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Alzheimer Disease & Associated Disorders
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.157
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 21  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0893-0341 - ISSN (Online) 1546-4156
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [301 journals]
  • Tailoring Research Recruitment for Acute Care Settings: Recommendations
           from People with Dementia and their Caregivers

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      Authors: Friz; Amanda M.; Benson, Clark; Mullen, Shannon; Block, Laura; Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea
      Abstract: imageBackground: There is a pressing need to increase enrollment and representation in Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia (ADRD) research. Current recruitment approaches focus largely on clinic and community settings, with minimal engagement of acute care environments despite their broad use across diverse populations. The objectives of this study were to examine views, preferences, and recommendations regarding acute care–based ADRD research recruitment among persons with dementia and their caregivers.Methods: The authors conducted semistructured interviews with recently hospitalized persons with dementia (N=3) and family caregivers (N=28). Interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis.Findings: All participants endorsed acute care as an appropriate time for recruitment into ADRD research studies and identified important elements of an appropriately tailored recruitment approach and an interpersonally effective research staff. Participants emphasized that this approach should consider the acute care context with respect to participant situation, uncertainty, and timing. Participant suggestions informed the design of a 5-step process to guide ADRD research recruitment in the context of acute care.Discussion: Findings provide valuable insights from people with dementia and their caregivers regarding opportunities for research engagement surrounding acute care and can inform expanded recruitment in these settings.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Sociodemographic and Clinical Characteristics of 1350 Patients With Young
           Onset Dementia: A Comparison With Older Patients

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      Authors: Ryan; Brigid; Martinez Ruiz, Adrian; Rivera-Rodriguez, Claudia; Curtis, Maurice; Cheung, Gary
      Abstract: imageObjective: To determine the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of a large cohort of patients with young onset dementia (YOD) (aged below 65), and whether they differ from older (age 65+) adults with dementia.Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Participants were New Zealanders who were assessed with International Residential Assessment Instrument (interRAI) assessments (including community-dwelling adults and those in long-term care) from 2016 to 2019 and had a diagnosis of dementia. Outcomes were sociodemographic and clinical characteristics captured in the interRAI assessment.Results: People with YOD were more likely to be male, of non-European ethnicity, and live in a dwelling other than a private home or be homeless. They were more likely to exhibit problematic behaviors and neuropsychiatric symptoms but were less frail and less dependent for activities of daily living. Financial strain and loneliness were more common in people with YOD. Carers of people with YOD were more likely to feel distress, anger, or depression, and families of people with YOD were more likely to feel overwhelmed.Conclusions: YOD patients have different needs than older adults with dementia. These differences must be considered by clinicians and organizations that provide care and support to people living with dementia.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Novel PSEN1 and PSEN2 Mutations Identified in Sporadic Early-onset
           Alzheimer Disease and Posterior Cortical Atrophy

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      Authors: Li; Xu-Ying; Cui, Yue; Jing, Donglai; Xie, Kexin; Zhong, Xiaoling; Kong, Yu; Wang, Yuting; Chu, Min; Wang, Chaodong; Wu, Liyong
      Abstract: imageBackground/Purpose: Sporadic early-onset Alzheimer disease (sEOAD) and its visual variant, posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), have a disease onset at less than 65 years of age with no familial aggregation. The etiology and genetic basis of these diseases remain poorly understood. Our study aimed to identify additional mutations or variants associated with sEOAD and PCA and to further examine their genetic and phenotypic spectrums.Methods: We performed whole-exome sequencing and analyzed the clinical and neuroimaging features of mutation carriers with 29 patients having sEOAD and 25 having PCA.Results: Nine rare damaging variants were identified in 4 patients with sEOAD and 3 with PCA. A novel mutation (p.A136V) in PSEN1 was identified in a patient with sEOAD and a likely pathogenic variant (p.M239T) was identified for PSEN2 in a patient with PCA. In addition, 7 rare damaging variants were detected in other genes related to neurodegenerative diseases. The patient carrying the PSEN1 p.A136V mutation presented with typical clinical and imaging features of sEOAD, and the PCA patient with the PSEN2 p.M239T mutation presented with visuospatial impairment as the initial symptom.Conclusion: Our study expands the PSEN1 mutation spectrum of sEOAD and highlights the importance of screening PSEN1 and/or PSEN2 mutations in PCA patients.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Evaluation of the Clinical Features Accompanied by the Gene Mutations: The
           2 Novel: PSEN1: Variants in a Turkish Early-onset Alzheimer Disease Cohort
           

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      Authors: Eryilmaz; Isil E.; Bakar, Mustafa; Egeli, Unal; Cecener, Gulsah; Yurdacan, Beste; Colak, Dilara K.; Tunca, Berrin
      Abstract: imageIntroduction: Early-onset Alzheimer disease (EOAD) is an earlier Alzheimer disease form which is characterized by the mutations in the amyloid precursor protein, presenilin-1/2 (PSEN1/2), and triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2). However, it is still necessary to report mutational screening in multiethnic groups to improve the genetic background of EOAD due to the variant classification challenge.Methods: We performed targeted sequencing for the amyloid precursor protein, PSEN1, PSEN2, and TREM2 genes in 74 patients and 1 family diagnosed with EOAD.Results: Among the detected variants, 8 were coding and 6 were noncoding in 15 of 74 patients. In PSEN1, 2 pathogenic coding variants (T274K and L364P) detected in 2 patients were novel and 3 coding variants (G183V, E318G, and L219P) detected in 2 patients were previously reported. We found 4 patients with the compound heterozygosity for the PSEN2 A23= and N43= and a family with the coexistence of them, and 1 patient with TREM2 Y38C. The coding variation frequency was 12.1%. In silico analysis indicated pathogenic potentials and clinical interpretations of the detected variants.Conclusion: Our study reveals the rare gene variants including novel ones from the Turkish EOAD cohort and provides to clinicians the list of detected variants in the screened genes, which may also be useful for accurate genetic counseling.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Apolipoprotein E4 Moderates the Association Between Vascular Risk Factors
           and Brain Pathology

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      Authors: Kaufman; Carolyn S.; Morris, Jill K.; Vidoni, Eric D.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Billinger, Sandra A.
      Abstract: imageBackground: The strongest genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD), Apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4), increases cardiovascular disease risk and may also act synergistically with vascular risk factors to contribute to AD pathogenesis. Here, we assess the interaction between APOE4 and vascular risk on cerebrovascular dysfunction and brain pathology.Methods: This is an observational study of cognitively normal older adults, which included positron emission tomography imaging and vascular risk factors. We measured beat-to-beat blood pressure and middle cerebral artery velocity at rest and during moderate-intensity exercise. Cerebrovascular measures included cerebrovascular conductance index and the cerebrovascular response to exercise.Results: There was a significant interaction between resting cerebrovascular conductance index and APOE4 carrier status on β-amyloid deposition (P=0.026), with poor conductance in the cerebrovasculature associated with elevated β-amyloid for the APOE4 carriers only. There was a significant interaction between non–high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and APOE4 carrier status (P=0.014), with elevated non–high-density lipoprotein cholesterol predicting a blunted cerebrovascular response to exercise in APOE4 carriers and the opposite relationship in noncarriers.Conclusions: Both cerebral and peripheral vascular risk factors are preferentially associated with brain pathology in APOE4 carriers. These findings provide insight into pathogenic vascular risk mechanisms and target strategies to potentially delay AD onset.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Prevalence of Mild Cognitive Impairment in the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936

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      Authors: Welstead; Miles; Luciano, Michelle; Muniz-Terrera, Graciela; Taylor, Adele M.; Russ, Tom C.
      Abstract: imageBackground: The Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 (LBC1936) is a highly phenotyped longitudinal study of cognitive and brain ageing. Given its substantial clinical importance, we derived an indicator of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and amnestic and nonamnestic subtypes at 3 time points.Methods: MCI status was derived at 3 waves of the LBC1936 at ages 76 (n=567), 79 (n=441), and 82 years (n=341). A general MCI category was derived as well as amnestic MCI (aMCI) and nonamnestic MCI (naMCI). A comparison was made between MCI derivations using normative data from the LBC1936 cohort versus the general UK population.Results: MCI rates showed a proportional increase at each wave between 76 and 82 years from 15% to 18%. Rates of MCI subtypes also showed a proportional increase over time: aMCI 4% to 6%; naMCI 12% to 16%. Higher rates of MCI were found when using the LBC1936 normative data to derive MCI classification rather than UK-wide norms.Conclusions: We found that MCI and aMCI rates in the LBC1936 were consistent with previous research. However, naMCI rates were higher than expected. Future LBC1936 research should assess the predictive factors associated with MCI prevalence to validate previous findings and identify novel risk factors.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Subtle Changes in Medication-taking Are Associated With Incident Mild
           Cognitive Impairment

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      Authors: Dorociak; Katherine E.; Mattek, Nora; Ferguson, John E.; Beattie, Zachary T.; Sharma, Nicole; Kaye, Jeffrey A.; Leese, Mira I.; Doane, Bridget M.; Hughes, Adriana M.
      Abstract: imageIntroduction: Medication-taking is a routine instrumental activity of daily living affected by mild cognitive impairment (MCI) but difficult to measure with clinical tools. This prospective longitudinal study examined in-home medication-taking and transition from normative aging to MCI.Methods: Daily, weekly, and monthly medication-taking metrics derived from an instrumented pillbox were examined in 64 healthy cognitively intact older adults (Mage=85.5 y) followed for a mean of 2.3 years; 9 transitioned to MCI during study follow-up.Results: In the time up to and after MCI diagnosis, incident MCI participants opened their pillbox later in the day (by 19 min/mo; β=0.46, P
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Odor Identification Testing Can Assist in the Clinical Distinction Between
           Psychiatric Disorders and Neurological/Neurodegenerative Disorders

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      Authors: Pachi; Ioanna; Evans, Andrew H.; Loi, Samantha M.; Eratne, Dhamidhu; Malpas, Charles B.; Walterfang, Mark; Farrand, Sarah; Kelso, Wendy; Stefanis, Leonidas; Velakoulis, Dennis
      Abstract: imageBackground/Objectives: The aim was to identify whether performance on olfactory identification can distinguish neurological/neurodegenerative disorders (NNDs) from primary psychiatric disorders (PPDs).Methods: This is a cross-sectional retrospective study of inpatients assessed in Neuropsychiatry, Royal Melbourne Hospital. Data extracted from the admission records included: demographics, tobacco use, medical comorbidities, cognitive function using the Neuropsychiatry Unit Cognitive Assessment Tool (NUCOG), and odor identification using the Sniffin’ Sticks Screening 12 test. The final diagnosis for patients was informed by established diagnostic criteria.Results: A total 121 patients were included. Eighty-eight patients (73%) were diagnosed with neurological or neurodegenerative disease, including Alzheimers dementia, frontotemporal dementia, Lewy body parkinsonian-related dementias (Parkinson disease, multiple system atrophy, dementia with Lewy bodies) and other neurological causes of dementia; 33 patients (27%) were diagnosed with PPDs (including mood and psychotic disorders). Patients who scored ≤8 on the Sniffin’ Sticks Screening 12 test were more likely to have NND than PPD, even after adjustment for age, sex and tobacco use (P=0.009, adjusted odds ratios=3.85, 95% confidence interval=1.40-10.62). Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses demonstrated that a score of ≤8 differentiated NND from PPD with sensitivity of 57% and specificity of 73% (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve of 0.67, P=0.004).Conclusions: Patients with neuropsychiatric difficulties who score 8 or less on Sniffin’ Sticks are more likely to have a neurodegenerative illness. A cut-off score of 8 is potentially a “red flag” for clinicians faced with the diagnostic question of PPD versus NND.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Driving Habits of Older Adults: A Population-based Study

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      Authors: Bhojak; Tejal; Jia, Yichen; Jacobsen, Erin; Snitz, Beth E.; Chang, Chung-Chou H.; Ganguli, Mary
      Abstract: imageObjectives: To describe factors associated with driving history, habits, and self-reported driving difficulties of 1982 older adults in a population-based survey.Setting: This was a community setting.Participants: Age-stratified random population sample drawn from publicly available voter registration list.Design: Participants underwent assessments including cognitive testing and self-reported current and past driving status, instrumental activities of daily living, self-rated health, social supports, physical limitations, and depressive symptoms. We built multivariable logistic regression models to identify factors associated with never having driven, having ceased driving, and reporting difficulties while driving.Results: In the multivariable model, “never drivers” were more likely than “ever drivers” to be older, female, less educated and to leave home less frequently. Former drivers were significantly older, more likely to be women, have lower test performance in the cognitive domain of attention, have more instrumental activity of daily living difficulties, leave home less frequently and have visual field deficits in the right eye than current drivers. Current drivers with reported driving difficulties were more likely than those without difficulties to have lower test performance in attention but higher in memory, were more likely to report depressive symptoms and to have both vision and hearing loss.Conclusion: Age, female sex, marital status, and education appear to be associated with driving cessation. Cognitive and functional impairments, mood symptoms and physical health also seem to influence driving cessation and reduction. Our findings may have implications for clinicians in assessing and educating their patients and families on driving safety.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • The Measurement of Everyday Cognition (ECog): Revisions and Updates

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      Authors: Farias; Sarah T.; Weakley, Alyssa; Harvey, Danielle; Chandler, Julie; Huss, Olivia; Mungas, Dan
      Abstract: imageIntroduction: The Everyday Cognition scale (ECog), a measure of everyday functioning developed in 2008, is sensitive to early detection and progression of neurodegenerative disease. The goal was to update ECog item content to ensure relevancy to contemporary older adults from diverse backgrounds.Methods: Participants included 44 culturally diverse older adults (18 with normal cognition, 11 with mild cognitive impairment) and their study partners. Item understandability and relevance was evaluated using iterative interviewing methods that were analyzed using standard qualitative methods. On the basis of this information, items were modified, deleted, or developed as needed.Results: Of the 39 original items, 19 were revised, 3 new items were added (primarily to cover contemporary activities such as the use of technology), and 1 was deleted. The revised version (ECog-II) includes 41 items.Discussion: To ensure strong psychometric properties, and to facilitate harmonization of previously collected data, we preserved well over half of the items. Future work will validate the revised ECog by measuring associations with neuropsychological performance, external measures of disease, and other functional measures. Overall, the revised ECog will continue to be a useful tool for measuring cognitively relevant everyday abilities in clinical settings and intervention clinical trials.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy-related Inflammation Presenting With a Cystic
           Lesion in Young-onset Alzheimer Disease

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      Authors: Ringman; John M.; Joe, Elizabeth; Sheikh-Bahaei, Nasim; Miller, Carol; Vinters, Harry V.; Guzman, Samuel; Chui, Helena C.
      Abstract: imageWe describe a patient with cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation (CAA-ri) presenting as Alzheimer disease (AD) with a mass lesion with symptom onset at age 59. He was found to have a nonenhancing lesion in the right temporal lobe on magnetic resonance imaging without evidence of hemorrhage. He underwent a biopsy which showed amyloid beta in blood vessel walls and a perivascular inflammatory infiltrate consistent with CAA-ri. Neurofibrillary tangles were present and a flortaucipir positron emission tomography showed bilateral signal highest in the lateral temporal and parietal cortices. A lumbar puncture showed tau, p-tau, and amyloid beta levels consistent with AD without evidence of inflammation. He was homozygous for the APOE ε4 allele. He died at age 67. A focus of CAA-ri can be present in the context of AD with a mass lesion and without evidence of hemorrhage, significant ischemic changes, or overt inflammation on cerebrospinal fluid examination.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • West Nile Virus Neuroinvasive Disease Accelerating Probable Dementia With
           Lewy Bodies

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      Authors: Segers; Kurt; Van Ranst, Alexander; Bostan, Alionka; Glibert, Gerald; Maillart, Evelyne; Clevenbergh, Philippe; Dachy, Bernard
      Abstract: We describe a case of dementia with Lewy bodies immediately following encephalitis due to West Nile virus (WNV). The patient had rapid eye movement–sleep behavior disorder and constipation before the onset of encephalitis, which suggests that he would have ultimately developed dementia with Lewy bodies even without WNV infection. Our case illustrates the interactions between α-synuclein and WNV, as observed in mouse models, wherein synuclein expression augments after WNV infection and protects neurons against the virus.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • The Association Between Cancer and Spousal Rate of Memory Decline: A
           Negative Control Study to Evaluate (Unmeasured) Social Confounding of the
           Cancer-memory Relationship

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      Authors: Ospina-Romero; Monica; Brenowitz, Willa D.; Glymour, M. Maria; Mayeda, Elizabeth R.; Graff, Rebecca E.; Witte, John S.; Ackley, Sarah F.; Lu, Kun Ping; Kobayashi, Lindsay C.
      Abstract: imageCancer diagnoses are associated with better long-term memory in older adults, possibly reflecting a range of social confounders that increase cancer risk but improve memory. We used spouse’s memory as a negative control outcome to evaluate this possible confounding, since spouses share social characteristics and environments, and individuals’ cancers are unlikely to cause better memory among their spouses. We estimated the association of an individual’s incident cancer diagnosis (exposure) with their own (primary outcome) and their spouse’s (negative control outcome) memory decline in 3601 couples from 1998 to 2014 in the Health and Retirement Study, using linear mixed-effects models. Incident cancer predicted better long-term memory for the diagnosed individual. We observed no association between an individual’s cancer diagnosis and rate of spousal memory decline. This negative control study suggests that the inverse association between incident cancer and rate of memory decline is unlikely to be attributable to social/behavioral factors shared between spouses.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Everyday Abilities Scale for India in Screening for Poststroke Dementia
           Among Young Stroke Survivors

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      Authors: Done; Indira P.; Aghoram, Rajeswari; Narayan, Sunil K.
      Abstract: imageIntroduction: Cognitive dysfunction after stroke is an important concern. We explored the utility of everyday abilities scale for India (EASI) for screening for dementia among young stroke survivors.Methods: We interviewed 150 young stroke survivors and caregivers. Vascular dementia was diagnosed according to American Heart Association-American Stroke Association (ASA-AHA) criteria. EASI was administered to all caregivers. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to determine the area under the curve and optimum cut-points for EASI for the identification of dementia.Results: Median EASI scores among subjects with dementia (n=35; 23.3%) was 2 (interquartile range: 0-4) and significantly different from those without (median: 0; interquartile range: 0-1; P
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Effects of Noninvasive Brain Stimulation (NIBS) on Cognitive Impairment in
           Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer Disease: A Meta-analysis

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      Authors: Wang; Tao; Guo, Zhiwei; Du, Yonghui; Xiong, Ming; Yang, Zhengcong; Ren, Long; He, Lin; Jiang, Yi; McClure, Morgan A.; Mu, Qiwen
      Abstract: imageObjective: The purpose of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the beneficial effects and optimal stimulation protocol of noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS) including repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer disease.Materials and Methods: PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched until March 2020. The cognitive outcomes were extracted and the standardized mean difference with 95% confidence interval was calculated.Results: Twenty-eight studies were included. The result of NIBS showed significant effect on global cognition (P
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Brain Volumes, Cognitive Decline, and Physical Activity in Older
           Inhabitants

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      Authors: Kawada; Tomoyuki
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Reply to: Brain Volumes, Cognitive Decline, and Physical Activity in Older
           Inhabitants

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      Authors: Vibha; Deepti; Ikram, Mohammad A.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
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