Subjects -> ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (Total: 304 journals)
    - CLEANING AND DYEING (1 journals)
    - ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (237 journals)
    - FIRE PREVENTION (13 journals)
    - HEATING, PLUMBING AND REFRIGERATION (6 journals)
    - HOME ECONOMICS (9 journals)
    - INTERIOR DESIGN AND DECORATION (21 journals)
    - REAL ESTATE (17 journals)

HOME ECONOMICS (9 journals)

Showing 1 - 9 of 9 Journals sorted alphabetically
Community, Work & Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Food, Culture and Society: An International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Instyle     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Home Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nutrition & Food Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Review of Economics of the Household     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
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Review of Economics of the Household
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.897
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 5  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-7152 - ISSN (Online) 1569-5239
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Self-employment and mental health

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper analyzes the role of mental health in self-employment decisions. We find evidence of a relationship between psychological distress and self-employment for men that depends on type of self-employment and severity of psychological distress. Specifically, there is suggestive evidence of a causal link from moderate psychological distress to self-employment in an unincorporated business as a main job for men. Additionally, we find evidence that long term mental illness can significantly increase the probability of self-employment in an unincorporated business for both men and women. Our results suggest that individual difficulty in wage-and-salary employment is the likely mechanism for this connection.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • COVID-19, marriage, and divorce in Japan

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      Abstract: Abstract Using monthly panel dataset of prefectures in Japan, this study explored the effects of stay-at-home policies on the flows into and out of marriage. It was found that these policies significantly reduced both outcomes. According to our estimates, a nationwide state of emergency reduced the number of marriages per 1000 population by 10.4%, while that of divorces was reduced by 27.0%. Moreover, the prefectures designated as the special-precautions area suffered additional reductions with 6.1% and 8.9% for those of marriage and divorce, respectively.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Hire or care: the effects of aging parents on household labor supply

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper analyzes how aging parents’ health conditions affect household labor supply. I propose a time-use model with wage heterogeneity and assume that care responsibilities involve both time and budget constraints. When households can purchase care services, differences in secondary earners’ wages and care requirements lead to heterogeneity in household responses to a parental health shock. Primary earners and high-wage secondary earners work more. I confirm the model’s predictions by using panel data from the Health and Retirement Study to construct an exogenous shock from the change in parents’ health conditions and estimate its impact on labor supply.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Domestic violence reporting during the COVID-19 pandemic: evidence from
           Latin America

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      Abstract: Abstract This article examines changes in the frequency and characteristics of domestic violence reports following the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic and the imposition of mobility restrictions in six Latin American countries. We find significantly different patterns between reports of psychological and physical violence, non-cohabitant and cohabitant violence, and across alternative reporting channels (domestic violence hotlines, emergency lines, and police reports). Calls to domestic violence hotlines soared, suggesting that this channel was best suited to respond to victims’ needs during the pandemic. In turn, calls to emergency lines and police complaints declined (especially in the first weeks of the pandemic), consistent with an increase in the perceived (relative) cost of using these channels. The results reveal how the pandemic altered domestic violence victims’ demand for institutional help and highlight the relevance of domestic violence hotlines as an accessible and valuable service.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Does getting a mortgage affect consumer credit use'

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      Abstract: Abstract Buying a house changes a household’s balance sheet by simultaneously reducing liquidity and introducing mortgage payments, which may leave the household more exposed to other shocks. We examine how this change impacts consumer credit beyond the mortgage. Using a large panel, we show that on acquiring a mortgage, credit card debt increases by about $1500 in the short term, severe delinquencies increase by 2.2 percentage points, and credit card utilization—the fraction of a consumer’s credit card limit that is used—increases by 11 percentage points. In the long term, credit card balances increase by $3900 and delinquencies by 9.1 percentage points. In our sample period before the 2008 financial crisis, credit limits increased faster than debt in the long run, pushing down long-term utilization. After the financial crisis, debt increased faster than credit limits in the long run, and credit card utilization rates rose upon the acquisition of a new mortgage, consistent with larger down payments leaving households more constrained.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • The impact of the COVID-19 recession on Mexican households: evidence from
           employment and time use for men, women, and children

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      Abstract: Abstract This study examines changes in labor supply, income, and time allocation during the COVID-19 pandemic in Mexico. Using an event-study design, we show that the COVID-19 recession had severe negative consequences for Mexican households. In the first month of the pandemic, employment declined by 17 percentage points. Men recovered their employment faster than women, where men’s employment approaches original levels by 2021Q2. Women, on the other hand, experienced persistent employment losses. Within-household, men also increased their time spent on household chores while neither gender (persistently) increased their time caring for others. Instead, children reduced their time spent on schoolwork by 25%.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Sexual orientation discrimination in the labor market against gay men

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      Abstract: Abstract The study replicates the first European field experiment on gay men’s labor market prospects in Greece. Utilizing the same protocol as the original study in 2006–2007, two follow-up field experiments took place in 2013–2014 and 2018–2019. The study estimated that gay men experienced occupational access constraints and wage sorting in vacancies offering lower remuneration. It was found that in 2013–2014 and 2018–2019, gay men experienced increasingly biased treatment compared to 2006–2007. Moreover, the results suggested that monthly unemployment bore an association with occupational access constraints and wage sorting in vacancies offering lower remuneration for gay men. In each of the three experiments, this study captured recruiters’ attitudes toward gay men. A one standard deviation increase in taste-discrimination attitudes against gay men decreased their access to occupations by 9.6%. Furthermore, a one standard deviation increase in statistical-discrimination attitudes against gay men decreased their access to occupations by 8.1%. According to the findings, in 2013–2014 and 2018–2019, firms excluding gay applicants expressed a higher level of taste- and statistical-discrimination attitudes compared to 2006–2007. A gay rights backlash due to the LGBTIQ+ group’s attempt to advance its agenda, rising far-right rhetoric, and prejudice associated with economic downturns experienced in Greece might correspond with increasing biases against gay men. The current study contributes to the economics of sexual orientation when an economy deteriorates.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Robust consumption policy with the desire for wealth accumulation

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      Abstract: Abstract We study the optimal consumption-saving problem for consumers who are ambiguous about labor income shocks and have a preference for (absolute) wealth. It is shown that the preference for wealth interacts with the degree of ambiguity in non-trivial ways in determining the optimal consumption. The model predicts that ambiguity and preference for wealth can produce substitution or complementarity effects on consumption. In addition, we find that the interactions of ambiguity and desire for wealth generate different implications for MPCs. We then show that these interactions significantly influence the contribution of ambiguity to excess sensitivity of consumption growth and the contribution of preference for wealth to excess smoothness of consumption.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Telework, Wages, and Time Use in the United States

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      Abstract: Abstract Using data on full-time wage and salary workers from the 2017–2018 American Time Use Survey Leave and Job Flexibilities Module, we estimate hourly wage differentials for teleworkers and compare how workers allocate their time over the day when they work from home rather than the office. We find that some teleworkers earn a wage premium, but it varies by gender, parental status, and teleworking intensity. Fathers who telework earn more than fathers in office-based jobs, regardless of teleworking intensity. Women without children who telework occasionally earn more than their office counterparts. In industries and occupations where telework is more prevalent, mothers who work from home most days of the week pay a wage penalty compared to mothers in office-based jobs. Using time diaries, we find differences in work patterns and hours across worker groups that could drive these teleworker wage differentials. Most teleworkers work less on home days; however, those who earn wage premiums are working longer hours on weekdays, regardless of their work location. When teleworking, mothers experience more interruptions in their workdays than other workers, which could have negative effects on their productivity. We also find that teleworkers spend less time on commuting and grooming activities but more time on leisure activities and with family on work-at-home days than on office days, and female teleworkers spend more time sleeping and on household production activities.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Child development and distance learning in the age of COVID-19

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      Abstract: Abstract School closures, forcibly brought about by the COVID-19 crisis in many countries, have impacted children’s lives and their learning processes. The heterogeneous implementation of distance learning solutions is likely to bring a substantial increase in education inequality, with long term consequences. The present study uses data from a survey collected during Spring 2020 lockdown in France and Italy to analyze parents’ evaluations of their children’s home schooling process and emotional well-being at time of school closure, and the role played by different distance learning methods in shaping these perceptions. While Italian parents have a generally worse judgment of the effects of the lockdown on their children, the use of interactive distance learning methods appears to significantly attenuate their negative perception. This is particularly true for older pupils. French parents rather perceive that interactive methods are effective in mitigating learning losses and psychological distress only for their secondary school children. In both countries, further heterogeneity analysis reveal that parents perceive younger children and boys to suffer more during this period.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Medicaid physician fees and access to care among children with special
           health care needs

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      Abstract: Abstract The objective of this study is to use data from the National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN) to test whether Medicaid physician fees are correlated with access to health services and adequacy of insurance coverage among CSHCN. We start with a difference-in-differences method, comparing the effects of Medicaid physician fees on outcomes of publicly-insured children in states that raised fees vs. in states that did not. As our preferred specification, we then estimate a triple difference model using privately-insured children as the comparison group. Our findings indicate that raising the Medicaid primary care fee level close to at least 90 percent of the Medicare level reduces the likelihood that publicly-insured CSHCN lack a usual source of care in a doctor’s office by about 15 percent. Fee increases are associated with improved access to specialty doctor care and large improvements in caregivers’ satisfaction with the adequacy of health insurance coverage among publicly-insured CSHCN. Results for some other access measures, such as global measures of having difficulties and delays accessing services, were mixed.
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
       
  • Child marriage: using the Indonesian family life survey to examine the
           lives of women and men who married at an early age

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      Abstract: Abstract An understanding of the experiences of men and women who marry before adulthood is important in motivating social change. Using fixed effects estimation (the inclusion of geographic fixed effects at diminishing levels of aggregation and sister fixed effects where possible) on panel data from the Indonesian Family Life Survey (IFLS), we follow the lives of a sample of 40,800 women and men for up to two decades and examine a wide range of factors associated with child marriage. We examine the lives of both girls and boys who marry early, and the differential experience of girls marrying older men versus young boys. Child marriage is found to be associated with lesser educational attainment, lower earnings and less say in household decision-making, for both men and women. Women are less likely to have a medically-supervised birth and their children are more likely to die, be stunted and perform worse on cognitive tests. Negative factors are mostly exacerbated when young girls marry similarly underage men.
      PubDate: 2022-08-06
       
  • Correction to: Work from Home and Daily Time Allocations: Evidence from
           the Coronavirus Pandemic

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      PubDate: 2022-07-07
       
  • Parental disability and teenagers’ time allocation

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      Abstract: Abstract Using the 2003–2019 American Time Use Survey, we examine how living with a parent who has a work-limiting disability is related to teenagers’ time allocation. Girls living with a disabled parent spend less time on educational activities, including both class time and homework, less time on shopping, and more time on pet care and leisure. Boys living with a disabled parent spend less time sleeping on schooldays. In addition, when examining the time spent by girls and boys in two-parent households, we find that the gender of the disabled parent matters. Girls living with a disabled mother in a two-parent household spend less time on educational activities and shopping and more time on pet care. Girls living with a disabled father in a two-parent household spend less time on shopping and food preparation and cleanup. Boys living with a disabled mother in a two-parent household spend less time on housework and caring for household children. However, if their father is disabled, boys spend more time on food preparation and cleanup. Boys living with a disabled father also spend less time with their mother. Thus, there are differences in teens’ time use that depend on both the gender of the teen and of the disabled parent, with teen girls likely being worse off than teen boys given the reduction in educational time. Our results suggest that differences in teenagers’ time investments are a plausible mechanism for gender differences in intergenerational economic mobility by parental-disability status.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • The effects of a negative economic shock on male marriage in the West Bank

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      Abstract: Abstract This study examines how a large negative economic shock impacts marriage rates for young men in the West Bank. Utilizing data from before and after the sudden and abrupt closure of the Israeli labor market for Palestinian commuters from the West Bank in 2001, our empirical design employs a difference-in-difference strategy and uses the variations in localities’ exposure to the Israeli labor market before the shock. The closure reduced the employment and income of adult men asymmetrically across localities. Our findings show that the closure caused a reduction in marriage rates among young men aged 19 to 29 years, as post-shock changes in marriage rates. Our results suggest that the adverse effect of the economic shock on male marriage is mediated through a combination of rising youth unemployment and rigid expectations about marriage costs.
      PubDate: 2022-06-28
       
  • Work from home and daily time allocations: evidence from the coronavirus
           pandemic

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      Abstract: Abstract The emergence and spread of the novel coronavirus in the U.S. were quickly followed by a widespread expansion in remote work eligibility, which, in turn, led to necessary alignments between pre-existing household management schedules and new home-based work schedules for many of those who worked from home (WFH) during the COVID-19 pandemic. We use 24-hour time diary data from the 2010–2020 American Time Use Survey to examine how major daily time allocations of those who WFH changed during the pandemic compared with those who worked away from home (WAFH). Before the pandemic, we find that those who WFH spent significantly less time working, commuting to work, grooming, and eating away from home, but significantly more time sleeping, socializing, relaxing, doing housework, caring for children, shopping, preparing food, and eating at home. During the pandemic, we find generally small and statistically insignificant changes in the time allocations of those who WAFH, but several large and significant changes in uses of time for those who WFH. A noteworthy intra-pandemic increase was in time devoted to labor market work by those who WFH, which almost halved the pre-pandemic WAFH-WFH difference. Results also show large and significant reductions in time devoted to other activities during the pandemic, including work-related travel, socializing, doing housework, shopping, shopping-related travel, and eating away from home. The intra-pandemic redistribution of time by those who WFH may have health and quality-of-life implications that should be assessed as the pandemic subsides and WFH becomes a more common feature of post-pandemic life.
      PubDate: 2022-06-13
       
  • Suddenly a stay-at-home dad' Short- and long-term consequences of
           fathers’ job loss on time investment in the household

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      Abstract: Abstract Commonly described as “gender care gap”, there is a persistent gender difference in the division of unpaid domestic responsibilities in developed countries. We use German survey data to provide novel evidence on short- and long-run effects of an exogenous shock on paternal availability, through a job loss, on the intra-household allocation of domestic work. We find that paternal child care and housework significantly increase in the short run on weekdays, while we do not see any similar shifts on weekends. Effects are positive and persistent for fathers who remain unemployed or have a working partner, but reverse after re-employment. We also find significant changes for female partners as well as in cumulative household time investments and outsourcing of tasks. Our results are in line with theoretical predictions regarding time availability and financial constraints, while we find no strong evidence for changes in bargaining powers, gender role attitudes or emotional bonding.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11150-021-09582-7
       
  • Disability and work intensity in Italian households

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      Abstract: Abstract The 2030 Agenda of the United Nations clearly sets the inclusion of persons with disabilities in the labour market as a main goal. However, especially in care welfare systems characterized by a low level of social services, disability not only impacts the labour market participation of disabled people themselves but may also affect the labour opportunities of other members of their household. Using EU-SILC data to compute individual work intensity-as a better measure of the actual level of labour attainment-this paper aims to disentangle direct and indirect correlations between disability and labour market participation in Italian households. In confirming the negative direct correlation between disability and labour market participation, the results also show a negative indirect correlation that depends on the family relationship between the disabled person and household members.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11150-021-09559-6
       
  • Re-examining female labor supply responses to the 1994 Australian pension
           reform

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      Abstract: Abstract Many governments are aiming to extend working lives by raising the age at which people can claim retirement pensions. This makes it vital to understand how these policies affect retirement decisions. In this paper, I revisit the labor supply effects of a major Australian reform that increased women’s pension age from 60 to 65. Atalay and Barrett (2015) studied these effects using repeated household surveys and a differences-in-differences design in which male cohorts form the comparison group. They estimate that the reform increased female labor force participation by 12 percentage points. Using earlier data, I show that the parallel-trends assumption did not hold before the reform because of a strong female-specific trend in participation rates across the relevant cohorts. Accounting for this trend, the estimated effect on female participation falls by two-thirds and becomes statistically insignificant at conventional levels. This highlights the importance of carefully assessing and controlling for trends across cohorts when evaluating pension reforms, which are typically phased in across cohorts.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11150-021-09561-y
       
  • Gender gaps in skills and labor market outcomes: evidence from the PIAAC

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      Abstract: Abstract Our paper makes the first attempt to address the empirical relationRicship between cognitive skills and gender gaps in labor market performance. We do so in a cross-country setting. To that end we use the PIAAC dataset, which contains information on OECD and non-OECD economies. Firstly, we document the existence of gender gaps in cognitive skills for numeracy, which are found to be around 2.5–4.6% and increase with age. These gaps remain even when comparing men and women within the same level and field of study. Next, we document sizable gender gaps in labor market outcomes, such as Labor Force Participation and hourly wages—around 18%, increase with age and rise remarkably for parents. Math skills are positively and strongly associated with these two labor market outcomes and its contribution to explain gender gaps, although significant, is limited—between 10 15% at most—in particular for parents.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11150-020-09523-w
       
 
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