Journal Cover Nature Reviews Neuroscience
  [SJR: 21.499]   [H-I: 309]   [349 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1471-003X - ISSN (Online) 1471-0048
   Published by NPG Homepage  [135 journals]
  • Decision making: Making hasty decisions
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 569 - 569
      Abstract: The activity of neurons in the basal ganglia contributes to the weighting of speed versus accuracy, rather than to deliberation, in a motor decision-making task.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 18, 569 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-09-07
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2017.116
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Non-coding RNA: Regulatory circles
    • Authors: Darran Yates
      Pages: 570 - 571
      Abstract: In mice, the circular RNA Cdr1as regulates microRNA expression in the brain and sensorimotor gating.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 18, 570 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-09-19
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2017.118
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Reward: Restraint from risky reward
    • Authors: Natasha Bray
      Pages: 570 - 571
      Abstract: In mice, a set of projections from the medial prefrontal cortex to the nucleus accumbens suppress reward seeking under risky conditions.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 18, 570 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-09-07
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2017.114
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Learning and memory: Memories take the sub-way
    • Authors: Sian Lewis
      Pages: 571 - 571
      Abstract: Two pathways from CA1 to the entorhinal cortex — a direct pathway and an indirect pathway, that projects via the hippocampal subiculum — are shown to play dissociable roles in memory formation and retrieval, respectively.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 18, 571 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-09-19
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2017.117
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Neurodegenerative disease: Towards transplant therapy
    • Authors: Natasha Bray
      Pages: 572 - 572
      Abstract: The long-term safety and efficacy of using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons to replace midbrain dopaminergic neurons lost in Parkinson disease (PD) have not been tested in primates. Kikuchi et al. grafted human iPSC-derived midbrain dopaminergic progenitors into the putamen of macaques that
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 18, 572 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-09-19
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2017.120
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Visual processing: Face off
    • Authors: Natasha Bray
      Pages: 572 - 572
      Abstract: How face patches — areas of cortex that process visual faces — develop is not known. Livingstone and colleagues reared three macaques for ∼200 days without any visual exposure to faces and used functional MRI to measure neural responses to images of faces, objects and
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 18, 572 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-09-19
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2017.121
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Techniques: Having a field day
    • Authors: Natasha Bray
      Pages: 572 - 572
      Abstract: Recording magnetic fields associated with neuronal activity could have certain advantages over voltage recordings, but current probes to detect such fields are too large for in vivo use. Caruso et al. developed micron-scale 'magnetrodes' and used these in the cat visual cortex to
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 18, 572 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-09-19
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2017.122
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Neurodevelopmental disorders: A transcription-targeting target
    • Authors: Natasha Bray
      Pages: 572 - 572
      Abstract: Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) represses the transcription of many target genes, including genes that encode chromatin-associated proteins. Loss of FMRP leads to fragile X syndrome (FXS); however, whether misregulation of chromatin-associated proteins contributes to FXS is unclear. Korb et al. showed that
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 18, 572 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-09-19
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2017.123
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Reward: Eating goes down a treat
    • Authors: Natasha Bray
      Pages: 572 - 572
      Abstract: A study in mice identified neurons in the central amygdala that express the serotonin 2A receptor and positively reinforce the consumption of food.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 18, 572 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-09-07
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2017.115
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • The use of brain organoids to investigate neural development and disease
    • Authors: Elizabeth Di Lullo, Arnold R. Kriegstein
      Pages: 573 - 584
      Abstract: Understanding the development and dysfunction of the human brain is a major goal of neurobiology. Much of our current understanding of human brain development has been derived from the examination of post-mortem and pathological specimens, bolstered by observations of developing non-human primates and experimental studies
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 18, 573 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-09-07
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2017.107
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • The impact of cytoskeletal organization on the local regulation of
           neuronal transport
    • Authors: Jeffrey J. Nirschl, Amy E. Ghiretti, Erika L. F. Holzbaur
      Pages: 585 - 597
      Abstract: Neurons are akin to modern cities in that both are dependent on robust transport mechanisms. Like the best mass transit systems, trafficking in neurons must be tailored to respond to local requirements. Neurons depend on both high-speed, long-distance transport and localized dynamics to correctly deliver
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 18, 585 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-31
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2017.100
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Electrodiffusion phenomena in neuroscience: a neglected companion
    • Authors: Leonid P. Savtchenko, Mu Ming Poo, Dmitri A. Rusakov
      Pages: 598 - 612
      Abstract: The emerging technological revolution in genetically encoded molecular sensors and super-resolution imaging provides neuroscientists with a pass to the real-time nano-world. On this small scale, however, classical principles of electrophysiology do not always apply. This is in large part because the nanoscopic heterogeneities in ionic
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 18, 598 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-09-19
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2017.101
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Polyglutamine spinocerebellar ataxias — from genes to potential
           treatments
    • Authors: Henry L. Paulson, Vikram G. Shakkottai, H. Brent Clark, Harry T. Orr
      Pages: 613 - 626
      Abstract: The dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a large and diverse group of neurodegenerative diseases. The most prevalent SCAs (SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, SCA6 and SCA7) are caused by expansion of a glutamine-encoding CAG repeat in the affected gene. These SCAs represent a substantial portion of
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 18, 613 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-17
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2017.92
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 10 (2017)
       
  • Noncoding RNAs in neurodegeneration
    • Authors: Evgenia Salta, Bart De Strooper
      Pages: 627 - 640
      Abstract: The emerging complexity of the transcriptional landscape poses great challenges to our conventional preconceptions of how the genome regulates brain function and dysfunction. Non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) confer a high level of intricate and dynamic regulation of various molecular processes in the CNS and they have
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 18, 627 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-08-17
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2017.90
      Issue No: Vol. 18, No. 10 (2017)
       
 
 
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