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Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.908
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 97  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0009-921X - ISSN (Online) 1528-1132
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [301 journals]
  • Editorial: Is Telemedicine Safe' It’s Unlikely We’ll Ever
           Know

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      Authors: Leopold; Seth S.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Editor’s Spotlight/Take 5: What Is the Best Evidence to Guide Management
           of Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures' A Systematic Review and Network
           Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

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      Authors: Leopold; Seth S.
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • What Is the Best Evidence to Guide Management of Acute Achilles Tendon
           Ruptures' A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis of Randomized
           Controlled Trials

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      Authors: Meulenkamp; Brad; Woolnough, Taylor; Cheng, Wei; Shorr, Risa; Stacey, Dawn; Richards, Megan; Gupta, Arnav; Fergusson, Dean; Graham, Ian D.
      Abstract: imageBackground Uncertainty exists regarding the best treatment for acute Achilles tendon ruptures. Simultaneous comparison of the multiple treatment options using traditional study designs is problematic; multiarm clinical trials often are logistically constrained to small sample sizes, and traditional meta-analyses are limited to comparisons of only two treatments that have been compared in head-to-head trials. Network meta-analyses allow for simultaneous comparison of all existing treatments utilizing both direct (head-to-head comparison) and indirect (not previously compared head-to-head) evidence.Questions/purposes We performed a network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to answer the following questions: Considering open repair, minimally invasive surgery (MIS) repair, functional rehabilitation, or primary immobilization for acute Achilles tendon ruptures, (1) which intervention is associated with the lowest risk of rerupture? (2) Which intervention is associated with the lowest risk of complications resulting in surgery?Methods This study was conducted with methods guided by the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions and is reported in adherence with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses extension statement for incorporating network meta-analysis. Five databases and grey literature sources (such as major orthopaedic meeting presentation lists) were searched from inception to September 30, 2019. Included studies were RCTs comparing treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures using two or more of the following interventions: primary immobilization, functional rehabilitation, open surgical repair, or MIS repair. We excluded studies enrolling patients with chronic ruptures, reruptures, and preexisting Achilles tendinopathy as well as studies with more than 20% loss to follow-up or less than 6 months of follow-up. Nineteen RCTs (1316 patients) were included in the final analysis. The mean number of patients per study treatment arm was 35 ± 16, mean age was 41 ± 5 years, mean sex composition was 80% ± 10% males, and mean follow-up was 22 ± 12 months. The four treatment groups were compared for the main outcomes of rerupture and complications resulting in operation. The analysis was conducted using random-effects Bayesian network meta-analysis with vague priors. Evidence quality was evaluated using Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology. We found risk of selection, attrition, and reporting bias to be low across treatments, and we found the risk of performance and detection bias to be high. Overall risk of bias between treatments appeared similar.Results We found that treatment with primary immobilization had a greater risk of rerupture than open surgery (odds ratio 4.06 [95% credible interval {CrI} 1.47 to 11.88]; p < 0.05). There were no other differences between treatments for risk of rerupture. Minimally invasive surgery was ranked first for fewest complications resulting in surgery and was associated with a lower risk of complications resulting in surgery than functional rehabilitation (OR 0.16 [95% CrI 0.02 to 0.90]; p < 0.05), open surgery (OR 0.22 [95% CrI 0.04 to 0.93]; p < 0.05), and primary immobilization (OR < 0.01 [95% CrI < 0.01 to 0.01]; p < 0.05). Risk of complications resulting in surgery was no different between primary immobilization and open surgery (OR 1.46 [95% CrI 0.35 to 5.36]). Data for patient-reported outcome scores and return to activity were inappropriate for pooling secondary to considerable clinical heterogeneity and imprecision associated with small sample sizes.Conclusion Faced with acute Achilles tendon rupture, patients should be counseled that, based on the best-available evidence, the risk of rerupture likely is no different across contemporary treatments. Considering the possibly lower risk of complications resulting in surgery associated with MIS repair, patients and surgeons must balance any benefit with the potential risks of MIS techniques. As treatments continue to evolve, consistent reporting of validated patient-reported outcome measures is critically important to facilitate analysis with existing RCT evidence. Infrequent but serious complications such as rerupture and deep infection should be further explored to determine whether meaningful differences exist in specific patient populations.Level of Evidence Level I, therapeutic study.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Not the Last Word: 500 Words of Solitude

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      Authors: Bernstein; Joseph
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Value-based Healthcare: Three Ways Healthcare Systems Can Get More Usage
           Out of Their Patient Engagement Tools

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      Authors: Jayakumar; Prakash; Duckworth, Elizabeth; Bozic, Kevin J.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • On Patient Safety: How Can We Get More Nonphysicians on Medical
           Boards'

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      Authors: Rickert; James
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR® Curriculum—Orthopaedic Education: How Can We Bridge the Chasm
           Between Podiatrists and Orthopaedic Surgeons'

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      Authors: Dougherty; Paul J.; Piraino, Jason A.
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Your Best Life: Preventing Physician Suicide

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      Authors: Hogan; William B.; Daniels, Alan H.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Editorial Comment: Selected Papers from the 9th International Congress of
           Arthroplasty Registries

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      Authors: Rolfson; Ola
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Collection and Reporting of Patient-reported Outcome Measures in
           Arthroplasty Registries: Multinational Survey and Recommendations

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      Authors: Bohm; Eric R.; Kirby, Sarah; Trepman, Elly; Hallstrom, Brian R.; Rolfson, Ola; Wilkinson, J. Mark; Sayers, Adrian; Overgaard, Søren; Lyman, Stephen; Franklin, Patricia D.; Dunn, Jennifer; Denissen, Geke; W-Dahl, Annette; Ingelsrud, Lina Holm; Navarro, Ronald A.
      Abstract: imageBackground Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are validated questionnaires that are completed by patients. Arthroplasty registries vary in PROM collection and use. Current information about registry collection and use of PROMs is important to help improve methods of PROM data analysis, reporting, comparison, and use toward improving clinical practice.Questions/purposes To characterize PROM collection and use by registries, we asked: (1) What is the current practice of PROM collection by arthroplasty registries that are current or former members of the International Society of Arthroplasty Registries, and are there sufficient similarities in PROM collection between registries to enable useful international comparisons that could inform the improvement of arthroplasty care? (2) How do registries differ in PROM administration and demographic, clinical, and comorbidity index variables collected for case-mix adjustment in data analysis and reporting? (3) What quality assurance methods are used for PROMs, and how are PROM results reported and used by registries? (4) What recommendations to arthroplasty registries may improve PROM reporting and facilitate international comparisons?Methods An electronic survey was developed with questions about registry structure and collection, analysis, reporting, and use of PROM data and distributed to directors or senior administrators of 39 arthroplasty registries that were current or former members of the International Society of Arthroplasty Registries. In all, 64% (25 of 39) of registries responded and completed the survey. Missing responses from incomplete surveys were captured by contacting the registries, and up to three reminder emails were sent to nonresponding registries. Recommendations about PROM collection were drafted, revised, and approved by the International Society of Arthroplasty Registries PROMs Working Group members.Results Of the 25 registries that completed the survey, 15 collected generic PROMs, most frequently the EuroQol-5 Dimension survey; 16 collected joint-specific PROMs, most frequently the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score and Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score; and 11 registries collected a satisfaction item. Most registries administered PROM questionnaires within 3 months before and 1 year after surgery. All 16 registries that collected PROM data collected patient age, sex or gender, BMI, indication for the primary arthroplasty, reason for revision arthroplasty, and a comorbidity index, most often the American Society of Anesthesiologists classification. All 16 registries performed regular auditing and reporting of data quality, and most registries reported PROM results to hospitals and linked PROM data to other data sets such as hospital, medication, billing, and emergency care databases. Recommendations for transparent reporting of PROMs were grouped into four categories: demographic and clinical, survey administration, data analysis, and results.Conclusion Although registries differed in PROM collection and use, there were sufficient similarities that may enable useful data comparisons. The International Society of Arthroplasty Registries PROMs Working Group recommendations identify issues that may be important to most registries such as the need to make decisions about survey times and collection methods, as well as how to select generic and joint-specific surveys, handle missing data and attrition, report data, and ensure representativeness of the sample.Clinical Relevance By collecting PROMs, registries can provide patient-centered data to surgeons, hospitals, and national entities to improve arthroplasty care.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: Collection and Reporting of Patient-reported Outcome
           Measures in Arthroplasty Registries: Multinational Survey and
           Recommendations

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      Authors: Blumenfeld; Thomas J.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • How Does Implant Survivorship Vary with Different Corail Femoral Stem
           Variants' Results of 51,212 Cases with Up to 30 Years Of Follow-up
           from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register

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      Authors: Melbye; Silje Marie; Haug, Sofie Cecilia Dietrich; Fenstad, Anne Marie; Furnes, Ove; Gjertsen, Jan-Erik; Hallan, Geir
      Abstract: imageBackground The Corail® cementless stem (DePuy Synthes) has been used in Norway since 1987 and is one of the most frequently used stems in THA worldwide. Although the published survival results of the standard Corail stem have been good, little is known about the long-term (more than 20 years) survival of other stem design variants. Further, some changes were made to the extramedullary part of the stem in 2003, and the effect of these changes on survival is unknown.Questions/purposes (1) What is the survival up to 30 years of the standard collarless Corail femoral stem, and were extramedullary changes (slimmer, polished and rectangular neck, shorter taper) associated with differences in survivorship? (2) How does the 10-year survival and the risk of revision of other Corail stem variants, including the standard collared stem, coxa vara collared stem, and high offset collarless stem, compare with those of the standard collarless stem? (3) Which factors are associated with an increased risk of revision of the Corail stem, and are there any differences in those factors among the four stem variants?Methods Data for this study were drawn from the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register. Since 1987, THAs have been registered in the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register with completeness of data greater than 97% for primary THAs and 93% for revisions. To study survivorship with up to 30 years of follow-up (1987 to 2018; median 7.7-year follow-up), and to compare the original stem with stems with extramedullary modifications, we included 28,928 standard collarless Corail stems in 24,893 patients (mean age at time of implantation 62 years; 66% [16,525 of 24,893] were women). To compare the newer stem variants with the standard collarless stem (2008 to 2018), we included 20,871 standard collarless, 10,335 standard collared, 6760 coxa vara collared, and 4801 high offset collarless stems. Survival probabilities were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method with endpoints of stem revision, revision due to aseptic stem loosening, and periprosthetic fracture. The endpoint of all noninfectious causes of THA revision (including cup revision) was additionally analyzed for the long-term comparison. The proportion of patients who died was limited, and there was no difference in death rate between the groups compared. Therefore, we believe that competing events were not likely to influence survivorship estimates to a large degree. To compare different stem variants and evaluate factors that could be associated with the risk of revision, we calculated hazard ratios using Cox regression analyses with adjustments for gender, age group, surgical approach, diagnosis, and stem size.Results The 30-year Kaplan-Meier survival of the standard collarless stem was 88.4% (95% confidence interval 85.4% to 91.4%), 93.3% (95% CI 91.1% to 95.5%), and 94.4% (95% CI 92.0% to 96.8%) using stem revision for any noninfectious cause, aseptic loosening, and periprosthetic fracture of the femur as endpoints, respectively. There was no difference in survival between the original stem and the modified stem. The 10-year Kaplan-Meier survivorship free of stem revision (all causes including infection) was 97.6% (95% CI 97.2% to 98.0%) for the standard collarless stem, 99.0% (95% CI 98.8% to 99.2%) for the standard collared stem, 97.3% (95% CI 96.3% to 98.3%) for the coxa vara collared stem, and 95.0% (95% CI 93.6% to 96.4%) for the high offset collarless stem. Compared with the standard collarless stem, the standard collared stem performed better (HR 0.4 [95% CI 0.3 to 0.6]; p < 0.001) and the high offset collarless stem performed more poorly (HR 1.4 [95% CI 1.1 to 1.7]; p = 0.006) with any stem revision as the endpoint, and similar results were found with revision for aseptic stem loosening and periprosthetic fracture as endpoints. Controlling for the noted confounders, the standard collared stem had a lower revision risk. The high offset collarless stem had an increased stem revision risk for any reason (HR 1.4 [95% CI 1.1 to 1.7]; p = 0.006) and aseptic loosening (HR 1.6 [95% CI 1.1 to 2.3]; p = 0.022). Other factors associated with an increased risk of stem revision for all stem variants were being a man (HR 1.7 [95% CI 1.4 to 2.0]; p < 0.001), age 70 to 79 years and 80 years and older compared with the age group of 50 to 59 years (HR 1.6 [95% CI 1.2 to 2.0]; p < 0.001 and HR 1.9 [95% CI 1.4 to 2.6]; p < 0.001, respectively), the anterior approaches (direct anterior Smith-Petersen and anterolateral Watson-Jones combined) compared with the posterior approach (HR 1.4 [95% CI 1.1 to 1.7]; p = 0.005), as well as a preoperative nonosteoarthritis diagnosis (HR 1.3 [95% CI 1.0 to 1.6]; p = 0.02) and small stem sizes (sizes 8-11) compared with the medium sizes (sizes 12-15) (HR 1.4 [95% CI 1.1 to 1.6]; p = 0.001). The very small sizes (8 and 9) were associated with a 2.0 times higher risk of revision (95%. CI 1.4 to 2.6; p < 0.01) compared with all other sizes combined.Conclusion When using the uncemented Corail stem, surgeons can expect good results with up to 30 years of follow-up. Our results should be generalizable to the typical surgeon at the average hospital in a comparable setting. From our results, using a collared variant would be preferable to a collarless one. Due to an increased risk of periprosthetic fracture, caution with the use of the uncemented Corail stem in patients older than 70 years, especially in women, is warranted. Poorer stem survival should also be expected with the use of small stem sizes. The risk of periprosthetic fractures for the Corail uncemented stem versus cemented stems in different age categories has not be...
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Does a Prescription-based Comorbidity Index Correlate with the American
           Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Score and Mortality After
           Joint Arthroplasty' A Registry Study

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      Authors: Kerr; Mhairi M.; Graves, Stephen E.; Duszynski, Katherine M.; Inacio, Maria C.; de Steiger, Richard N.; Harris, Ian A.; Ackerman, Ilana N.; Jorm, Louisa R.; Lorimer, Michelle F.; Gulyani, Aarti; Pratt, Nicole L.
      Abstract: imageBackground When analyzing the outcomes of joint arthroplasty, an important factor to consider is patient comorbidities. The presence of multiple comorbidities has been associated with longer hospital stays, more postoperative complications, and increased mortality. The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classification system score is a measure of a patient’s overall health and has been shown to be associated with complications and mortality after joint arthroplasty. The Rx-Risk score is another measure for determining the number of different health conditions for which an individual is treated, with a possible score ranging from 0 to 47.Questions/purposes For patients undergoing THA or TKA, we asked: (1) Which metric, the Rx-Risk score or the ASA score, correlates more closely with 30- and 90-day mortality after TKA or THA? (2) Is the Rx-Risk score correlated with the ASA score?Methods This was a retrospective analysis of the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry (AOANJRR) database linked to two other national databases, the National Death Index (NDI) database and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS), a dispensing database. Linkage to the NDI provided outcome information on patient death, including the fact of and date of death. Linkage to the PBS was performed to obtain records of all medicines dispensed to patients undergoing a joint replacement procedure. Patients were included if they had undergone either a THA (119,076 patients, 131,336 procedures) or TKA (182,445 patients, 215,712 procedures) with a primary diagnosis of osteoarthritis, performed between 2013 and 2017. We excluded patients with missing ASA information (THA: 3% [3055 of 119,076]; TKA: 2% [4095 of 182,445]). This left 127,761 primary THA procedures performed in 116,021 patients (53% [68,037 of 127,761] were women, mean age 68 ± 11 years) and 210,501 TKA procedures performed in 178,350 patients (56% [117,337 of 210,501] were women, mean age 68 ± 9 years) included in this study. Logistic regression models were used to determine the concordance of the ASA and Rx-Risk scores and 30-day and 90-day postoperative mortality. The Spearman correlation coefficient (r) was used to estimate the correlation between the ASA score and Rx-Risk score. All analyses were performed separately for THAs and TKAs.Results We found both the ASA and Rx-Risk scores had high concordance with 30-day mortality after THA (ASA: c-statistic 0.83 [95% CI 0.79 to 0.86]; Rx-Risk: c-statistic 0.82 [95% CI 0.79 to 0.86]) and TKA (ASA: c-statistic 0.73 [95% CI 0.69 to 0.78]; Rx-Risk: c-statistic 0.74 [95% CI 0.70 to 0.79]). Although both scores were strongly associated with death, their correlation was moderate for patients undergoing THA (r = 0.45) and weak for TKA (r = 0.38). However, the median Rx-Risk score did increase with increasing ASA score. For example, for THAs, the median Rx-Risk score was 1, 3, 5, and 7 for ASA scores 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. For TKAs, the median Rx-Risk score was 2, 4, 5, and 7 for ASA scores 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively.Conclusion The ASA physical status and RxRisk were associated with 30-day and 90-day mortality; however, the scores were only weakly to moderately correlated with each other. This suggests that although both scores capture a similar level of patient illness, each score may be capturing different aspects of health. The Rx-Risk may be used as a complementary measure to the ASA score.Level of Evidence Level III, therapeutic study.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: Does a Prescription-based Comorbidity Index Correlate
           with the American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Score and
           Mortality After Joint Arthroplasty' A Registry Study

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      Authors: Meena; Amit
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Cementless Fixation Is Associated With Increased Risk of Early and
           All-Time Revision After Hemiarthroplasty But Not After THA for Femoral
           Neck Fracture: Results From the American Joint Replacement Registry

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      Authors: Huddleston; James I. III; De, Ayushmita; Jaffri, Heena; Barrington, John W.; Duwelius, Paul J.; Springer, Bryan D.
      Abstract: imageBackground Despite ample evidence supporting cemented femoral fixation for both hemiarthroplasty and THA for surgical treatment of displaced femoral neck fractures, cementless fixation is the preferred fixation method in the United States. To our knowledge, no nationally representative registry from the United States has compared revision rates by fixation for this surgical treatment.Question/purpose After controlling for relevant confounding variables, is femoral fixation method (cemented or cementless) in hemiarthroplasty or THA for femoral neck fracture associated with a greater risk of (1) all-cause revision or (2) revision for periprosthetic fracture?Methods Patients with Medicare insurance who had femoral neck fractures treated with hemiarthroplasty or THA reported in the American Joint Replacement Registry database from 2012 to 2017 and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services claims data from 2012 to 2017 were analyzed in this retrospective, large-database study. Of the 37,201 hemiarthroplasties, 42% (15,748) used cemented fixation and 58% (21,453) used cementless fixation. Of the 7732 THAs, 20% (1511) used cemented stem fixation and 80% (6221) used cementless stem fixation. For both the hemiarthroplasty and THA cohorts, most patients were women and had cementless femoral fixation. Early revision was defined as a procedure that occurred less than 90 days from the index procedure. All patients submitted to the registry were included in the analysis. Patient follow-up was limited to the study period. No patients were lost to follow-up. Due to inherent limitations with the registry, we did not compare medical complications, including deaths attributed directly to cemented fixation. A logistic regression model including the index arthroplasty, age, gender, stem fixation method, hospital size, hospital teaching affiliation, and Charlson comorbidity index score was used to determine associations between the index procedure and revision rates.Results For the hemiarthroplasty cohort, risk factors for any revision were cementless stem fixation (odds ratio 1.42 [95% confidence interval 1.20 to 1.68]; p < 0.001), younger age (OR 0.96 [95% CI 0.95 to 0.97]; p < 0.001), and higher Charlson comorbidity index (OR 1.06 [95% CI 1.02 to 1.11]; p = 0.004). Risk factors for early revision were cementless stem fixation (OR 1.77 [95% CI 1.43 to 2.20]; p < 0.001), younger age (OR 0.98 [95% CI 0.97 to 0.99]; p < 0.001), and higher Charlson comorbidity index (OR 1.09 [95% CI 1.04 to 1.15]; p < 0.001). Risk factors for revision due to periprosthetic fracture were cementless fixation (OR 6.19 [95% CI 3.08 to 12.42]; p < 0.001) and higher Charlson comorbidity index (OR 1.16 [95% CI 1.06 to 1.28]; p = 0.002). Risk factors for early revision due to periprosthetic fracture were cementless fixation (OR 7.38 [95% CI 3.17 to 17.17]; p < 0.001), major teaching hospital (OR 2.10 [95% CI 1.08 to 4.10]; p = 0.03), and higher Charlson comorbidity index (OR 1.20 [95% CI 1.09 to 1.33]; p < 0.001). For the THA cohort, there were no associations.Conclusion These data suggest that cemented fixation should be the preferred technique for most patients with displaced femoral neck fractures treated with hemiarthroplasty. The fact that stem fixation method did not affect revision rates for those patients with displaced femoral neck fractures treated with THA may be due to current practice patterns in the United States.Level of Evidence Level III, therapeutic study.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • What Are the Long-term Outcomes of Mortality, Quality of Life, and Hip
           Function after Prosthetic Joint Infection of the Hip' A 10-year
           Follow-up from Sweden

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      Authors: Wildeman; Peter; Rolfson, Ola; Söderquist, Bo; Wretenberg, Per; Lindgren, Viktor
      Abstract: imageBackground Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a complication after arthroplasty that negatively affects patient health. However, prior reports have not addressed the long-term consequences of hip PJI in terms of patient mortality, quality of life, and hip function.Questions/purposes At a minimum of 10 years after PJI in patients undergoing primary THA, in the context of several large, national databases in Sweden, we asked: (1) Is mortality increased for patients with PJI after THA compared with patients with a noninfected THA? (2) Does PJI of the hip have a negative influence on quality of life as measured by the Euro-QoL-5D-5L (EQ-5D-5L), ambulatory aids, residential status, and hip function as measured by the Oxford Hip Score (OHS)? (3) Which factors are associated with poor patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for patients with PJI after primary THA?Methods This study included 442 patients with a PJI after primary THA, from a previously published national study, including all patients with a THA performed from 2005 to 2008 in Sweden (n = 45,570) recruited from the Swedish Hip Arthroplasty Registry (SHAR). Possible deep PJIs were identified in the Swedish Dispensed Drug Registry and verified by review of medical records. Mortality in patients with PJI was compared with the remaining cohort of 45,128 patients undergoing primary THA who did not have PJI. Mortality data were retrieved from the SHAR, which in turn is updated daily from the population registry. A subgroup analysis of patients who underwent primary THA in 2008 was performed to adjust for the effect of comorbidities on mortality, as American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores became available in the SHAR at that time. For the PROM analysis, we identified three controls matched by age, gender, indication for surgery, and year of operation to each living PJI patient. A questionnaire including EQ-5D-5L, ambulatory aids, residential status, and OHS was collected from patients with PJI and controls at a mean of 11 years from the primary procedure. Apart from age and gender, we analyzed reoperation data (such as number of reoperations and surgical approach) and final prosthesis in situ to explore possible factors associated with poor PROM results.Results After controlling for differences in sex, age, and indication for surgery, we found the all-cause 10-year mortality higher for patients with PJI (45%) compared with patients undergoing THA without PJI (29%) (odds ratio 1.4 [95% CI 1.2 to 1.6]; p < 0.001). The questionnaire, with a minimum of 10 years of follow-up, revealed a lower EQ-5D-5L index score (0.83 versus 0.94, -0.13 [95% CI -0.18 to -0.08; p < 0.001]), greater proportion of assisted living (21% versus 12%, OR 2.0 [95% CI 1.2 to 3.3]; p = 0.01), greater need of ambulatory aids (65% versus 42%, OR 3.1 [95% 2.1 to 4.8]; p < 0.001), and a lower OHS score (36 versus 44, -5.9 [-7.7 to -4.0]; p < 0.001) for patients with PJI than for matched controls. Factors associated with lower OHS score for patients with PJI were three or more reoperations (-8.0 [95% CI -13.0 to -3.2]; p = 0.01) and a direct lateral approach used at revision surgery compared with a posterior approach (-4.3 [95% CI -7.7 to -0.9]; p = 0.01).Conclusion In this study, we found that PJI after THA has a negative impact on mortality, long-term health-related quality of life, and hip function. Furthermore, the subgroup analysis showed that modifiable factors such as the number of reoperations and surgical approach are associated with poorer hip function. This emphasizes the importance of prompt, proper initial treatment to reduce repeated surgery to minimize the negative long-term effects of hip PJI.Level of Evidence Level III, therapeutic study.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: What Are the Long-term Outcomes of Mortality, Quality of
           Life, and Hip Function after Prosthetic Joint Infection of the Hip' A
           10-year Follow-up from Sweden

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      Authors: Tan; Timothy L.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • A Comparison of Revision Rates for Osteoarthritis of Primary Reverse Total
           Shoulder Arthroplasty to Primary Anatomic Shoulder Arthroplasty with a
           Cemented All-polyethylene Glenoid: Analysis from the Australian
           Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry

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      Authors: Gill; David R. J.; Page BMedSci, Richard S.; Graves, Stephen E.; Rainbird, Sophia; Hatton, Alesha
      Abstract: imageBackground There has been decreased use of anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty (aTSA) because reverse TSA (rTSA) is increasingly being used for the same indications. Although short-term studies generally have not found survivorship differences between these implant designs, these studies are often small and their follow-up is limited to the short term. Likewise, the degree to which patient characteristics (such as gender, age, and American Society of Anesthesiologists [ASA] score) may or may not be associated with survivorship differences calls for larger and longer-term studies than is often possible in single-center designs. Large national registry studies may be able to help answer these questions.Questions/purposes By analyzing a large Australian registry series of primary aTSAs with cemented all-polyethylene glenoids and rTSA for osteoarthritis (OA), we asked: (1) Is the revision risk for OA higher for aTSA with all-polyethylene glenoids or for rTSA, adjusting for patient characteristics such as age, gender, ASA score, and BMI? (2) Is the patient’s gender associated with differences in the revision risk after controlling for the potentially confounding factors of age, ASA score, and BMI?Methods In this comparative, observational registry study performed between January 1, 2015, and December 31, 2019, all primary aTSAs with all-polyethylene glenoids and rTSA for OA as determined by the treating surgeon and reported to our national registry formed two groups for analysis. The study period was set to time-match for the collection of ASA score and BMI in 2012 and 2015, respectively. Our registry enrolls more than 97% of all shoulder arthroplasties undertaken in Australia. There were 29,294 primary shoulder arthroplasties; 1592 hemiarthroplasties, 1876 resurfacing and stemless shoulders, 269 stemmed, and 11,674 reverse shoulder arthroplasties were excluded for other diagnoses. A total of 1210 metal-backed glenoids in stemmed aTSA for OA were excluded. A total of 3795 primary aTSAs with all-polyethylene glenoids and 8878 primary rTSAs for OA were compared. An aTSA with an all-polyethylene glenoid and rTSA were more likely to be performed in women (56% and 61% of patients, respectively). The mean age was 69 ± 8 years for aTSA with all-polyethylene glenoids and 74 ± 8 years for rTSA. One aTSA for OA was performed in a patient with an unknown glenoid type. The ASA score (n = 12,438) and BMI (n = 11,233) were also recorded. The maximum follow-up was 5 years for both groups, and the mean follow-up was 2.6 ± 1.4 years for aTSA with all-polyethylene glenoids and 2.1 ± 1.4 years for rTSA. The endpoint was time to revision (all causes), and the cumulative percent revision was determined using Kaplan-Meier estimates of survivorship (time to revision) and HRs from Cox proportional hazard models that were adjusted for age, gender, ASA score, and BMI category.Results Overall, there were no differences in the 4-year cumulative percent revision between the groups; the 4-year cumulative percent revision was 3.5% for aTSA with all-polyethylene glenoids (95% CI 2.9%-4.2%) and 3.0% for rTSA (95% CI 2.6%-3.5%). There was an increased risk of revision of rTSA compared with aTSA using all-polyethylene glenoids in the first 3 months (HR 2.17 [95% CI 1.25-3.70]; p = 0.006, adjusted for age, gender, ASA score, and BMI). After that time, there was no difference in the rate of revision, with the same adjustments. In the first 3 months, men undergoing rTSA had a higher rate of revision than men with aTSA using all-polyethylene glenoids (HR 4.0 [95% CI 1.72-9.09]; p = 0.001, adjusted for age, BMI, and ASA). There was no difference between men in the two groups after that time. Women with aTSA using all-polyethylene glenoids were at a greater risk of revision than women with rTSA from 3 months onward (HR 2.77 [95% CI 1.55-4.92]; p < 0.001, adjusted for age, BMI, and ASA), with no difference before that time.Conclusion Given the absence of survivorship differences at 4 years between rTSA and aTSA, but in light of the differences in the revision risk between men and women, surgeons might select an aTSA with an all-polyethylene glenoid to treat OA, despite the current popularity of rTSA. However, there are survivorship differences between genders. Future studies should evaluate whether our comparative findings are replicated in men and women undergoing aTSA with all-polyethylene glenoids and rTSA for primary diagnoses such as rheumatoid arthritis or post-traumatic arthritis, and whether there are functional differences between the two implant designs when used for OA.Level of Evidence Level III, therapeutic study.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: A Comparison of Revision Rates for Osteoarthritis of
           Primary Reverse Total Shoulder Arthroplasty to Primary Anatomic Shoulder
           Arthroplasty with a Cemented All- polyethylene Glenoid: Analysis from the
           Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry

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      Authors: Ricchetti; Eric T.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • What Is the Best Way for Patients to Take Photographs of Medical Images
           (Radiographs, CT, and MRI) Using a Smartphone'

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      Authors: Yang; Xiao-jiang; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Ya-nan; Zhang, Nan; Li, Tian-qing; Ma, Tian-cheng; Zhang, Ke-ying; Jiang, Ming-chun; Ma, Zhen-sheng
      Abstract: imageBackground Teleradiology has become one of the most important approaches to virtual clinical diagnosis; its importance has only grown during the coronavirus 2019 pandemic. In developing countries, asking patients to take photographs of their images using a smartphone can facilitate the process and help keep its costs down. However, the images taken by patients with smartphones often are of poor quality, and there is no regulation or standard instruction about how to use smartphones to take photographs of medical examination images effectively. These problems limit the use of smartphones in remote diagnosis and treatment.Questions/purposes To formulate a set of guidelines for the most appropriate and effective use of smartphones to capture images (radiographs, CT images, and MR images), and to determine whether these guidelines are more effectively adopted by patients of differing ages and genders.Methods In this prospective study, a set of step-by-step instructions was created with the goal of helping patients take better smartphone photographs of orthopaedic diagnostic images for transfer to telemedicine services. Following the advice of surgeons, experts in smartphone technology, imaging experts, and suggestions from patients, the instructions were modified based on clinical experience and finalized with the goals of simplicity, clarity, and convenience. Potentially eligible patients were older than 18 years, had no cognitive impairment, and used smart phones. Based on that, 256 participants (patients or their relatives and friends) who visited the orthopaedic department of our hospital from June to October 2020 potentially qualified for this study. A total of 11% (29) declined to participate, leaving 89% (227) for analysis here. Their mean age was 36 ± 11 years, 50% were women (113 of 227), and the patient himself/herself represented in 34% (78 of 227) of participants while relatives or friends of patients made up 66% (149 of 227) of the group. In this study, the diagnoses included spinal stenosis (47% [107 of 227]), disc herniation without spinal stenosis (31% [71 of 227]), vertebral fractures (14% [32 of 227]), and other (7% [17 of 227]). Each study participant first took photographs of their original medical images based on their own knowledge of how to use the smartphone camera function; each participant then took pictures of their original images again after receiving our instructional guidance. Three senior spine surgeons (YZ, TQL, TCM) in our hospital analyzed, in a blinded manner, the instructed and uninstructed imaging files based on image clarity (the content of the image is complete, the text information in the image is clearly visible, there is neither reflection nor shadow in the image) and image position (it is not tilted, curled, inverted, or reversed). If either of these conditions was not satisfied, the picture quality was deemed unacceptable; two of three judges’ votes determined the outcome. Interobserver reliability with kappa values for the three judges were 0.89 (YZ versus TQL), 0.92 (YZ versus TCM), and 0.90 (TQL versus TCM).Results In this study, the overall proportion of smartphone medical images deemed satisfactory increased from 40% (91 of 227) for uninstructed participants to 86% (196 of 227) for instructed participants (risk ratio 2.15 [95% CI 1.82 to 2.55]; p
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: What Is the Best Way for Patients to Take Photographs of
           Medical Images (Radiographs, CT, and MRI) Using a Smartphone'

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      Authors: Potter; Hollis G.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Does Medical Students’ Sense of Belonging Affect Their Interest in
           Orthopaedic Surgery Careers' A Qualitative Investigation

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      Authors: Gerull; Katherine M.; Parameswaran, Priyanka; Jeffe, Donna B.; Salles, Arghavan; Cipriano, Cara A.
      Abstract: imageBackground The concept of social belonging has been shown to be important for retention and student success in collegiate environments and general surgery training. However, this concept has never been explored in relation to medical students’ impressions of orthopaedic surgery careers.Question/purpose To investigate medical students’ sense of belonging in orthopaedic surgery and how it affects their interest in pursuing orthopaedic surgery careers.Methods Medical students from four medical schools were invited to participate in telephone interviews aimed to investigate medical students’ reasons for considering (or not considering) orthopaedic surgery as a future career. Students were selected using random sampling and theoretical sampling methods (selecting participants based on specific characteristics) to obtain a diversity of student perspectives across medical school year, gender, race, age, and interest in orthopaedics. Semistructured interviews with open-ended questions and face validity were used to minimize bias in the interview process. Analysis was performed using grounded theory methodology, a rigorous and well-established method for creating conceptual models based on qualitative data. The result seeks to be a data-driven (as opposed to hypothesis-driven) theory that provides perspective on human behavior. Interviews were conducted until the point of thematic saturation, defined as the point when no new ideas occur in subsequent interviews; this was achieved at 23 students (16 self-identified as women, 12 self-identified as underrepresented minorities).Results Medical students articulated stereotypes about orthopaedic surgeons, in particular, that they were white, male, and athletic. Students derived their sense of belonging in orthopaedic surgery from how closely their identities aligned with these stereotypes about the field. Students who felt a sense of belonging described themselves as being part of a cultural “in-group,” and students who did not feel a sense of belonging felt that they were in a cultural “out-group.” Members of the in-group often reported that orthopaedic experiences further reinforced their positive identity alignment, which typically led to increased interest and continued engagement with the field. Conversely, students in the out-group reported that their exposures to orthopaedics further reinforced their lack of identity alignment, and this typically led to decreased interest and engagement. Many students in the out-group reported pursuing other specialties due to a lack of belonging within orthopaedics.Conclusion Students derive their sense of belonging in orthopaedics based on how closely their identity aligns with stereotypes about the field. Importantly, there were gender and racial factors associated with orthopaedic stereotypes, and thus with belonging (self-identifying as the in-group). Moreover, out-group students tended not to choose orthopaedic surgery careers because of a lack of belonging in the specialty.Clinical Relevance With knowledge of the factors that influence students’ sense of belonging, academic orthopaedic departments can focus on interventions that may lead to a more diverse pool of medical students interested in orthopaedic surgery. These might include explicitly addressing stereotypes about orthopaedics and cultivating positive identity alignment for students from diverse backgrounds through targeted mentorship fostering partnerships with affinity organizations, and creating space to talk about barriers. Targeted interventions such as these are needed to interrupt the cycle of in-group and out-group formation that, in this small multicenter study, appeared to deter students with underrepresented identities from pursuing orthopaedic surgery careers.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: Does Medical Students’ Sense of Belonging Affect Their
           Interest in Orthopaedic Surgery Careers' A Qualitative Investigation

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      Authors: LeBrun; Drake G.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Good Outcome Scores and Low Conversion Rate to THA 10 Years After Hip
           Arthroscopy for the Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement

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      Authors: Büchler; Lorenz; Grob, Valentin; Anwander, Helen; Lerch, Till D.; Haefeli, Pascal C.
      Abstract: imageBackground Arthroscopic treatment of symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) has promising short-term to mid-term results. In addition to treating acute pain or impaired function, the goal of hip-preserving surgery is to achieve a lasting improvement of hip function and to prevent the development of osteoarthritis. Long-term results are necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of surgical treatment and to further improve results by identifying factors associated with conversion to THA.Questions/purposes (1) How do the Merle d’Aubigné-Postel scores change from before surgery to follow-up of at least 10 years in patients undergoing hip arthroscopy for the treatment of FAI? (2) What is the cumulative 10-year survival rate of hips with the endpoints of conversion to THA or a Merle d’Aubigné-Postel score less than 15? (3) Which factors are associated with conversion to THA?Methods Between 2003 and 2008, we treated 63 patients (65 hips) for symptomatic FAI with hip arthroscopy at our institution. During that period, the indications for using arthroscopy were correction of anterior cam morphology and anterolateral rim trimming with debridement or reattachment of the labrum. We excluded patients who were younger than 16 years and those who had previous trauma or surgery of the hip. Based on that, 60 patients (62 hips) were eligible. A further 17% (10 of 60) of patients were excluded because the treatment was purely symptomatic without treatment of cam- and/or pincer-type morphology. Of the 50 patients (52 hips) included in the study, 2% (1) of patients were lost before the minimum study follow-up of 10 years, leaving 49 patients (51 hips) for analysis. The median (range) follow-up was 11 years (10 to 17). The median age at surgery was 33 years (16 to 63). Ninety percent (45 of 50) of patients were women. Of the 52 hips, 75% (39 of 52) underwent cam resection (femoral offset correction), 8% (4 of 52) underwent acetabular rim trimming, and 17% (9 of 52) had both procedures. Additionally, in 35% (18 of 52) of hips the labrum was debrided, in 31% (16 of 52) it was resected, and in 10% (5 of 52) of hips the labrum was reattached. The primary clinical outcome measurements were conversion to THA and the Merle d’Aubigné-Postel score. Kaplan-Meier survivorship and Cox regression analyses were performed with endpoints being conversion to THA or Merle d’Aubigné-Postel score less than 15 points.Results The clinical result at 10 years of follow-up was good. The median improvement of the Merle d’Aubigné-Postel score was 3 points (interquartile range 2 to 4), to a median score at last follow-up of 17 points (range 10 to 18). The cumulative 10-year survival rate was 92% (95% CI 85% to 99%) with the endpoints of conversion to THA or Merle d’Aubigné-Postel score less than 15. Factors associated with conversion to THA were each year of advancing age at the time of surgery (hazard ratio 1.1 [95% CI 1.0 to 1.3]; p = 0.01) and preoperative Tönnis Grade 1 compared with Tönnis Grade 0 (no sign of arthritis; HR 17 [95% CI 1.8 to 166]; p = 0.01).Conclusion In this series, more than 90% of patients retained their native hips and reported good patient-reported outcome scores at least 10 years after arthroscopic treatment of symptomatic FAI. Younger patients fared better in this series, as did hips without signs of osteoarthritis. Future studies with prospective comparisons of treatment groups are needed to determine how best to treat complex impingement morphologies.Level of Evidence Level IV, therapeutic study.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: Good Outcome Scores and Low Conversion Rate to THA 10
           Years After Hip Arthroscopy for the Treatment of Femoroacetabular
           Impingement

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      Authors: Millis; Michael B.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Is the Preoperative Use of Antidepressants and Benzodiazepines Associated
           with Opioid and Other Analgesic Use After Hip and Knee Arthroplasty'

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      Authors: Rajamäki; Tuomas J.; Moilanen, Teemu; Puolakka, Pia A.; Hietaharju, Aki; Jämsen, Esa
      Abstract: imageBackground Mental health disorders can occur in patients with pain conditions, and there have been reports of an increased risk of persistent pain after THA and TKA among patients who have psychological distress. Persistent pain may result in the prolonged consumption of opioids and other analgesics, which may expose patients to adverse drug events and narcotic habituation or addiction. However, the degree to which preoperative use of antidepressants or benzodiazepines is associated with prolonged analgesic use after surgery is not well quantified.Question/purposes (1) Is the preoperative use of antidepressants or benzodiazepine medications associated with a greater postoperative use of opioids, NSAIDs, or acetaminophen? (2) Is the proportion of patients still using opioid analgesics 1 year after arthroplasty higher among patients who were taking antidepressants or benzodiazepine medications before surgery, after controlling for relevant confounding variables? (3) Does analgesic drug use decrease after surgery in patients with a history of antidepressant or benzodiazepine use? (4) Does the proportion of patients using antidepressants or benzodiazepines change after joint arthroplasty compared with before?Methods Of the 10,138 patients who underwent hip arthroplasty and the 9930 patients who underwent knee arthroplasty at Coxa Hospital for Joint Replacement, Tampere, Finland, between 2002 and 2013, those who had primary joint arthroplasty for primary osteoarthritis (64% [6502 of 10,138] of patients with hip surgery and 82% [8099 of 9930] who had knee surgery) were considered potentially eligible. After exclusion of another 8% (845 of 10,138) and 13% (1308 of 9930) of patients because they had revision or another joint arthroplasty within 2 years of the index surgery, 56% (5657 of 10,138) of patients with hip arthroplasty and 68% (6791 of 9930) of patients with knee arthroplasty were included in this retrospective registry study. Patients who filled prescriptions for antidepressants or benzodiazepines were identified from a nationwide drug prescription register, and information on the filled prescriptions for opioids (mild and strong), NSAIDs, and acetaminophen were extracted from the same database. For the analyses, subgroups were created according to the status of benzodiazepine and antidepressant use during the 6 months before surgery. First, the proportions of patients who used opioids and any analgesics (that is, opioids, NSAIDs, or acetaminophen) were calculated. Then, multivariable logistic regression adjusted with age, gender, joint, Charlson Comorbidity Index, BMI, laterality (unilateral/same-day bilateral), and preoperative analgesic use was performed to calculate odds ratios for any analgesic use and opioid use 1 year postoperatively. Additionally, the proportion of patients who used antidepressants and benzodiazepines was calculated for 2 years before and 2 years after surgery.Results At 1 year postoperatively, patients with a history of antidepressant or benzodiazepine use were more likely to fill prescriptions for any analgesics than were patients without a history of antidepressant or benzodiazepine use (adjusted odds ratios 1.9 [95% confidence interval 1.6 to 2.2]; p < 0.001 and 1.8 [95% CI 1.6 to 2.0]; p < 0.001, respectively). Similarly, patients with a history of antidepressant or benzodiazepine use were more likely to fill prescriptions for opioids than patients without a history of antidepressant or benzodiazepine use (adjusted ORs 2.1 [95% CI 1.7 to 2.7]; p < 0.001 and 2.0 [95% CI 1.6 to 2.4]; p < 0.001, respectively). Nevertheless, the proportion of patients who filled any analgesic prescription was smaller 1 year after surgery than preoperatively in patients with a history of antidepressant (42% [439 of 1038] versus 55% [568 of 1038]; p < 0.001) and/or benzodiazepine use (40% [801 of 2008] versus 55% [1098 of 2008]; p < 0.001). The proportion of patients who used antidepressants and/or benzodiazepines was essentially stable during the observation period.Conclusion Surgeons should be aware of the increased risk of prolonged opioid and other analgesic use after surgery among patients who were on preoperative antidepressant and/or benzodiazepine therapy, and they should have candid discussions with patients referred for elective joint arthroplasty about this possibility. Further studies are needed to identify the most effective methods to reduce prolonged postoperative opioid use among these patients.Level of Evidence Level III, therapeutic study.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: Is the Preoperative Use of Antidepressants and
           Benzodiazepines Associated with Opioid and Other Analgesic Use After Hip
           and Knee Arthroplasty'

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      Authors: Wyles; Cody C.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • In-hospital Complications Are More Likely to Occur After Reverse Shoulder
           Arthroplasty Than After Locked Plating for Proximal Humeral Fractures

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      Authors: Köppe; Jeanette; Stolberg-Stolberg, Josef; Rischen, Robert; Faldum, Andreas; Raschke, Michael J.; Katthagen, J. Christoph
      Abstract: imageBackground Currently, there seems to be a paradigm change in the surgical treatment of proximal humeral fractures in patients aged 65 years and older, with a considerable increase in the use of reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA) compared with angular stable internal fixation (locking plate fixation). However, even among shoulder specialists there is controversy regarding the best treatment strategy.Questions/purposes To evaluate for (1) a greater risk of in-hospital major adverse events, (2) a greater risk for in-hospital surgical complications, and (3) a greater risk of 30-day mortality, locking plate fixation and RTSA were compared for the treatment of proximal humerus fractures of patients aged 65 years and older after controlling for potentially confounding variables in a large-database analysis.Methods Health claims data of the largest German insurance company including approximately one-third of the population (26.5 million policyholders) between 2010 and 2018 were analyzed. This database was chosen because of its size, nationwide distribution, and high quality/completeness. In total, 55,070 patients (≥ 65 years of age) treated with locking plate fixation (75% [41,216]) or RTSA (25% [13,854]) for proximal humeral fracture were compared. As primary endpoints, major adverse events (including acute myocardial infarction, stroke, organ failure, resuscitation, and death) and surgical complications (infection, hematoma, loss of reduction, dislocation, and revision surgery) were analyzed. The risk of all endpoints was analyzed with multivariable logistic regression models in the context of comorbidities to address existing group differences.Results After controlling for potentially confounding variables such as age, sex, and risk profile, RTSA was associated with a higher risk for major adverse events (OR 1.40 [95% CI 1.29 to 1.53]; p < 0.001) and surgical complications (OR 1.13 [95% CI 1.05 to 1.21]; p < 0.01) compared with locking plate fixation. There was no evidence for an increase in mortality (OR 0.98 [95% CI 0.86 to 1.12]; p = 0.81).Conclusion The increased in-hospital risk for major adverse events and surgical complications may moderate the enthusiasm associated with RTSA for proximal humeral fractures in patients 65 years and older. Treatment decisions should be based on individual risk estimation to avoid potential harmful events. Future studies must include long-term outcomes and quality of life to enlighten these findings in a broader context.Level of Evidence Level III, therapeutic study.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: In-hospital Complications Are More Likely to Occur After
           Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty Than After Locked Plating for Proximal
           Humeral Fractures

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      Authors: Gruson; Konrad I.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Most YouTube Videos About Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Have the Potential to
           Reinforce Misconceptions

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      Authors: Goyal; Ria; Mercado, Amelia E.; Ring, David; Crijns, Tom J.
      Abstract: imageBackground Studies of online health information have addressed completeness and adherence to evidence, which can be difficult because current evidence leaves room for debate about etiology, diagnosis, and treatment. Fewer studies have evaluated whether online health information can reinforce misconceptions. It can be argued that information with the potential to harm health by reinforcing unhelpful misconceptions ought to be held to a higher standard of evidence.Questions/purposes (1) What is the prevalence and nature of health information in YouTube videos with the potential to reinforce common misconceptions about symptoms and treatment associated with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS)? (2) What factors (such as the number of views, likes, and subscribers) are associated with Potential Reinforcement of Misconception scores of YouTube videos about CTS?Methods After removing all personalized data, we searched for the term “carpal tunnel syndrome” on YouTube, reviewed the first 60 English-language videos that discussed the diagnosis and treatment of CTS, and collected available metrics. The primary outcome was the number of statements that could reinforce misconceptions about CTS, rated by two authors using a checklist. As a secondary outcome, we counted the number of statements that could help patients by reorienting or balancing common misconceptions, providing agency, and facilitating decisions, and we subtracted the number of potential misconceptions from this count. A modified version of the DISCERN instrument (a validated scoring system designed to gauge the quality and reliability of health information) was used to evaluate each video. We sought factors associated with the Potential Reinforcement of Misconception score—in both the negative-only and combined (positive and negative) variations—accounting for various YouTube metrics (such as the number of views, number of likes and dislikes, and duration) and the modified DISCERN score. The interrater reliability was excellent for both the Potential Reinforcement of Misconceptions checklist (ICC = 0.97; Pearson correlation [r] = 0.97) and DISCERN information quality score (ICC = 0.96; r = 0.97).Results Seventy-eight percent of the YouTube videos (47 of 60 videos) contained at least one statement that could reinforce common misconceptions about CTS. The median number of potentially misconception-reinforcing statements was two (range one to three), with the most common statements being that CTS is caused by hand use (38%; 23 of 60 videos) and that splints can alter the natural history of the disease (37%; 22 videos). Videos that were more popular (higher number of views or likes) did not contain less potential reinforcement of misconceptions. In the multivariable analysis, we found a strong association between the DISCERN score and the CTS Potential Reinforcement of Misconceptions score (regression coefficient = 0.67; 95% CI 0.22-1.2; partial r2 = 0.13; p = 0.004) and a lower number of subscribers (calculated per one million subscribers: regression coefficient = -0.91; 95% CI -1.8 to -0.023; p = 0.045).Conclusion Potential reinforcement of misconceptions is prevalent in YouTube videos about CTS, more so in videos with lower information quality scores.Clinical Relevance Online health information should be held to a standard of accuracy (alignment with best evidence), and where such evidence leaves room for debate, it should be held to a standard by which unhealthy misconceptions are not reinforced.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: Most YouTube Videos About Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Have the
           Potential to Reinforce Misconceptions

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      Authors: Goitz; Robert J.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Clinically Important Reductions in Physical Function and Quality of Life
           in Adults with Tumor Prostheses in the Hip and Knee: A Cross-sectional
           Study

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      Authors: Fernandes; Linda; Holm, Christina Enciso; Villadsen, Allan; Sørensen, Michala Skovlund; Zebis, Mette Kreutzfeldt; Petersen, Michael Mørk
      Abstract: imageBackground Patients with a bone sarcoma who undergo limb-sparing surgery and reconstruction with a tumor prosthesis in the lower extremity have been shown to have reduced self-reported physical function and quality of life (QoL). To provide patients facing these operations with better expectations of future physical function and to better evaluate and improve upon postoperative interventions, data from objectively measured physical function have been suggested.Questions/purposes We sought to explore different aspects of physical function, using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) as a framework, by asking: (1) What are the differences between patients 2 to 12 years after a bone resection and reconstruction surgery of the hip and knee following resection of a bone sarcoma or giant cell tumor of bone and age-matched controls without walking limitations in ICF body functions (ROM, muscle strength, pain), ICF activity and participation (walking, getting up from a chair, daily tasks), and QoL? (2) Within the patient group, do ICF body functions and ICF activity and participation outcome scores correlate with QoL?Methods Between 2006 and 2016, we treated 72 patients for bone sarcoma or giant cell tumor of bone resulting in bone resection and reconstruction with a tumor prosthesis of the hip or knee. At the timepoint for inclusion, 47 patients were alive. Of those, 6% (3 of 47) had undergone amputation in the lower limb and were excluded. A further 32% (14 of 44) were excluded because of being younger than 18 years of age, pregnant, having long transportation, palliative care, or declining participation, leaving 68% (30 of 44) for analysis. Thus, 30 patients and 30 controls with a mean age of 51 ± 18 years and 52 ± 17 years, respectively, were included in this cross-sectional study. Included patients had been treated with either a proximal femoral (40% [12 of 30]), distal femoral (47% [14 of 30]), or proximal tibia (13% [4 of 30]) reconstruction. The patients were assessed 2 to 12 years (mean 7 ± 3 years) after the resection-reconstruction. The controls were matched on gender and age (± 4 years) and included if they considered their walking capacity to be normal and had no pain in the lower extremity. Included outcome measures were: passive ROM of hip flexion, extension, and abduction and knee flexion and extension; isometric muscle strength of knee flexion, knee extension and hip abduction using a hand-held dynamometer; pain intensity (numeric rating scale; NRS) and distribution (pain drawing); the 6-minute walk test (6MWT); the 30-second chair-stand test (CST); the Toronto Extremity Salvage Score (TESS), and the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30). The TESS and the EORTC QLQ-C30 were normalized to 0 to 100 points. Higher scoring represents better status for TESS and EORTC global health and physical functioning scales. Minimum clinically important difference for muscle strength is 20% to 25%, NRS 2 points, 6MWT 14 to 31 meters, CST 2 repetitions, TESS 12 to 15 points, and EORTC QLQ-C30 5 to 20 points.Results Compared with controls, the patients had less knee extension and hip abduction strength in both the surgical and nonsurgical limbs and regardless of reconstruction site. Mean knee extension strength in patients versus controls were: surgical limb 0.9 ± 0.5 Nm/kg versus 2.1 ± 0.6 Nm/kg (mean difference -1.3 Nm/kg [95% CI -1.5 to -1.0]; p < 0.001) and nonsurgical limb 1.7 ± 0.6 Nm/kg versus 2.2 ± 0.6 Nm/kg (mean difference -0.5 Nm/kg [95% CI -0.8 to -0.2]; p = 0.003). Mean hip abduction strength in patients versus controls were: surgical limb 1.1 ± 0.4 Nm/kg versus 1.9 ± 0.5 Nm/kg (mean difference -0.7 Nm/kg [95% CI -1.0 to -0.5]; p < 0.001) and nonsurgical limb 1.5 ± 0.4 Nm/kg versus 1.9 ± 0.5 Nm/kg (-0.4 Nm/kg [95% CI -0.6 to -0.2]; p = 0.001). Mean hip flexion ROM in patients with proximal femoral reconstructions was 113° ± 18° compared with controls 130° ± 11° (mean difference -17°; p = 0.006). Mean knee flexion ROM in patients with distal femoral reconstructions was 113° ± 29° compared with patients in the control group 146° ± 9° (mean difference -34°; p = 0.002). Eighty-seven percent (26 of 30) of the patients reported pain, predominantly in the knee, anterior thigh, and gluteal area. The patients showed poorer walking and chair-stand capacity and had lower TESS scores than patients in the control group. Mean 6MWT was 499 ± 100 meters versus 607 ± 68 meters (mean difference -108 meters; p < 0.001), mean CST was 12 ± 5 repetitions versus 18 ± 5 repetitions (mean difference -7 repetitions; p < 0.001), and median (interquartile range) TESS score was 78 (21) points versus 100 (10) points (p < 0.001) in patients and controls, respectively. Higher pain scores correlated to lower physical functioning of the EORTC QLQ-C30 (Rho -0.40 to -0.54; all p values < 0.05). Less muscle strength in knee extension, knee flexion, and hip abduction correlated to lower physical functioning of the EORTC QLQ-C30 (Rho 0.40 to 0.51; all p values < 0.05).Conclusion This patient group demonstrated clinically important muscle weaknesses not only in resected muscles but also in the contralateral limb. Many patients reported pain, and they showed reductions in walking and chair-stand capacity comparable to elderly people. The results are relevant for information before surgery, and assessments of objective physical function are advisable in postoperative monitori...
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: Clinically Important Reductions in Physical Function and
           Quality of Life in Adults with Tumor Prostheses in the Hip and Knee: A
           Cross-sectional Study

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      Authors: Nystrom; Lukas M.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • What Are Practical Surgical Anatomic Landmarks and Distances from Relevant
           Neurologic Landmarks in Cadavers for the Posterior Approach in Shoulder
           Arthroplasty'

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      Authors: Bahk; Michael S.; Greiwe, R. Michael
      Abstract: imageBackground Traditional total shoulder arthroplasty is performed through the deltopectoral approach and includes subscapularis release and repair. Subscapularis nonhealing or dysfunction may leave patients with persistent pain, impairment, and instability. Alternative approaches that spare the subscapularis include rotator interval and posterior shoulder approaches; however, to our knowledge, a cadaveric study describing pertinent surgical anatomy for a posterior shoulder approach regarding shoulder arthroplasty has not been performed.Questions/purposes (1) What are the distances from important neurologic structures of the shoulder for arthroplasty through a posterior approach? (2) What surgical landmarks can help identify the internervous interval between the infraspinatus and teres minor?Methods Twelve hemitorso cadaver specimens with intact rotator cuffs were dissected to study posterior shoulder anatomy regarding posterior shoulder arthroplasty. The median (range) age of the specimens was 79 years (55 to 92). Six of the 12 specimens were right-hand dominant, and 10 specimens were male. Cadaver height was a median 171 cm (155 to 191) and weight was a median of 68 kg (59 to 125). A posterior deltoid split and internervous approach between the infraspinatus and teres minor were used. A posterior T capsulotomy was performed. The distances to important neurologic structures were measured with an electronic caliper and provided in median (range) distances in millimeters. Although not as meaningful as distance ratios accounting for a specimen’s body size, neurologic distances in millimeters are surgically practical and provide intraoperative usefulness. Surgical landmarks that can help identify the infraspinatus and teres minor plane were noted. Practical visual and tactile cues between the infraspinatus and teres minor were identified. Posterior rotator cuff tendon morphologies and widths were recorded.Results The closest important neurologic structure was the axillary nerve, measuring a median (range) 17 mm (9 to 19) from the inferior glenoid rim while the infraspinatus branch of the suprascapular nerve measured 21 mm (15 to 36) from the posterior glenoid rim. The axillary nerve measured 84 mm (70 to 97) from the posterior tip of the acromion in the deltoid split. Three surgical landmarks were helpful for identifying the plane between the infraspinatus and teres minor in all 12 specimens: (1) identifying the triangular teres minor tendon insertion, (2) medial palpation identifying the low point between the prominent muscle bellies of the infraspinatus and teres minor, and (3) identifying the distinct and prominent teres minor tubercle, which is well localized and palpable.Conclusion A major benefit of the posterior approach for shoulder arthroplasty is subscapularis preservation. Multiple practical surgical cues are consistently present and can help identify the infraspinatus and teres minor interval. We did not find the presence of fat stripes to be helpful. The suprascapular nerve is in proximity to posterior surgical dissection and differs from the deltopectoral approach. This is an important distinction from an anterior approach and requires care with dissection. Future studies are necessary to assess iatrogenic risk to the posterior rotator cuff and external rotation strength. This may entail intraoperative nerve conduction studies of the posterior rotator cuff and clinical studies assessing external rotation strength.Clinical Relevance Studying posterior shoulder anatomy is an initial first step to assessing the feasibility of the posterior approach for anatomic shoulder arthroplasty. Additional studies assessing the degree of glenohumeral exposure and possible iatrogenic posterior rotator cuff injury are necessary. Because of the proximity of neurologic structures, it is recommended that surgeons not perform this technique until sufficient evidence indicates that it is equivalent or superior to standard anterior approach total shoulder arthroplasty. After such evidence is available, proper training will be necessary to ensure safe use of the posterior shoulder approach.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • CORR Insights®: What Are Practical Surgical Anatomic Landmarks and
           Distances from Relevant Neurologic Landmarks in Cadavers for the Posterior
           Approach in Shoulder Arthroplasty'

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      Authors: Carson; Eric W.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Letter to the Editor: What Are the MCIDs for PROMIS, NDI, and ODI
           Instruments Among Patients With Spinal Conditions'

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      Authors: Hays; Ron D.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • A Personal Remembrance: Berton Roy Moed MD (1950-2020)

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      Authors: Vrahas; Mark S.
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • A Remembrance of George A. Snook MD (1925-2017)

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      Authors: Owens; Colleen T.
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Erratum to: Custom Implants in TKA Provide No Substantial Benefit in Terms
           of Outcome Scores, Reoperation Risk, or Mean Alignment: A Systematic
           Review

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      Authors: Beit Ner; Eran; Dosani, Saad; Biant, Leela C.; Tawy, Gwenllian Fflur
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
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