Subjects -> ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (Total: 309 journals)
    - CLEANING AND DYEING (1 journals)
    - ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (242 journals)
    - FIRE PREVENTION (13 journals)
    - HEATING, PLUMBING AND REFRIGERATION (6 journals)
    - HOME ECONOMICS (9 journals)
    - INTERIOR DESIGN AND DECORATION (21 journals)
    - REAL ESTATE (17 journals)

ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (242 journals)            First | 1 2     

Showing 201 - 97 of 97 Journals sorted alphabetically
Territoire en Mouvement     Open Access  
Territories : A Trans-Cultural Journal of Regional Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Territorio     Full-text available via subscription  
Territorio della Ricerca su Insediamenti e Ambiente. Rivista internazionale di cultura urbanistica     Open Access  
Territorios     Open Access  
Territorios en formación     Open Access  
The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
The Urban Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Tidsskrift for boligforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for Kortlægning og Arealforvaltning     Open Access  
Town and Regional Planning     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Town Planning and Architecture     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Town Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
UPLanD - Journal of Urban Planning, Landscape & environmental Design     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban Affairs Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
URBAN DESIGN International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Urban Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Urban Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Urban Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Urban Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Urban Land     Free   (Followers: 2)
Urban Planning     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Urban Planning and Design Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Urban Policy and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Urban Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Urban Studies Research     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Urban Transformations     Open Access  
Urban, Planning and Transport Research     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Urbanisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Urbano     Open Access  
Vitruvian     Open Access  
Vivienda y Ciudad     Open Access  
WPS Review International on Sustainable Housing and Urban Renewal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Yhdyskuntasuunnittelu     Open Access  
ZARCH : Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Architecture and Urbanism     Open Access  

  First | 1 2     

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URBAN DESIGN International
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.48
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1357-5317 - ISSN (Online) 1468-4519
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2537 journals]
  • Revisiting the public health-urban design nexus in the post-pandemic era

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      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Covid-19 as an “invisible other” and socio-spatial distancing within a
           one-metre individual bubble

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      Abstract: Inspired by the social representation theory, the article embraces many aspects of the way in which the space dimension in social distancing has become a central measure for both one’s own and others’ health protection during the Covid-19 pandemic, evoking symbolic dimensions related to the social representations of “others” that are emotionally driven by fear or mirror the vulnerable self, activating the othering–otherness process. This invisible (sometimes stigmatized) “other”—never previously known—has in a few months infected more than 11 million people on the global scale and caused more than 500 thousands deaths (as of 30 June 2020: https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/). It has dictated where we can go, whether and how we can work, and whom we can meet, induced the virtualization of social relationships (“neighbours from afar” and “together but divided”), and confined working and socio-recreational activities to the home. The socio-spatial prescriptive distancing assumes various meanings in cultural contexts depending on whether lifestyles are more collectivist or individualistic and whether social practices are marked by crowded social proximity or distance. The social representations of cities as complex systems of “places” conceived for social “coexistence” have moved to prescriptive rules of inter-individual spaces (1 m, 2 m, and even more) for “survival”, with significant effects on place identity.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • The planners’ response to COVID-19

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      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • All change. Has COVID-19 transformed the way we need to plan for a
           healthier and more equitable food environment'

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      Abstract: The food environment has taken on much of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Evidence shows people's relationship and access to the food environment is a determinant of their health and wellbeing, and in relation to prevalence of chronic and non-communicable diseases. The spatial planning system forms part of a whole systems action in shaping the environment in a way that maximises population health gain. While these practices have had varying degrees of success, the sudden introduction and spread of COVID-19, and the responses to it, has forced us to re-examine the utility of current planning practice, particularly the impact on inequalities. In this commentary we aim to explore the post-pandemic role of spatial planning as a mechanism for improving public health by highlight a whole system perspective on the food environment, referring to experiences in Wales as a case study, and concluding with observation on future consumer trends around access to food.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Space and spatial practices in times of confinement. Evidence from three
           European countries: Austria, France and Poland

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      Abstract: In the first half of 2020, millions of people were subjected to drastic restrictions aimed at limiting the spread of the Covid-19 disease. Austria, France and Poland have implemented a lockdown to varying degrees and for varying lengths of time. This is an unprecedented situation in Europe: until now, even in times of war, curfew measures have never been applied 24 h a day. The research presented in this article was carried out in real time, in April and May 2020, with the help of urban planning students from three countries. Its objective is to observe the interaction between these measures and the urban space in two dimensions. On the one hand, we analyse the impact of these measures on the urban space and on the spatial practices of the inhabitants. On the other hand, we examine the conditions which different types of urban and rural space have provided for the inhabitants experiencing confinement. This empirical study leads to a discussion and recommendation for the town planners of the future.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • Reshaping approaches of architectural heritage devastated through bombing:
           case study of Generalštab, Belgrade

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      Abstract: The main objective of the research is to demonstrate the possible approaches to treatment of architectural heritage largely destroyed by bombardment, particularly to give an alternative method in reconstruction of bombarded urban landmarks, in regards to negative emotional attachment (detachment or alienation). The background research is based on the essential theories and studies connected to the treatment of bombarded places and war architecture, architecture of ruins, memory, identity, and emotional attachment, reflecting on reconstruction, conservation, and revitalisation methods. The hypothesis of the research is that the emotional attachment defines place identity. The paper focuses on the case study of the bombarded urban landmark of Generalštab complex in Belgrade. Using a questionnaire which involved 235 respondents, a relationship was established between the citizens of Belgrade and the Generalštab complex. The questionnaire gathered information on (1) recognisability, values, and significance, (2) emotional connection, and (3) citizens’ attitudes to possible approaches on the treatment of the Generalštab in the future. Finally, as a result of comprehensive analysis, the paper proposes one of the potential architectural approaches towards Generalštab complex, which is in line with the principles of the profession, but also the citizens’ attitudes and the needs of the City of Belgrade. Overall, the research aims to show the complexity of the observed topics, as well as an attempt to raise and develop the awareness about the importance and value of the bombarded architectural heritage.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • When a city must be a tree: rethinking the spatial approach to fighting
           epidemics based on the notion of ‘intermediate confinement’

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      Abstract: Principles of sustainability defend compactness, density and diversity as main characteristics of the optimal development of cities. These factors support public transport efficiency, economic activity, accessibility to equipments and services, proximity and walkability of streets and social exchanges in open public spaces. The Covid-19 pandemic crisis has called into question these factors perceived as booster of infections. However, dense and compact cities can also be the synonym of a more efficient provision of services, along with solidarity networks and creative solutions to fight the sanitary and economic crisis. Based on Alexander's (1965) concepts of 'tree' and 'semi-lattice', this study aims to identify areas in the urban tissue that could be self-sufficient, that is functionally autonomous to manage epidemics from the neighbourhood scale. Encouraging healthier lifestyles during lockdown is fundamental for social resilience. What alternative spatial approach to fighting epidemics could perform better' How could an "intermediate confinement" based on self-sufficiency and the promotion of healthier environments become a major priority for action' The analysis of Madrid (Spain) offers a suitable case study due to its density, diversity and high contagiousness during the Covid-19 crisis, revealing also some issues to apply such 'intermediate confinement' strategy, due to major spatial imbalances.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
       
  • High-density mobile LiDAR for measuring urban streetscape features

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      Abstract: This study investigates the feasibility of utilizing high-density mobile Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) to measure urban streetscape features. The results suggest that mobile LiDAR’s density allows for much smaller voxels than in the previous research and the ability to measure small urban streetscape features in 3D. This includes street trees, light/lampposts, street furniture, traffic and commercial signage, building window proportions, awnings, and enclosed courtyard restaurants. Moreover, mobile LiDAR facilitated measuring and categorizing these streetscape features in walkable, downtown-like streetscape environments. The ability to compartmentalize such streetscapes into smaller cubic foot voxels to be quantitatively measured and categorized could supplement or replace conventional audit-based streetscape measurement. This study introduces new methods—based on voxel data analysis—to compile accurate descriptive statistics of streetscape features and how they can be represented in 3D.
      PubDate: 2021-11-08
       
  • Public’s perceptions of urban identity of Thessaloniki, Greece

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      Abstract: Urban identity (UI) is a multi-faceted concept that encompasses different aspects of urban environment, built heritage and natural environment and is also related to important properties of the cities. The paper studies the associations between the inhabitants’ perceptions of UI and their socio-demographic profile. The city of Thessaloniki is the case study of this research. The research was based on data collection via structured questionnaires, and the results were statistically analyzed using: descriptive statistics, χ2 analysis, crosstabs method, regression analysis and discriminant analysis. The results show that UI, being a generally unknown term to the public, incorporates the notions of history and culture, urban environment, social behavior and everyday life, and it is influenced by social and economic factors. The perceptions on the city’s identity are associated with gender, age and family status, as well as the way people spend their spare time. It emerges that, in Thessaloniki, a policy mix is necessary to preserve and upgrade the historical assets of the city, along with the improvement of its every day functions.
      PubDate: 2021-10-04
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-021-00172-8
       
  • Lockdown in a disneyfied city: Kraków Old Town and the first wave of
           the Covid-19 pandemic

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      Abstract: This paper presents the geography of the historic central district of Kraków, Poland before, during and after the first wave of the 2020 pandemic. It describes how the disneyfied main part of the UNESCO heritage site of universal values turned into a ghost town as functional changes were turning into physical ones amid restrictions. From the results of pre-pandemic processes (that, as we argue, turned the city into its disneyfied version), to the lockdown (that later revealed itself to be but the first one in a row), to the post-lockdown recovery, these changes are presented in modified figure-ground diagrams with accessibility being defined by both tangible and intangible properties. The results are set against the background of the city’s current policies regarding economic recovery, mobility and accessibility to urban green areas. As an attempt to address the present vulnerability of the once resilient historic city centres—of which Kraków Old Town is a luminous example—this paper tends to be a voice in the debate on the post-2020 planning and the strategies we will need to face the subsequent waves of this, or other, pandemics as well as consequences of climate change.
      PubDate: 2021-10-04
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-021-00175-5
       
  • A typological approach to the transformation of cave dwellings in Baishe
           Village, Shaanxi, China

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      Abstract: With the recent boom in rural tourism, many Chinese historic villages are experiencing a rapid transformation process in which traditional residences are shifted to become mixed-use zones of residential and commercial functions. This rapid transformation process presents threats to local villagers’ daily lives. Cave villages in the Loess Plateau of China have historically benefited from adaptability to social, historical, and natural conditions and have retained their living function for over a thousand years. However, in the present time, the increasing tourism needs caused contradiction on how to sustain the living needs in the transformation process. It follows that the cave villages are an appropriate case study by which to illustrate the transformation of historic villages in China. Based on a field survey that addressed the practical needs of residents in Baishe village, Shaanxi, this paper provides a practical typological approach to demonstrate how future interventions in traditional dwellings could be implemented through prototyping the formation and spatial structure evolution of cave-dwellings. This paper contributes to integrating historical values into modern residents’ needs through spatial evolutionary analysis and provides an analytic perspective on the construction of people-oriented communities in China.
      PubDate: 2021-09-28
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-021-00173-7
       
  • Correction to: Urban design and informal settlements: placemaking
           activities and temporary architectural interventions in BaSECo compound

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      PubDate: 2021-09-22
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-021-00174-6
       
  • Cognitive, behavioral, social, and cultural characteristics of the city
           and urban design

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      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-021-00171-9
       
  • Urban design frameworks, user activities and public tendencies in
           Brisbane’s urban squares

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      Abstract: This research seeks to demonstrate the ways in which urban design frameworks stimulate and encourage social activities in urban public squares. We observed two public squares in Brisbane using a framework of design factors identified from existing literature to examine how such a framework correlates with user activities and engagement. The observation identifies patterns of public behaviour suggesting clear links between the design factors and the public’s engagement with them. The results show that activated areas of social gathering draw people in, and the busier a space is, both the frequency and the duration of people lingering in the space increase. The study suggests that simply providing respite from the urban environment (and/or weather conditions) does not adequately encourage social interaction and that people-friendly design factors can instigate social activities. One of the primary conclusions of this study is that members of the public in Brisbane are both actively and passively social and often seek out locations where people-watching and being around other members of the public are facilitated and encouraged. The research provides the basis for further debates on what public space in Brisbane should cater for and how it could better contribute to its urban context.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-020-00113-x
       
  • Nathan Phillips Square: mediating intercultural encounter through urban
           design

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      Abstract: Nathan Phillips Square is Toronto’s most important landmark, symbolising the city’s rejection of its conservative and monocultural past, in favour of a diverse, modern and global future, cast in Modernist urbanism and architecture. Today, Toronto is one of the most ethnically diverse cities in the world, in a country widely considered the most successful multicultural society in the world. However, what role the built form of the city’s microscale public spaces plays in supporting this pluralism remains largely unresearched. This paper attempts to contribute to this gap through an empirical examination of how Nathan Phillips Square enables and constrains ethnocultural differences and intercultural encounter. The paper begins with an exploration of literature on encounter in public spaces, and the agency of built form in mediating such interactions. The paper then presents three key findings based on an actor-network ethnography. This paper is critical of the emphasis placed on the square’s symbolic capital, at the expense of the multi-ethnic everyday life of the city. As a result, the failings of Modernism appear locked in, largely reducing the square to a spectacle. It is hoped that these findings will better inform urban designers and governments in shaping public space for ethnically diverse Western cities.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-021-00154-w
       
  • More than ‘urban character’: an introduction to the concept of fengmao
           and fengmao-led planning and design in China

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      Abstract: The concept of fengmao has found wide-spread use and application in urban design and development in China over the past four decades. It is increasingly used as a means of evaluating, maintaining and preserving cultural heritage. However, the common translation as ‘urban character’ in the English language literature fails to convey the complexity and comprehensiveness of the notion. We introduce the concept in its fullness and provide brief history of the evolution of the term over recent decades, linking its rising importance with some of China’s major urban and rural development turns. We illustrate the rural fengmao assessment framework on the case of the national leader in this regard, Anji County (Zhejiang Province, China). Finally, we demonstrate that current fengmao assessment and improvement efforts neglect two areas that are instrumental in sustainable development: the inclusion of (a) local stakeholders and (b) a detailed ecosystems and ecosystem services analysis as part of fengmao evaluation. We propose a more comprehensive conceptualisation and definition of fengmao which is better aligned with the aims and principles of sustainable development and offer concluding remarks.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-021-00166-6
       
  • Scale or size' An analysis of the factors that affect building
           density: evidence from high-density central urban zones in Asia

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      Abstract: Building density is an important factor affecting both urban morphology and urban habitat. Recently, “compact cities” with high density have become the main trend in urban sustainable development. Yet, how to promote effectively high-density city construction through spatial measures remains a challenge. This paper investigates the central urban zones of high-density cities in Asia. The construction scale and block size of 29 central zones in 17 international cities were quantitatively studied to compare their respective relationships with building density; other related factors were also considered (geographical features and urban nature). No direct correlation between construction scale and building density was found. However, a block’s size was strongly correlated with its building density. In general, smaller block size was associated with a higher building density. Based on the results, we conclude that simply compressing scale will not effectively improve building density. Instead, the development of a small-size block may promote high-density spatial construction, thereby, facilitating the realization of compact cities and sustainable urban development.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-021-00165-7
       
  • Cognitive responses to urban environments: behavioral responses in lab and
           field conditions

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      Abstract: Urban design context continually influences cognition and behavior and shapes human responses for pedestrians. Researchers have studied established the role of context well (Sussman and Hollander 2015; Robinson and Pallasmaa 2015; Zeisel et al. 2003; Wells et al. 2007), but less is known about how variations in the built environment impact behavior performance. The book, Cognitive Architecture: Designing for How We Respond to the Built Environment (Sussman and Hollander 2015), argues that a set of four architectural principles might explain impacts on human mental states. This study uses those four principles to provide a framework to empirically test the relationship between variations in the built environment and behavior performance using a go–no-go task. The findings suggest that context matters and the paper offers key implications for urban design theory and practice.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-020-00122-w
       
  • Urban design and informal settlements: placemaking activities and
           temporary architectural interventions in BaSECo compound

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      Abstract: In Manila, like many regions in the global south, the steady march towards urbanisation has generated an intensive urban landscape of high-rise buildings and large patterns of unplanned and often illegal settlements. Although the Philippine government has formulated several programmes to control the irregular growth of its territory, none of these initiatives has fully addressed the challenge of urban informality. This article examines the initial outcomes of a long-term research plan focused on the development of an upgrading strategy for the informal community of BaSECo in Manila. It describes the preliminary stages of the socio-spatial analysis of the district as well as the participatory process, carried out through a series of studies and fieldwork activities that involved students, NGOs and the community itself. The results of this work suggest that ‘action research’ can become a critical tool for experimenting with alternative strategies in the revitalisation of informal settlements. At the same time, this study highlights the importance of using on-site academic activities to develop an integrated approach that blends architectural education and research with raising students’ awareness of the socially responsible application of architecture and urban design.
      PubDate: 2021-08-30
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-021-00168-4
       
  • On the spontaneous beauty of cities: neither design nor chaos

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      Abstract: A clear bridge connecting the theory of spontaneous order and the issue of beauty in and for cities has not yet been developed. After a general exploration of the concept of beauty, this article builds an alternative idea of beauty, namely, beauty as spontaneity. In particular, it argues that beauty in the urban realm greatly depends on forms and orders that can hardly be comprehensively designed but rather emerge as the result of the freedom granted to multiple urban agents to express themselves in space. In this article the works of Jacobs and Romano are analysed and explored. Starting from some of their main ideas, the paper suggests certain planning and design tactics to nurture this kind of beauty and provides some essential ethical principles.
      PubDate: 2021-08-18
      DOI: 10.1057/s41289-021-00170-w
       
 
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