Journal Cover Nature Medicine
  [SJR: 13.959]   [H-I: 439]   [696 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1078-8956 - ISSN (Online) 1546-170X
   Published by NPG Homepage  [135 journals]
  • Human primary liver cancer–derived organoid cultures for disease
           modeling and drug screening
    • Human primary liver cancer–derived organoid cultures for disease modeling and drug screening

      Human primary liver cancer–derived organoid cultures for disease modeling and drug screening, Published online: 13 November 2017; doi:10.1038/nm.4438

      NatureArticleSnippet(type=short-summary, markup=

      Tumor organoids derived from the most common subtypes of primary liver cancer recapitulate the histologic and molecular features of the tissues of origin, even after long-term culture. These in vitro models, as well as those for colorectal cancer reported in Crespo et al. in a previous issue, are amenable for drug screening and allow the identification of therapeutic approaches with potential for cancer treatment.

      , isJats=true)Human primary liver cancer–derived organoid cultures for disease modeling and drug screening, Published online: 2017-11-13; doi:10.1038/nm.44382017-11-13
      DOI: 10.1038/nm.4438
       
  • Targeting the T cell receptor β-chain constant region for
           immunotherapy of T cell malignancies
    • Targeting the T cell receptor β-chain constant region for immunotherapy of T cell malignancies

      Targeting the T cell receptor β-chain constant region for immunotherapy of T cell malignancies, Published online: 13 November 2017; doi:10.1038/nm.4444

      NatureArticleSnippet(type=short-summary, markup=

      Pule and colleagues identify the TCR β-chain constant region as a new target for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells in treatment of T cell cancers while potentially preserving a healthy T cell repertoire. They demonstrate that anti-TCRB1 CAR T cells eliminate cancerous TCRB1+ T cells while sparing nearly one-third of normal TCRB2+ T cells.

      , isJats=true)Targeting the T cell receptor β-chain constant region for immunotherapy of T cell malignancies, Published online: 2017-11-13; doi:10.1038/nm.44442017-11-13
      DOI: 10.1038/nm.4444
       
  • UCP1-independent signaling involving SERCA2b-mediated calcium cycling
           regulates beige fat thermogenesis and systemic glucose homeostasis
    • UCP1-independent signaling involving SERCA2b-mediated calcium cycling regulates beige fat thermogenesis and systemic glucose homeostasis

      UCP1-independent signaling involving SERCA2b-mediated calcium cycling regulates beige fat thermogenesis and systemic glucose homeostasis, Published online: 13 November 2017; doi:10.1038/nm.4429

      NatureArticleSnippet(type=short-summary, markup=

      Calcium cycling induced by the SERCA2b–RyR2 pathway in beige fat cells allows for thermogenic activity independent of UCP1.

      , isJats=true)UCP1-independent signaling involving SERCA2b-mediated calcium cycling regulates beige fat thermogenesis and systemic glucose homeostasis, Published online: 2017-11-13; doi:10.1038/nm.44292017-11-13
      DOI: 10.1038/nm.4429
       
  • Enhancing the precision of genetic lineage tracing using dual recombinases
    • Enhancing the precision of genetic lineage tracing using dual recombinases

      Enhancing the precision of genetic lineage tracing using dual recombinases, Published online: 13 November 2017; doi:10.1038/nm.4437

      NatureArticleSnippet(type=short-summary, markup=

      Genetic cell-lineage tracing studies in mice are crucial for delineating the contribution of stem and progenitor cells to different cell types, both in disease states and after regenerative therapy. He et al. have developed new genetic lineage-tracing systems that provide more definitive results than the commonly used Cre-based system and show that this new technology can resolve current controversies in the field, as demonstrated by lineage-tracing studies in the heart and liver.

      , isJats=true)Enhancing the precision of genetic lineage tracing using dual recombinases, Published online: 2017-11-13; doi:10.1038/nm.44372017-11-13
      DOI: 10.1038/nm.4437
       
  • Corrigendum: Host DNA released by NETosis promotes rhinovirus-induced
           type-2 allergic asthma exacerbation
    • Corrigendum: Host DNA released by NETosis promotes rhinovirus-induced type-2 allergic asthma exacerbation

      Corrigendum: Host DNA released by NETosis promotes rhinovirus-induced type-2 allergic asthma exacerbation, Published online: 07 November 2017; doi:10.1038/nm1117-1384a

      Corrigendum: Host DNA released by NETosis promotes rhinovirus-induced type-2 allergic asthma exacerbation, Published online: 2017-11-07; doi:10.1038/nm1117-1384a2017-11-07
      DOI: 10.1038/nm1117-1384a
       
  • Corrigendum: Targeting cellular senescence prevents age-related bone loss
           in mice
    • Corrigendum: Targeting cellular senescence prevents age-related bone loss in mice

      Corrigendum: Targeting cellular senescence prevents age-related bone loss in mice, Published online: 07 November 2017; doi:10.1038/nm1117-1384c

      Corrigendum: Targeting cellular senescence prevents age-related bone loss in mice, Published online: 2017-11-07; doi:10.1038/nm1117-1384c2017-11-07
      DOI: 10.1038/nm1117-1384c
       
  • Barrier-tissue macrophages: functional adaptation to environmental
           challenges
    • Barrier-tissue macrophages: functional adaptation to environmental challenges

      Barrier-tissue macrophages: functional adaptation to environmental challenges, Published online: 07 November 2017; doi:10.1038/nm.4430

      NatureArticleSnippet(type=short-summary, markup=

      Mowat, Scott and Bain discuss the functions of barrier-tissue macrophages in homeostasis and disease, and how these are shaped by their local environment.

      , isJats=true)Barrier-tissue macrophages: functional adaptation to environmental challenges, Published online: 2017-11-07; doi:10.1038/nm.44302017-11-07
      DOI: 10.1038/nm.4430
       
  • Can NK cells purge HIV sanctuaries'
    • Can NK cells purge HIV sanctuaries?

      Can NK cells purge HIV sanctuaries?, Published online: 07 November 2017; doi:10.1038/nm.4434

      NatureArticleSnippet(type=standfirst, markup=

      A recent study identifies a population of CXCR5+ natural killer (NK) cells patrolling B cell follicles in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected African green monkeys that might contribute to the lack of disease progression in this nonpathogenic model.

      , isJats=true)Can NK cells purge HIV sanctuaries?, Published online: 2017-11-07; doi:10.1038/nm.44342017-11-07
      DOI: 10.1038/nm.4434
       
 
 
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