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Intensive Care Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.293
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 86  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1432-1238 - ISSN (Online) 0342-4642
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2658 journals]
  • Severe pneumatosis intestinalis in a patient with botulism

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      PubDate: 2021-10-20
       
  • The weighing

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      PubDate: 2021-10-19
       
  • Chicken or the egg' Critical illness and mental health

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      PubDate: 2021-10-18
       
  • Variation in severity-adjusted resource use and outcome in intensive care
           units

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      Abstract: Purpose Intensive care patients have increased risk of death and their care is expensive. We investigated whether risk-adjusted mortality and resources used to achieve survivors change over time and if their variation is associated with variables related to intensive care unit (ICU) organization and structure. Methods Data of 207,131 patients treated in 2008–2017 in 21 ICUs in Finland, Estonia and Switzerland were extracted from a benchmarking database. Resource use was measured using ICU length of stay, daily Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System Scores (TISS) and purchasing power parity-adjusted direct costs (2015–2017; 17 ICUs). The ratio of observed to severity-adjusted expected resource use (standardized resource use ratio; SRUR) was calculated. The number of expected survivors and the ratio of observed to expected mortality (standardized mortality ratio; SMR) was based on a mortality prediction model covering 2015–2017. Fourteen a priori variables reflecting structure and organization were used as explanatory variables for SRURs in multivariable models. Results SMR decreased over time, whereas SRUR remained unchanged, except for decreased TISS-based SRUR. Direct costs of one ICU day, TISS score and ICU admission varied between ICUs 2.5–5-fold. Differences between individual ICUs in both SRUR and SMR were up to > 3-fold, and their evolution was highly variable, without clear association between SRUR and SMR. High patient turnover was consistently associated with low SRUR but not with SMR. Conclusion The wide and independent variation in both SMR and SRUR suggests that they should be used together to compare the performance of different ICUs or an individual ICU over time.
      PubDate: 2021-10-18
       
  • Palliative care interventions in intensive care unit patients

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      Abstract: Purpose The integration of palliative care into intensive care units (ICUs) is advocated to mitigate physical and psychological burdens for patients and their families, and to improve end-of-life care. The most efficacious palliative care interventions, the optimal model of their delivery and the most appropriate outcome measures in ICU are not clear. Methods We conducted a systematic review of randomised clinical trials and observational studies to evaluate the number and types of palliative care interventions implemented within the ICU setting, to assess their impact on ICU practice and to evaluate differences in palliative care approaches across different countries. Results Fifty-eight full articles were identified, including 9 randomised trials and 49 cohort studies; all but 4 were conducted within North America. Interventions were categorised into five themes: communication (14, 24.6%), ethics consultations (5, 8.8%), educational (18, 31.6%), involvement of a palliative care team (28, 49.1%) and advance care planning or goals-of-care discussions (7, 12.3%). Thirty studies (51.7%) proposed an integrative model, whilst 28 (48.3%) reported a consultative one. The most frequently reported outcomes were ICU or hospital length of stay (33/55, 60%), limitation of life-sustaining treatment decisions (22/55, 40%) and mortality (15/55, 27.2%). Quantitative assessment of pooled data was not performed due to heterogeneity in interventions and outcomes between studies. Conclusion Beneficial effects on the most common outcomes were associated with strategies to enhance palliative care involvement, either with an integrative or a consultative approach. Few studies reported functional outcomes for ICU patients. Almost all studies were from North America, limiting the generalisability to other healthcare systems.
      PubDate: 2021-10-15
       
  • The future of antimicrobial dosing in the ICU: an opportunity for data
           science

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      PubDate: 2021-10-11
       
  • Critical care ultrasound goal-directed versus early goal-directed therapy
           in septic shock

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      PubDate: 2021-10-07
       
  • The REMDACTA trial: do interleukin receptor antagonists provide additional
           benefit in COVID-19'

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      PubDate: 2021-10-07
       
  • Medical dominos: impact of COVID-19 care on the health of the population

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      PubDate: 2021-10-06
       
  • Assess COVID-19 prognosis … but be aware of your instrument’s
           accuracy!

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      PubDate: 2021-10-05
       
  • Fluid management in diabetic ketoacidosis: new tricks for old dogs'

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      PubDate: 2021-10-05
       
  • Securing the airway in critical care scenarios: questioning the
           fundamentals

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      PubDate: 2021-10-05
       
  • Tocilizumab and remdesivir in hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19
           pneumonia: a randomized clinical trial

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      Abstract: Purpose Trials of tocilizumab in patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia have demonstrated mixed results, and the role of tocilizumab in combination with other treatments is uncertain. Here we evaluated whether tocilizumab plus remdesivir provides greater benefit than remdesivir alone in patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia. Methods This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial included patients hospitalized with severe COVID-19 pneumonia requiring > 6 L/min supplemental oxygen. Patients were randomly assigned (2:1 ratio) to receive tocilizumab 8 mg/kg or placebo intravenously plus ≤ 10 days of remdesivir. The primary outcome was time from randomization to hospital discharge or “ready for discharge” (defined as category 1, assessed by the investigator on a 7-category ordinal scale of clinical status) to day 28. Patients were followed for 60 days. Results Among 649 enrolled patients, 434 were randomly assigned to tocilizumab plus remdesivir and 215 to placebo plus remdesivir. 566 patients (88.2%) received corticosteroids during the trial to day 28. Median time from randomization to hospital discharge or “ready for discharge” was 14 (95% CI 12–15) days with tocilizumab plus remdesivir and 14 (95% CI 11–16) days with placebo plus remdesivir [log-rank P = 0.74; Cox proportional hazards ratio 0.97 (95% CI 0.78–1.19)]. Serious adverse events occurred in 128 (29.8%) tocilizumab plus remdesivir and 72 (33.8%) placebo plus remdesivir patients; 78 (18.2%) and 42 (19.7%) patients, respectively, died by day 28. Conclusions Tocilizumab plus remdesivir did not shorten time to hospital discharge or “ready for discharge” to day 28 compared with placebo plus remdesivir in patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia.
      PubDate: 2021-10-05
       
  • Effect of oral chlorhexidine de-adoption and implementation of an oral
           care bundle on mortality for mechanically ventilated patients in the
           intensive care unit (CHORAL): a multi-center stepped wedge
           cluster-randomized controlled trial

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      Abstract: Purpose Oral chlorhexidine is used widely for mechanically ventilated patients to prevent pneumonia, but recent studies show an association with excess mortality. We examined whether de-adoption of chlorhexidine and parallel implementation of a standardized oral care bundle reduces intensive care unit (ICU) mortality in mechanically ventilated patients. Methods A stepped wedge cluster-randomized controlled trial with concurrent process evaluation in 6 ICUs in Toronto, Canada. Clusters were randomized to de-adopt chlorhexidine and implement a standardized oral care bundle at 2-month intervals. The primary outcome was ICU mortality. Secondary outcomes were time to infection-related ventilator-associated complications (IVACs), oral procedural pain and oral health dysfunction. An exploratory post hoc analysis examined time to extubation in survivors. Results A total of 3260 patients were enrolled; 1560 control, 1700 intervention. ICU mortality for the intervention and control periods were 399 (23.5%) and 330 (21.2%), respectively (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.82 to 1.54; P = 0.46). Time to IVACs (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.06; 95% CI 0.44 to 2.57; P = 0.90), time to extubation (aHR 1.03; 95% CI 0.85 to 1.23; P = 0.79) (survivors) and oral procedural pain (aOR, 0.62; 95% CI 0.34 to 1.10; P = 0.10) were similar between control and intervention periods. However, oral health dysfunction scores (− 0.96; 95% CI − 1.75 to − 0.17; P = 0.02) improved in the intervention period. Conclusion Among mechanically ventilated ICU patients, no benefit was observed for de-adoption of chlorhexidine and implementation of an oral care bundle on ICU mortality, IVACs, oral procedural pain, or time to extubation. The intervention may improve oral health.
      PubDate: 2021-10-05
       
  • Sodium chloride or Plasmalyte-148 evaluation in severe diabetic
           ketoacidosis (SCOPE-DKA): a cluster, crossover, randomized, controlled
           trial

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      Abstract: Purpose To determine whether treatment with Plasmalyte-148 (PL) compared to sodium chloride 0.9% (SC) results in faster resolution of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and whether the acetate in PL potentiates ketosis. Methods We conducted a cluster, crossover, open-label, randomized, controlled Phase 2 trial at seven hospitals in adults admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) with severe DKA with hospital randomised to PL or SC as fluid therapy. The primary outcome, DKA resolution, was defined as a change in base excess to ≥ − 3 mEq/L at 48 h. Results Ninety-three patients were enrolled with 90 patients included in the modified-intention-to-treat population (PL n = 48, SC n = 42). At 48 h, mean fluid administration was 6798 ± 4850 ml vs 6574 ± 3123 ml, median anion gap 6 mEq/L (IQR 5–7) vs 7 mEq/L (IQR 5–7) and median blood ketones 0.3 mmol/L (IQR 0.1–0.5) vs 0.3 (IQR 0.1–0.5) in the PL and SC groups. DKA resolution at 48 h occurred in 96% (PL) and 86% (SC) of patients; odds ratio 3.93 (95% CI 0.73–21.16, p = 0.111). At 24 h, DKA resolution occurred in 69% (PL) and 36% (SC) of patients; odds ratio 4.24 (95% CI 1.68–10.72, p = 0.002). The median ICU and hospital lengths of stay were 49 h (IQR 23–72) vs 55 h (IQR 41–80) and 81 h (IQR 58–137) vs 98 h (IQR 65–195) in the PL and SC groups. Conclusion Plasmalyte-148, compared to sodium chloride 0.9%, may lead to faster resolution of metabolic acidosis in patients with DKA without an increase in ketosis. These findings need confirmation in a large, Phase 3 trial.
      PubDate: 2021-10-05
       
  • Critical influenza and prophylactic antifungal therapy for aspergillosis:
           a nuanced approach to a pertinent infectious disease

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      PubDate: 2021-10-04
       
  • Safety and tolerability of non-neutralizing adrenomedullin antibody
           adrecizumab (HAM8101) in septic shock patients: the AdrenOSS-2 phase 2a
           biomarker-guided trial

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      Abstract: Purpose Investigate safety and tolerability of adrecizumab, a humanized monoclonal adrenomedullin antibody, in septic shock patients with high adrenomedullin. Methods Phase-2a, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled biomarker-guided trial with a single infusion of adrecizumab (2 or 4 mg/kg b.w.) compared to placebo. Patients with adrenomedullin above 70 pg/mL, < 12 h of vasopressor start for septic shock were eligible. Randomization was 1:1:2. Primary safety (90-day mortality, treatment emergent adverse events (TEAE)) and tolerability (drug interruption, hemodynamics) endpoints were recorded. Efficacy endpoints included the Sepsis Support Index (SSI, reflecting ventilator- and shock-free days alive), change in Sequential-related Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) and 28-day mortality. Results 301 patients were enrolled (median time of 8.5 h after vasopressor start). Adrecizumab was well tolerated (one interruption, no hemodynamic alteration) with no differences in frequency and severity in TEAEs between treatment arms (TEAE of grade 3 or higher: 70.5% in the adrecizumab group and 71.1% in the placebo group) nor in 90-day mortality. Difference in change in SSI between adrecizumab and placebo was 0.72 (CI −1.93–0.49, p = 0.24). Among various secondary endpoints, delta SOFA score (defined as maximum versus minimum SOFA) was more pronounced in the adrecizumab combined group compared to placebo [difference at 0.76 (95% CI 0.18–1.35); p = 0.007]. 28-day mortality in the adrecizumab group was 23.9% and 27.7% in placebo with a hazard ratio of 0.84 (95% confidence interval 0.53–1.31, log-rank p = 0.44). Conclusions Overall, we successfully completed a randomized trial evaluating selecting patients for enrolment who had a disease-related biomarker. There were no overt signals of harm with using two doses of the adrenomedullin antibody adrecizumab; however, further randomized controlled trials are required to confirm efficacy and safety of this agent in septic shock patients.
      PubDate: 2021-10-04
       
  • High dose coupled plasma filtration and adsorption in septic shock
           patients. Results of the COMPACT-2: a multicentre, adaptive, randomised
           clinical trial

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      Abstract: Purpose This study aimed at evaluating the efficacy and safety of high-dose (> 0.2 L/kg of treated plasma per day) coupled plasma filtration-adsorption (CPFA) in treating patients with septic shock. Methods Multicentre, randomised, adaptive trial, performed in 12 Italian intensive care units (ICUs). Patients aged 14 or more, admitted to the ICU with septic shock, or had developed it during the stay were eligible. The final outcome was mortality at discharge from the last hospital at which the patient received care. Results Between May 2015, and October 2017, 115 patients were randomised. The first interim analysis revealed a number of early deaths, prompting an unplanned analysis. Last hospital mortality was non-significantly higher in the CPFA (55.6%) than in the control group (46.2%, p = 0.35). The 90-day survival curves diverged in favour of the controls early after randomisation and remained separated afterwards (p = 0.100). An unplanned analysis showed higher mortality in CPFA compared to controls among patients without severe renal failure (p = 0.025); a dose–response relationship was observed between treated plasma volume and mortality (p = 0.010). Conclusion The COMPACT-2 trial was stopped due to the possible harmful effect of CPFA in patients with septic shock. The harmful effect, if present, was particularly marked in the early phase of septic shock. Patients not requiring renal replacement therapy seemed most exposed to the possible harm, with evidence of a dose–response effect. Until the mechanisms behind these results are fully understood, the use of CPFA for the treatment of patients with septic shock is not recommended.
      PubDate: 2021-10-03
       
  • Surviving sepsis campaign: international guidelines for management of
           sepsis and septic shock 2021

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      PubDate: 2021-10-02
       
  • Time outside for a long-term ventilated ICU patient

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      PubDate: 2021-10-01
       
 
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