Followed Journals
Journal you Follow: 0
 
Sign Up to follow journals, search in your chosen journals and, optionally, receive Email Alerts when new issues of your Followed Journals are published.
Already have an account? Sign In to see the journals you follow.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Infectious Diseases
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.302
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 48  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0022-1899 - ISSN (Online) 1537-6613
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [414 journals]
  • Smallpox

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Breman J.
      Abstract: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation10.13039/100000865
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiaa588
      Issue No: Vol. 224, No. Supplement_4 (2021)
       
  • The Rotavirus Vaccine Story: From Discovery to the Eventual Control of
           Rotavirus Disease

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Glass R; Tate J, Jiang B, et al.
      Abstract: Worldwide, rotavirus is the leading pathogen causing severe diarrhea in children and a major cause of under 5 years mortality. In 1998, the first rotavirus vaccine, RotaShield, was licensed in the United States but a rare adverse event, intussusception, led to its withdrawal. Seven years passed before the next generation of vaccines became available, Rotarix (GSK) and Rotateq (Merck), and 11 years later, 2 additional vaccines from India, Rotavac (Bharat) and Rotasiil (Serum Institute), were recommended by World Health Organization for all children. Today, these vaccines are used in more than 100 countries and have contributed to marked decreases in hospitalizations and deaths from diarrhea. However, these live oral vaccines are less effective in low-income countries with high under 5 years mortality for reasons that are not understood. Efforts to develop new vaccines that avoid the oral route are in progress and will likely be needed to ultimately control rotavirus disease.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiaa598
      Issue No: Vol. 224, No. Supplement_4 (2021)
       
  • Human Papillomavirus Vaccines

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Markowitz L; Schiller J.
      Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are among the most effective vaccines available, the first to prevent infection by a mucosatropic sexually transmitted infectious agent and to do so without specific induction of mucosal immunity. Currently available prophylactic HPV vaccines are based on virus-like particles that self-assemble spontaneously from the L1 major capsid protein. The first HPV vaccine was licensed in 2006. All vaccines target HPV-16 and HPV-18, types which cause the majority of HPV-attributable cancers. As of 2020, HPV vaccines had been introduced into national immunization programs in more than 100 countries. Vaccination polices have evolved; most programs target vaccination of young adolescent girls, with an increasing number also including boys. The efficacy and safety found in prelicensure trials have been confirmed by data from national immunization programs. The dramatic impact and effectiveness observed has stimulated interest in ambitious disease reduction goals.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiaa621
      Issue No: Vol. 224, No. Supplement_4 (2021)
       
  • Live Attenuated Varicella Vaccine: Prevention of Varicella and of Zoster

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gershon A; Gershon M, Shapiro E.
      Abstract: Michiaki Takahashi developed the live attenuated varicella vaccine in 1974 . This was the first, and is still the only, herpesvirus vaccine. Early studies showed promise, but the vaccine was rigorously tested on immunosuppressed patients because of their high risk of fatal varicella; vaccination proved to be lifesaving. Subsequently, the vaccine was found to be safe and effective in healthy children. Eventually, varicella vaccine became a component of measles mumps rubella vaccine, 2 doses of which are administered in the USA to ~90% of children. The incidence of varicella has dropped dramatically in the USA since vaccine-licensure in 1995. Varicella vaccine is also associated with a decreased incidence of zoster and is protective for susceptible adults. Today, immunocompromised individuals are protected against varicella due to vaccine-induced herd immunity. Latent infection with varicella zoster virus occurs after vaccination; however, the vaccine strain is impaired for its ability to reactivate.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiaa573
      Issue No: Vol. 224, No. Supplement_4 (2021)
       
  • Influenza Vaccines: Successes and Continuing Challenges

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Becker T; Elbahesh H, Reperant L, et al.
      Abstract: Influenza vaccines have been available for over 80 years. They have contributed to significant reductions in influenza morbidity and mortality. However, there have been limitations in their effectiveness, in part due to the continuous antigenic evolution of seasonal influenza viruses, but also due to the predominant use of embryonated chicken eggs for their production. The latter furthermore limits their worldwide production timelines and scale. Therefore today, alternative approaches for their design and production are increasingly pursued, with already licensed quadrivalent seasonal influenza vaccines produced in cell cultures, including based on a baculovirus expression system. Next-generation influenza vaccines aim at inducing broader and longer-lasting immune responses to overcome seasonal influenza virus antigenic drift and to timely address the emergence of a new pandemic influenza virus. Tailored approaches target mechanisms to improve vaccine-induced immune responses in individuals with a weakened immune system, in particular older adults.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiab269
      Issue No: Vol. 224, No. Supplement_4 (2021)
       
  • Hepatitis B Vaccines

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Pattyn J; Hendrickx G, Vorsters A, et al.
      Abstract: Hepatitis B is caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV), which infects the liver and may lead to chronic liver disease, including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HBV represents a worldwide public health problem, causing major morbidity and mortality. Affordable, safe, and effective, hepatitis B vaccines are the best tools we have to control and prevent hepatitis B. In 2019, coverage of 3 doses of the hepatitis B vaccine reached 85% worldwide compared to around 30% in 2000. The effective implementation of hepatitis B vaccination programs has resulted in a substantial decrease in the HBV carrier rate and hepatitis B-related morbidity and mortality. This article summarizes the great triumphs of the hepatitis B vaccine, the first anticancer and virus-like-particle–based vaccine. In addition, existing unresolved issues and future perspectives on hepatitis B vaccination required for global prevention of HBV infection are discussed.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiaa668
      Issue No: Vol. 224, No. Supplement_4 (2021)
       
  • Triumph of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccines: Overcoming a Common Foe

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rodgers G; Whitney C, Klugman K.
      Abstract: Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) has reduced the burden of pneumococcal disease by the near elimination of vaccine serotypes from countries giving a booster dose at >9 months of life. Herd protection, induced by interruption of pneumococcal vaccine type transmission has protected children too young to be immunized, children and adults with underlying risk conditions for invasive pneumococcal disease, and the elderly. PCV has rolled out in most poor countries, but millions of children remain un-immunized especially in middle income countries because of cost constraints. These are being met by considering fewer doses to maintain herd protection, and support for more affordable vaccine from developing country manufacturers. While 3rd generation PCV’s with potential inclusion of 20+ serotypes are close to market in adults, it will be their introduction into childhood immunization and herd protection that is most likely to maximize the public health benefits of these vaccines.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiaa535
      Issue No: Vol. 224, No. Supplement_4 (2021)
       
  • Herpes Zoster Vaccines

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Harbecke R; Cohen J, Oxman M.
      Abstract: Herpes zoster (HZ) affects approximately 1 in 3 persons in their lifetime, and the risk of HZ increases with increasing age. The most common, debilitating complication of HZ is the chronic neuropathic pain of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Two herpes zoster vaccines, a live-attenuated varicella-zoster virus (VZV) vaccine (zoster vaccine live [ZVL]; ZOSTAVAX [Merck]) and an adjuvanted VZV glycoprotein E (gE) subunit vaccine (recombinant zoster vaccine [RZV]; SHINGRIX [GlaxoSmithKline]) are licensed for the prevention of HZ and PHN in healthy older adults. The safety and efficacy of both vaccines has been demonstrated in clinical trials in immunocompetent adults and in selected immunocompromised persons and persons with immune-mediated diseases. Numerous real-world effectiveness studies have confirmed the safety and effectiveness of both ZVL and RZV. Recombinant zoster vaccine (RZV) is more effective for prevention of HZ than ZVL. Recombinant zoster vaccine is nonreplicating and is thus safe in immunocompromised persons. Additional zoster vaccines are in different stages of development. Wider distribution of safe and effective zoster vaccines will improve the health and well being of the rapidly growing population of older adults around the world.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiab387
      Issue No: Vol. 224, No. Supplement_4 (2021)
       
  • Immunization Against Poliomyelitis and the Challenges to Worldwide
           Poliomyelitis Eradication

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Modlin J; Bandyopadhyay A, Sutter R.
      Abstract: Both inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) and oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) have contributed to the rapid disappearance of paralytic poliomyelitis from developed countries despite possessing different vaccine properties. Due to cost, ease of use, and other properties, the Expanded Programme on Immunization added OPV to the routine infant immunization schedule for low-income countries in 1974, but variable vaccine uptake and impaired immune responses due to poor sanitation limited the impact. Following launch of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative in 1988, poliomyelitis incidence has been reduced by >99% and types 2 and 3 wild polioviruses are now eradicated, but progress against type 1 polioviruses which are now confined to Afghanistan and Pakistan has slowed due to insecurity, poor access, and other problems. A strategic, globally coordinated replacement of trivalent OPV with bivalent 1, 3 OPV in 2016 reduced the incidence of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) but allowed the escape of type 2 vaccine–derived polioviruses (VDPV2) in areas with low immunization rates and use of monovalent OPV2 in response seeded new VDPV2 outbreaks and reestablishment of type 2 endemicity. A novel, more genetically stable type 2 OPV vaccine is undergoing clinical evaluation and may soon be deployed prevent or reduce VDPV2 emergences.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiaa622
      Issue No: Vol. 224, No. Supplement_4 (2021)
       
  • Overview of the United States’ Immunization Program

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Roper L; Hall M, Cohn A.
      Abstract: This manuscript describes the history, background, and current structure of the United States Immunization Program, founded upon public- and private-sector partnerships that include federal agencies, state and local health departments, tribal nations and organizations, healthcare providers, vaccine manufacturers, pharmacies, and a multitude of additional stakeholders. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sets the U.S. adult and childhood immunization schedules based on recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. We review the current immunization schedules; describe the set of surveillance and other systems used to monitor the health impact, coverage levels, and safety of recommended vaccines; and note significant challenges. Vaccines have reduced the incidence of many diseases to historic lows in the US, and have potential to further reduce the burden of respiratory and other infectious diseases in the United States. Though the United States vaccination program has had notable successes in reducing morbidity and mortality from infectious disease, challenges—including disparities in access and vaccine hesitancy—remain. Supporting access to and confidence in vaccines as an essential public health intervention will not only protect individuals from vaccine-preventable diseases; it will also ensure the country is prepared for the next pandemic.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiab310
      Issue No: Vol. 224, No. Supplement_4 (2021)
       
  • Hib Vaccines: Their Impact on Haemophilus influenzae Type b Disease

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gilsdorf J.
      Abstract: Haemophilusinfluenzae serotype b (Hib) is an important cause of serious, invasive infections, particularly in young children. Since 1985, a series of vaccines composed of the type b capsular polysaccharide polyribosylribitol phosphate (PRP), followed by PRP conjugated to various proteins, have been licensed for use in the United States and worldwide. The conjugated vaccines offer increased immunogenicity and prolonged durability of immune protection compared to the plain PRP vaccine and increasingly are combined with other childhood vaccines for decreased cost and increased ease of vaccination. Hib vaccines have a very favorable safety profile, have been found to be either cost-saving or cost-effective by many public health agencies, and, in most countries, are initiated during early infancy as part of routine childhood immunization programs. As a result of widespread use of the vaccines, the incidence of Hib infections, and their associated morbidity and mortality, has fallen dramatically across the globe. Yet, many children remain unimmunized or underimmunized against Hib, particularly in limited-resource countries. Future efforts to further reduce the disease burden of Hib infections remain a high priority.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiaa537
      Issue No: Vol. 224, No. Supplement_4 (2021)
       
  • Rubella Eradication: Not Yet Accomplished, but Entirely Feasible

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Plotkin S.
      Abstract: Rubella virus is the most teratogenic virus known to science and is capable of causing large epidemics. The RA 27/3 rubella vaccine, usually combined with measles vaccine, has eliminated rubella and congenital rubella syndrome from much of the world, notably from the Western Hemisphere. Except in immunosuppressed individuals, it is remarkably safe. Together with rubella vaccine strains used in China and Japan, eradication of the rubella virus is possible, indeed more feasible than eradication of measles or mumps.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiaa530
      Issue No: Vol. 224, No. Supplement_4 (2021)
       
  • Triumphs of Immunization

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Modlin J; Schaffner W, Orenstein W, et al.
      Abstract: vaccinesimmunization impactglobal health
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiab123
      Issue No: Vol. 224, No. Supplement_4 (2021)
       
  • The World of Immunization: Achievements, Challenges, and Strategic Vision
           for the Next Decade

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lindstrand A; Cherian T, Chang-Blanc D, et al.
      Abstract: Immunization is among the most cost-effective public health interventions available and is estimated to have averted at least 37 million deaths between 2000 and 2019. Since the establishment of the Expanded Programme on Immunization in 1974, global vaccination coverage increased and the coverage gap between rich and poor countries decreased. Creation of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, in 2000 allowed the poorest countries in the world to benefit from new, life-saving vaccines and expand the breadth of protection against an increasing number of vaccine-preventable diseases. Despite this progress, inequities in access to and uptake of vaccines persist. Opportunities to realize the full potential of vaccines are within reach but require focused, tailored and committed action by Governments and immunization stakeholders. The Immunization Agenda 2030 provides a framework for action during the next decade to attain a world where everyone, everywhere, at every age fully benefits from vaccines for good health and well-being.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiab284
      Issue No: Vol. 224, No. Supplement_4 (2021)
       
  • Pertussis (Whooping Cough)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Decker M; Edwards K.
      Abstract: Pertussis (whooping cough) is a respiratory infection caused by Bordetella pertussis. All ages are susceptible. In the prevaccine era, almost all children became infected. Pertussis is particularly dangerous in young infants, who account for practically all hospitalizations and deaths, but clinical disease is burdensome at any age. Widespread use of pertussis vaccines dramatically reduced cases, but concern over adverse reactions led to the replacement of standard whole-cell by acellular pertussis vaccines that contain only a few selected pertussis antigens and are far less reactogenic. Routine administration of acellular pertussis vaccines combined with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids is recommended in infancy with toddler and preschool boosters, at age 11, and during pregnancy. Boosting in the second half of every pregancy is critical to protection of the newborn. Waning of vaccine immunity over time has become an increasing concern, and several new pertussis vaccines are being evaluated to address this problem.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiaa469
      Issue No: Vol. 224, No. Supplement_4 (2021)
       
  • Measles in the 21st Century: Progress Toward Achieving and Sustaining
           Elimination

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gastañaduy P; Goodson J, Panagiotakopoulos L, et al.
      Abstract: The global measles vaccination program has been extraordinarily successful in reducing measles-related disease and deaths worldwide. Eradication of measles is feasible because of several key attributes, including humans as the only reservoir for the virus, broad access to diagnostic tools that can rapidly detect measles-infectious persons, and availability of highly safe and effective measles-containing vaccines (MCVs). All 6 World Health Organization (WHO) regions have established measles elimination goals. Globally, during 2000–2018, measles incidence decreased by 66% (from 145 to 49 cases per million population) and deaths decreased by 73% (from 535 600 to 142 300), drastically reducing global disease burden. Routine immunization with MCV has been the cornerstone for the control and prevention of measles. Two doses of MCV are 97% effective in preventing measles, qualifying MCV as one of the most effective vaccines ever developed. Mild adverse events occur in <20% of recipients and serious adverse events are extremely rare. The economic benefits of measles vaccination are highlighted by an overall return on investment of 58 times the cost of the vaccine, supply chains, and vaccination. Because measles is one of the most contagious human diseases, maintenance of high (≥95%) 2-dose MCV coverage is crucial for controlling the spread of measles and successfully reaching measles elimination; however, the plateauing of global MCV coverage for nearly a decade and the global measles resurgence during 2018–2019 demonstrate that much work remains. Global commitments to increase community access to and demand for immunizations, strengthen national and regional partnerships for building public health infrastructure, and implement innovations that can overcome access barriers and enhance vaccine confidence, are essential to achieve a world free of measles.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Sep 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/infdis/jiaa793
      Issue No: Vol. 224, No. Supplement_4 (2021)
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.236.51.151
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-