Subjects -> ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (Total: 304 journals)
    - CLEANING AND DYEING (1 journals)
    - ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (237 journals)
    - FIRE PREVENTION (13 journals)
    - HEATING, PLUMBING AND REFRIGERATION (6 journals)
    - HOME ECONOMICS (9 journals)
    - INTERIOR DESIGN AND DECORATION (21 journals)
    - REAL ESTATE (17 journals)

ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (237 journals)                  1 2     

Showing 1 - 97 of 97 Journals sorted by number of followers
Urban Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
International Journal of Urban and Regional Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
City & Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Urban Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Housing Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Urban, Planning and Transport Research     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Applied Ecology and Environmental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Transport and Land Use     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
European Planning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
European Urban and Regional Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Urban Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Sustainable Development     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Conflict and Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Architecture and Urban Planning     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Urban Design     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Interiors : Design, Architecture and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Urban Affairs Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Housing, Theory and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Architecture and Urbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Urban Studies Research     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Disasters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Cities and the Environment (CATE)     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
The Urban Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Housing Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Landscape History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Current Urban Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Urban Policy and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Urban Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
City, Territory and Architecture     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Urban Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Environnement Urbain / Urban Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Civil and Environmental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Sustainable Building Technology and Urban Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Urban Planning and Design Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Urban Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
URBAN DESIGN International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Landscape Journal : design, planning, and management of the land     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Land Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Community Development     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Housing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Land and Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Architecture, Planning and Construction Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Urban Design and Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Town Planning and Architecture     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cityscape     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Urban Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Town and Regional Planning     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Building Construction and Planning Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
European Spatial Research and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Smart and Sustainable Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Critical Planning     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Environment, Space, Place     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Cities People Places : An International Journal on Urban Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Borderlands Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Environmental Engineering and Landscape Management     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of architecture&ENVIRONMENT     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Urban Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Articulo - Journal of Urban Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Town Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Ambiances     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Future Cities and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Urban Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Urban Planning     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Apuntes : Revista de Estudios sobre Patrimonio Cultural - Journal of Cultural Heritage Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Rural Landscapes : Society, Environment, History     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of the Built Environment and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Estudios Demográficos y Urbanos     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Research in Urbanism Series     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Urban and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Geoplanning : Journal of Geomatics and Planning     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Human Capital in Urban Management     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
UPLanD - Journal of Urban Planning, Landscape & environmental Design     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
A&P Continuidad     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Land Use Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Strategic Property Management     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Agriculture and Rural Development in the Tropics and Subtropics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Seoul Journal of Korean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Baltic Journal of Real Estate Economics and Construction Management     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Bhumi : The Planning Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Rural Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Change Over Time     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Urban Land     Free   (Followers: 3)
Il Capitale Culturale. Studies on the Value of Cultural Heritage     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Land     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin KNOB     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Management Theory and Studies for Rural Business and Infrastructure Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Smart Cities     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Town Planning and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Insights into Regional Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
BUILT : International Journal of Building, Urban, Interior and Landscape Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Études rurales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
TeMA Journal of Land Use, Mobility and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ángulo Recto. Revista de estudios sobre la ciudad como espacio plural     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Rural Law and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Streetnotes     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Biourbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
South African Journal of Geomatics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rural China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Landscape Online     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
project baikal : Journal of architecture, design and urbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Urbanisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Joelho : Journal of Architectural Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Housing and Human Settlement Planning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
In Situ. Revue des patrimoines     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Online Journal of Rural Research & Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forum Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Belgeo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Storia Urbana     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Degraded and Mining Lands Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos Metrópole     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Den Gamle By : Danmarks Købstadmuseum (Årbog)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arquitectura y Urbanismo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Space Ontology International Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Urban Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brussels Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Glocality     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivio di Studi Urbani e Regionali     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Estudios del Hábitat     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Raumforschung und Raumordnung / Spatial Research and Planning     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Architectural / Planning Research and Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Architecture, Design and Construction     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Design     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Community Well-Being     Hybrid Journal  
Rural & Urbano     Open Access  
Ciudades     Open Access  
Polish Journal of Landscape Studies     Open Access  
Yhdyskuntasuunnittelu     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for boligforskning     Open Access  
Kart og plan     Open Access  
Vitruvian     Open Access  
Sens public     Open Access  
Procesos Urbanos     Open Access  
Psychological Research on Urban Society     Open Access  
Jurnal Arsitektur Lansekap     Open Access  
RUA     Open Access  
tecYt     Open Access  
Pensum     Open Access  
Les Cahiers de la recherche architecturale urbaine et paysagère     Open Access  
Jurnal Pengembangan Kota     Open Access  
ZARCH : Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Architecture and Urbanism     Open Access  
Mokslas – Lietuvos ateitis / Science – Future of Lithuania     Open Access  
Revista de Arquitectura     Open Access  
Revista Empresa y Humanismo     Open Access  
South Australian Geographical Journal     Open Access  
Produção Acadêmica     Open Access  
Revista Amazônia Moderna     Open Access  
Continuité     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Brasileira de Estudos Urbanos e Regionais     Open Access  
Eikonocity. Storia e Iconografia delle Città e dei Siti Europei - History and Iconography of European Cities and Sites     Open Access  
Urban Science     Open Access  
Scienze del Territorio     Open Access  
Ri-Vista : Ricerche per la progettazione del paesaggio     Open Access  
Risco : Revista de Pesquisa em Arquitetura e Urbanismo     Open Access  
Baru : Revista Brasileira de Assuntos Regionais e Urbanos     Open Access  
Pampa : Revista Interuniversitaria de Estudios Territoriales     Open Access  
Revista Márgenes Espacio Arte y Sociedad     Open Access  
Pós. Revista do Programa de Pós-Graduação em Arquitetura e Urbanismo da FAUUSP     Open Access  
International Planning History Society Proceedings     Open Access  
Territorios en formación     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Investigación Urbanística     Open Access  
Alternativa. Revista de Estudios Rurales     Open Access  
Revista Movimentos Sociais e Dinâmicas Espaciais     Open Access  
Vivienda y Ciudad     Open Access  
Cordis : Revista Eletrônica de História Social da Cidade     Open Access  
Paranoá : cadernos de arquitetura e urbanismo     Open Access  
História, Natureza e Espaço - Revista Eletrônica do Grupo de Pesquisa NIESBF     Open Access  
Paisagem e Ambiente     Open Access  
Room One Thousand     Open Access  
Territorio     Full-text available via subscription  
Sociologia urbana e rurale     Full-text available via subscription  
Territorio della Ricerca su Insediamenti e Ambiente. Rivista internazionale di cultura urbanistica     Open Access  
Revista Transporte y Territorio     Open Access  
Revista El Topo     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Desenvolvimento Regional     Open Access  
Revista Hábitat Sustenable     Open Access  
Revista de Geografia e Ordenamento do Território     Open Access  
Cidades, Comunidades e Territórios     Open Access  
International Journal of E-Planning Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Urbano     Open Access  
Territorios     Open Access  
Quivera     Open Access  
Ager. Revista de Estudios sobre Despoblacion y Desarrollo Rural     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Desarrollo Rural     Open Access  
Territoire en Mouvement     Open Access  
EchoGéo     Open Access  
Métropoles     Open Access  

        1 2     

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Urban Studies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.628
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 81  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0042-0980 - ISSN (Online) 1360-063X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Introduction: Verticality, radicalism, resistance

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Casper Laing Ebbensgaard, Michał Murawski, Saffron Woodcraft, Katherine Zubovich
      Pages: 619 - 635
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Volume 61, Issue 4, Page 619-635, March 2024.
      In recent decades urban scholarship has witnessed a ‘vertical’ or ‘volumetric’ turn that has advanced understandings of the multi-modal power asymmetries cutting through and organising urban space. Yet, this volumetric scholarship often remains locked into binary critiques – of success/failure, inclusion/exclusion, luxury/abjection, dispossession/accumulation, arborescent/rhizomatic, horizontal/vertical. This special issue tinkers with the limitations of these (unwittingly) binary urban geometries and volumetrologies – material as well as metaphorical ones. By building the etymological opposition of ‘the vertical’ with ‘the radical’ into the title of the volume (via the Latin root radix, meaning ‘root’), we seek to make the radical itself work with geometric and morphological associations. The papers in this special issue proffer diverse ethnographic, geographic and conceptual material for considering and theorising urban verticality in concert with rather than in opposition to its incumbent horizontalisms, diagonals, curls, zigzags and scattered planes. As we completed work on the special issue, the horrors of russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukrainian territory played out before our eyes. Accordingly, we make use of the introduction to reflect upon the insight that the war in Ukraine brings to bear on the intersection between domains of the urban, the vertical and the radical in the fraught, tense, vicious, fragile – but resistant – urban worlds of today. In doing so, we seek not only to render more clearly visible the violent effects of power verticals on lives, worlds and cities, but also to find seeds of hope in emergent, insurgent forms of (vertical as well as horizontal, and neither vertical nor horizontal) resistance.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-28T08:00:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231216884
      Issue No: Vol. 61, No. 4 (2024)
       
  • Growth and decline of a sustainable city: A multitemporal perspective on
           blue-black-green infrastructures at the pre-Columbian Lowland Maya city of
           Tikal

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      Authors: Christian Isendahl, Nicholas P Dunning, Liwy Grazioso, Scott Hawken, David L Lentz, Vernon L Scarborough
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The New Urban Agenda’s call for long-term visions in urban planning fails to recognise that ‘long-term’ implies different longevities depending on context of assessment. Compared to other social sciences, archaeological approaches add rigour to envisioning urban sustainability over several centuries and millennia. The archaeology of the pre-Columbian Lowland Maya urban tradition is an interesting case because data have been used to support conflicting arguments about Maya urban sustainability. We suggest that these contradictions can be partly explained by: (1) sustainability being ambiguously defined, (2) subsets of the urban system being expected to indicate the behaviour of other subsets or of the entire system, and (3) processes being evaluated using different timescales. Drawing on 1500 years of urban history at Tikal, this paper examines how archaeological perspectives add depth of reflection and unfold critical assumptions of the meaning of ‘long-term’ and ‘sustainability’ concealed in self-explanatory notions. We outline the development and longevity of urban settlement at Tikal and analyse the blue-black-green (water, soil, vegetation) infrastructures that sustained urban metabolism and sponsored basic urban functions. Our analyses contribute new insights on the challenges associated with future sustainability transitions over varying temporal scales. The diversity of past and present urban systems and infrastructural initiatives cannot be fitted within a single narrative of urban sustainability, however, and much research is required to examine how blue-black-green infrastructures can support transformative change of aggregated human population zones struggling with potable water scarcity, soil degradation, and habitat and biodiversity loss.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-29T10:44:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231224648
       
  • Book review: Jakarta: The City of a Thousand Dimensions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gregory Bracken
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-26T11:03:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980241233984
       
  • Book review: The Urban Rehabilitation of Post-Disaster Scapes

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      Authors: Muhammad Rizal Pahleviannur
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-26T10:59:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980241233931
       
  • Those who leave: Out-migration and decentralisation of welfare
           beneficiaries in gentrified Paris

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      Authors: Luc Guibard, Renaud Le Goix
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In major metropolitan areas, gentrification, financialisation and welfare retrenchment contribute to a severe housing crisis. Over the past 20 years, home price inflation and affordable housing shrinkage have been particularly acute in Paris. Such issues have been linked to the displacement of lower-income Parisians and the suburbanisation of poverty on a regional scale. In this article, we match disaggregated data from the Family Benefits Fund (CAF) with information on local housing markets, to empirically document these expulsionary processes. Our methodology is twofold. First, we investigate out-migration factors using logistic regressions. Second, we compare households’ changes in access to the city centre and urban resources following a move. Data show that social vulnerability is associated with a greater risk of leaving Paris and that housing welfare is playing a crucial role in mitigating this risk. Also, the higher the pressure on local housing markets, the more social inequalities determine mobility behaviour. Finally, beyond the effects of family structure, patterns of decentralisation are related to income level: less affluent households go farther from the city centre, job opportunities and services than higher-income households.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-19T10:29:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231224640
       
  • Neighbourhood structure and environmental quality: A fine-grained analysis
           of spatial inequalities in urban Germany

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      Authors: Christian König
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Urban environments are characterised by sparsity of space, elevated levels of air pollution and limited exposure to natural environments. Yet, residential environmental quality varies substantially both between and within cities. This study combines information on the socio-economic and demographic composition of 243,607 urban neighbourhoods with administrative and remote sensing data on the spatial distribution of industrial plants and urban green space to investigate patterns of environmental inequality in urban Germany at unprecedented levels of spatial granularity. It disentangles neighbourhood disadvantages experienced by foreign minorities (non-nationals) from those experienced by low-income households in order to assess the plausibility of economic explanations of residential sorting. The high level of spatial granularity makes it possible to examine patterns of environmental inequality not only between the relatively large areas that have been used as units of analysis in previous work but also within them, while reducing the threat of ecological bias. Results indicate that non-nationals are more likely to be exposed to industrial air pollution and less likely to live close to green spaces. This association holds even after adjusting for neighbourhood income composition and in fixed-effects specifications that restrict the analysis to within-city variation. I find no evidence for environmental inequality by socio-economic status. Exploratory sub-sample analyses show that neighbourhood disadvantages for non-nationals are higher in cities characterised by high levels of anti-foreigner sentiment, pointing towards housing market discrimination as a potentially important driver of foreign residents’ neighbourhood disadvantage.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-19T10:27:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231224224
       
  • Book review forum: Housing in the Margins

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      Authors: Rachael Dobson, Nicholas Blomley, Allan Cochrane, Ryan Thomas Devlin, Hanna Hilbrandt
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-15T05:48:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231223693
       
  • Smart cities at the intersection of public governance paradigms for
           sustainability

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      Authors: Giuseppe Grossi, Olga Welinder
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      As a research domain, the smart city keeps growing, despite the remaining contradictions and ambiguity related to its conceptual aspects. We propose to dig deeper into the complex socio-technical nature of the smart city and examine the concept through the lens of different public governance paradigms, therefore aligning it with the sustainability outcomes. Embracing interrelated dimensions of humans, technologies and organisations, the smart city can be viewed through the intersection of public governance paradigms (digital governance, collaborative governance and networks). The case of the smart city initiative of Tampere in Finland serves as an empirical illustration of how the proposed conceptual model might be applied in practice. Providing a novel approach to the smart city from a public management perspective, this model would allow policymakers to acquire a more comprehensive understanding of smart city governance and its multi-dimensional outcomes, in terms of social, environmental and economic sustainability. This approach enables the unlocking of the potential to generate multiple values for each group of actors and ensure more effective integration of smart initiatives, policies and projects, based on the public governance paradigms.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-15T05:46:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980241227807
       
  • ‘Security’ and private governance in São Paulo’s corporate
           centrality frontier

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      Authors: Gabriella DD De Biaggi
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In the last half-century, the ‘centre–periphery’ model has become insufficient to describe the increasingly fragmented and multicentric Latin American metropolises. Frontiers between central and peripheral areas are shifting, in part, due to the emergence of new corporate centralities, usually located outside historical city centres and heavily equipped with private ‘security’ agents and devices. By examining the evolving governing practices taking place in and around the dynamic frontier of a business centrality in São Paulo, Brazil, this article discusses the connections between the transformation in centre–periphery relations and the reworking of prior forms of socio-spatial control since the ‘security’ turn of the 1990s. More specifically, it explores the effects of the production of securitised corporate centralities on the racialised differential governance of urban space. For this purpose, the article draws from empirical work involving fieldwork, interviews with public and private ‘security’ agents, the observation of meetings of the local Public Security Community Council (CONSEG), and the analysis of police statistics. In sum, the argument presented here is that the evolution of segregation mechanisms and governing practices in Latin-American metropolises reproduces centre–periphery relations under new spatial configurations, and increases the capacity of private agents to subject urban space to their own rules and regulations.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-15T05:31:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980241227148
       
  • Place-oriented digital agency: Residents’ use of digital means to
           enhance neighbourhood change

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      Authors: Hadas Zur
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The smart city literature mostly focusses on digital initiatives from above. However, digitalisation also reshapes the city from below. Residents use digital means and platforms to empower their agency in the city. This paper aims to explore how residents utilise digital tools to activate their agency and influence local politics. The paper focusses on one neighbourhood in the city of Tel Aviv where different groups of residents struggle to promote their desired political-spatial vision. The main question is whether digitalisation produces new forms of agency on the neighbourhood scale. The paper argues that: (1) digitalisation provides residents with new forms of connective action, creating digital networks at different scales, using representational practices and forming new spaces for political negotiation; (2) through these practices, they manage to influence the symbolic and political status of the neighbourhood and reframe the struggle over its character and future; (3) groups with higher digital agency gain wider visibility of their claims and needs with politicians, the media and public officials. Importantly, this does not only serve middle-class groups. (4) Ultimately, residents become predominant political actors through digital agency. Methodologically, this paper includes two methods: (i) interviews with residents and municipal workers and (ii) social media analysis and online ethnography. The conclusion elaborates the concept of place-oriented digital agency as a particular type of agency aimed at determining change in a specific locale.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-15T05:19:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231224629
       
  • Afterword: Out there (or, do we have lift off')

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      Authors: AbdouMaliq Simone
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-14T11:29:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980241231668
       
  • Doing sonic urban ethnography: Voices from Shanghai, Berlin and London

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      Authors: Ana Aceska, Karolina Doughty, Muhammet Esat Tiryaki, Katherine Robinson, Eva Tisnikar, Fang Xu
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Matters of sound and listening are increasingly being attended to across the social sciences and humanities, reflecting what has been termed a ‘sonic turn’ since the early 2000s. In urban ethnographic research, scholars are starting to pay attention to the role of sound in social relations, in expressions of identity and senses of belonging, as well as in processes of othering. In this paper, we explore the theoretical and methodological opportunities of sonic urban ethnography, that is, an urban ethnography that foregrounds sound and listening in theoretical and methodological ways. We argue that the promise of sonic urban ethnography lies in its ability to interrupt the predominant focus on text and the visual by developing expanded practices of listening for alternative ways of knowing and engaging with the urban. We share four empirical vignettes from Shanghai, Berlin and London that illustrate, in their different ways, the power exercised through sound in the urban environment. Our discussion of the empirical cases highlights three key ‘lessons’ for doing sonic urban ethnography.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-02-14T11:27:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231223866
       
  • Book review: Urban Design Governance: Soft Powers and the European
           Experience

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      Authors: Yueh-Sung Weng
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-28T07:25:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231223689
       
  • Hukou type, hukou place and labour market vulnerability in Chinese
           megacities: The case of Beijing in the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Qiujie Shi, Tao Liu, Rongxi Peng
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents an investigation into the different roles of hukou type and place in shaping labour market vulnerability within Chinese megacities, using the COVID-19 pandemic-induced income loss in Beijing as a case study. We find that while the hukou system played a role in shaping this loss, its impact was achieved mainly through hukou place, with hukou type having no significant effect. Compared to locals, non-local hukou holders in Beijing were more likely to lose income; and their magnitude of income loss was larger. Locals and non-locals were also subject to different rules when deciding which individuals in the group would have a pay cut, with personal attributes playing a significant role in this decision for non-locals but not for locals. In addition, working in self-employed businesses was a disadvantage for the non-local group only; and the threshold by which family income helped reduce the risk of income loss was lower for non-locals than for locals. This study highlights the importance of extending the discussion on the hukou system’s impact to the question of labour market vulnerability, particularly considering the ongoing and potentially prolonged weakness in China’s labour market. It sheds light on the need to differentiate between hukou place and type in future studies concerning China’s hukou system.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-28T07:23:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231223088
       
  • Inventraset assemblages: The spatial logic of informal street vending,
           transport and settlement

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      Authors: Kim Dovey, Redento B Recio
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Urban informality remains a central challenge for those engaged in understanding and transforming global South cities. There have been calls to develop new conceptual language geared to this challenge and much debate around the degree to which it might be subsumed within global urban theory. We argue that theories of informal urbanism need to be grounded in an understanding of how it works to sustain livelihoods, moving beyond studies of informal settlement, street vending and transport to understand the synergies, interrelations and interdependencies between them. Informal vending and transport provide employment and produce cheap goods and mobility; informal settlement produces affordable housing in key locations with access and mobility. ‘Inventraset’ is a portmanteau concept that links informal vending, transport and settlement into a dynamic urban assemblage that is inventive, transgressive and settled. This model is demonstrated through an empirical study of the spatial logic of the inventraset triangle within the megacities of Manila and Jakarta. Here the informal is normal, whether displayed in the intensities of transit nodes and street markets or camouflaged within zones of exclusion. This is not an ‘informal city’ but one where informal street vending, transport and settlement are geared to formal spatial and governance structures in different ways in different neighbourhoods − an assemblage of informal/formal and of vending/transport/settlement without which the urban economy would collapse. This is a call not simply to rename the informal but to understand it as a mode of production that is more than the inverse of the formal.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-28T07:20:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231223060
       
  • Proximity as urban democratic legitimacy: Strategies of participation in
           Buenos Aires

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      Authors: Sam Halvorsen, Rocio Annunziata
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Since 2007, Buenos Aires has been governed by a centre-right coalition that has made participation an integral part of its approach to governance. Under mayor Horacio Rodríguez Larreta (2015–2023), the idea and practice of proximity became central, notably through weekly meetings with neighbours across the city. This article demonstrates that proximity was a strategy for building urban democratic legitimacy. In so doing, it introduces the work of Pierre Rosanvallon to an urban studies readership. Contemporary literature on urban participation is at risk of establishing ontologically fixed positions, as seen in recent debates on the ‘post-political city’. Rosanvallon’s legitimacy of proximity is an analytical device that provides an open and non-essential reading of participation. Based on extensive qualitative research, the article examines how and why Larreta and his city government deployed the strategy of proximity, while also highlighting its limits.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-28T07:17:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231222170
       
  • What is local government financialisation' Four empirical channels to
           clarify the roles of local government

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      Authors: Hannah Hasenberger
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Recent literature at the nexus of geography and political economy notes that local governments are becoming financialised. But it is not always clear what this means. Specifically, what is being financialised' And what is the role of local governments in this process' Building on Whiteside’s definition of local state-led financialisation as enabled and internal, this article combines a systematic literature review with the comparative analysis of country-level statistics to clarify this process further. It identifies four channels through which local government financialisation unfolds empirically. First, local governments enable the financialisation of public assets and services through privatisation and outsourcing and by applying financial principles to land use planning. Second, they borrow against their own assets. Third, local governments use bonds and derivatives to manage the risks and costs of their borrowing. Fourth, they invest to generate financial income. Focusing on high-income countries in Western Europe, the article extends the geographical remit of the US- and UK-centric literature. Building on its findings, the article highlights two avenues for further research. First, internationally comparative research can explore how the structural context in which local governments operate shapes their financialisation. Second, critical research into the tension between the objectives and risks of local government financialisation adds nuance to current debates.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-28T07:15:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231222133
       
  • Local policy-making within the multilevel system: A study of governance in
           peripheral(ised) medium-sized cities undergoing socio-economic
           transformation in Saxony, Germany and Lower Silesia, Poland

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      Authors: Rafał Gajewski, Robert Knippschild
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Our motivation for undertaking this research was to verify the scope and results of public policies aimed at supporting peripheralised medium-sized cities, and to check how these policies have been perceived by stakeholders within these cities. We selected the Polish-German borderland as a case region for this, primarily due to a particular concentration of cities experiencing the detrimental effects of socio-economic transformation. These are also cities exposed to the consequences of radicalising political discourse. We chose two pairs of cities comparable to centres behind the border: Bautzen and Görlitz (located in East Saxony), as well as Zgorzelec and Jelenia Góra (the western part of Lower Silesia). We assumed peripheralisation, left-behind places and multilevel governance to be the theoretical frameworks to capture the dynamics of processes taking place within such peripheral(ised) medium-sized cities. Our main research objective was to investigate the way the public authorities have been navigating their respective paths within the multi-level urban development / regional policy systems. The main conclusion of the research is the low institutional capacity among the public authorities in the given cities to allow them to be able to reverse negative trends.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-28T07:13:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231221085
       
  • Back to the suburbs' Millennial residential locations from the Great
           Recession to the pandemic

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      Authors: Hyojung Lee, Whitney Airgood-Obrycki, Riordan Frost
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In the past decade, there has been a great deal of attention paid to and speculation about the residential mobility and location decisions of millennials. Academics and practitioners alike have been trying to determine where millennials are moving and why, including whether they are leading a ‘back to the city’ movement or whether they are moving to the suburbs as previous generations did at their age. Using US Census data, this article examines the geographical population distribution of young adults in the USA in recent decades. Categorising neighbourhoods by their urban or suburban character and by their central or peripheral location, we find that millennials lived in urban areas on the heels of the Great Recession at higher rates than previous generations. However, over the decade, the millennial population gradually shifted towards suburban areas: central urban and peripheral urban neighbourhoods largely lost millennial residents from 2011 to 2021, while peripheral suburban neighbourhoods experienced substantial gains. When it comes to neighbourhood amenities (e.g. restaurants and parks), millennials largely left amenity-rich areas for neighbourhoods with fewer amenities, though these amenities grew faster in the neighbourhoods that gained millennials the most. Millennial suburbanisation seems to be associated with housing affordability and demand for larger homes, as the population shift was more pronounced in the metros that have lower housing affordability and a lower share of larger homes in their central urban neighbourhoods. The results indicate the importance of affordable and right-sized housing, complemented with neighbourhood amenities, in attracting and retaining this population group.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-28T07:07:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231221048
       
  • Book review: Lively Cities: Reconfiguring Urban Ecology

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      Authors: Ayushi Chauhan
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T12:11:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980241228462
       
  • Book review: The Urban Question in Africa: Uneven Geographies of
           Transition

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      Authors: Sören Scholvin
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T12:10:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980241228460
       
  • Book review: Urban Violence: Security, Imaginary, Atmosphere

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      Authors: Julian Molina
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T12:08:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980241228441
       
  • Suburbanisation in East Germany

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      Authors: Matthias Bernt, Anne Volkmann
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Rampant suburbanisation is one of the most visible changes evidenced in cities throughout Central and Eastern Europe in the past three decades. In this paper, we analyse how suburbanisation unfolded in East Germany after reunification. We do this against the background of ongoing debates about the usefulness and meaning of the term post-socialism that have questioned the self-enclosed spatiality of the concept and suggest giving the concept of neoliberalisation a more central role in analysing the changes experienced in this part of the world. We show that the suburbanisation process in East Germany rested on three neoliberal policy orientations: (1) extensive investment stimuli for the construction of new rental housing, (2) promotion of home ownership and (3) the privileging of suburban locations through planning gaps. Since all these policies are based on neoliberal ideas, we argue that neoliberalisation and post-socialist reform agendas have appeared as two sides of the same coin. Against this background, we advocate putting the developments that came after socialism at the centre of the research and call for a new generation of studies on post-socialist neoliberalisation.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-22T12:23:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231218612
       
  • Sanitation configurations in Lilongwe: Everyday experiences on and off the
           grid

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      Authors: Cecilia Alda-Vidal, Alison L Browne, Mary Lawhon, Deljana Iossifova
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Scholars have called for increased attention to the practices through which residents of southern cities create and use infrastructure. The failures and disruptions of many particular artefacts have meant that people often develop multiple ways to access water, electricity, or transportation, even if all of them have limitations. For sanitation, thinking through heterogeneous infrastructure configurations can help us to see connections between toilets, and the reasons for maintaining access to different types of toilets, given their different risks and benefits. In this paper, we focus on plots in Lilongwe with both indoor flush-toilets and backyard latrines, and the lived experiences of people as they navigate choices about the use of these toilets. The presence of on and off-grid toilets is rooted in colonial urban form, yet is perpetuated – and proliferates in new places – as residents face a number of constraints, including most recently recurrent water shortages due to droughts. We consider both how this configuration challenges official imaginaries of urban sanitation, and how it helps residents to address different risks and sanitation needs. Drawing on the experience of Lilongwe, we reflect on what can be learnt from this heterogeneous infrastructural configuration in terms of planning for more resilient water and sanitation services in Global South cities and beyond.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-22T12:13:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231217661
       
  • Constitutive outsides or hidden abodes' Totality and ideology in
           critical urban theory

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      Authors: William Conroy
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In the context of hotly contested debates within critical urban theory, many scholars have recently attempted (both implicitly and explicitly) to move beyond the relational-dialectical concept of ‘totality’, taking up the notion of ‘the constitutive outside’ in its place. With this in view, this article seeks to (1) develop a critique of the ways in which the concept of the constitutive outside is deployed in these debates; and (2) to sketch another path forward – one that understands capitalist urbanisation as a distinctive moment in the evolution of a world-encompassing and internally related socio-spatial totality, while also attending to well-founded concerns among theorists of the constitutive outside regarding the question of difference and ascriptive hierarchisation. More precisely, this article will pursue a close reading of work on the constitutive outside in critical urban theory, suggesting that it effectively re-articulates longstanding and entrenched tenets of capitalist ideology, positing the image of a ‘space-time of the other’. And it will conclude with a revised conceptualisation of totality for critical urban theory, building on Nancy Fraser’s recent work on capitalism’s racialised, gendered, and ecological ‘hidden abodes’.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-22T12:07:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231217633
       
  • Informality through the state: How overregulation and tolerance shape
           informal land development in metropolitan Brazil

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      Authors: João Tonucci
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The relationship between the state and informal land development in Global South metropolises has yet not received much attention in urban studies. Concerning that knowledge gap, this paper investigates how the state regulates and inspects irregular and clandestine land subdivisions in the Metropolitan Region of Belo Horizonte (MRBH). A mixed-methods approach, focused on the inner workings of the land development control policy led by the MRBH Agency between 2009 and 2018, provides new evidence of the relationships between inspectors, developers, and prosecutors, among other actors. By delving deep into the intricate nexus between a changing regulatory landscape and the bureaucratic, street-level, and everyday enforcement practices by officials, the paper reveals how land development control, directly and indirectly, shapes informal land development in the MRBH. Particularly, it sheds light on how land development control unrolls through a contradictory combination of overregulation on one side and tolerance on the other. In light of this, I argue that, as land development control evolves without effectively tackling the land question and the structural drivers of informality, the state becomes paradoxically entangled in the production of the same forms of informality it is expected to curb. Therefore, land development control is better understood as a fragile and ambivalent state compromise between the need to regulate urban expansion and market-driven informal urbanisation. By creating opportunities for rent extraction and capital accumulation which are explored by informal land developers, the state has been crucial for property-led informal urbanisation in metropolitan Brazil.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-22T12:04:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231215708
       
  • Deconstructing the urban viewpoint: Exploring uneven regional development
           with Nancy Fraser’s notion of justice

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      Authors: Kristina Grange, Nils Björling, Lina Olsson, Julia Fredriksson
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Uneven regional development fomented by city-centric growth agendas generates significant challenges for regional peripheries. Placing regional margins and other plural geographies at the centre, in this article we apply a normative framework based on justice theory to uncover the dominance of urban viewpoints in urban regional development policy. Departing from Nancy Fraser’s three-dimensional justice theory, we provide a deconstruction of city-centrism by illustrating how regional disparities in two regions in Sweden are not only reproduced by economic maldistribution but also by political misrepresentation and cultural misrecognition. By doing so, we illustrate the fruitfulness of applying a normative justice framework to create a broader understanding of factors that contribute to the political production of uneven regional development and need to be addressed if a transformative and progressive change is to occur.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-22T12:01:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231214502
       
  • The changing social class structure of London, 2001–2021: Continued
           professionalisation or asymmetric polarisation'

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      Authors: Chris Hamnett
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The changing class structure of cities has been a topic of considerable importance and debate for over a 150 years, since the industrial revolution created a large industrial proletariat in many western cities. But the rise of post-industrial society, the decline of the manufacturing industry, a shrinking industrial working class, and the growth of the professional and managerial class from the 1970s onwards has provoked fresh debate about this, as has the emergence of gentrification in many cities. This paper looks at the changing social class structure of London from 2001 to 2021 using data from the population Census. It shows that the higher professional and managerial class continued its long term growth after a pause in 2001–2011. But the number and proportions of small employers, the self-employed and routine workers have also grown. There is therefore continuing professionalisation but also ‘asymmetric polarisation’. The paper also examines the geography of social class change by borough over the period and shows that while the professional and managerial class grew in all boroughs, suggesting a gradual upward class change across London, it was highest in the most gentrified inner London boroughs. However, the percentage point growth of the self-employed and routine groups was generally higher in the mostly suburban boroughs where professional and managerial class percentage point change growth was smallest (and vice versa) which suggests an intensified social class sorting and divergence across London with the lower class groups growing most rapidly in suburban outer London where housing costs are less.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-22T11:56:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231213280
       
  • Urban heat islands and the transformation of Singapore

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      Authors: Yoonhee Jung
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      An urban heat island is defined as an urban area that experiences warmer temperatures than its surroundings. This study examines how Singapore’s planning efforts established after the mid-20th century have affected the thermal environment of the city in association with land transformation, using historical temperature data available from the Meteorological Service of Singapore and some historical studies. Singapore’s planners have carefully regulated the growth of its downtown while promoting expansion in other parts of the city-state. These effects of planning have also unconsciously shaped the location and outline of Singapore’s urban heat island. As a result, new urban heat peaks were found around the centres of newly constructed large-scale new towns compared to industrial areas. This study provides lessons for land planning in mitigating a city’s urban heat island effects.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-22T10:32:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231217391
       
  • Book review forum: Waiting Town

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      Authors: Sangeeta Banerji, VK Phatak, Llerena Guiu Searle, Laura Lieto, Lisa Björkman
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-19T03:55:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231221745
       
  • Caring and commoning in political society: Insights from the Scugnizzo
           Liberato of Naples

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      Authors: Roberto Sciarelli
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Recent research has highlighted the connection between commoning processes and the creation of new infrastructures of care in the areas of Southern Europe which were most affected by austerity policies and by the connected crisis of social reproduction. The objective of this paper is to shed new light on the caring practices organised through and within urban commons by using the theoretical lenses provided by Subaltern Studies, which also explored processes of collective self-organisation, the development of solidarity ties and reclamation of social welfare. The main theoretical reference is provided by the work of Partha Chatterjee on ‘The politics of the governed’. The discussion is conducted through the analysis of the caring practices organised within the Scugnizzo Liberato, one of the urban commons of the city of Naples, located in Southern Italy, investigated through a prolonged process of co-research.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-18T04:00:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231217375
       
  • Navigating spatial inequalities: The micro-politics of migrant dwelling
           practices during COVID-19 in Antwerp

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      Authors: Hannah Robinson, Jil Molenaar, Lore Van Praag
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic and its multiple lockdowns disrupted city life, while restrictions on physical distancing and urban activities highlighted the importance of our living environment and its links to our well-being. As part of the COVINFORM research project, this case study uses a micro-political lens to explore the specific spatial challenges which migrants faced in two of the more socially deprived neighbourhoods in Antwerp, Antwerpen-Noord and Borgerhout. This study aims to understand the specific spatial challenges migrants encountered during the pandemic and examine how they navigated and asserted agency within the confines of their living situation during this period. We combine participant observation with 25 semi-structured interviews with migrants living in two neighbourhoods in Antwerp (Flanders, Belgium), namely Borgerhout and Antwerpen-Noord. Findings show that the COVID-19 pandemic reinforced urban spatial disparities, where people’s strategies of adaptation were suddenly disrupted. Lower-income migrants were particularly affected, living in crowded housing without access to private open space. Access to public and green spaces, as well as facilities and public transport links, became more important during the pandemic, especially for those in poorer housing conditions. Within this context of spatial inequalities, migrants deployed their agency through claiming access to the city, shifting dwelling practices, and leveraging neighbourhood and community networks.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-18T03:12:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231217389
       
  • Book review: The Changing American Neighborhood: The Meaning of Place in
           the Twenty-First Century

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      Authors: Richard Harris
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-09T12:50:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231221730
       
  • Housing movement coalitions in the United States: Trends from big networks
           among urban civil society leaders

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      Authors: Andrew Messamore
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Coalitions of formal housing, civil rights and anti-poverty organisations play an important role in urban housing movements. However, the extent and dynamics of these ‘housing movement coalitions’ are not well understood. In this article, I document the geography of housing movement coalitions across 148 US cities using leadership networks among 11.8 million civic leaders. I show that cohesive coalitions of formal housing, civil rights and anti-poverty leaders exist in a wide range of US cities, including in conservative states. In terms of change, housing coalitions have only grown in a handful of politically liberal cities since the global financial crisis, and most housing coalitions have stagnated and some have declined. Finally, change score regression models indicate that economic insecurity is associated with housing coalition emergence, but municipal austerity and hostile political environments may weaken the opportunities for coalitions to expand. These findings suggest movement scholars should widen their focus to include housing coalitions in more diverse contexts, and more closely examine how municipal funding shapes housing coalitions and their relationship to grassroots activism.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-06T12:23:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231213204
       
  • Social ties in and out of the neighbourhood: Between compensation and
           cumulation

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      Authors: Joanie Cayouette-Remblière, Eric Charmes
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The central question addressed in this article is how social ties within and outside the neighbourhood are articulated in different contexts for various population groups. Two major perspectives emerge from the literature on personal networks, neighbourhood effects, and neighbourhood-based social capital. The first assumes a compensation mechanism, whereby local and extra-local ties flourish at each other’s expense. The second considers that these two types of ties can be cumulated. After presenting the interpretations and empirical data that support these two perspectives and highlighting the persistent ambiguity on the issue, they are tested with the support of an original survey of 2572 people in 14 neighbourhoods in the Paris and Lyon metropolitan regions. A range of indicators for social ties is used to build two indices, one for local ties and one for extra-local ties. The article then examines variations between these indices as a function of individual characteristics and contexts to test whether compensation or cumulation exists between the local and extra-local ties. The main findings are, first, that local and extra-local ties each evolve along one dimension. In particular, working-class social ties do not appear to have a specific pattern. Second, compensation exists, but cumulation of local and extra-local ties is predominant. Lastly, this cumulation is a factor of inequalities. It benefits those with the most resources in terms of income, qualifications and occupation, as well as the residents of upper-class or gentrified neighbourhoods. Geographical origins also play a role for the descendants of immigrants, who establish fewer extra-local ties.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-06T12:17:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231212298
       
  • Diverging mobility situations in Greater Mexico City: Exploring the
           factors behind the mobility situations of public transport commuters

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      Authors: David López-García
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates the factors behind the likelihood of experiencing a specific type of mobility situation. The case of commuting by public transport in Greater Mexico City is analysed. A one-way ANOVA with post-hoc procedures and three multinomial logistic regression models are used to assess the extent to which transport-, land use- or socio-economic-related variables influence the likelihood of experiencing a specific mobility situation. The results show that the mobility situations of workers are primarily influenced by the socio-economic characteristics of commuters, followed by land-use patterns and the availability of transport systems, respectively. This means that in addition to transport-related policies, reducing commuting disparities in urban regions will require policies able to reduce socio-economic inequalities and influence the urban structure.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2024-01-04T01:34:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231214728
       
  • Reimagining hope through the political: A post-foundational reading of
           urban alternatives beyond postpolitics

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      Authors: Mohamed Saleh, Friederike Landau-Donnelly
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This paper proposes hope as a lens for critical urban research for the purpose of grasping the interplay between forces of change and stability as manifested in popular uprisings, as well as in broader, self-organised spatial practices in everyday life. This hopeful lens allows for reimagining hope through the concept of ‘the political’, defined in the post-foundationalist literature as an ontological condition assuming the inherent impossibility for ‘politics’ to reach its final closure, fixation or stability. The hopes thus arising from ‘the political’ provide critical urban scholars with better tools to navigate the ever-present possibilities for emancipatory change and action, arising from an ontological lack of foundations, upon which political orders are temporarily based. In this paper, we show how theoretical notions from post-foundationalism can expand the current sense of hope by instilling a non-teleological view on inherent possibilities for matters to be otherwise, thus implying the absence of certainty about presupposed ideas of what genuine political change should look like. Through this lens, hope appears linked to concrete openings for alternatives found in everyday life. By laying out such a hopeful approach, we aim to expand the awareness of urban ‘scholars’ to ponder both mundane and radical materialisations and practices of ‘the political’ within urban settings. Ultimately, by reimagining hope to look beyond or alongside postpolitics, we unlock a future-oriented research agenda that adds nuance to an ontologically restricted conception of ‘politics’, which allows for broader empirical attunement to ever-present embodied signs of unfinished urban alternatives generated by ‘the political’.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-27T12:06:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231213733
       
  • Book review: The Great Urban Transition: Landscape and Environmental
           Changes from Siberia, Shanghai, to Saigon

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      Authors: Muhammad Khairul, Nurul Fajri Saminan, Yasmin Yasmin
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-27T11:55:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231219182
       
  • Book review: Les sauvages de la Civilisation: Regards sur la Zone,
           d’hier à aujourd’hui and The People’s Hotel: Working for Justice in
           Argentina

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      Authors: Vincenzo Maria Di Mino
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-23T06:45:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231217701
       
  • Book review: Urban Revolutions: Urbanisation and (Neo-)Colonialism in
           Transatlantic Context

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      Authors: Laam Hae
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-23T06:39:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231216351
       
  • Mapping policy pathways: Urban referencing networks in public art policies

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      Authors: Noga Keidar, Daniel Silver
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the dynamics of inter-referencing between cities and develops the concept of the ‘Urban Referencing Network’ as a representation of the references made by cities to one another in policy documents. The study employs public art policies, specifically the Percent for Art policy, to investigate the structure of inter-referencing within the urban referencing network. Using a corpus of policy documents from 26 Anglophone cities with over one million residents, we analyse 150 documents containing 2178 inter-references. Combining network measurements and regressions, we explore the emergence of central nodes and the mechanisms influencing their formation. The broader field of arts and cultural policies, with its extensive inter-urban connections and professional networks, provides fertile ground for studying urban referencing networks. By integrating literature on policy mobility and urban networks, this study contributes to a deeper understanding of the circulation of urban ideas and the interplay between cities in policy-making processes. The results demonstrate that only a few cities, including New York, Chicago, London, Seattle, Los Angeles, and Montreal, emerge as central nodes, attracting the other cities’ attention. Attributes of the referenced cities, like economic importance, iconicity and early adoption, determine to a great extent who are the most central nodes.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-19T04:57:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231206853
       
  • How land use patterns keep driving cheap: Geographic support for
           transportation taxes

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      Authors: Adam Millard-Ball, Purva Kapshikar
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Economists tend to favour price-based approaches, such as gasoline and carbon taxes, to address the negative impacts of car travel, while urban planners tend to emphasise land use planning such as compact development. In this paper, we argue that the two approaches are synergistic. We use precinct-level data from two California referenda to show that land use planning makes pricing more feasible: voters in dense, transit-oriented neighbourhoods are more willing to support a carbon price and increased gasoline taxes. Political ideology is a more important determinant of voting patterns, but in a closely divided election, land use patterns, public transportation, and other aspects of the built environment can determine the success of a referendum on driving taxes. Our results also imply that the voluminous research on land use and transportation underestimates the long-run impacts of compact development on driving, through ignoring the ways in which urban form shapes the politics of taxation.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-16T11:42:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231207487
       
  • ‘Volviendo a Vivir’ (coming back to life): Urban trauma, activism and
           building emancipatory futures

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      Authors: Sonja Marzi, Rachel Pain
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This paper engages recent writing on urban trauma, exploring its connection with the gendered forms of activism that displaced women practise as they seek to rebuild more emancipatory urban futures. Their activisms are situated in the context of multiple, ongoing and intersecting forms of violence from intimates, armed groups and the state, including institutional neglect (in and of the city) that is racialised and gendered. We draw on participatory action research undertaken with women in the Colombian cities of Bogotá and Medellín. Using creative audio-visual methods over several months, women co-researchers produced a documentary in which they chart the ways that they claim spaces of the city inside and outside their homes. We draw particular attention here to the temporal dimension of urban trauma as it intersects with migrant women’s spatial biographies; this has consequences for their activisms which also transcend the sites and scales of public and private spheres, national and global crises and individual and community responses. We argue that it is the gradually accruing and multiplying character of violence and trauma which in turn necessitates the gradual and multiscalar development of these activisms. The women used ecological metaphors of rooting and growth to explain how, through these activisms and directly informed by past traumatic events, they ‘come back to life’. Together, they build solidarity networks and alliances, and imagine and practise alternative feminist urban futures and modes of recovery in their new urban homes.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-15T11:00:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231213730
       
  • Urban development and long-term flood risk and resilience: Experiences
           over time and across cultures. Cases from Asia, North America, Europe and
           Australia

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      Authors: Duncan C Keenan-Jones, Anna Serra-Llobet, Hongming He, G Mathias Kondolf
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Rivers are the lifeblood of many cities, but flood risk is projected to increase due to urbanisation and climate change. Better floodplain management in and near urban areas is required to produce the New Urban Agenda’s ‘just, safe, healthy, accessible, affordable, resilient and sustainable cities’. Many jurisdictions are looking to move or keep people out of human-constructed residential ‘niches’ on hazardous floodplains, but this has proved difficult to achieve. Our historical case studies of colonial societies in ancient Rome, as well as on the Yangtze, Mississippi and Brisbane rivers, show the deep roots of many contemporary flood risk issues, such as failures of risk perception related to recent settlement, the moral hazard of spending on flood defence infrastructure, the creeping nature of floodplain encroachment into ‘niches’ of perceived protection created by structural interventions, the need for a central, ‘whole of river’ approach, and the difficulties of implementing this approach locally. These case studies also suggest solutions, including the adoption of Indigenous perspectives, benefits to incentivise local actors and a historical education strategy to increase appetite for more sustainable flood risk mitigation.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-15T10:54:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231212077
       
  • Race and perceptions of revitalisation in the ‘District of
           Gentrification’

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      Authors: Michael Leo Owens, Arica Schuett, Nyron N. Crawford, Andrea Benjamin
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Ethnographies of gentrification, by using interviews, suggest individual and group sentiments about it as a form of revitalisation are heterogenous, even within neighbourhoods experiencing it. Discerning variation and changes over time in citywide sentiments about gentrification, however, is a challenge. It requires city-level survey data, especially longitudinal data, which is scarce. We use novel data from Washington Post surveys of District of Columbia (i.e. Washington, DC) residents between 2000 and 2016 to test predictions of city-level gentrification opinions, deduced from neighbourhood-based ethnographies of gentrification. We observe and emphasise how, over time, race is consistently associated with opinion divergence about gentrification, including perceptions of its inequalities and consequences. Our findings demonstrate the value of citywide surveys for extending empirical findings from neighbourhood-level ethnographies of gentrification.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-15T10:38:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231211819
       
  • Analysing a private city being built from scratch through a social and
           environmental justice framework: A research agenda

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      Authors: Sarah Moser, Nufar Avni
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      A growing body of scholarship examines new cities being built from scratch that are developed and governed by the private sector. While this scholarship explores discourse and rhetoric, economic objectives, and some social and environmental impacts of new private cities, scholars to date have not taken a social or environmental justice approach to analysing new city projects. In this article we examine Forest City, a private city project being built on artificial islands off the coast of Malaysia by one of China’s largest property development companies, and its unique governance and claims to being ‘eco’, despite the significant environmental damage it has caused. Intended as a lush and exclusive gated enclave for Chinese nationals, Forest City is a productive case study through which to consider the consequences of a private city using the frameworks of social and environmental justice. We suggest more critical research that engages with social and environmental justice is needed on the many emerging projects branded as eco-cities of the future, a troubling claim that signals a growing normalisation of mega-scale privatisation and loose or absent regulations regarding social inclusivity and environmental protection.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-15T10:32:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231211814
       
  • Belling the cat: Designing collective action institutions for natural
           resource management in the peri-urban interface

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      Authors: Vishal Narain, Pranay Ranjan
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Peri-urban spaces are experiencing tremendous growth in the Global South, which in turn has fuelled a suite of environmental and natural resource management challenges, including inequitable access to and conflicts over natural resources, and the existence of institutional lacunae. Against this backdrop, we examine how scholars study collective action institutions around natural resource management in peri-urban spaces, with a regional focus on South Asia, and present its implications for institutional design and development in peri-urban contexts. In order to do so, we use ‘organic institutions’ and ‘pragmatic institutions’– a type of institutional classification grounded in the origin of institutions, as a conceptual entry point. We find that less is known about the role of organic institutions in enabling collective action around natural resource management in peri-urban spaces, even though their understanding is key for efforts at building effective pragmatic institutions. The paper concludes that practitioners working in peri-urban spaces should invest resources into understanding underlying social differences and developing strategies to mobilise social groups, by developing an understanding of organic institutions in peri-urban spaces.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-15T10:28:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231211681
       
  • Differentiated grassroots: Navigating sustainability transitions in
           conservative political contexts

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      Authors: Ali Adil
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Uneven subnational energy policy and regulatory geographies in the United States are a widely recognised reality, resulting from the absence of a concerted federal effort towards climate change and sustainable energy development. Against this backdrop, the rise of citizen-led energy transitions or Grassroots Energy Communities (GECs) in liberal and conservative states signals an opportunity for fostering a common ground for climate action, only to be undermined by questions concerning their touted countervailing potential against the mainstream energy system. With particular reference to conservative political contexts, this article presents a comparative case study of Grassroots Energy Communities arising amidst uneven socio-spatial circumstances. By interrogating lived experiences and situated socio-material practices, the article offers interesting theoretical, practical and policy insights. By explicating the materiality of technical devices, purposively rendered meaningful in context and politicised towards particular political and economic ends, the study shows how socio-material processes not only help forge strategic alliances between potentially antagonistic stakeholders but also lead to the obfuscation of power differentials. From a policy perspective, this study shows how conservative ideology – despite hyper-nationalist invocations – subjects local citizen-led efforts to the vicissitudes of global capital by selectively justifying state support to facilitate its circulation.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-15T10:25:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231209860
       
  • Density and pandemic urbanism: Exposure and networked density in Manila
           and Taipei

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      Authors: Hung-Ying Chen, Colin McFarlane, Priyam Tripathy
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Density has been a key focus in research on the urban dimensions of the COVID-19 pandemic. Much of this work has debated the role of density in infection rates. In contrast, we develop a comparison of the management of pandemic urbanism in two high density Asian cities with divergent pandemic experiences: Manila and Taipei. To pursue the comparison, we develop two conceptualisations of density: exposure density and networked density. Our approach allows us to examine the nature and consequences, especially for the urban poor, of different approaches to density in the pandemic, and to advance research on urban density.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-12T12:53:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231211011
       
  • New metro and housing price and rent premiums: A natural experiment in
           China

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      Authors: Dongsheng He, Guibo Sun, Ling Li, Chris Webster
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Causal evidence of housing premiums of new metro lines is indispensable for financing and governing infrastructure investments. Previous studies have investigated the housing effects of urban rail transit with varying methods, while causality remains unsettled. This study used a natural experiment to estimate the causal effects of the new metro interventions on housing premiums in Shenzhen, China. We used metro planning knowledge, reasoning on pursuits in land finance and engineering efficiency to verify the as-if randomness of the treatment–control group assignment in the natural experiment to reinforce the power of causal inference. We applied hedonic difference-in-difference (DID) models to estimate the average treatment effects based on the longitudinal housing price and rent data. We found that housing rents increased significantly and consistently after the metro entered operation, but the price premium varied. In addition, the rent premiums around new metro lines showed a price gradient over the distance to stations. Our findings provide scientific evidence for designing value capture mechanisms (e.g. value-added property tax and rent revenue) to recover metro investment costs in China.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-07T10:45:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231208560
       
  • Vertical Horizons: Dealing with luxury urban skies

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      Authors: Andrew Harris, Tom Wolseley
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      There has been a conspicuous growth in the height and extent of luxury urban development in the 21st century. This has been accompanied by important critical analyses exploring how this upward construction has created new vertical social divides and landscapes of power. This article argues, however, that there are spatial and methodological limitations to the way luxury urban skies have tended to be framed and pursued. Through a focus on the decisions taken in producing the 2017 meditative film Vertical Horizons by Tom Wolseley, the paper offers an expanded agenda for engagements with elite vertical development. This film juxtaposes views of London and Western Europe’s tallest skyscraper, the Shard, from different vantage points, with contrasting narratives about the building. Vertical Horizons seeks to use its focus on the Shard to open up more imaginative experiments with high-rise landscapes, and better recognition of the potential complicities in responses to the gleaming façades of contemporary urbanisation. The paper posits that more multi-sited, creative and reflective approaches, such as those pursued in Vertical Horizons, are required in efforts at levelling with the social and symbolic power of urban vertical luxification.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-07T10:32:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231206972
       
  • Cities for citizens! Public value spheres for understanding conflicts in
           urban planning

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      Authors: Rico H Herzog, Juliana E Gonçalves, Geertje Slingerland, Reinout Kleinhans, Holger Prang, Frances Brazier, Trivik Verma
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Identifying the diverse and often competing values of citizens, and resolving the consequent public value conflicts, are of significant importance for inclusive and integrated urban development. Scholars have highlighted that relational, value-laden urban space gives rise to many diverse conflicts that vary both spatially and temporally. Although notions of public value conflicts have been conceived in theory, there are few empirical studies that identify such values and their conflicts in urban space. Building on public value theory and using a case-study mixed-methods approach, this paper proposes a new approach to empirically investigate public value conflicts in urban space. Using unstructured participatory data of 4528 citizen contributions from a Public Participation Geographic Information Systems in Hamburg, Germany, natural language processing and spatial clustering techniques are used to identify areas of potential value conflicts. Four expert interviews assess and interpret these quantitative findings. By integrating quantitative assessments with the qualitative findings of the interviews, we identify 19 general public values and nine archetypical conflicts. On the basis of these results, this paper proposes a new conceptual model of ‘Public Value Spheres’ that extends the understanding of public value conflicts and helps to further account for the value-laden nature of urban space.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-12-04T08:41:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231207475
       
  • Fences, seeds and bees: The more-than-human politics of community
           gardening in Rotterdam

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      Authors: Shivant Jhagroe
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores the more-than-human politics of a community garden in Rotterdam, as an expression of sustainable and resilient city making. Challenging the anthropocentrism underlying most research on the politics of urban sustainability/resilience and urban gardening, the paper proposes a more-than-human assemblage approach to urban gardening politics. I argue that urban gardens can be understood as more-than-human configurations and conceptualised as urban garden assemblages. Such assemblages are processes with different temporalities and types of agencies (insects, plants, soil and fences) and can be analytically understood as more-than-human: (1) relations and performances; (2) power hierarchies/resistances; and (3) ethical co-becomings. Building on participatory ethnography, interviews and (online) documents, the paper then presents an empirical account of the Gandhi-garden, a community garden in Rotterdam, embedded in the global Transition Towns movement. The empirical case shows how mundane acts of pulling weeds and using permacultural planting methods are more-than-human place-making practices. It also highlights how, for example, human–soil, human–seed and human–bee entanglements challenge urban neoliberalism while gardeners experiment with sustainable food and a non-violent economy. The paper illustrates the ethico-political expressions of more-than-human community gardening through solidarity bonds with Palestine via olive trees and non-violence thinking, as well as some human/non-human ambivalences when dealing with dog waste and potentially harvest-stealing birds. Finally, the paper presents some reflections and contributions regarding scholarship in the fields of urban gardening, and sustainable/resilient city making.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-11-30T06:48:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231208830
       
  • Housing the homeless: Shifting sites of managing the poor in the
           Netherlands

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      Authors: Nienke Fredrika Boesveldt, Dolly Loomans
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Contemporary approaches to counter homelessness push for a housing-led model that is seen as more progressive and less punitive than traditional approaches. Few studies have however investigated its translation on the ground. In this paper we aim to do so by studying the implementation of a housing-led approach in the Netherlands; in a context of housing shortages and health care austerity. By building on qualitative interviews with people (previously) experiencing homelessness and professional stakeholders, we argue that while a regular home is a much-needed improvement to emergency shelters and institutions, housing contracts are often conditional and used as disciplinary instruments restricting what people are allowed to do in their own home. Care and screening services are increasingly executed by housing associations and the local police, further entwining housing, care and punishment. Intersecting with local housing shortages and insufficient health care this becomes a barrier to a more effective and humane approach to homelessness. These findings contribute to theories on urban governance by showing how the management of the poor is extended to the private domain.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-11-30T06:44:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231208624
       
  • Rezoning a top-notch CBD: The choreography of land-use regulation and
           creative destruction in Manhattan’s East Midtown

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      Authors: Igal Charney
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This paper makes the case for the connection between making land-use regulatory changes and the process of destruction and redevelopment. Under the capitalist imperative, buildings that do not fulfil the full potential for profit are likely to be demolished (or refurbished) but demolition and new development are not shaped exclusively by the immutable laws of the market as they are mediated and facilitated by specific institutional contexts. Using the case of East Midtown rezoning in New York City, the paper examines the amendments of two land-use regulatory mechanisms: the enlargement of development rights (rezoning or upzoning) and the relaxation of the spatial limitations on the usage of existing unused rights (transferable development rights). While apparently unconnected, upzoning and transferable development rights are part of the regulatory framework that seeks to secure the ongoing generation of the highest-possible profits for private as well as public interests. By examining the choreography of rezoning and transferable development rights, the paper shows how the mechanics of creative destruction work while substantiating an existing body of knowledge on land use policies and practices in New York City. When used together, rezoning and transferable development rights are instrumental in remaking the built environment. Essentially, the rezoning of a 78-block area in East Midtown Manhattan unlocks captured and latent development rights that otherwise could not come about, and demonstrates the necessity of institutional arrangements to make creative destruction actually work.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-11-30T06:42:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231208623
       
  • Creating the spectacular city in everyday life: A governance analysis of
           urban public space in China

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      Authors: Ryanne Flock
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Chinese cities are making a name for themselves through what Guthman calls an ‘accumulation by spectacle’. Studies elucidate the fast change of the urban fabric and the interconnection of commercial profits with pro-state propaganda during mega-events. The spectacle appears as a once-in-lifetime chance for a city, orchestrated during a specific time and in purpose-built venues. This article, however, argues that efforts of spectacularisation expand to everyday life. I take the marginalisation of the urban poor in Guangzhou, that is, street vendors and beggars, as a starting point to understand governmental ideals, strategies and patterns of controlling public space. The data is based on fieldwork, government documents, yearbooks and newspapers. Engaging in the discussion on what Debord termed the ‘society of the spectacle’, I explain how urban management concentrates on areas serving (1) tourism and commerce, (2) memorial politics, (3) government relations and (4) transport and traffic; and follows the pulse of (1) annual events and seasonal holidays, (2) recurring political dates, (3) exceptional mega-events and (4) regular urban development campaigns. These zones and periods of increased control intertwine and culminate in an ‘ideal’ public space excluding poverty and other elements contesting the city’s success images.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-11-29T09:40:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231201549
       
  • The rise of AI urbanism in post-smart cities: A critical commentary on
           urban artificial intelligence

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      Authors: Federico Cugurullo, Federico Caprotti, Matthew Cook, Andrew Karvonen, Pauline MᶜGuirk, Simon Marvin
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Artificial intelligence (AI) is emerging as an impactful feature of the life, planning and governance of 21st-century cities. Once confined to the realm of science fiction and small-scale technological experiments, AI is now all around us, in the shape of urban artificial intelligences including autonomous cars, robots, city brains and urban software agents. The aim of this article is to critically examine the nature of urbanism in the emergent age of AI. More specifically, we shed light on how urban AI is impacting the development of cities, and argue that an urbanism influenced by AI, which we term AI urbanism, differs in theory and practice from smart urbanism. In the future, the rise of a post-smart urbanism driven by AI has the potential to form autonomous cities that transcend, theoretically and empirically, traditional smart cities. The article compares common practices and understandings of smart urbanism with emerging forms of urban living, urban governance and urban planning influenced by AI. It critically discusses the limitations and potential pitfalls of AI urbanism and offers conceptual tools and a vocabulary to understand the urbanity of AI and its impact on present and future cities.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-11-14T06:28:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231203386
       
  • Negotiating the exclusive right to public schools in China’s
           education-featured gated communities under multiscalar and
           multidirectional urban entrepreneurialism

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      Authors: Shenjing He, Rong Cai
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      How urban entrepreneurialism is enacted at the neighbourhood level while connecting with broader urban processes remains insufficiently explored. This study introduces a novel conceptual framework of multiscalar and multidirectional urban entrepreneurialism to examine the governance of gated communities that involves dynamic interactions between the entrepreneurial local state, developers, gated communities and individual homeowners/investor-citizens. In Chinese cities, the pursuit of quality living and good schools has given rise to ‘education-featured gated communities’ that package privileged access to K–12 schools with tailor-made residential services. By turning education from a public good into a club good that can be capitalised in the housing price and leveraged in urban (re)development, education-featured gated communities are highly sought after by homebuyers, developers, and local states, becoming an important and integral component of urban entrepreneurialism. When the rising demands of gated community homeowners for school places are not met, activism for quality education within gated communities becomes ubiquitous. Drawing on multiple case studies and multi-source empirical data including national and local policies/documents, in-depth interviews, non-participant observation and site visits, this research examines how homeowners negotiate their exclusive right to public schools through intensive interactions with local authorities. We argue that the semi-private governance of gated communities forms the institutional basis for the ‘shareholding enterprise’ centring on property values. By unpacking the multidirectional processes of entrepreneurial governance that built upon an effective feedback loop involving multiscalar entrepreneurial endeavours based on shareholder value, this study offers a nuanced and enriched understanding of contemporary urban entrepreneurialism.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-11-10T10:53:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231204714
       
  • Greening informality through metabolic coordination: An urban political
           ecology of governing extralegal housing forms in Taiwan

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      Authors: Chihsin Chiu
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Despite its significance in informing inclusive political interventions in informal settlements in different political economic contexts, the urban informality literature falls short in exploring state intervention in or policy responses towards desire-based informal housing forms characterised by extralegal construction. This article uses Kaohsiung City in Taiwan as a case study to explore how the local government has collaborated with the private sector to govern the extralegal construction prevailing in community buildings. These interventions include the use of rooftop solar power systems aimed at remodelling existing buildings and green building design prototypes created to prevent future informalities. Using an urban political ecology lens, I analyse how the municipality appropriates the values and properties of solar power systems and green architecture to unite actors, relating extralegal construction to urban metabolism. I develop the concept of ‘metabolic coordination’ to show how the state coordinates actors, resources, technologies and capital to embed an internal circuit of funding flows governing extralegal construction in a larger external circuit of capital circulation consisting of growing solar photovoltaic and green housing markets. The adopted lens of urban political ecology interrogates three interrelated aspects of embedding informality in renewed urban space: municipal interventions remaking informalities, property-led greening of informalities and its negotiation, and inequality in accessing interventions. The city uses pragmatic and adaptive approaches to control extralegal construction. These approaches allow the city to leverage informality for growth and sustainability. However, the governing schemes create new forms of injustice and inequality.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-11-10T10:48:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231202684
       
  • For whom do we densify' Explaining income variation across densification
           projects in the region of Utrecht, the Netherlands

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      Authors: Vera Götze, Josje Anna Bouwmeester, Mathias Jehling
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      While governments worldwide rely upon compact city policies to reduce land consumption from urban growth, recent studies have addressed the potential trade-off between densification and housing affordability. Concerns have been voiced that densification leads to a one-sided housing supply, structurally excluding low-income households. However, few studies address household income variation across densification projects, leaving us with a limited understanding of the circumstances under which exclusion occurs. To this end, we explore household incomes in densification projects between 2012 and 2020 in the Province of Utrecht, the Netherlands, where urban development is traditionally strongly regulated through active land policy. At the same time, current shifts towards a more deregulated housing market make for an interesting case. Exceptional access to detailed cadastral and census data allows us to identify densification projects and assign them a median household income each. We investigate the influence of location and transformation process on household incomes through regression analysis and conduct qualitative case studies of projects whose median income was highly mispredicted by the regression model. This allows us to integrate non-quantified factors, such as land ownership and public policy interventions, in explaining such interesting cases. For the Province of Utrecht, our study confirms that while households in densification projects earn significantly more than their neighbours, the range of incomes in densification projects is large. Project characteristics such as centrality, neighbourhood status and transformation process explain only a small share of this variance. For cases where median incomes are much lower than predicted by the model, public land ownership, in combination with inclusionary zoning, is essential in ensuring housing affordability. Our approach highlights the necessity of supplementing densification policies with measures that secure affordable housing.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-11-04T11:44:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231205793
       
  • Reclaiming data for improved city governance: Barcelona’s New Data
           Deal

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      Authors: Fernando Fernandez-Monge, Sarah Barns, Rainer Kattel, Francesca Bria
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Cities today are key sites for the operation of global digital marketplaces. It is on the curbsides and at the intersections of cities where technology companies and digital platforms gain access to valuable urban data to be used in the delivery of data-driven services. In this context, urban data ownership and control have become a central policy arena for smart city governance. This article argues that, given the increased policy activism by city governments, there is an urgent need to better understand the key goals and instruments deployed by cities to resist corporate control of urban data. It first reviews the treatment of the topic by different strands in the literature on smart city governance and then uses the ‘New Data Deal’ programme launched by the city of Barcelona to draw empirical data from one of the author’s involvement leading the programme, interviews with actors involved in the programme as well as from key policy and evaluation documents. By studying the design and implementation of Barcelona’s ‘New Data Deal’, an early mover and leading reference in the academic and policy debates, the article presents the key successes, limitations and tensions faced by a city government trying to regain access and control over urban data, including a reflection on the role that city governments can play in shaping a global agenda around improved data governance.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-11-04T11:39:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231204835
       
  • Assembling high-rise: The uneven agencies of air in suburban densification
           in the Anthropocene

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      Authors: Nicole T Cook, Sophie-May Kerr
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic brought to the surface the critical qualities of air – airflow, ventilation, particulates etc. – in relation to the well-being of people living in high-rise. Engineering and architectural research has burgeoned in response. However, in focusing on models of airflow, ventilation and particulates as discrete variables, engineering and architectural discourse fails to capture the diverse ways that air enters into and shapes the everyday lived experience of high-rise dwelling. Drawing on research in Sydney’s Southwestern suburbs, we reveal high-rise as an assemblage that links apartment dwelling with air, via car-dependent suburbanisation, pollution and climate-change induced temperature extremes in the Anthropocene. In addition to viruses, air teems with carbon, insects, noise and pollutants, while viscerally mediating human encounters with fluctuating temperatures. Multiple relations between people, buildings and air unfold simultaneously, confounding attempts to account for air’s elemental milieu through single variables like greenhouse gas or COVID-19. While embedded in relations of power, high-rise assemblages unleash vernacular adaptation that through low-tech and low-cost technologies work to connect suburban high-rise with evolving ecological systems. Recognising the pharmacological quality of air, as both ‘poison’ and ‘cure’, we contrast models of high-rise as encapsulated environments with resident (and other) experiments that orient high-rise to the elements, and the interlinked challenges of urban living in the Anthropocene.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-11-03T11:42:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231205026
       
  • The geography of urban innovation beyond patents only: New evidence on
           large and secondary cities in the United States

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      Authors: Carolina Castaldi
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The geography of urban innovation in the United States has often been portrayed as dominated by a few large cities. However, emerging perspectives challenge this notion by highlighting the significance of secondary cities for innovation processes. Unfortunately, prevailing narratives and empirical evidence focus on technological invention only, measured by patents. This study aims to reevaluate the geography of urban innovation by considering various phases of the innovation process and incorporating a broader range of innovation types. In addition to conventional patent metrics, this research suggests incorporating trademarks and design rights as complementary data. The findings reveal that large cities still exhibit prominence when examining absolute counts of innovation. Instead, analysing intensities allows the identification of secondary cities that specialise in various innovation activities beyond technological invention only. Overall, the findings provide compelling evidence that urban innovation in the United States is not limited to a few large cities nor is it solely driven by technological invention.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-11-03T11:39:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231204718
       
  • Conceptualising ‘street-level’ urban design governance in
           Scotland

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      Authors: Robert Richardson
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article develops ‘street-level bureaucracy’ theory to conceptualise how policy implementation within urban design governance is shared among actors whose role transcends sectoral responsibilities and motivations. It presents case study research with a Scottish local authority which has made a strategic investment in a placemaking policy agenda, including the creation of an influential design review panel of volunteer experts which exemplifies the wider embrace of private capacity within public governance. The paper identifies the distinctive role of design review panel members in street-level implementation, and shows how their discretion is shaped simultaneously by public and private interests. It concludes that understanding and utilising these micro-level processes provides opportunities for conceptualising policy implementation within a neoliberalising urban governance context, and for addressing the implementation gap between the aims of public urban design policy and the realities of delivery.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-11-03T11:33:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231204219
       
  • The urban political ecology of the commons or commoning as a socio-natural
           process: The case of the Peri-Urban Gardening group in Thessaloniki

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      Authors: Maria Karagianni
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This paper casts the foundations for the development of an urban political ecology of the commons, drawing on the case of a guerrilla gardening initiative in Thessaloniki, Greece. In doing so, it draws on the literature of urban political ecology and its ontological and epistemological underpinnings and argues for a reconceptualisation of urban commoning as a socio-natural, productive process. Understanding commoning as inherently socio-natural, the product of discursive and material practices, opens new horizons for both academic research and activist engagement in efforts to imagine and build alternative urban futures. The commoning practices of the Peri-Urban Gardening Group of Karatassou, in Thessaloniki, serve as a heuristic case study for the development of a holistic methodological framework that uncovers the equal significance of discursive and material commoning practices and processes.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-10-31T09:56:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231202874
       
  • What’s in a name' Place misrepresentation and neighbourhood stigma in
           the online rental market

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      Authors: Ariela Schachter, John Kuk, Max Besbris, Lydia Ho
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In this article we examine how the online rental housing market reflects the desirability of different neighbourhoods in St. Louis, MO, a metropolitan area with long-standing high levels of Black–White residential segregation. Using a large digital corpus of advertisements for rental housing, we first show that adverts in neighbourhoods with more Black residents are less likely to list a neighbourhood name than adverts for available housing units in neighbourhoods with more White residents. Advertisements for housing in neighbourhoods with more Black residents are also more likely to list a different, higher-income neighbourhood name than the one in which they are located. Next, using a survey of St. Louis residents, we find that neighbourhoods with more Black residents are perceived as less desirable by both White and Black St. Louisans. We then employ a pair of survey experiments and find that interest in renting a particular housing unit changes if the advert does not list a neighbourhood name or uses a different neighbourhood name than one commonly associated with its location. Altogether, our findings reveal that postings in online housing markets reflect and reproduce existing racial-spatial patterns and may contribute to the avoidance/stigmatisation of certain neighbourhoods.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-10-30T11:37:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231198147
       
  • Theorising the causal impacts of social frontiers: The social and
           psychological implications of discontinuities in the geography of
           residential mix

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      Authors: Aarti Iyer, Gwilym Pryce
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Until very recently, the question of how residents might be affected by the gradient of neighbourhood boundaries – whether these boundaries are abrupt or gradual – has remained largely absent from mainstream segregation research. Yet, theoretical and empirical findings emerging from recent studies suggest the impacts could be profound and far-reaching. This article seeks to provide a conceptual foundation for understanding such effects. We focus on the concept of ‘social frontiers’: spatial discontinuities in the geography of residential mix which occur when community boundaries are abrupt. Drawing on insights from cognate disciplines, we develop a theory of social frontier impacts that articulates their potential importance in limiting and shaping contact between neighbouring communities, exacerbating territorial conflict and ultimately affecting the psychological wellbeing and life course outcomes of those living at the frontier. We present our thesis as a series of propositions and corollaries, and reflect on the implications for empirical research.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-10-30T11:30:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231194834
       
  • Redesigning the relationship between heritage and city: Insights from the
           Gandhi Heritage Portal, Ahmedabad

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      Authors: Pooja Thomas
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Urban heritage is often tasked with the burden of mediating city history as well as its imagined futures. In Asian contexts, these imagined futures have often been encoded as ‘smart’ urbanity while historicity is wielded as soft power. Past studies have discussed this in the context of Ahmedabad, a significant urban centre in the region of Gujarat, India, whose urban heritage has served to promote the city’s image. This article suggests that it is the digital archive, the Gandhi Heritage Portal, that potentially offers ways of disrupting the mediation of the city through heritage. With ethnographic interviews, observations, and secondary literature on the histories of the city, this article attempts a close discursive reading of the spatial, material, and ideological implications of an Ashram ‘doing’ technology through the Gandhi Heritage Portal. The article suggests that the making of the digital archive offered opportunities to dislocate heritage from neoliberal aspirations of the city.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-10-19T10:23:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231202639
       
  • Deciphering the ‘cosmopolitan grid’: The production of space in
           diversifying heartland neighbourhoods of Singapore

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      Authors: Felicity Hwee-Hwa Chan, Hui Lee Low
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Global capital and highly-skilled international labour are sought by cities for economic growth. Much research has been about Western cities, but less is known about how pro-growth developmental Asian countries, which have become key global hubs, organise their urban planning and policy efforts to gain global capital and skilled labour in their cities. In Singapore, the state is active in reshaping the city into a ‘cosmopolitan grid’ by planning and developing new urban amenity spaces that can attract human capital to fuel the desired urban growth, such as international schools, private housing options, and access to a global selection of goods and services. Oftentimes, the socio-cultural and socio-spatial changes at the neighbourhood level are seemingly ignored, despite the significance of the neighbourhood as a critical social space for the daily practice and formation of social relations in demographically diverse cities. Drawing on cognitive mapping interviews with foreign-born and native-born residents in two upper-middle income suburban neighbourhoods in Singapore, which are recognised as the heartlands of the native-born but have become popular with highly-skilled foreign-born families (namely Western expatriates) in the last decade, this article shows how the top-down rational production of cosmopolitan space by the state framed in a formation of the ‘cosmopolitan grid’ has played out and shaped the everyday production of social space among the native and foreign-born residents which determines the experience and opportunities for integration in this city-state.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-10-18T11:04:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231199347
       
  • Burden or benefit: Is retail marijuana facility siting influenced by LULU-
           or gentrification-related neighbourhood characteristics'

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      Authors: Dwayne Marshall Baker
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      As legal marijuana is emerging as an important component of cities across the United States, it is important to understand the factors that contribute to legal marijuana facility siting. Although land use and zoning are expected to determine where commercial marijuana facilities are located, if residential characteristics also enter siting considerations, some neighbourhoods may either bear the burden of undesired facilities or reap the benefits of legal marijuana, underscoring equitable considerations in marijuana facility siting. Thus, this study examines how neighbourhood change associated with locally unwanted land uses and gentrification influences the amount of retail marijuana facilities across three US cities: Denver, Colorado; Portland, Oregon; and Seattle, Washington. Using a series of Poisson-related regressions, this study finds that neighbourhood residential characteristics influence retail marijuana facilities in ways exceeding siting restrictions alone, like zoning. Notably, quantitative results suggest that there are fewer retail marijuana facilities in neighbourhoods experiencing locally unwanted land use-related change than non-locally unwanted land use neighbourhoods in Denver and Seattle; and more retail marijuana facilities in gentrified compared to non-gentrified neighbourhoods in Denver. Overall, these findings advance understanding of the connection between legal marijuana and neighbourhood changes and aim to influence guidelines for integrating legal marijuana facilities into communities.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-10-09T12:22:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231198140
       
  • Character contradiction: The exclusionary nature of preservationist
           planning restrictions

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      Authors: Rachel Gallagher, Thomas Jason Sigler, Yan Liu
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Preservationist planning broadly describes planning instruments that purport to preserve physical qualities of neighbourhoods by preventing demolition of historic dwellings. Here, we analyse land use conversion of almost 6000 lots in Brisbane, Australia, to understand if, and how, preservationist planning impacts the built environment. Results demonstrate that preservationist planning suppresses multi-family housing construction, even where increased density is encouraged by the planning scheme. We suggest that preservationist planning is exclusionary in nature and not solely focused on built heritage, particularly as substantial modifications to existing dwellings are allowed. These findings run counter to the purported aim of built heritage protection and suggest that the preservationist planning framework should be revised.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-10-09T11:42:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231195218
       
  • The urbanisation of controlled environment agriculture: Why does it matter
           for urban studies'

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      Authors: Simon Marvin, Lauren Rickards, Jonathan Rutherford
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This paper critically examines why urban studies should be interested in the emergence of controlled environment agriculture. Over the last decade, there has been significant commercial and urban policy interest in controlled environment agriculture systems for producing food in enclosed environments. Furthermore, there has been a significant expansion in research publications on urban controlled environment agriculture, stressing the novel character of these systems and the complex relationships with the conventional concerns of urban agriculture. The paper subjects these claims to critical scrutiny and then reconceptualises urban controlled environment agriculture as an emergent urban infrastructure of artificial, highly productive microclimates and ecosystems for non-human life designed to increase the productive use of ‘surplus or under-utilised’ urban spaces. We argue that controlled environment agriculture tries to secure food production through three spatial–temporal fixes: (1) the enclosure move – holding food closer by substituting the increasingly hostile outdoors for the controlled indoors in order to optimise yield, quality, efficiency and the ‘cleanness’ of the food; (2) the urban move – holding food closer to the city by substituting rural agricultural space for urban space to shorten supply chains and thereby help secure food production and improve its green credentials; and (3) combining 1 and 2, the urban interiorisation move – holding food yet closer still by moving food production into city buildings and intricate infrastructural systems, increasing control by securing total environments. In these ways, the paper shows how urban controlled environment agriculture selectively extends existing logics of urban and rural agriculture and identifies the future research challenges for urban studies.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-10-09T11:37:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231200991
       
  • How digitalisation influences neighbourhood change

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      Authors: George C Galster
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Despite much research on the societal and individual consequences of new digital communication technologies, little attention has been paid to the neighbourhood as a locus of impact. This paper investigates how the growing influence of social media and real estate platforms will likely shape the process of neighbourhood change and the geographic distribution of population and financial resources. The investigation is grounded on a model of neighbourhood dynamics based on flows of households and property investments across metropolitan space, which are guided by imperfect information about housing market opportunities. Decision-makers receive information passively (increasingly through local and non-local social media) and when uncertainty about course of action becomes intolerable they turn to active search (increasingly involving online real estate platforms). Based on this conceptual framing, the article synthesises extant research to draw implications on how the expanding use of these new technologies is affecting neighbourhoods by changing the composition of decision-makers and the information that underpins their decisions. It concludes that digitalisation reduces neighbourhoods residential stability, social capital and diversity, while rendering their dwellings less well-maintained and more expensive.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-09-30T06:40:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231198197
       
  • How have digital mobility platforms responded to COVID-19 and why does
           this matter for ‘the urban’'

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      Authors: Mike Hodson, Andy Lockhart, Andrew McMeekin
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Digital mobility platforms have become increasingly pervasive over the last decade or so in a wide variety of urban contexts. Much digital mobility platform activity has focused on city centres and urban cores, where returns on investment are often seen to be greatest, where existing transport infrastructure can be thick and where there are concentrated circulations of people. The global spread of coronavirus from early 2020 resulted in widespread policies of social distancing and lockdowns. Though there was a geographical unevenness to such policies, COVID-19 saw dramatic reductions in urban public transport provision and use, and new forms of experimentation with urban infrastructures, including with digital mobility platforms. How digital mobility platforms have responded to COVID-19 is not clearly understood and requires systematic research engagement. To address this we ask: how have digital mobility platforms responded to COVID-19 and what are the implications of this for ‘the urban’' We develop a stylised understanding of six digital platform responses to COVID-19. The status of these six responses is that they are synthetic and propositional and need to be systematically tested in a variety of actually existing urban contexts.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-09-30T06:37:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231194891
       
  • Homeownership and subjective well-being: Are the links heterogeneous
           across location, age and income'

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      Authors: Rachel Ong ViforJ, Hiroaki Suenaga, Ryan Brierty
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the impact of homeownership on subjective well-being and how it varies by location, age and income in Australia. We apply panel data models with instrumental variables within a two-stage modelling framework and find that homeownership, particularly outright ownership, positively affects subjective well-being – as measured by life, financial, home and neighbourhood satisfaction – relative to renting. However, these effects are not homogeneous. Outright owners in major urban locations enjoy higher financial satisfaction but poorer neighbourhood satisfaction than their counterparts outside major urban locations. The subjective well-being gap between owners and renters widens as age increases within the age range of 30s to 60s. However, the presence of mortgage debt depresses the financial satisfaction associated with homeownership. Beyond age 50, the existence of a mortgage debt burden cancels any positive financial satisfaction effects that homeownership has relative to renting. As income increases, the positive effects of homeownership on subjective well-being diminishes in the domain of financial satisfaction This reflects greater diversification in high-income households’ asset portfolios compared to low-income households’ portfolios. We discuss the policy implications of these heterogeneous effects.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-09-30T01:26:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231190479
       
  • Has South Korea’s policy of relocating public institutions been
           successful' A case study of 12 agglomeration areas under the Innovation
           City Policy

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      Authors: Song Hee Kang, Jae Seung Lee, Saehoon Kim
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      South Korea’s Innovation City policy aims to balance the geography of economic activity across the country by relocating public institutions to local cities. The economic impact of relocating public institutions to local cities has been assessed by examining job creation, public spending, the quality of public services or demands for housing and employment in donor cities. However, as economies have become increasingly knowledge-based, the attractiveness of urban areas to young workers has become a metric to measure an area’s economic development potential. There is a paucity of research on the economic impact of relocating public institutions that analyses the attractiveness of the destination cities for young people. Thus, this paper examines the migration of young people to evaluate the economic impact of relocating public institutions on the balanced geography of economic activity across the country. The examination was conducted by analysing the effects of (1) agglomeration area location type and (2) general place quality on young people’s migration. Quasi-experimental research and panel regression (2010–2019) were conducted on 12 agglomeration areas. The findings revealed that relocating public institutions was more likely to attract young migrants than the control group, whereas outskirt agglomeration areas attracted and retained young people more than inner city agglomeration areas. Relocating public institutions is a strategic means of attracting young people to local cities to balance the geography of economic activity. Here, the effect of relocating public institutions on young people’s migration varies depending on the location of agglomeration areas and the place quality of destination cities.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-09-15T06:02:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231193567
       
  • Entrepreneurs beyond neoliberalism: Municipally owned corporations and
           climate change mitigation in German cities

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      Authors: Leon Wansleben, Nils Neumann
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Urban studies have shown that the affordances, constraints and forms of urban climate change mitigation often emerge from ‘entrepreneurial’ modes of governance that have developed in post-Fordist cities. However, comparative research stresses that concepts focused on the growing power of private capital under neoliberalisation are inadequate to comprehend developments in German cities. In this article, we argue that municipally owned corporations occupy critical positions in climate change mitigation governance. While municipal ownership of utilities in principle increases local governance capacities, municipally owned corporations’ roles are shaped by fiscal relations and asymmetric organisational capacities between ‘agents’ and ‘principals’. In the case of Cologne, we show that the city has failed to leverage ownership over its public energy utility to decarbonise energy provision. Managers were able to assert corporate interests in the face of fragmented political actors and entrenched fiscal crisis. In this context of political incapacity and fragmentation, environmental social movements become important actors for translating widely shared decarbonisation objectives into concrete political demands towards municipally owned corporations.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-09-13T12:14:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231195789
       
  • In/formal reappropriations: Spatialised needs and desires in residential
           alleys in Melbourne, Australia

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      Authors: Miza Moreau
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This paper engages in critical debate with urban informality in interstitial urban spaces through the lens of micro-scalar spatial practices motivated by everyday needs and desires. The aim is to examine the generative potential of small-scale reappropriations to change the functions, meanings and governing policies of undervalued urban spaces. An empirical focus is taken on residential alleys in inner-city neighbourhoods of Melbourne, Australia. Remnants of 19th-century sanitation and drainage infrastructure, these alleys are now underdetermined spaces of manifold functions and meanings. Drawing from extensive fieldwork documentation and interviews, this study maps and interrogates the interplay of formal and informal spatial practices. Formal practices, driven by assertion of authority rather than vision for public space, operate like Bourdieu’s habitus. Informal practices, driven by everyday needs and desires, have a teleoaffective dimension that can modify the social field in which these dispositions are formed and thereby alter habitus.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-09-13T12:08:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231195617
       
  • Hot climates in urban South Asia: Negotiating the right to and the
           politics of shade at the everyday scale in Karachi

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      Authors: Soha Macktoom, Nausheen H Anwar, Jamie Cross
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Although the climate has admittedly always been hot and humid in cities like Karachi, increasingly hotter temperatures are exacerbating the impact of heat on informal, precariously employed outdoor workers such as street vendors, guards and rickshaw drivers, who must negotiate their right and access to shade at the everyday scale. Recalling Mike Davis’ radical, political claim that shade is an inalienable human right, this paper proposes that few people working in the outdoor spaces of the South Asian city today understand or experience shade in these terms. Rather shade is something that must be claimed, alongside other rights and entitlements. Moreover, shade alone is insufficient as it cannot reduce the exposure of bodies to harmful ambient radiations and overall thermal discomfort. This paper makes three broad propositions for outlining a theory for the social study of shade in the South Asian city. By paying closer attention to the ways that outdoor workers negotiate shade in Karachi, this paper opens up for analysis a wider spectrum of claims-making activity in changing South Asian urban climates. It places workers’ search for shade in the broader context of shade policing and urban management aimed at creating spatial as well as social order. Finally, this article emphasises key directions and questions for future research.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-09-13T12:01:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231195204
       
  • Scale and modularity in thermal governance: The replication of
           India’s heat action plans

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      Authors: Aalok Khandekar, Jamie Cross, Anant Maringanti
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Since 2013, when the first urban Heat Action Plan in India was developed in and for the western city of Ahmedabad, Gujarat, there are now more than 30 such plans focused on different cities, regions, and entire states in the country, many following the original template developed in Ahmedabad. This article investigates the temporal and spatial politics of such heat action planning, asking: what is the nature of thermal governance that Heat Action Plans posit' Based on our analysis, we suggest that two key attributes characterise Indian Heat Action Plans: first, they frame heat waves as disasters; second, as the Ahmedabad template has travelled to other locations, Heat Action Plans have ceased to engage with their local contexts in any meaningful way. We further argue that such a conceptualisation of Heat Action Plans has produced important obfuscations, shaping official knowledge about and responses to extreme heat in ways that are unable to grapple with the messy, uneven, and contested nature of the socio-political terrains in which they are supposed to intervene.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-09-12T07:11:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231195193
       
  • The conflictual governance of street experiments, between austerity and
           post-politics

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      Authors: Ersilia Verlinghieri, Elisabetta Vitale Brovarone, Luca Staricco
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Car dependency greatly contributes to the climate crisis and the corrosion of public space. In response, cities are introducing pedestrianisation, cycle lanes or tactical urban interventions aimed at repurposing streets for other road users. Framed as ‘experiments’, these reallocations of street space disrupt traditional transport planning procedures, often with promising results in promoting active travel. They are also associated with deep conflicts and criticism, especially by citizens defending the right to drive. Despite their ability to stop experiments, such conflicts have been little explored in the debates about experimentation and automobility. Similarly, street experiments have in most cases been uncritically embraced as a panacea for urban mobility problems, with little attention paid to experimentation as an expression of austerity urbanism. This paper aims to deepen our understanding of street experiments and their relationship to automobility by contextualising their conflictual unfolding as an expression of post-political planning in the age of austerity urbanism. Through a critical examination of the Torino Mobility Lab, a collaborative pedestrianisation experiment in Torino, we show how the governance-beyond-state setup of such projects masks a complex and contested coexistence of different meanings and processes for reimagining urban mobility and public space. We show how conflicts emerge embedded in the problematic and post-political governance of transport experiments. Nested within austerity urbanism, the experiment remains limited in its ability to create healthy spaces for participation. We conclude by highlighting the limitations and contradictions of attempts to overcome car dependency embedded in post-political frameworks and neoliberal-austerity planning practices.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-09-08T07:06:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231193860
       
  • An evaluation framework for predictive models of neighbourhood change with
           applications to predicting residential sales in Buffalo, NY

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      Authors: Jan Voltaire Vergara, Maria Y Rodriguez, Jonathan Phillips, Ehren Dohler, Melissa L Villodas, Amy Blank Wilson, Kenneth Joseph
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      New data and technologies, in particular machine learning, may make it possible to forecast neighbourhood change. Doing so may help, for example, to prevent the negative impacts of gentrification on marginalised communities. However, predictive models of neighbourhood change face four challenges: accuracy (are they right'), granularity (are they right at spatial or temporal scales that actually matter for a policy response'), bias (are they equitable') and expert validity (do models and their predictions make sense to domain experts'). The present work provides a framework to evaluate the performance of predictive models of neighbourhood change along these four dimensions. We illustrate the application of our evaluation framework via a case study of Buffalo, NY, where we consider the following prediction task: given historical data, can we predict the percentage of residential buildings that will be sold or foreclosed on in a given area over a fixed amount of time into the future'
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-08-28T06:16:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231189403
       
  • Mumbai’s differential verticalisation: The dialectic of sovereign and
           technical planning rationalities

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      Authors: Himanshu Burte
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Heeding Harris’ call to study diverse verticalisms, I discuss four distinct planning-induced verticalisations in Mumbai by interrelating issues of power, volume and intentionality. Through a novel conceptual framework illuminating the politics of planning, I show how a dialectical tension between (political–bureaucratic) ‘sovereign’ and ‘technical’ rationalities of planning shapes each of the four pathways of verticalisation. Mumbai reveals that verticalisation can be unintended – (a) planning can fail to cognise volume (and the vertical as a dimension of significance), and also (b) lack any purposive agenda related to it. Yet, the differential treatment of social groups through sovereign planning exceptions that shape verticalisation also reveals a politics of verticality. This politics illuminates planners’ conception of the public and connects it to both the amenities and violence of the vertical life that sovereign planning’s exceptions have led to. Overall, a differentiated pattern of exceptionality emerges out of the dialectic of sovereign and technical rationality in planning practice. Sovereign (and in one case, technical) exceptions deflect, suspend and displace technical rationality at different moments along each planning pathway of verticalisation. They selectively benefit businesses and elite groups sometimes by withdrawing the very health protections for the poor that lend legitimacy to planning.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-08-26T12:16:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231192822
       
  • The post-socialist cities from Central and Eastern Europe: Between spatial
           growth and demographic decline

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      Authors: Alexandra Sandu
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This research examines two major phenomena that have driven the transformation of cities in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) following the fall of communism: intensive urban sprawl and population decline. Using a quantitative methodology to examine the patterns and dynamics of built-up areas and population in 93 cities from CEE, the article assesses their transformation between 1990 and 2018. The findings show that, while there are overall similarities in the dynamics of built-up area and population changes in CEE cities, there are also notable differences that vary by country, city size, proximity to Western Europe and economic attractiveness.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-08-26T12:11:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231189261
       
  • ‘Beyond GDP’ in cities: Assessing alternative approaches to
           urban economic development

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      Authors: Richard Crisp, David Waite, Anne Green, Ceri Hughes, Ruth Lupton, Danny MacKinnon, Andy Pike
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Crises spur reflection and re-evaluation of what matters and what is valued. The impacts of the 2008 global financial crisis, COVID-19 pandemic and climate emergency are reigniting debates about the nature of economic development approaches and what they aim to achieve in urban settings. Addressing a substantive gap in contemporary debates by helping to navigate a burgeoning and diverse field, this paper provides a critical and comparative assessment of five leading agendas that have been positioned as alternative and progressive policy responses to urban economic change: inclusive growth; the wellbeing economy; community wealth building; doughnut economics; and the foundational economy. Taking an international perspective, the paper provides a comparative review of their stated visions, mechanisms for change, and the spatial scales through which they are led and implemented. Our argument is that these alternative approaches to urban economic development are shaping creative, innovative and progressive responses to longstanding urban problems within policy and practice communities but require on-going scrutiny and evaluation to realise their potential to meaningfully achieve transformative change.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-08-12T10:52:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231187884
       
  • Reimagining Urban Living Labs: Enter the Urban Drama Lab

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      Authors: Cecilie Sachs Olsen, Merlijn van Hulst
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In this paper we introduce the Urban Drama Lab as a new manifestation of Urban Living Labs. We expand current debates concerning Urban Living Labs by contrasting and comparing them with knowledge and practices developed in the field of theatre and performance. This enables us to scrutinise the ways in which stakeholders, issues and interests are represented and, in extension, performed in Urban Living Labs. We argue that this is important for two reasons: (1) because the current focus of Urban Living Labs on offering a real-world testing ground for urban experimentation constitutes a specific way of representing and performing stakeholders, issues, and interests, but that (2) questions of representation are seldom explicitly addressed because Urban Living Labs are seen to offer direct access to the real-world in a presumably ‘neutral’ setting. The Urban Drama Lab foregrounds that Urban Living Labs can never be neutral and free from structures of power but that they can set up a frame in which these structures can be scrutinised, assessed and possibly remodelled and rearranged. We conclude that the Urban Drama Lab might enable a fuller understanding of how the Urban Living Lab may address not only complex urban challenges, but also how it might also engage better with the power relations, contestations, conflicts and politics that are often at the core of these challenges.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-08-02T11:25:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231187771
       
  • Operationalising social protection: Reflections from urban India

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      Authors: Gautam Bhan
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      A global pandemic has brought renewed attention to an old question: what do we owe each other' Calls to engage in thinking about a ‘new social contract’ have emerged rooted both in an intimate memory of crisis as well as in the possibilities rooted in relief work, mutual aid and stimulus packages. Scholars have sought to learn, for example, what relief measures could teach us about social protection in a ‘post-pandemic’ world, even while cautioning that socio-economic inequalities were only revealed rather than caused by the pandemic. Drawing on a set of empirical cases collectively produced by researchers (including this author) at the Indian Institute for Human Settlements, Bangalore, this article turns to a specific part of any social contract: the design and operation of social protection systems. Within this, it argues that operational modes of delivering social protection need specific attention within scholarly debates, especially in their complexities within the spatial and economic informality that marks cities of the global south. Put simply: how we deliver both existing and new entitlements is as important as deciding what entitlements urban residents should be entitled to. I offer four main operational concerns that mark the delivery of social protection to informal workers in urban India: (a) residence as an operational barrier; (b) workplaces as sites of delivery; (c) working with worker organisations as delivery infrastructures; and (d) building systems of recognition and registration of informal workers.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-08-02T11:19:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231186077
       
  • The heterogeneous impacts of widespread upzoning: Lessons from Auckland,
           New Zealand

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      Authors: Ka Shing Cheung, Paavo Monkkonen, Chung Yim Yiu
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Zoning reform is increasingly recognised as an important strategy to increase housing affordability and environmental sustainability. Few cities have undertaken significant upzoning of low-density neighbourhoods, making the 2016 Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) probably the most ambitious zoning reform in the world. Parcels zoned for single houses previously dominated Auckland, but three-quarters of them now allow multiple units. Existing studies have documented the building boom that followed this zoning reform, yet the relatively rare case offers additional insights. In this article, we use appraisal, census and zoning data on over 200,000 parcels in Auckland to answer three research questions about the heterogeneous impacts of the AUP. First, to what extent did upzoning increase the appraised value of properties’ redevelopment options' Second, did upzoning increase appraised property values to a greater degree in higher-income and more centrally located neighbourhoods' Finally, was zoning reform in Auckland significantly influenced by similar political pressures as in other countries' That is, was upzoning less likely (and downzoning more likely) in higher-income neighbourhoods' The answers to these three questions are substantially, it’s complicated, and yes.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-07-31T06:42:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231190281
       
  • Libertecture: A catalogue of libertarian spaces

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      Authors: Rowland Atkinson, Liam O’Farrell
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In this article we identify spaces and built environments that have the effect of placing libertarian thinking in urban contexts, using the term ‘libertecture’ to refer to the way that these architectures convey principles of personal liberty and unfettered market activity. These ideas are thus embedded in cities via the design, architecture, management and function of an emerging array of buildings, districts and infrastructures. Locating our analysis in cultural political economy, we believe that these libertectures are important because of the way that they refract and amplify divisive ideas into the social spaces and thinking of residents and citizens. Whereas neoliberal urbanism was seen as undermining socially just cities, libertarian ideas amplified by new built environments may presage more atomised, unequal and unsustainable urban conditions, potentially foreclosing the identification of more just alternatives and democratic forms. We offer a ‘catalogue’ of seven forms of libertecture: private cities, residential exits, portal spaces, fiscal lockers, pioneer exclaves, infinity spaces, and necrotectures. We conclude that the manifestation of libertarian thinking in spaces and city forms is an important object of study for urban studies as it considers challenges to inclusive and sustainable forms of urban governance.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-07-22T11:43:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231181323
       
  • Underground urbanism in Africa: Splintered subterranean space in Lagos,
           Nigeria

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      Authors: Abidemi Agwor, Maria de Lourdes Melo Zurita, Paul G Munro
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Africa is rapidly urbanising and is likely to home to some of the most populous cities within the next decade. Such rapid growth has made the prevention of urban sprawl a Sisyphean Quest in many African cities, as rural fringes are rapidly being transformed into urbanised space. A strategy proposed around the world to address some of the urban challenges is the increasing adoption of a volumetric lens to planning the city. Specifically, to use the urban underground as a strategic site to place infrastructure and free-up superficial urban surface space, in turn potentially helping to create more sustainable, liveable, equitable and just urban environments. Yet, so far, little attention has been paid to the urban underground in Africa cities. In this paper, mobilising Lagos, Nigeria as a case study, we start addressing this lacuna. We provide a critical long-term analysis – spanning the colonial and since independence eras – of how the urban underground has been used in Lagos, focussing on utility (energy, telecommunications, water) and transport infrastructure. We follow this with an analysis of how political economies have shaped underground use and access, with a particular consideration on informal interactions, and how they shape underground use and access. We conclude by offering an assessment of the possibilities and challenges that the urban underground presents for the future of Lagos and other African cities, with a critical consideration of the dynamism of localised volumes and the practices around them.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-05-31T09:24:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231174996
       
  • Making power visible: Business improvement districts and creative
           placemaking in Washington, DC

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      Authors: Susanna F. Schaller, Aaron Howe, Coy McKinney, Sarah Shoenfeld
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Business improvement districts represent a privatising urban governance instrument that visibly transforms urban landscapes. In the United States, the racialised impacts of business improvement districts require examination. Through a discussion of Washington, DC, a city profoundly injured by racist planning histories, we illustrate how business improvement districts, as part of a broader entrepreneurial regime, have driven gentrification citywide since the late 1990s. Focusing on the intersection of redevelopment and ‘creative placemaking’, we make visible the contradictions embedded in this business improvement district urbanism, which has harnessed the work of a network of actors to revalorise urban space while erasing working class places and in DC, its Black cultural, political and economic space.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-05-23T08:24:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231174991
       
  • Verticalities in comparison: Debates on high-rise construction in Izmir
           and Istanbul

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      Authors: Anlam Filiz
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Large-scale high-rise architecture projects have been central to the rise of the construction industry in Turkey in recent years. This vertical escalation, however, has not been received without dissidence. Scholars, activists, journalists and officials with different viewpoints have participated in media debates regarding the reasons and consequences of this transformation. In these discussions, stakeholders have raised various environmental, cultural and ethical concerns that the vertical organisation of cities generate. Focussing on juxtapositions of Izmir and Istanbul in debates on urban verticality in the city of Izmir, Turkey’s third most populated city, the paper examines how such comparisons with Istanbul, where the recent urban neoliberal transformation is experienced most intensely, have been mobilised to oppose vertical expansion. The paper argues that as a result of the recent centralisation of the Turkish economy around construction, the hyper-visibility of skyscrapers and the concentration of the urban transformation generated by the Turkish construction industry in Istanbul, skyscrapers have become materialised symbols of Istanbul’s integration into global capitalism, neoliberal urbanisation, and the difference between Istanbul and other urban centres in Turkey. This example establishes urban verticality as a discursive axis at which urban centres outside of the Global North establish their difference from each other.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-05-19T12:32:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231168054
       
  • Long-term trends in settlement persistence in Southwest Asia: Implications
           for sustainable urbanism, past, present and future

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      Authors: Dan Lawrence, Michelle W de Gruchy, Israel Hinojosa-Baliño, Abdulameer Al-Hamdani
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Southwest Asia saw the emergence of large settlements in the Early Holocene, and the world’s first urban communities around 6000 years ago, with cities a feature of the region ever since. These developed in diverse environmental settings, including the dry-farming plains of Northern Mesopotamia, the irrigated alluvium of Southern Mesopotamia and the more variegated landscapes of the Levant. In this paper we use a dataset of several hundred sites dating from the earliest large sites around 12,000 years ago to the Classical period (2000 BP), to examine trends in settlement sustainability through time. We use persistence of occupation as a proxy for sustainability and compare settlement trajectories in different land use zones. Comparing cities and settlements at these spatial and temporal scales allows us to address a key question in the New Urban Agendas framework: how urban development can best be supported by sustainable use of land. We find that the highest levels of persistence were not uniformly associated with high agricultural productivity regions, and some of the longest-lived settlements are located in marginal environments, likely at critical points in transport networks. We also find that persistence is enhanced in landscapes which do not require large-scale capital investment or specific forms of economic and social organisation to maintain high levels of agricultural productivity, and that sustainability is inversely correlated with social complexity. Our results show that the millennial timescales available through archaeology can enable us to identify the political, social and ecological conditions required for large centres to persist through time.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-04-05T11:56:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231161245
       
  • The birth of cool: Heat and air-conditioning in the history of Wuhan,
           1950–2020

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      Authors: Chris Courtney
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the impact of air-conditioning on the history of Wuhan, a Chinese city famed for the oppressive heat of its summers. It draws upon oral history testimony, ethnographic research, and written sources, to argue that air-conditioning has played an important yet underappreciated role in changing local culture, social interactions, and the urban environment. It begins by describing how citizens of Wuhan coped with heat in the Maoist era (1949–1976), examining official heatstroke prevention techniques alongside the everyday practices of local citizens, including the use of bamboo beds and air-raid shelters. It then examines the dialectical relationship between socio-economic and technological change that occurred following the introduction of air-conditioning. This new technology, which required people to close their doors on their neighbours, arrived at the same time that older forms of communal living were becoming untenable. Finally, this article examines the role that air-conditioning has played in creating and alleviating the urban heat island problem, a process of localised climate change that makes cities hotter than their hinterlands. It concludes by exploring how locals feel about urban heating, a problem that seems intractable in Wuhan, as it is throughout much of urban Asia.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-02-21T01:09:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231153512
       
  • Urban energy landscape in practice: Architecture, infrastructure and the
           material culture of cooling in post-reform Chongqing, China

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      Authors: Madlen Kobi
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Until the 1990s and the spread of air-conditioning, cooling down during the hot, humid and windless summers in the city of Chongqing (Southwest China) was mainly practised outdoors: sleeping on the rooftops of multistorey buildings, playing mah-jongg in the streets, fanning oneself with a hand fan or installing bamboo beds in the compounds’ leafy courtyards. With the availability of affordable electricity and the popularisation of mechanical cooling, refreshing oneself has been relocated to the indoors. The transforming practices in and around the house have led not only to an increasing dependency on electricity for cooling but also to a socio-economic stratification. This paper traces the history of heat mitigation in Chongqing since the 1950s. Based on five months of anthropological fieldwork, semi-structured interviews, and oral history, I analyse how Chongqing residents cope with heat in and around the built environment. Practices of cooling are closely intertwined with the architectural history of the city, for example, building design, construction materials, green spaces, or the arrangement of houses. Staying cool in the socialist era buildings from the 1960s meant something different compared to the high-rise buildings in the early-21st century. Theoretically, the paper engages with urban energy landscapes as ‘connective tissue’ where everyday heat mitigating practices are intertwined with the locally built environment including architecture, energy infrastructure and technologies. By focusing on the material culture involved in cooling, I shift our perspective from the large infrastructure to the small objects that co-constitute the energy landscape of urban heat mitigation.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-02-21T01:05:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980231153309
       
  • Unequal and unjust: The political ecology of Bangkok’s increasing
           urban heat island

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      Authors: Danny Marks, John Connell
      Abstract: Urban Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The intensity of Bangkok’s urban heat island during the dry season can be as high as 6–7° and in the densest areas the urban heat island’s intensity is approximately 4°C. The urban heat island thus is causing a city already oppressively hot to become even hotter. The urban heat island also contributes to health problems, such as heat stroke and fatigue, particularly to those with lower incomes. We historically examine the numerous causes of Bangkok’s urban heat island, such as the lack of green space, high levels of air conditioning, and high rates of vehicle exhaust fumes. For example, Bangkok has only three square metres of green space per person which is one of the lowest in all of Asia. Local governmental weaknesses, administrative fragmentation, prioritisation of economic growth and limited buy-in from the private sector have intensified Bangkok’s urban heat island, and imposed numerous barriers to actions that would reduce heat, such as establishing green space, restructuring urban transport or creating and following an effective urban plan. Ideas mooted to remedy these problems have yet to come to fruition, largely because of bureaucratic inertia, fragmentation and divisions within the relevant lead organisations. The political ecology lens also reveals how political–economic processes largely determine the vulnerability of urban inhabitants to heat, but also that thermal governance is highly unequal and unjust. Those who contribute to and profit the most from Bangkok’s urban heat island, such as real estate developers, shopping mall owners, and automobile corporations, suffer the least from its effects, whereas low-income communities hardly contribute to this problem, yet are the most vulnerable.
      Citation: Urban Studies
      PubDate: 2023-01-07T07:32:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00420980221140999
       
 
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  Subjects -> ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (Total: 304 journals)
    - CLEANING AND DYEING (1 journals)
    - ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (237 journals)
    - FIRE PREVENTION (13 journals)
    - HEATING, PLUMBING AND REFRIGERATION (6 journals)
    - HOME ECONOMICS (9 journals)
    - INTERIOR DESIGN AND DECORATION (21 journals)
    - REAL ESTATE (17 journals)

ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (237 journals)                  1 2     

Showing 1 - 97 of 97 Journals sorted by number of followers
Urban Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
International Journal of Urban and Regional Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
City & Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Urban Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Housing Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Urban, Planning and Transport Research     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Applied Ecology and Environmental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Transport and Land Use     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
European Planning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
European Urban and Regional Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Urban Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Urbanism: International Research on Placemaking and Urban Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Sustainable Development     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Conflict and Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Architecture and Urban Planning     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Urban Design     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Interiors : Design, Architecture and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Urban Affairs Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Housing, Theory and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Architecture and Urbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Urban Studies Research     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Disasters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Housing Policy Debate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Cities and the Environment (CATE)     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
The Urban Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Housing Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Landscape History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Current Urban Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Urban Policy and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Urban Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
City, Territory and Architecture     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Urban Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Environnement Urbain / Urban Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Civil and Environmental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Sustainable Building Technology and Urban Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Urban Planning and Design Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Urban Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
URBAN DESIGN International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Landscape Journal : design, planning, and management of the land     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Land Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Community Development     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Housing Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Land and Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Architecture, Planning and Construction Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Housing, Care and Support     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Urban Design and Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Town Planning and Architecture     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cityscape     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Urban Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Town and Regional Planning     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Building Construction and Planning Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
European Spatial Research and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Smart and Sustainable Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Critical Planning     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Environment, Space, Place     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Cities People Places : An International Journal on Urban Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Borderlands Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Environmental Engineering and Landscape Management     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of architecture&ENVIRONMENT     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Urban Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Articulo - Journal of Urban Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Town Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Ambiances     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Future Cities and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Urban Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Urban Planning     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Apuntes : Revista de Estudios sobre Patrimonio Cultural - Journal of Cultural Heritage Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Rural Landscapes : Society, Environment, History     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of the Built Environment and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of European Real Estate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Estudios Demográficos y Urbanos     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Research in Urbanism Series     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Urban and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Geoplanning : Journal of Geomatics and Planning     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Human Capital in Urban Management     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
UPLanD - Journal of Urban Planning, Landscape & environmental Design     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
A&P Continuidad     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Land Use Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Strategic Property Management     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Agriculture and Rural Development in the Tropics and Subtropics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Seoul Journal of Korean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Baltic Journal of Real Estate Economics and Construction Management     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Bhumi : The Planning Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Rural Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Change Over Time     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Urban Land     Free   (Followers: 3)
Il Capitale Culturale. Studies on the Value of Cultural Heritage     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Land     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin KNOB     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Management Theory and Studies for Rural Business and Infrastructure Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Smart Cities     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Town Planning and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Insights into Regional Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
BUILT : International Journal of Building, Urban, Interior and Landscape Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Études rurales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
TeMA Journal of Land Use, Mobility and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ángulo Recto. Revista de estudios sobre la ciudad como espacio plural     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Rural Law and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Streetnotes     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Biourbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
South African Journal of Geomatics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rural China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Landscape Online     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
project baikal : Journal of architecture, design and urbanism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Urbanisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Joelho : Journal of Architectural Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Housing and Human Settlement Planning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
In Situ. Revue des patrimoines     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Online Journal of Rural Research & Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forum Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Belgeo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Storia Urbana     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Degraded and Mining Lands Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos Metrópole     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Den Gamle By : Danmarks Købstadmuseum (Årbog)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arquitectura y Urbanismo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Space Ontology International Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Urban Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brussels Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Glocality     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archivio di Studi Urbani e Regionali     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Estudios del Hábitat     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Raumforschung und Raumordnung / Spatial Research and Planning     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Architectural / Planning Research and Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Architecture, Design and Construction     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Design     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Community Well-Being     Hybrid Journal  
Rural & Urbano     Open Access  
Ciudades     Open Access  
Polish Journal of Landscape Studies     Open Access  
Yhdyskuntasuunnittelu     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for boligforskning     Open Access  
Kart og plan     Open Access  
Vitruvian     Open Access  
Sens public     Open Access  
Procesos Urbanos     Open Access  
Psychological Research on Urban Society     Open Access  
Jurnal Arsitektur Lansekap     Open Access  
RUA     Open Access  
tecYt     Open Access  
Pensum     Open Access  
Les Cahiers de la recherche architecturale urbaine et paysagère     Open Access  
Jurnal Pengembangan Kota     Open Access  
ZARCH : Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Architecture and Urbanism     Open Access  
Mokslas – Lietuvos ateitis / Science – Future of Lithuania     Open Access  
Revista de Arquitectura     Open Access  
Revista Empresa y Humanismo     Open Access  
South Australian Geographical Journal     Open Access  
Produção Acadêmica     Open Access  
Revista Amazônia Moderna     Open Access  
Continuité     Full-text available via subscription  
Revista Brasileira de Estudos Urbanos e Regionais     Open Access  
Eikonocity. Storia e Iconografia delle Città e dei Siti Europei - History and Iconography of European Cities and Sites     Open Access  
Urban Science     Open Access  
Scienze del Territorio     Open Access  
Ri-Vista : Ricerche per la progettazione del paesaggio     Open Access  
Risco : Revista de Pesquisa em Arquitetura e Urbanismo     Open Access  
Baru : Revista Brasileira de Assuntos Regionais e Urbanos     Open Access  
Pampa : Revista Interuniversitaria de Estudios Territoriales     Open Access  
Revista Márgenes Espacio Arte y Sociedad     Open Access  
Pós. Revista do Programa de Pós-Graduação em Arquitetura e Urbanismo da FAUUSP     Open Access  
International Planning History Society Proceedings     Open Access  
Territorios en formación     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Investigación Urbanística     Open Access  
Alternativa. Revista de Estudios Rurales     Open Access  
Revista Movimentos Sociais e Dinâmicas Espaciais     Open Access  
Vivienda y Ciudad     Open Access  
Cordis : Revista Eletrônica de História Social da Cidade     Open Access  
Paranoá : cadernos de arquitetura e urbanismo     Open Access  
História, Natureza e Espaço - Revista Eletrônica do Grupo de Pesquisa NIESBF     Open Access  
Paisagem e Ambiente     Open Access  
Room One Thousand     Open Access  
Territorio     Full-text available via subscription  
Sociologia urbana e rurale     Full-text available via subscription  
Territorio della Ricerca su Insediamenti e Ambiente. Rivista internazionale di cultura urbanistica     Open Access  
Revista Transporte y Territorio     Open Access  
Revista El Topo     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Desenvolvimento Regional     Open Access  
Revista Hábitat Sustenable     Open Access  
Revista de Geografia e Ordenamento do Território     Open Access  
Cidades, Comunidades e Territórios     Open Access  
International Journal of E-Planning Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Urbano     Open Access  
Territorios     Open Access  
Quivera     Open Access  
Ager. Revista de Estudios sobre Despoblacion y Desarrollo Rural     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Desarrollo Rural     Open Access  
Territoire en Mouvement     Open Access  
EchoGéo     Open Access  
Métropoles     Open Access  

        1 2     

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Heriot-Watt University
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