Followed Journals
Journal you Follow: 0
 
Sign Up to follow journals, search in your chosen journals and, optionally, receive Email Alerts when new issues of your Followed Journals are published.
Already have an account? Sign In to see the journals you follow.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.722
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 218  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0021-9355 - ISSN (Online) 1535-1386
Published by Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery Homepage  [4 journals]
  • Is Immobilization Necessary for Early Return to Work Following Distal
           Biceps Repair Using a Cortical Button Technique': A Randomized
           Controlled Trial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bergman; Joseph W.; Silveira, Anelise; Chan, Robert; Lapner, Michael; Hildebrand, Kevin A.; Le, Ian L.D.; Sheps, David M.; Beaupre, Lauren A.; Lalani, Aleem
      Abstract: imageBackground: Improvements in surgical fixation to repair distal biceps tendon ruptures have not fully translated to earlier postoperative mobilization; it is unknown whether earlier mobilization affords earlier functional return to work. This parallel-arm randomized controlled trial compared the impact of early mobilization versus 6 weeks of postoperative immobilization following distal biceps tendon repair.Methods: One hundred and one male participants with a distal biceps tendon rupture that was amenable to a primary repair with use of a cortical button were randomized to early mobilization (self-weaning from sling and performance of active range of motion as tolerated during first 6 weeks) (n = 49) or 6 weeks of immobilization (splinting for 6 weeks with no active range of motion) (n = 52). Follow-up assessments were performed by a blinded assessor at 2 and 6 weeks and at 3, 6, and 12 months. At 12 months, distal biceps tendon integrity was verified with ultrasound. The primary outcome was return to work. Secondary outcomes were pain, range of motion, strength, shortened Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (QuickDASH) score, and tendon integrity. Intention-to-treat analysis was performed. A linear mixed model for repeated measures was used to compare pain, range of motion, strength, and QuickDASH between the groups over time; return to work was assessed with use of independent t tests.Results: The groups were similar preoperatively (p ≥ 0.16). The average age (and standard deviation) was 44.7 ± 8.6 years. Eighty-three participants (82%) were followed to 12 months. There were no differences between the groups in terms of return to work (p ≥ 0.83). Participants in the early mobilization group had significantly more passive forearm supination (p = 0.04), with passive forearm pronation (p = 0.06) and active extension and supination (p = 0.09) trending toward significantly greater range of motion in the early mobilization group relative to the immobilization group. Participants in the early mobilization group had significantly better QuickDASH scores over time than those in the immobilization group (p = 0.02). There were no differences between the groups in terms of pain (p ≥ 0.45), active range of motion (p ≥ 0.09), or strength (p ≥ 0.70). Two participants (2.0%, 1 in each group) had full-thickness tears on ultrasound at 12 months (p = 0.61). Compliance was not significantly different between the groups (p = 0.16).Conclusions: Early motion after distal biceps tendon repair with cortical button fixation is well tolerated and does not appear to be associated with adverse outcomes. No clinically important group differences were seen.Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level I. See Instructions for
      Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT+
       
  • Ineffective Communication: The Uninformed Injured Worker

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Vanderhooft; Jan Eric
      Abstract: imageBackground: Effective communication has been demonstrated to impact patient health outcomes, specifically in improving symptom resolution, safety, function, and emotional well-being, and to lower malpractice claims. I hypothesized that the communication process with patients with Workers’ Compensation is inadequate.Methods: Prospectively, claimants presenting for an independent medical evaluation or an impairment rating were assessed concerning the education that they received with regard to their claim. Basic principles were based on the Utah Labor Commission Employee’s Guide to Workers’ Compensation and an employee information sheet.Results: There were 556 consecutive claimants assessed. None of the participants expressed any familiarity with the employee information sheet. Although there was a mean of 12 months since the date of claim to the evaluation, 536 participants (96.4%) were effectively unaware of the principles surrounding their claim; of these participants, 6 had attorneys and 23 had prior industrial claims. Of the 3.6% of participants who had received the State Employee Guide, 5 had a prior evaluation with the medical director of the Labor Commission, 6 had located the information online, and 9 had been provided information by their nurse-case manager. Even with this information, the context or importance of the information was not well understood. There were 16.4% of participants who were aware of the mileage compensation. Two claimants were aware that the insurer, not the employer, was responsible for managing the claim, 2 claimants were aware that their claim was open for life, and 1 claimant was aware that claimants could change physicians.Conclusions: Workers’ Compensation programs were designed to expedite care and treatment while decreasing the adversarial environment for workplace injuries. Yet delays and confrontational events continue to be experienced by the injured worker. This often results in the impression that workplace injuries have worse outcomes for the same diagnosis. The lack of effective education with regard to the rights and responsibilities of the claimant may also lead to this poorer outcome. Given studies showing the benefits of patient education in preventing malpractice claims and improving health-care outcomes, it is suggested that improved patient education for the injured worker is warranted and may lead to improved outcomes with diminished adversarial events.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT+
       
  • Molecular and Clinical Elucidation of the Mechanism of Action of Steroids
           in Idiopathic Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yamanaka; Yoshiaki; Tajima, Takafumi; Tsujimura, Yoshitaka; Kosugi, Kenji; Mano, Yosuke; Zenke, Yukichi; Hachisuka, Akiko; Aoki, Takatoshi; Sakai, Akinori
      Abstract: imageBackground: Carpal tunnel steroid injection is a nonoperative intervention for the treatment for idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). The antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and antiedematous properties of steroids account for their therapeutic effects in the context of CTS; however, their relative contribution has not been clarified.Methods: Fibroblasts from subsynovial connective tissues (SSCT) were intraoperatively collected from patients with idiopathic CTS and were incubated with or without the steroid triamcinolone acetonide (TA) for 1, 3, and 7 days; the expression of fibrosis-related genes and inflammatory cytokines was evaluated using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. A clinical prospective study was conducted with patients who received carpal tunnel TA injections. We performed clinical and electrophysiological evaluations before and 1, 3, and 5 months after TA injection; and we compared the median nerve, flexor tendon, and SSCT areas and the median nerve flattening ratio before and 1 month after TA injection using 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).Results: TA induced downregulation of the fibrosis-related genes Col1A1 (collagen type I alpha 1 chain), Col1A2, and Col3A1 but not the inflammation-related genes. The nerve flattening ratio did not change after TA injection according to the MRI-based observation of the median nerve, flexor tendon, and SSCT areas.Conclusions: The therapeutic effects of injected TA are apparently mediated by its antifibrotic rather than its anti-inflammatory and antiedematous properties. TA probably alters the properties but not the morphology of SSCT.Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for
      Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT+
       
  • Comparative Analysis of Serial Union Patterns After Opening-Wedge High
           Tibial Osteotomy with and without Bone-Void Fillers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kim; Seong Chan; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Jae Ik; Kim, Tae Woo; Lee, Yong Seuk
      Abstract: imageBackground: Opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy produces opening gaps; however, there is little consensus on bone graft necessity and the material that would produce a superior union. The purposes of the present study were (1) to compare the serial union patterns associated with various bone-void fillers, (2) to determine whether bone-void filler is necessary to achieve bone union of the opening gap, and (3) to determine whether bone union is different according to the correction degree during opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy.Methods: In this retrospective study, 97 knees were randomly assigned to treatment with hydroxyapatite chip bone (Group A), allogenic chip bone (Group B), or no bone graft (Group C) and were analyzed after a minimum 1-year follow-up. To compare the bone union pattern, the area of callus filling located at the most medial side on an anteroposterior radiograph of the knee was recorded, and a modified van Hemert scoring system was used in the mediolaterally divided 5 zones. The correlations between the correction degree and bone union scores were evaluated.Results: There were no significant differences in the extent of mediolateral bone-healing at 6 weeks or 3 months postoperatively (p = 0.172 and p = 0.228). However, Group C showed more prominent progression of the gap filling to the medial side compared with Groups A and B at 6 months postoperatively (p = 0.002). Group C showed slow progression of bone union up to 6 weeks but surpassed the other groups at 6 months. The union pattern was not different between Groups A and B, and the correction degree was not correlated with bone union beyond 3 months postoperatively.Conclusions: Despite the different gap-healing patterns, opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy without bone graft achieved bone union comparable with allogenic and synthetic graft materials. Group C (no bone graft) showed slower progression of bone union but surpassed the other groups at around 6 months. Based on the union pattern, there was no difference depending on the correction degree and the use of bone-void fillers.Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for
      Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT+
       
  • Stepped Augmented Glenoid Component in Anatomic Total Shoulder
           Arthroplasty for B2 and B3 Glenoid Pathology: A Study of Early Outcomes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Iannotti; Joseph P.; Jun, Bong-Jae; Derwin, Kathleen A.; Ricchetti, Eric T.
      Abstract: imageBackground: Posterior glenoid bone loss is commonly associated with primary glenohumeral osteoarthritis. Surgical management of bone loss in anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty (aTSA) remains controversial. We studied the use of a stepped augmented glenoid component for management of Walch B2 and B3 glenoids and compared the radiographic and clinical outcomes at short-term follow-up with those achieved with a non-augmented component of the same design in Walch A1 glenoids.Methods: Ninety-two patients (42 A1, 29 B2, and 21 B3 glenoids) were prospectively followed after aTSA. Sequential 3-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) imaging was performed preoperatively, within 3 months postoperatively with metal artifact reduction (MAR) to define implant position, and at a minimum of 2 years postoperatively with MAR. Scapular 3D registration with implant registration allowed 3D measurement of glenoid implant position, implant shift, and central peg osteolysis (CPO).Results: CPO with or without implant shift occurred in a higher percentage of B3 glenoids treated with the augmented glenoid component (29%) than A1 glenoids treated with a standard component (5%) (p = 0.028). There was no significant difference in the frequency of CPO between B2 glenoids with the augmented component (10%) and A1 glenoids with the standard component. There was no difference in postoperative glenoid component version and inclination between groups. B3 glenoids were associated with more component medialization relative to the premorbid joint line compared with A1 and B2 glenoids (p < 0.001).Conclusions: A stepped augmented glenoid component can restore premorbid glenoid anatomy in patients with asymmetric biconcave glenoid bone loss (Walch B2), with short-term clinical and radiographic results equivalent to those for patients without glenoid bone loss (Walch A1) treated with a non-augmented component. There is a greater risk of CPO in patients with moderate-to-severe B3 glenoid pathology with this stepped augmented glenoid component. Longer follow-up will help define the clinical implications of CPO over time.Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for
      Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT+
       
  • Lower 1-Year Postoperative Mortality After Acetabular Versus Proximal
           Femoral Fractures in Elderly Patients

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stetzelberger; Vera M.; Brouze, Iris F.; Steppacher, Simon D.; Bastian, Johannes D.; Schwab, Joseph M.; Tannast, Moritz
      Abstract: imageBackground: Geriatric acetabular fractures are becoming more common due to demographic changes. Compared with proximal femoral fractures, surgical treatment is more complex and often does not allow full-weight-bearing. The aims of this study were to compare operatively treated acetabular and proximal femoral fractures with regard to (1) cumulative 1-year mortality, (2) perioperative complications, and (3) predictive factors associated with a higher 1-year mortality.Methods: This institutional review board-approved comparative study included 486 consecutive surgically treated elderly patients (136 acetabular and 350 proximal femoral fractures). After matching, 2 comparable groups of 129 acetabular and 129 proximal femoral fractures were analyzed. Cumulative 1-year mortality was evaluated through Kaplan-Meier survivorship analysis, and perioperative complications were documented and graded. After confirming that the proportionality assumption was met, Cox proportional hazard modeling was conducted to identify factors associated with increased 1-year mortality.Results: The acetabular fracture group had a significantly lower cumulative 1-year mortality before matching (18% compared with 33% for proximal femoral fractures, log-rank p = 0.001) and after matching (18% compared with 36%, log-rank p = 0.005). Nevertheless, it had a significantly higher overall perioperative complication rate (68% compared with 48%, p < 0.001). In our multivariable Cox regression analysis, older age, perioperative blood loss of>1 L, and wheelchair mobilization were associated with lower survival rates after acetabular fracture surgery. Older age and a higher 5-item modified frailty index were associated with a higher 1-year mortality rate after proximal femoral fractures, whereas postoperative full weight-bearing was protective.Conclusions: Despite the complexity of operative treatment and a higher complication rate after acetabular fractures in the elderly, the 1-year mortality rate is lower than that after operative treatment of proximal femoral fractures, even after adjustment for comorbidities.Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for
      Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT+
       
  • Comparison of Outcomes by Reconstructive Strategy in Patients with
           Prostheses for Proximal Femoral Focal Deficiency

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Floccari; Lorena V.; Jeans, Kelly A.; Herring, John A.; Johnston, Charles E.; Karol, Lori A.
      Abstract: imageBackground: The present study compares prosthetic treatment options for proximal femoral focal deficiency in terms of gait analysis, oxygen consumption, and patient-reported outcomes.Methods: Twenty-three patients who had been managed with a prosthesis for unilateral proximal femoral focal deficiency underwent gait analysis; this group included 7 patients who had received an equinus prosthesis, 6 who had received a rotationplasty prosthesis, and 10 who had undergone Syme amputation and had received an above-the-knee prosthesis. Cadence parameters, kinematic and kinetic data, and oxygen consumption were measured, and the Gait Deviation Index (GDI) was calculated. Medical records and radiographs were reviewed. The Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument (PODCI) was completed by the child’s parent.Results: Patients underwent gait analysis at a mean age of 11.6 years (range, 4 to 19 years). Proximal femoral focal deficiency classification was not predictive of the chosen treatment. Patients in the rotationplasty group had undergone more procedures than those in the Syme amputation and equinus groups (mean, 3.3, 1.8, and 0.7 procedures, respectively) (p = 0.001). Oxygen cost did not differ between groups; however, all required greater energy expenditure than normal (170%, 144%, and 159%, in the equinus, rotationplasty, and Syme amputation groups, respectively) (p = 0.427). Likewise, hip power, abductor impulse, and GDI did not differ, but all groups had GDI scores>3 standard deviations below normative values. Patients in the equinus group walked faster (97% of normal for age) than those in the rotationplasty (84%) and Syme amputation groups (83%) (p = 0.018), whereas those in the Syme amputation group had superior knee range of motion (55° from the prosthetic knee) than those in the equinus (20°) and rotationplasty groups (15° generated from the ankle) (p = 0.003). There were no differences in terms of the PODCI subscales for pain, sport/physical function, happiness, or global function. Transfer/basic mobility improved with age (r = 0.516, p = 0.017), but no other associations were found between gait variables and PODCI scores.Conclusions: Rotationplasty provided no patient-reported benefit and no functional benefit in terms of gait parameters or oxygen consumption, despite requiring more surgical procedures compared with other prosthetic options. Patients with an equinus prosthesis walked the fastest, whereas treatment with a Syme amputation and prosthetic knee yielded equivalent gait parameters and oxygen consumption as compared with those for patients using an equinus prosthesis. These findings contradict those of previous reports that rotationplasty provides superior function over other proximal femoral focal deficiency prosthetic treatment options.Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for
      Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT+
       
  • Midterm Results of Primary Exeter Cemented Stem in a Select Patient
           Population

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gausden; Elizabeth B.; Abdel, Matthew P.; Mabry, Tad M.; Berry, Daniel J.; Trousdale, Robert T.; Sierra, Rafael J.
      Abstract: imageBackground: Most North American surgeons predominantly use uncemented stems in primary total hip arthroplasties (THAs) and reserve cemented stems for selected older patients and those with poor bone quality. However, data on this “selective use” strategy for cemented stems in the population at risk for periprosthetic fracture and implant loosening are limited. The purpose of this study was to describe implant survivorship, complications, and radiographic results of a specific collarless, polished, tapered cemented stem (Exeter; Stryker) used selectively in a predominantly elderly population undergoing primary THA.Methods: We identified 386 patients who underwent a total of 423 primary THAs with selectively utilized Exeter stems for the treatment of osteoarthritis between 2006 and 2017. In the same time period, 11,010 primary THAs were performed with uncemented stems and 961 with non-Exeter cemented stems. The mean patient age was 77 years, 71% were female, and the mean body mass index was 29 kg/m2. Competing risk analysis accounting for death was utilized to determine cumulative incidences of revision and reoperation. The mean follow-up was 5 years (range, 2 to 12 years).Results: The 10-year cumulative incidence of any femoral component revision in this patient cohort was 4%, with 10 stems revised at the time of the latest follow-up. There were no intraoperative femoral fractures. The indications for revision were postoperative periprosthetic femoral fracture (n = 6), dislocation (n = 3), and infection (n = 1). There were no revisions for femoral loosening. The 10-year cumulative incidence of reoperation was 10%. The 10-year cumulative incidence of Vancouver B periprosthetic femoral fracture was 2%. Radiographically, there were no cases of aseptic loosening or osteolysis. There was a significant improvement in median Harris hip score, from 53 preoperatively to 92 at a mean follow-up of 5 years (p < 0.001).Conclusions: The strategy of selectively utilizing a collarless, polished, tapered cemented stem produced a low (4%) cumulative incidence of stem revision at 10 years postoperatively and resulted in no cases of aseptic loosening. The use of the Exeter stem did not eliminate postoperative femoral fractures in this predominantly elderly, female patient population.Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for
      Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT+
       
  • High Failure Rates of a Unilateral Posterior Peri-Apical Distraction
           Device (ApiFix) for Fusionless Treatment of Adolescent Idiopathic
           Scoliosis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stadhouder; Agnita; Holewijn, Roderick M.; Haanstra, Tsjitske M.; van Royen, Barend J.; Kruyt, Moyo C.; de Kleuver, Marinus
      Abstract: imageBackground: Conventional surgical treatment for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) consists of correction of the spinal deformity with rigid spinal instrumentation and fusion. Less-invasive and fusionless surgery could potentially improve patient outcomes. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of a recently U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved posterior peri-apical self-distracting device (ApiFix) that is designed to gradually correct the deformity without spinal fusion.Methods: In a prospective cohort study of 20 patients with AIS (Risser stage 1-4; Lenke 1 or 5; major curve Cobb angle, 40° to 55°; and Bunnell scoliometer rotation,
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT+
       
  • The Effect of Supramalleolar Osteotomy without Marrow Stimulation for
           Medial Ankle Osteoarthritis: Second-Look Arthroscopic Evaluation of 29
           Ankles

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lim; Jung-Won; Eom, Joon-Sang; Kang, Sung Jin; Lee, Dong-Oh; Kang, Hwa Jun; Jung, Hong-Geun
      Abstract: imageBackground: The effect of supramalleolar osteotomy without a bone marrow-stimulating procedure for articular cartilage regeneration in the ankle joint remains unknown. We investigated whether supramalleolar osteotomy yielded favorable clinical and radiographic outcomes. We also evaluated the joint tissue appearance after supramalleolar osteotomy without a bone marrow-stimulating procedure with use of second-look arthroscopy and its correlation with the outcome.Methods: Twenty-nine ankles were retrospectively reviewed at a mean of 2.9 years after supramalleolar osteotomy without a bone marrow-stimulating procedure. All 29 ankles had had second-look arthroscopy to evaluate tibiotalar joint tissue regeneration at a minimum of 1 year postoperatively. A visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score, and patient satisfaction were used for functional evaluations. Ankle osteoarthritis was classified with the Takakura staging system, and the tibial anterior surface (TAS) angle and tibial lateral surface (TLS) angle were measured on radiographs.Results: The mean VAS and AOFAS scores improved from 6.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.7 to 6.8) preoperatively to 1.5 (95% CI, 0.9 to 2.1) postoperatively and from 60.5 (95% CI, 54.9 to 66.1) preoperatively to 88.3 (95% CI, 84.3 to 92.3) postoperatively, respectively. Patient satisfaction with the outcome of the procedure was classified as very satisfied or satisfied for 27 ankles (93.1%). Sixteen of 21 ankles that were classified as Takakura stage-IIIa and 2 of 3 ankles that were classified as stage-IIIb preoperatively improved to stage II postoperatively. The mean TAS and TLS angles significantly improved from 83.5° (95% CI, 82.2° to 84.7°) and 77.0° (95% CI, 75.4° to 78.7°) preoperatively to 94.2° (95% CI, 92.7° to 95.7°) and 80.4° (95% CI, 78.3° to 82.5°) postoperatively, respectively. On second-look arthroscopy, 26 ankles (89.7%) showed tissue regeneration of the medial compartment of the ankle joint and no patient showed cartilage deterioration.Conclusions: Medial tibiotalar tissue regeneration was identified in most patients with medial compartment ankle osteoarthritis following supramalleolar osteotomy without a bone marrow-stimulating procedure. The procedure results in satisfactory clinical and radiographic outcomes with high patient satisfaction.Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for
      Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT+
       
  • The Hip-Spine Challenge

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chavarria; Joseph C.; Douleh, Diana G.; York, Philip J.
      Abstract: image➤The proper diagnosis and treatment of patients with concurrent hip and spine pathological processes can be challenging because of the substantial overlap in symptomatology.➤There is no consensus on which pathological condition should be addressed first.➤Factors such as advanced spinal degeneration, deformity, and prior fusion alter the biomechanics of the spinopelvic unit. Attention should be paid to recognizing these issues during the work-up for a total hip arthroplasty as they can result in an increased risk of dislocation.➤In patients with concurrent spine and hip degeneration, the surgeon must pay close attention to appropriate implant positioning and have consideration for implants with enhanced stability to minimize the risk of dislocation.➤A proper understanding of sagittal balance and restoration of this balance is integral to improving patient outcomes following spinal surgery.➤The advent of new imaging modalities, increased awareness of spinopelvic mobility, as well as a better understanding of sagittal alignment will hopefully improve our treatment of patients with hip-spine syndrome.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT+
       
  • What’s Important: Retirement, Viewed 2 Years Later

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Weiland; Andrew J.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT+
       
  • Causal Language in Observational Orthopaedic Research

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Varady; Nathan H.; Feroe, Aliya G.; Fontana, Mark Alan; Chen, Antonia F.
      Abstract: image : With the increasing availability of large clinical registries and administrative data sets, observational (i.e., nonexperimental) orthopaedic research is being performed with increased frequency. While this research substantially advances our field, there are fundamental limitations to what can be determined through a single observational study. Avoiding overstatements and misstatements is important for the sake of accuracy, particularly for ensuring that clinical care is not inadvertently swayed by how an observational study is written up and described. We have noticed that causal language is frequently misused in observational orthopaedic research—that is, language that says or implies that 1 variable definitively causes another, despite the fact that causation can generally only be determined with randomization. In this data-backed commentary, we examine the prevalence of causal language in a random sample of 400 observational orthopaedic studies; we found that causal language was misused in 60% of them. We discuss the implications of these results and how to report observational findings more accurately: the word “association” (and its derivatives) can almost always replace or reframe a causal phrase.
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT+
       
  • “What We Have Here Is a Failure to Communicate”: Commentary on an
           article by Jan Eric Vanderhooft, MD, FAAOS: “Ineffective Communication:
           The Uninformed Injured Worker”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Talmage; James Byron
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT+
       
  • What Actually Happens After One Injects a Steroid into the Carpal Tunnel
           of a Patient': Commentary on an article by Yoshiaki Yamanaka, MD, PhD,
           et al.: “Molecular and Clinical Elucidation of the Mechanism of Action
           of Steroids in Idiopathic Carpal Tunnel Syndrome”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Slater; Robert R. Jr.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT+
       
  • Bridging the Gap. Is Augmentation Necessary During Opening-Wedge High
           Tibial Osteotomy': Commentary on an article by Seong Chan Kim, MD, et
           al.: “Comparative Analysis of Serial Union Patterns After Opening-Wedge
           High Tibial Osteotomy with and without Bone-Void Fillers”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Angeline; Michael
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 06 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT+
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.236.51.151
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-