These findings underscore the importance of ongoing research and development to address these limitations and ensure that ChatGPT is used responsibly and ethically. While systematic review research on ChatGPT heralds exciting opportunities, it also demands a careful understanding of its nuances to harness its potential effectively. Overall, this study provides a valuable resource for researchers and practitioners interested in ChatGPT at this early stage and helps to identify the grey areas around this topic.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2023-11-28
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-04-2023-0035
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Exploring alternative discourses about datafication in a speculative youth
           participatory action research curriculum

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      Authors: Ezequiel Aleman
      Abstract: This paper aims to address the limitations in designing educational approaches that apply critical approaches to data literacy, given the obscure nature of digital platforms, which leave youth unable to develop discourses that challenge dominant narratives about the role of data in their lives. The purpose of this study is to propose and evaluate a critical data literacy approach that empowers youth to engage with data from a sociocultural perspective using a speculative participatory research approach that affords opportunities to develop alternative discourses. This is a multiple-case study that involves five alternative schools in Uruguay which implemented the Nayah-Irú curriculum over ten weeks leading to the development of six distinct research projects about the materialization of data in youth lives. The curriculum incorporates an alternate reality game (ARG) to engage youth in critical data literacy, based on the principles of Youth Participatory Action Research (YPAR) epistemology and Speculative Civic Literacies. The findings of this study highlight the integration of speculative storytelling and real-life experiences in developing alternative discourses about datafication. The analysis revealed instances of discursive closure among the youth, but through the curriculum's speculative fiction elements, such as the narrative of Nayah-Irú, emotional connections were formed, leading to increased engagement, critical inquiry, and problem framing. The study conducted on the Nayah-Irú curriculum shows its effectiveness in engaging youth and educators in critical data literacy by affording opportunities for youth to engage in the analysis of their personal data literacies in an alternative world. Bringing speculative approaches to data literacy can open new avenues for exploring data literacy with youth in ways that center their voices and help them overcome different forms of discursive closure. This study offers new insights into critical data literacy education blending youth participatory action research epistemologies with a speculative literacies framework to support youth in developing alternative discourses regarding the role of data in their lives.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2023-11-28
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-06-2023-0079
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Situating personal data literacy interventions
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Juliana Elisa Raffaghelli, Marc Romero Carbonell, Teresa Romeu-Fontanillas
      Abstract: It has been demonstrated that AI-powered, data-driven tools’ usage is not universal, but deeply linked to socio-cultural contexts. The purpose of this paper is to display the need of adopting situated lenses, relating to specific personal and professional learning about data protection and privacy. The authors introduce the results of a case study based on a large educational intervention at a fully online university. The views of the participants from degrees representing different knowledge areas and contexts of technology adoption (work, education and leisure) were explored after engaging in the analysis of the terms and conditions of use about privacy and data usage. After consultation, 27 course instructors (CIs) integrated the activity and worked with 823 students (702 of whom were complete and correct for analytical purposes). The results of this study indicated that the intervention increased privacy-conscious online behaviour among most participants. Results were more contradictory when looking at the tools’ daily usage, with overall positive considerations around the tools being mostly needed or “indispensable”. Though appliable only to the authors’ case study and not generalisable, the authors’ results show both the complexity of privacy views and the presence of forms of renunciation in the trade-off between data protection and the need of using a specific software into a personal and professional context. This study provides an example of teaching and learning activities that supports the development of data literacy, with a focus on data privacy. Therefore, beyond the research findings, any educator can build over the authors’ proposal to produce materials and interventions aimed at developing awareness on data privacy issues. Developing awareness, understanding and skills relating to data privacy is crucial to live in a society where digital technologies are used in any area of our personal and professional life. Well-informed citizens will be able to obscure, resist or claim for their rights whenever a violation of their privacy takes place. Also, they will be able to support (through adoption) better quality apps and platforms, instead of passively accepting what is evident or easy to use. The authors specifically spot how students and educators, as part of a specific learning and cultural ecosystem, need tailored opportunities to keep on reflecting on their degrees of freedom and their possibilities to act regarding evolving data systems and their alternatives.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2023-11-22
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-06-2023-0086
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Community college students’ self-assessment of data literacy: exploring
           differences amongst demographic, academic, and career characteristics

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      Authors: Sarah Amber Evans, Lingzi Hong, Jeonghyun Kim, Erin Rice-Oyler, Irhamni Ali
      Abstract: Data literacy empowers college students, equipping them with essential skills necessary for their personal lives and careers in today’s data-driven world. This study aims to explore how community college students evaluate their data literacy and further examine demographic and educational/career advancement disparities in their self-assessed data literacy levels. An online survey presenting a data literacy self-assessment scale was distributed and completed by 570 students at four community colleges. Statistical tests were performed between the data literacy factor scores and students’ demographic and educational/career advancement variables. Male students rated their data literacy skills higher than females. The 18–19 age group has relatively lower confidence in their data literacy scores than other age groups. High school graduates do not feel proficient in data literacy to the level required for college and the workplace. Full-time employed students demonstrate more confidence in their data literacy than part-time and nonemployed students. Given the lack of research on community college students’ data literacy, the findings of this study can be valuable in designing and implementing data literacy training programs for different groups of community college students.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2023-11-08
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-06-2023-0065
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • A systematic review of analytical thinking skills in STEM education
           settings

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      Authors: Riyan Hidayat, Irham Nugroho, Zamzami Zainuddin, Tony Anak Ingai
      Abstract: In the realm of education, there has been an increasing emphasis on developing analytical thinking (AT) in the past few years. This systematic review focuses on an analysis of journal publications that have explored AT within the context of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. This analysis investigated four primary issues: (1) the operational definition that was used; (2) the types of theories that were used; (3) the interventions that were implemented to enhance AT skills; and (4) the research designs that were used. To ensure a comprehensive and thorough review, we used the guidelines of preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis. A comprehensive review of 28 pertinent scholarly articles reveals that scholars frequently rely on the concepts proposed by Anderson (2002), Marzano and Kendall (2008), Rodrangsee and Tuntiwongwanich (2021) and Suyatman et al. (2021) to establish a framework for delineating the competencies associated with analytical thinking (AT). Quasi-experimental designs were the most frequently used research designs in the studies analysed, followed by research and development approaches and then correlational designs. Most researchers have focused on investigating the effectiveness of problem-based learning as an intervention for improving AT skills. However, most research indicates that the theories or theoretical frameworks used to guide the research must be evident. To the extent the authors know, this study represents the initial comprehensive examination of analytical thinking in STEM education. It presents a consolidated summary of the available evidence, assessing its quality and bringing it together in a single resource.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2023-11-07
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-06-2023-0070
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Data literacy education through university-industry collaboration

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      Authors: Eylem Taş
      Abstract: This study aims to explore the findings related to data literacy skills for students to succeed in the digital age labor market and the role of university-industry collaborations (UICs) in the co-design and co-delivery of curriculum for the development of students’ data literacy. The study uses an interview-based research methodology to gather insights from industry partners and stakeholders. The interviews focus on identifying key data literacy skills, understanding the significance of these skills and exploring the role of UICs in enhancing students’ data literacy. The findings reveal several important data literacy skills for students. The most commonly mentioned skills include data evaluation/analysis, identifying the relevance of data and data protection in a sensitive manner. Participants also emphasized the importance of recognizing the interrelationships among data, adapting data across different contexts and strategically combining diverse data. The study emphasizes the role of universities in providing a well-rounded educational setting that fosters the development of data literacy skills. Additionally, it highlights the value of practical collaborations between universities and industries, enabling students to apply theoretical knowledge in real-world contexts. The study highlights the interconnected nature of various data skills and emphasizes the significance of data literacy in navigating the complexities of the digital age labor market. It also sheds light on the role of UICs in codesigning and codelivering curricula to enhance students’ data literacy. The findings provide valuable insights into the practical implications for UICs in preparing students for the data-driven job market.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2023-11-03
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-06-2023-0077
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
 
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