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New Library World
Number of Followers: 892  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 2 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 0307-4803 - ISSN (Online) 2398-5348
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Interdependent creativity for learning in a virtual world

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      Authors: Martine Gadille, Maria Antonietta Impedovo, Josephine Rémon, Caroline Corvasce
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to understand how the creativity of pupils and teachers is nurtured through the use of a virtual world (VW) within a sociotechnical network affecting pupils’ learning in a pilot secondary school. The analysis is the result of a pluri-disciplinary systemic analysis involving didactics, sociology, psychology and management science on an individual, collective and systemic scale. This participatory action research is based on interviews and systematic observations in class, in-world and in the global ecosystem. Linguistic and multimodal analysis is applied to the data, through teacher monographs that hint at the teachers’ activity. Pupils’ and teachers’ creativity appeared to be anchored within four main interdependent nurturing conditions the personal inclinations and professional interactions in the sociotechnical network sustaining the VW; a creative regulation allowing compromises with the institutional constraints of pedagogical control; avatars and 3 D boundary objects that act as a motor of teachers-pupils inquiry and creativity; the sociotechnical network that contributes, through the actors’ play, to bringing the organisational rules of the school towards an innovation trajectory, that in turns mediates success in the use and the adoption of the new technology. Although this is a study within a specific school, the findings can be put to use by other pedagogical teams who would wish to integrate a VW to re-engage pupils. The participatory design processes taking place within a sociotechnical network support teachers in the building of Virtual World scenarios negotiated with researchers and start-up developers. The pedagogical use of a virtual world opens new learning engagement opportunities for the pupils through enhanced experiential learning and sustains the transformation of teachers’ professionality. The authors’ approach differs from the previous educational VW literature, in that they integrate the teachers’ creativity and their pedagogical scripts into their study, within a systemic approach, thus requiring a wider theoretical framework, necessary for understanding the building of strategies and knowledge that foster teachers’ and pupils’ creativity in educational settings using a VW.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2021-06-22
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-02-2020-0038
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Knowledge sharing discourse types used by key actors in online affinity
           spaces

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      Authors: Priya Sharma, Qiyuan Li, Susan M. Land
      Abstract: The growth of online social network sites and their conceptualization as affinity spaces makes them well suited for exploring how individuals share knowledge and practices around specific interests or affinities. The purpose of this study is to extend what is known about highly active/key actors in online affinity spaces, especially the ways in which they sustain and contribute to knowledge sharing. This study analyzed 514 discussion posts gathered from an online affinity space on disease management. This study used a variety of methods to answer the research questions: the authors used discourse analyses to examine the conversations in the online affinity space, social network analyses to identify the structure of participation in the space and association rule mining and sentiment analysis to identify co-occurrence of discourse codes and sentiment of the discussions. The results indicate that the quality and type of discourse varies considerably between key and other actors. Key actors’ discourse in the network serves to elaborate on and explain ideas and concepts, whereas other actors provide a more supportive role and engage primarily in storytelling. This work extends what is known about informal mentoring and the role of key actors within affinity spaces by identifying specific discourse types and types of knowledge sharing that are characteristic of key actors. Also, this study provides an example of the use of a combination of rule mining association and sentiment analysis to characterize the nature of the affinity space.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2021-06-18
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-09-2020-0211
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Collaborative idea exchange and material tinkering influence families’
           creative engineering practices and products during engineering programs in
           informal learning environments

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      Authors: Soo Hyeon Kim, Heather Toomey Zimmerman
      Abstract: This paper aims to investigate how families’ sociomaterial experiences in engineering programs held in libraries and a museum influence their creative engineering practices and the creativity expressed in their products derived from their inquiry-driven engineering activities. This research project takes a naturalistic inquiry using qualitative and quantitative analyses based on video records from activities of 31 parent–child pairs and on creativity assessment of products that used littleBits as prototyping tools. Families engaged in two sociomaterial experiences related to engineering – collaborative idea exchange and ongoing generative tinkering with materials – which supported the emergence of novel ideas and feasible solutions during the informal engineering programs. Families in the high novelty score group experienced multiple instances of collaborative idea exchange and ongoing generative tinkering with materials, co-constructed through parent-child collaboration, that were expansive toward further idea and solution generation. Families in the low novelty score group experienced brief collaborative idea exchange and material tinkering with specific idea suggestions and high involvement from the parent. An in-depth case study of one family further illustrated that equal engagement by the parent and child as they tinkered with the technology supported families’ creative engineering practices. This analysis adds to the information sciences and learning sciences literatures with an account that integrates methodologies from sociocultural and engineering design research to understand the relationship between families’ engagement in creative engineering practices and their products. Implications for practitioners include suggestions for designing spaces to support families’ collaborative idea exchange and ongoing generative tinkering to facilitate the development of creative engineering practices during short-term engineering programs.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2021-05-11
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-02-2020-0031
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Re-mediating designs for equity: making commitments concrete

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      Authors: A. Susan Jurow, Quinton Freeman
      Abstract: The purpose of the paper is to detail how a social design experiment focused on equity was systematically reorganized to address changing historical and social contexts of injustice. This paper presents a design narrative. The design narrative presents the principled foundations that guided our re-design of the social design experiment. The value of this design narrative is in demonstrating how designs for equity need to be revised in light of dynamic social, cultural and historical circumstances.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2021-05-05
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-10-2020-0231
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Epistemic beliefs and internet reliance – is algorithmic authority
           part of the picture'

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Tore Ståhl , Eero Sormunen , Marita Mäkinen
      Abstract: The internet and search engines dominate within people’s information acquisition, especially among the younger generations. Given this trend, this study aims to explore if information and communication technology (ICT) practices, internet reliance and views of knowledge and knowing, i.e. epistemic beliefs, interact with each other. Everyday practices and conceptions among beginning undergraduate students are studied as a challenge for higher education. The study builds upon survey-based quantitative data operationalising students’ epistemic beliefs, their internet reliance and their ICT practices. The survey items were used to compute subscales describing these traits, and the connections were explored using correlations analysis. The results suggest that the more beginning undergraduate students rely on internet-based information, the more they are inclined to epistemic beliefs where knowledge is regarded as certain, unchanging, unambiguous and as being handed down by some authority. The approach used in the study applies to the sample used, and further research is required to test the applicability of the approach on larger samples. The study highlights the risk of everyday information practices being transferred into the educational context. Ignorance of these changes may pose a risk for knowledge building on different educational levels and in a longer perspective, a threat to democracy. While there is some research on epistemic beliefs in relation to internet-based information, studies approaching the problem over a possible connection between epistemic beliefs and internet reliance are scarce. In addition, this study implies a conceptual bridge between epistemic beliefs and internet reliance over the concept of algorithmic authority.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2021-09-13
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-01-2021-0004
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Assessing elementary students’ collaborative problem-solving in
           makerspace activities

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      Authors: Danielle Herro , Cassie Quigley , Oluwadara Abimbade
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to identify and assess collaborative problem solving (CPS) behaviors in elementary students in science, technology, engineering, arts/humanities and mathematics (STEAM)-related making and to garner students perspectives. We offer a valid way for researchers to understand collaborative processes and for educators to create opportunities for collaboration. Additionally, the feedback from the assessment offers students a way to reflect on their CPS skills. This qualitative study evaluated 52 elementary students’ CPS skills using co-measure, a validated rubric assessing students’ CPS when working in STEAM-related makerspace activities. Students worked in collaborative groups to “make” artifacts when solving a problem posed by their teacher. They were assessed using co-measure’s four dimensions: peer interactions, positive communication, inquiry rich/multiple paths and transdisciplinary approaches and scored via each dimension’s associated attributes. Student interviews provided their perspectives on CPS. A majority of students scored in the acceptable or proficient range in the social dimensions of peer interactions and positive communication. Students scored slightly lower on the cognitive dimensions of inquiry rich/multiple paths and markedly lower on transdisciplinary approaches when collaborating. Findings suggest to increase CPS skills, teachers might develop “making” activities fostering greater inquiry and model ways to strategize and verify information, approach the problem drawing on student interest and prior knowledge and collaboratively use tools, materials and methods that mimic the real world when problem-solving. Much of the current research on assessing CPS during making is in the early stages of considering appropriate assessment approaches, especially in schools. To expand this literature the study includes elementary students between the ages of 6-10, the focus is on assessing their collaboration using an observational rubric. The authors use preliminary findings from young children’s perspectives on making to position the future work.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2021-09-09
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-08-2020-0176
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Digital civic learning in schools: Youth perspectives and experiences

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      Authors: Daniela K. DiGiacomo
      Abstract: While living in the information age is not new, the continued spread of dis/mis/information in tandem with rising partisanship has made clear the educational need for robust and critical information and media literacy education (Bulger and Davison, 2018; Garcia et al., 2021; Reich, 2018; Wineburg and McGrew, 2016). Given that most young people (and adults) today get their information and news about the world through online sources, including social media (Pew Research Center, 2018; Garcia et al., 2021), it is imperative for the health of the American democracy that students’ school-based civic learning opportunities include digital civic learning, too. This paper aims to offer a study into one such schooling landscape in a large and diverse public school district in the USA. A mixed-method approach – including an online survey and face-to-face group interviews – was used to understand the opportunity landscape more broadly and glean insight into the texture and nuance of youth perspectives and experiences on digital civic learning. Analysis of data reveals a dearth of consistent and routine opportunities for digital civic learning within the Rio Public School District context. Empirical research that examines and makes visible students’ lived experiences and perspectives with digital civic information is essential if as educators and researchers, the authors are to successfully design for more and better of these experiences.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2021-07-31
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-01-2020-0013
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Building personas from phenomenography: a method for user-centered design
           in education

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Tra Huynh , Adrian Madsen , Sarah McKagan , Eleanor Sayre
      Abstract: Personas are lifelike characters that are driven by potential or real users’ personal goals and experiences when interacting with a product. Personas support user-centered design by focusing on real users’ needs. However, the use of personas in educational research and design requires certain adjustments from its original use in human-computer interface design. This paper aims to propose a process of creating personas from phenomenographic studies, which helps us create data-grounded personas effectively. Personas have features that can help address design problems in educational contexts. The authors compare the use of personas with other common methodologies in education research, including phenomenology and phenomenography. Then, this study presents a six-step process of building personas using phenomenographic study as follows: articulate a design problem, collect user data, assemble phenomenographic categories, build personas, check personas and solve the design problem using personas. The authors illustrate this process with two examples, including the redesign of a professional development website and an undergraduate research program design. The authors find that personas are valuable tools for educational design websites and programs. Phenomenography can productively help educational designers and researchers build sets of personas following the process the authors propose. The use and method of personas in educational contexts are scarce and vague. Using the example contexts, the authors provide educational designers and researchers a clear method of creating personas that are relatable and applicable for their design problems.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2021-07-31
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-12-2020-0256
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • (Design) thinking out loud: adolescents’ design talk in a library
           makerspace tabletop game design camp

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      Authors: Taylor M. Kessner , Priyanka Parekh , Earl Aguliera , Luis E. Pérez Cortés , Kelly M. Tran , Sinem Siyahhan , Elisabeth R. Gee
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore how making tabletop board games elicited adolescents’ design thinking during their participation in a summer game design camp at their local library. This study leverages qualitative approaches to coding transcripts of participants’ talk. This study uses the design thinking framework from the Hasso-Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford University as provisional codes to identify and make sense of participants’ verbalized design activity. This study found that the making context of designing tabletop board games elicited a high frequency of design talk in participants, evidenced by both quantitative and qualitative reports of the data. Additionally, participants in large measure obviated constraints on their design activity imposed by linear conceptions of the design thinking model this study introduces, instead of moving fluidly across design modes. Finally, participants’ prior experiences in both life and in regard to games significantly influenced their design study. This study highlights the unique affordances of making-centric approaches to designing tabletop games in particular, such as participants’ quick and sustained engagement in the study of design. This study also highlights the need for conceptions of design thinking specific to designing games.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2021-08-10
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-08-2020-0185
      Issue No: Vol. 122 , No. 9/10 (2021)
       
  • Supporting the initial work of evidence-based improvement cycles through a
           data-intensive partnership

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      Authors: Alex J. Bowers , Andrew E. Krumm
      Abstract: Currently, in the education data use literature, there is a lack of research and examples that consider the early steps of filtering, organizing and visualizing data to inform decision-making. The purpose of this study is to describe how school leaders and researchers visualized and jointly made sense of data from a common learning management system (LMS) used by students across multiple schools and grades in a charter management organization operating in the USA. To make sense of LMS data, researchers and practitioners formed a partnership to organize complex data sets, create data visualizations and engage in joint sensemaking around data visualizations to begin to launch continuous improvement cycles. The authors analyzed LMS data for n = 476 students in Algebra I using hierarchical cluster analysis heatmaps. The authors also engaged in a qualitative case study that examined the ways in which school leaders made sense of the data visualization to inform improvement efforts. The outcome of this study is a framework for informing evidence-based improvement cycles using large, complex data sets. Central to moving through the various steps in the proposed framework are collaborations between researchers and practitioners who each bring expertise that is necessary for organizing, filtering and visualizing data from digital learning environments and administrative data systems. The authors propose an integrated cycle of data use in schools that builds on collaborations between researchers and school leaders to inform evidence-based improvement cycles.
      Citation: Information and Learning Sciences
      PubDate: 2021-07-29
      DOI: 10.1108/ILS-09-2020-0212
      Issue No: Vol. 122 , No. 9/10 (2021)
       
  • Information and Learning Sciences

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