Subjects -> ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (Total: 304 journals)
    - CLEANING AND DYEING (1 journals)
    - ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (237 journals)
    - FIRE PREVENTION (13 journals)
    - HEATING, PLUMBING AND REFRIGERATION (6 journals)
    - HOME ECONOMICS (9 journals)
    - INTERIOR DESIGN AND DECORATION (21 journals)
    - REAL ESTATE (17 journals)

HOME ECONOMICS (9 journals)

Showing 1 - 9 of 9 Journals sorted alphabetically
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Food, Culture and Society: An International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Home Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Review of Economics of the Household     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
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Review of Economics of the Household
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.897
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 5  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-7152 - ISSN (Online) 1569-5239
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Adapting to an aggregate shock: The impact of the Covid-19 crisis on rural
           households

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      Abstract: Abstract We examine the response of rural Ugandan households to a large aggregate shock, the Covid-19 pandemic, during and one year after the first lockdown in March 2020. Using 6 rounds of phone surveys from 558 households in western Uganda, we find that household income recovery from the lockdown differs by whether households had a business pre-pandemic. After an initial sharp fall, the incomes of those without a business have recovered to pre-pandemic levels. However, the relatively better-off households with a business before the pandemic still have one-third lower income, due to sustained closure of businesses even after the end of the first lockdown restrictions. Additionally, business-owning households have 30% lower wealth one-year into the pandemic, driven by 44% lower assets, 45% drop in savings, and a 15 fold increase in net-borrowing, suggesting long-term damage. Our findings point to the need to support households who face dwindling finances to fall back on.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
       
  • Child penalty in Russia: evidence from an event study

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      Abstract: Abstract In this paper, we investigate the child penalty in Russia using data from the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS) and the methodological framework of event studies. We find that five years after childbirth, women suffer an earnings penalty, while no effect is observed for men. The mothers’ penalty stems exclusively from lower employment after childbirth. Contrary to similar studies on Western Europe and the US, we do not find penalties in terms of working hours or hourly wage rates for women who remain in the labour force. We further find that mothers’ employment penalty is strongly driven by household characteristics and by their spouses’ beliefs. Finally, we find that parenthood decreases the probability of working in supervisory positions for mothers and in the public sector for fathers.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
       
  • Giving and volunteering over a lifecycle

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      Abstract: Abstract Charitable giving in the US is substantial, contributing 2% of the annual GDP. I develop a lifecycle model of warm-glow giving for consumers who derive utility from both acts of giving and volunteering, and explore the general equilibrium characteristics of an economy of these pro-social consumers. By separating the charitable deduction rate from the income tax rate as well as identifying non-separable utility not only between consumption and charitable giving, but also between giving and volunteering, the model unambiguously determines the direction of welfare from any particular change in a tax system, illuminating the role of policy in the private provision of public goods. Subject to mortality risks, the consumers are enabled to endogenously choose their retirement age, revealing salient features regarding lifecycle giving/volunteering on top of consumption/leisure behaviors in a calibrated OLG equilibrium. A simulation result shows that given an income tax rate, an increase in deduction rate increases not only giving but also output and consumption, due to greater labor supply. Reasonable parameterization of the model confers the highest level of welfare for the tax rate of about 23% given an equal rate for the income tax and charitable deduction.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
       
  • Gender gap in the impact of social capital on household food security in
           Zimbabwe: does spatial proximity matter'

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      Abstract: Abstract Despite the numerous strides that have been made towards ensuring food security since the launch of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the gap between the rich and poor across and within countries is still worryingly too large. Around 57.7% of the Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) population is food insecure compared to 26.4% of the world population. It is therefore necessary to make concerted efforts to improve food security in Sub-Saharan Africa and the rest of the developing world particularly among the poorest and most vulnerable groups. This paper employs propensity score matching analysis to explore gender heterogeneity in the impact of bonding and bridging social capital on household food security on the basis of a nationally representative sample of Zimbabwean households. It offers five major findings. First, female headed households are more likely to have bonding social capital than their male counterparts. Second, there are no gender differences in the household’s ability to possess bridging social capital. Third, household spatial proximity to households with social capital improves the probability of the household possessing social capital. Fourth, both bonding and bridging social capital improves household food security. Finally, female headed households are more able to increase food security than those headed by males when they have both bonding and bridging social capital. The study argues that coping strategies should target putting the family at the core of inclusive development agendas such as food and nutrition assistance programmes in order to maximise the likelihood of easing food insecurity within communities.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
       
  • The added-worker effect in the Netherlands before and during the Great
           Recession

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      Abstract: Abstract We study the added-worker effect in the Netherlands with large-scale administrative panel data for the period 1999–2015. Conditioning on samples with similar employment histories, we employ differences-in-differences to estimate the effect of a male partner’s unemployment shock on the female partner’s income. We find a modest added-worker effect of 2–5% of the male partner’s income loss, as compared to the much larger compensating effect from social insurance schemes. The added-worker effect largely disappeared at the beginning of the Great Recession, but resurfaced a few years later. Over the years, profits from self-employment have become more important in dealing with unemployment shocks.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
       
  • Income loss among the self-employed: implications for individual wellbeing
           and pandemic policy measures

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      Abstract: Abstract Due to the pandemic-induced economic crisis, self-employed individuals are currently suffering considerable income losses. The self-employed and the members in their households usually form an economic unit. As a consequence, the income cuts not only affect the self-employed themselves but also the rest of their household. We used the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) to calculate how much income the self-employed are able to sacrifice to achieve a subjective barely sufficient household income, which we interpret as the minimum level to maintain the standard of living. Our results suggest that full-time self-employed are typically the bread-earners in their households and that, as a consequence, even moderate income losses of the self-employed often lead to problems in maintaining the living standards of their households. Conditional on individual and household characteristics, the self-employed with employees are found to live in households that are less resilient to income losses. Furthermore, a negative correlation between falling short of the barely adequate household income and wellbeing was discovered. Self-employed in households with less than adequate incomes also reported higher concerns about social cohesion. These results have implications for policy - especially in light of the economic crisis induced by the pandemic.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
       
  • A bigger house at the cost of an empty stomach' The effect of
           households’ indebtedness on their consumption: micro-evidence using
           Belgian HFCS data

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper investigates the potentially non-linear relation between households’ indebtedness and their consumption. To do so, we use panel data from the two waves of the Belgian Household Finance and Consumption Survey. Unlike previous studies, we find a negative effect of households’ indebtedness on their consumption, even in the absence of any negative shock on their assets. Our findings suggest that, without such a shock, it is the day-to-day sustainability of the debt, rather than its overall sustainability, that leads households to reduce their consumption. The effect thus seems to occur through precautionary motives. To explore potential non-linearities in this effect, we perform a threshold analysis, whose results suggest that households should not have a debt-service-to-income ratio greater than 30% as this leads to a substantial reduction in their consumption. The effect appears to be robust to various specifications, including the inclusion of other European countries, to result from a trade-off between housing and consumption, and to be more prevalent among fragile households.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
       
  • Adverse childhood experiences and unhealthy lifestyles later in life:
           evidence from SHARE countries

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper investigates whether exposure to adverse experiences during childhood, such as physical and emotional abuse, affects the likelihood of unhealthy habits later in life. The novelty of our approach is twofold. First, we exploit the recently published data on adverse childhood experiences in 19 European countries from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement (SHARE), which enables us to account for country-specific heterogeneity and investigate the long-term effects of exposure to adverse early-life circumstances (such as smoking, drinking, excess weight and obesity) on unhealthy lifestyles later in life. Second, we estimate the effect of childhood trauma on unhealthy lifestyles separately for European macro-regions using a clustering of countries emphasising cultural differences. Our results highlight the positive effect of exposure to adverse childhood experiences on the probability of unhealthy lifestyles in the long run. Harm from parents is associated with a higher probability of smoking in adulthood, while child neglect and a poor relationship with parents increase the probability of smoking later in life.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
       
  • Using behavioral insights in early childhood interventions: the effects of
           Crianza Positiva e-messaging program on parental investment

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      Abstract: Abstract We study whether an e-messaging program rooted on behavioral economics insights and administered on top of a parenting workshop helps improve parental investment and commitment. Treated families received messages thrice a week for 24 weeks. The messages were designed to help parents reorient their attention towards positive parenting goals, simplify parental tasks, and reinforce positive identities. Using an RCT on 24 early childhood centers in Uruguay, we find incremental effects over the workshop on the frequency of parental involvement and parenting quality. Effects range around 0.3 standard deviations and are larger for families experiencing more negative shocks and lower negative identity at baseline, suggesting the program triggered the right channels.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
       
  • Migration of dual-earner couples: a subjective wellbeing approach

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      Abstract: Abstract We model push factors that determine the domestic migration decisions for couples, with emphasis on dual-earner different-sex couples. Unlike many prior studies that concentrate on labour market determinants of migration, we place the subjective well-being (SWB) reported by each partner at centre stage. We test whether migration determinants differ depending on whether the female is the main breadwinner in a dual-earner couple. We also test if determinants differ when either the female or the male is the sole earner within a couple. The evidence shows that a couple is more likely to migrate if she reports low SWB in the year prior to migration, with the strength of this effect varying depending on the earnings status of each partner prior to migration. Male SWB does not have the same impact on the migration choice although we find some evidence that pre-migration male wages impact the migration decision.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
       
  • School schedules and mothers’ employment: evidence from an education
           reform

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      Abstract: Abstract Women’s employment plays an important role in household well-being, and among mothers, lack of child care is one of the main reasons for not working and not seeking employment. We investigate the effect of a reform that lengthened school schedules from half to full days in Chile—providing childcare for school aged children—on different maternal employment outcomes. Using a panel of 2814 mothers over a 7-year period, we find evidence of important positive causal effects of access to full-day schools on mother’s labor force participation, employment, weekly hours worked, and months worked during the year. We also find that lower-education and married mothers benefit most from the policy. Findings suggest that alleviating childcare needs can promote women’s attachment to the labor force, increase household incomes and alleviate poverty and inequality.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
       
  • Task specialization and cognitive skills: evidence from PIAAC and IALS

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      Abstract: Abstract We study how the tasks conducted on the job relate to measures of cognitive skills using data from 18 countries participating in the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competences (PIAAC) and from 13 countries that also participate in the International Adult Literacy Study (IALS). We document two main findings. Firstly, individual-fixed effect models suggest that low-educated workers specializing in a particular set of basic tasks -say, in numeric relative to reading or ICT tasks- obtain 10% of one standard deviation higher scores in the domain of the PIAAC assessment most related to those tasks than in the rest -say, numeracy relative to literacy or problem-solving scores. Secondly, a synthetic cohort analysis using repeated literacy assessments in IALS and PIAAC indicates that, among the low-educated, long-run increases in the reading task component of jobs correlate positively with increases in cohort-level literacy scores. The results are stronger among low-skilled workers with less working experience or females -i.e., the set of workers who have had less time to sort in the labor market. An interpretation of our findings is that tasks conducted on the job help in building human capital but are imperfect substitutes of formal schooling.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
       
  • Correction: Do fathers have son preference in the United States'
           Evidence from paternal subjective well-being

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      PubDate: 2023-02-02
       
  • Life satisfaction and body mass index: estimating the monetary value of
           achieving optimal body weight

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      Abstract: Abstract According to the World Health Organization, obesity is one of the greatest public-health challenges of the 21st century. Body weight is also known to affect individuals’ self-esteem and interpersonal relationships, including romantic ones. We estimate the “utility-maximizing” Body Mass Index (BMI) and calculate the implied monetary value of changes in both individual and spousal BMI, using the compensating income variation method and data from the Swiss Household Panel. We employ the Oster’s method (Oster, 2019) to estimate the degree of omitted variable bias in the effect of BMI on life satisfaction. Results suggest that the optimal own BMI is 27.1 and 20.1 for men and women, respectively. The annual value of reaching optimal weight ranges from $7069 for women with underweight to $88,709 for women with obesity and between $95,165 for men with underweight to $32,644 for men with obesity. On average, women value reduction in their own BMI about four times higher than reduction in their spouse’s BMI. Men, on the other hand, value a reduction in their spouse’s BMI almost twice as much compared to a reduction in their own BMI. This highlights important gender differences and relative effects based on spousal BMI.
      PubDate: 2023-01-24
       
  • On the economic determinants of prostitution: marriage compensation and
           unilateral divorce in U.S. states

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      Abstract: Abstract Understanding the determinants of prostitution is key to regulate it. This paper studies the hypothesis that marriage conditions are an economic determinant of female prostitution. I exploit differences in the timing of entry into force of divorce laws across U.S. states to explore the effect of such laws on arrests of female prostitutes. Using a difference-in-difference design, I find that unilateral divorce leads to a reduction of female arrested prostitutes between 5–10%. Results are consistent with the notion that improving marriage opportunities can be a powerful force to deter entry into prostitution for a subset of the population who is inframarginal. Lack of alternatives are key to explain the choice to conduct this activity. To this extent, this work is part of a broader research agenda hinting at improvements in gender equality as a mean for tapering off female prostitution.
      PubDate: 2023-01-19
       
  • Who is doing the chores and childcare in dual-earner couples during the
           COVID-19 era of working from home'

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      Abstract: Abstract In 2020–21, parents’ work-from-home days increased three-and-a-half-fold following the initial COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns compared to 2015–19. At the same time, many schools offered virtual classrooms and daycares closed, increasing the demand for household-provided childcare. Using weekday workday time diaries from American Time Use Survey and looking at parents in dual-earner couples, we examine parents’ time allocated to paid work, chores, and childcare in the COVID-19 era by the couple’s joint work location arrangements. We determine the work location of the respondent directly from their diary and predict the partner’s work-from-home status. Parents working from home alone spent more time on childcare compared to their counterparts working on-site, though only mothers worked fewer paid hours. When both parents worked from home compared to on-site, mothers and fathers maintained their paid hours and spent more time on childcare, though having a partner also working from home reduced child supervision time. On the average day, parents working from home did equally more household chores, regardless of their partner’s work-from-home status; however, on the average school day, only fathers working from home alone spent more time on household chores compared to their counterparts working on-site. We also find that mothers combined paid work and child supervision to a greater extent than did fathers.
      PubDate: 2023-01-09
       
  • The minimum wage and parent time use

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      Abstract: Abstract This study used a differences-in-differences strategy with national time diary data from 2003 to 2018 to examine the effects of minimum wage changes on parents’ time with children and in child-related activities. Findings indicate that a $1 increase in the minimum wage was associated with a small increase (2.6%) in the likelihood parents with one or more children under age 16 spent time actively caring for or helping children on weekends, and in more total time with children (a 2% increase in secondary child care time). In general, coefficients were larger for mothers’ time use, particularly non-employed mothers, with potential implications for gender disparities in caregiving. Unmarried parents and parents of color showed increases in their time spent in activities related to children’s health (~55% increase). Mothers showed an increase (8%) in the likelihood they spent any time in child education-related activities, and increases in child care time appeared concentrated among parents whose youngest child was 6–15 years of age. Findings suggest that increases in state minimum wages may lead to small increases in parents’ time investments in children, with some variation among subgroups.
      PubDate: 2023-01-06
       
  • Intertemporal elasticity of substitution with leisure margin

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper investigates households’ consumption smoothing behavior by estimating the intertemporal elasticity of substitution of consumption (IES) while allowing labor/leisure to vary. To this end, we adopt a utility specification that allows non-separability between consumption and leisure. Using this specification, we define a leisure margin as the gap between the IES that allows leisure to vary and the IES that keeps leisure constant. We find a positive and statistically significant leisure margin throughout the paper. In addition, the leisure margin becomes larger when the spouse’s leisure is taken into consideration. This result indicates that family labor supply plays an important role in households’ consumption decisions. We further explore the heterogeneous nature of nonmarket time, and show that consumption-leisure substitutability could be explained largely by home production. Our findings demonstrate the importance of time allocation when individuals make decisions on consumption and saving.
      PubDate: 2023-01-03
       
  • Do fathers have son preference in the United States' Evidence from
           paternal subjective well-being

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      Abstract: Abstract Using data drawn from 2010, 2012, and 2013 American Time Use Survey Well-Being Modules, this paper examines the existence of son preference among fathers in the U.S. by estimating the effect of child gender on the fathers’ subjective well-being. A wide range of subjective well-being measures, including happiness, pain, sadness, stress, tiredness, and meaningfulness, is analyzed, and fixed-effects models are adopted to control for unobserved individual heterogeneity. The results from the full sample show that fathers feel less sad and tired when interacting with both sons and daughters versus with daughters only. In families with only one child, fathers report no difference in subjective well-being when spending time with a son versus with a daughter. By further stratifying this sample of fathers by child’s age of three, we continue to find no difference in paternal subjective well-being between being with a son and with a daughter when the child is younger than three. However, when the child is three or older, we find that fathers feel less stressed and more meaningful being with a son versus with a daughter. The results from Asian fathers in the U.S., in contrast, show a tremendous reduction in stress in activities with sons only than with daughters only. These results indicate no evidence of son preference in the general U.S. population. If there is any, it only exists among Asian fathers in the U.S.
      PubDate: 2023-01-02
       
  • Financial inclusion and multidimensional child poverty

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      Abstract: Abstract Despite the concerted efforts being made at the global, regional, and national levels to reduce child poverty, children in resource-poor countries continue to experience deprivations in multidimensional forms. This study examines the link between parental financial inclusion and multidimensional child poverty using a nationally representative living standards data from Ghana—a nation with documentative evidence of high incidence of multidimensional child poverty. Employing different variants of the propensity score matching technique and multidimensional constructs of financial inclusion and child poverty, our overall finding indicates that financial inclusion decreases multidimensional child poverty. This outcome is consistent across different cut-offs used in measuring multidimensional child poverty and alternative propensity score matching methods. We also find that financial inclusion reduces child poverty more for male and rural-located children. Relatively, financial inclusion has the biggest effect in reducing children’s deprivations in living conditions, followed by their health- and education-related deprivations respectively. Household income per capita and durable asset accumulation serve as potential pathways through which financial inclusion transmits to multidimensional child poverty.
      PubDate: 2023-01-02
       
 
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