Subjects -> ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (Total: 304 journals)
    - CLEANING AND DYEING (1 journals)
    - ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (237 journals)
    - FIRE PREVENTION (13 journals)
    - HEATING, PLUMBING AND REFRIGERATION (6 journals)
    - HOME ECONOMICS (9 journals)
    - INTERIOR DESIGN AND DECORATION (21 journals)
    - REAL ESTATE (17 journals)

ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (237 journals)            First | 1 2     

Showing 201 - 97 of 97 Journals sorted alphabetically
Territorios     Open Access  
Territorios en formación     Open Access  
The Evolving Scholar     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Journal of Integrated Security and Safety Science (JISSS)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
The Urban Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Tidsskrift for boligforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for Kortlægning og Arealforvaltning     Open Access  
Town and Regional Planning     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Town Planning and Architecture     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Town Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
UPLanD - Journal of Urban Planning, Landscape & environmental Design     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Urban     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban Affairs Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
URBAN DESIGN International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Urban Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Urban Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Urban Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Urban Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Urban Land     Free   (Followers: 2)
Urban Planning     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Urban Planning and Design Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Urban Policy and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Urban Science     Open Access  
Urban Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Urban Studies Research     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Urban Transformations     Open Access  
Urban, Planning and Transport Research     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Urbanisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Urbano     Open Access  
Vitruvian     Open Access  
Vivienda y Ciudad     Open Access  
Yhdyskuntasuunnittelu     Open Access  
ZARCH : Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Architecture and Urbanism     Open Access  

  First | 1 2     

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Urban Forum
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.693
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 5  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1874-6330 - ISSN (Online) 1015-3802
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Overcoming Obstacles to the Integration of Informal Actors in
           Accra’s Open-Air Marketplaces

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      Abstract: Abstract Urban open-air markets are indispensable institutions in the global South. Yet they are most often confronted with formidable environmental problems such as improper solid waste management (SWM). Accordingly, when research is initiated into the complex world of urban market environmental management (UMEM), the focus tends to be on either SWM technological interventions or the performances of formal or informal SWM actors. Whereas city authorities have desired to understand how to regulate the burgeoning number of informal SWM actors, research priorities have been to advocate for the formalisation and integration of informal systems of SWM with formal systems. Consequently, attention is rarely paid to informal actors’ perceptions of SWM integration and formalisation pathways. This paper presents insights into how the integration of informal SWM actors is being approached in Ghana, and how this process is being experienced by the informal actors in Accra’s open-air markets. The informal actors’ critiques generally related to the formalisation processes, enforcement of legitimate expectations, and limited SWM infrastructure. The biggest obstacle related to the narrow conception of integration as formalisation through public and private sector, as this was perceived by informal SWM workers as an exclusionary, exploitative, and restrictive measure.
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
       
  • Official Risks and Everyday Disasters: the Interplay of Riskscapes in Two
           Unplanned Settlements in Monrovia

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      Abstract: Abstract Monrovia’s unplanned settlements provide a window into the diverse rationales and practices that go into planning and managing urban space. Even though unplanned settlements are economically, spatially, and socially integrated into cities, the desire to eliminate or formalise them persists. In the essay, I examine how everyday risks are addressed in the coexistence and co-evolution of planning and unplanned urbanisation in postwar contexts. As well as showing how expert-recommended risk management approaches cross over into local practices, I explain how and why multiple understandings of ‘risk’ and ‘resilience’ can influence practice. The unequal power dynamic suggests that the practices of state actors influence the residents of unplanned settlements, in a manner that is discernible of governmentality. As riskscapes, and by extension resilience, represent multiple realities to stakeholders, the question of coalescing the mosaic of practices into a common risk governance framework is critical. The essay emphasises that resilience-building should evolve from a thorough understanding of the dynamics of the multiplicity of riskscapes. Finally, the paper argues that an evolutionary approach to risk governance, paying attention to the interacting elements and configurations that link discourse, actors, institutions, power, and knowledge, will provide a platform for negotiating the links between risk perception and risk assessment within the emerging riskscapes. This will be the basis of a deliberative and negotiated resilience pathway that will integrate the priorities and interests of all stakeholders in the planning and decision-making process.
      PubDate: 2022-05-12
       
  • Tenure Insecurity in Informal Land Delivery System of Lagos State,
           Nigeria: Causes and Manifestations

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      Abstract: Abstract Tenure security is necessary for land to serve as a means for generating a livelihood and be a vehicle for investing and accumulating wealth. This is because, when there is a risk of dispossession of land, people are not able to invest in land. This paper examines the causes and manifestations of land tenure insecurity in the informal land delivery system of Lagos State. A qualitative research approach was adopted for the study. Interviews were conducted with representatives of 23 indigenous landholding families (ILFs) in the five Divisions of Lagos State. The data collected were analysed through thematic analysis. The study discovered that security of tenure is highest if possession is taken immediately after purchase and it reduces the longer the period possession is taken after purchase. Other causes of tenure insecurity include counterclaims by other family members, claim by non-members of the family or invasion by external forces such as ajagun gbale, defects in the character of members of the family council, and economic reasons. It was also discovered that the manifestation of tenure insecurity includes sales of land to another person, imposition of payment of security fee, re-purchase of land, re-location to another plot, and refund of purchase consideration. Tenure insecurity increases transactional cost with consequential implications on the attractiveness of real estate as an investment option. There is, therefore, a need to incorporate the informal land delivery system into the formal system and strengthening of institutions that protect and enforce property rights.
      PubDate: 2022-04-09
       
  • Political Economy of Air Pollution in Kenya

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      Abstract: Abstract Air pollution is a major environmental health risk factor in Nairobi, Kenya. Most research conducted on air pollution in Nairobi has focused on measuring pollution concentrations. Although this research is very important, it is also crucial to understand barriers in the regulatory process that prevents this data from translating into effective action. This article attempts to fill in this gap. It starts by detailing the history of urban planning in Nairobi and its legacy in shaping contemporary urbanization and spatial patterns of air pollution. It then relies on interviews, participant observations, and a close reading of key laws and policies to evaluate current political, institutional, and data-infrastructure gaps in the Kenyan air pollution governance framework that serve as barriers for equitable air pollution mitigation. Finally, it draws on interviews and media analyses to examine the promises and perils of citizen science to improve air quality levels in Kenya. It ends by making policy recommendations to make Nairobi more liveable and breathable in the long term.
      PubDate: 2022-04-02
       
  • Comparing Climate Politics and Adaptation Strategies in African Cities:
           Challenges and Opportunities in the State-Community Divide

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      Abstract: Abstract Residents of African municipalities exhibit a lengthy and varied history of coping with conditions of pervasive precarity and uncertainty in the context of an unevenly present state. The climate crisis compounds these challenges. Based on case studies from across the continent, this introduction to the Special Issue on the Politics of Climate Action in Africa’s Cities presents research oriented around questions of “do-it-yourself” urbanism, sustainable development, and climate change adaptation and mitigation efforts undertaken by socio-economically vulnerable citizens. It offers insight into how the urban poor respond to ongoing urban climate crises, the variable roles of an absent, ineffectual, or inattentive state, and the unequal power relations undergirding sustainability discourse and practice. It draws on a cross-regional comparative perspective that centres conversations about urban theory and development in a (urban) world succumbing to mounting pressures from climate change, environmental precarity, and pervasive inequities.
      PubDate: 2022-03-16
       
  • The Practice and Politics of Urban Climate Change Mitigation and
           Adaptation Efforts: The Case of Cairo

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      Abstract: Abstract Research on climate change mitigation and adaptation is pressing in order to understand its implications and risks in different urban areas. It is especially critical for those who face high degrees of urban inequality in the context of an uneven state presence. This paper is an explorative and investigative study which uses Cairo as a case. The focus of the study is on mapping state and private sector efforts in mitigating climate change issues, specifically for vulnerable groups who have limited access to public services. The study adopted an investigative approach where a literature search and bibliometric mapping were used to identify the gap in knowledge in the field of architecture and urban climate change mitigation and adaptation, followed by a field survey which included conducting interviews and questionnaires with different stakeholders from the public and private sector to investigate the link between the efforts for climate change mitigation. The explorative part of the study concluded that there is a huge knowledge gap in the Middle East and in Egypt when it comes to research efforts related to climate change with a focus on the built environment. The results of the investigative part of this study revealed that—apart from already limited efforts on ground—there is no synchronization in efforts between the public and private sector. Climate change issues are still not a priority when poverty, economy, and health are still a prime concern and take precedence over climate change. There is uneven presence of public efforts for climate change adaptation and mitigation. The efforts that do exist in the public sphere are self-help unorganized work (efforts) conducted by the civil society.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
       
  • Where is the State Missing' Addressing Urban Climate Change at the
           Margins in Luanda and Maputo

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      Abstract: Abstract Climate change and its urban dimensions have become more actively debated topics since the beginning of the millennium. As a result of being such a recent concern, the available definitions of what is at stake and what is needed to deal with it—in particular who should deal with it—are often too broad, vague and even disputable depending on the interlocutors, and often focussed on the rural areas. In the context of urban climate change in Luanda and in Maputo, there is an undefined set of tasks and responsibilities to deal with the impacts and prevent further negative effects to the urban dwellers and the poor in particular. This article identifies recurrently mentioned areas where the state is considered absent (and should be present). Based on fieldwork conducted in Luanda and in Maputo, the available literature, accounts of expert stakeholders, and the appraisals and claims of the urban dwellers, this article analyses the existing legal and policy dispositions and the existing systems and resources to deal with climate change. This is simultaneously confronted with what policy stakeholders, urban practitioners and urban dwellers on the ground see that is missing, needs to be improved, and is urgent and capable of improving daily lives. The main findings are that responsibilities and attributions, despite being unclear and not fully defined, predominantly rely on the state and state institutions.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
       
  • Saving Up for a Rainy Day' Savings Groups and Resilience to Flooding
           in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper explores the role of savings groups in resilience to urban climate-related disasters. Savings groups are a rapidly growing phenomenon in Africa. They are decentralized, non-institutional groups that provide millions of people excluded from the formal banking sector with a trusted, accessible, and relatively simple source of microfinance. Yet there is little work on the impacts of savings groups on resilience to disasters. In this paper, we use a combination of quantitative and qualitative evidence from Dar es Salaam (Tanzania) to shed new light on the role that savings groups play in helping households cope with climate-related shocks. Drawing on new data, we show that approximately one-quarter of households have at least one member in a group, and that these households recover from flood events faster than those who do not. We further argue that the structure of savings groups allows for considerable group oversight, reducing the high costs of monitoring and sanctioning that often undermine cooperative engagement in urban areas. This makes the savings group model a uniquely flexible form of financing that is well adapted to helping households cope with shocks such as repeated flooding. In addition to this, we posit that they may provide a foundation for community initiatives focusing on preventative action.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
       
  • “Fruity” Smells, City Streets, and the Politics of Sanitation
           in Colonial Accra

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      Abstract: Abstract When the British declared Accra the capital of their Gold Coast Colony in the 1870s, they sought to remake the politics of space and the culture of everyday life in the old town, which had long been settled by members of the Ga ethnic group. British efforts concentrated particularly on issues of “sanitation.” While sanitation debates included issues of road drainage, water provision, and rubbish collection, the most animated conversations centered on issues of sewage. What appears on the surface to be a relatively straight-forward conversation about public health highlighted fundamental cultural fissures over relatively mundane issues such as smell, bathing practice, and the organization of the household or compound. In historicizing both the infrastructural politics and sanitary cultures of urban residents and the regulatory and policy strategies of government officials in the context of colonial Accra, this article aims to refocus debates about sustainable development to think more carefully about what a just, inclusive, decolonized, and community-centered approach might look like.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
       
  • Entrepreneurship and the Promises of Inclusive Urban Development in
           Ethiopia

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      Abstract: Abstract Ethiopia is urbanizing rapidly and migration is the major factor in the urbanization process. Migration is selective and rural youth are more likely to migrate to cities than others. However, the capacity of cities to accommodate migrants by providing formal employment is limited. Consequently, migrants remain without access to employment opportunities. The majority are pushed into self-employment in the informal sector. Despite such challenges, harnessing the benefits of the youth bulge and promoting inclusive development through entrepreneurship programs has become a priority area since 1990s. Although progresses have been made, entrepreneurship programs are unable to reach the unemployed youth and those engaged in informal sector. The objective of this paper is to explore barriers that hinder the youth to join entrepreneurship programs. The study followed qualitative approach. Data were collected through key informant interviews and focus group discussions from four cities-Addis Ababa, Adama, Bahir Dar and Hawassa. The findings show that politicization of entrepreneurship; lack of understanding the needs of the youth, weak institutional systems, low levels of service capacity and inefficiency and lack of entrepreneurship education and youth negligence hinder the success of entrepreneurship programs thereby attaining inclusive development. Entrepreneurship programs thus need to follow flexible and participatory approach. Programs need to be selective in the type of entrepreneurial initiatives and supports that can address the needs and priorities of the youth. Providing youth with entrepreneurial education has a positive effect on their decision to be engaged in entrepreneurial activities. The government needs to minimize its political intervention in entrepreneurship programs.
      PubDate: 2022-02-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s12132-022-09458-8
       
  • Marginal Voices, Resilient Acts: Urban Marginality and Responses to
           Climate-Related Events in Lilongwe City Informal Settlements

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      Abstract: Abstract Urban informal settlements have, over the years, been centres of conflicting development debates, yet, for people with low socio-economic status, these are areas of opportunities. However, the “peripheral” nature of these locations has far-reaching implications on how people in these areas participate in decision-making processes that affect them. Lately, the effects of climate-related events have also added another layer of socio-economic, political, and environmental challenge to the dynamics of life in the marginal areas of the urban setting. The purpose of this paper is to critically examine how people in marginal informal settlements of Lilongwe City respond to climate-related events and interact with the wider ecosystem of development stakeholders. The major thesis of the paper is that while critical policymakers ignore these peripheral voices in the provision of basic services, an enhanced support to these informal settlements can prove positive if efforts are harnessed to mitigate the effects of climate-related events and urban marginality and amplify marginal voices to change social policies for the good of all. This paper uses the case of Lilongwe City where three informal settlements of Mtandire, Kaliyeka, and Kawale form part of the study.
      PubDate: 2022-02-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s12132-022-09460-0
       
  • Practice and Politics of Land Use for Urban Climate Mitigation and
           Adaptation in Blantyre and Lilongwe Cities, Malawi

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      Abstract: Abstract Malawi’s population is fast growing, with a good share of urban residents being susceptible to environmental risks and disasters. This risk is aggravated by climate change. Blantyre and Lilongwe cities are not spared by this scenario. The study used household survey, key informant interviews, observation, and experience to gather primary data, and desk study to solicit secondary data. Random and purposive sampling was employed to identify survey respondents and informants, respectively. Content analysis was used to establish themes and relationships. A good number of regulatory frameworks (policies) and programmes for abating urban climate change mitigation and adaptation have been in place, but implementation is a challenge. Political interference tends to shift priorities on policies to be implemented at one particular point in time of a political regime, and this has culminated into a sour relationship between politics and land use planning, with the former jeopardizing the practice by the latter. Funding insufficiency, uncontrolled development, political interference, corruption and lack of transparency, insufficient stakeholder engagement, and poor planning contribute to poor and insufficient disaster risk management, and to increased disaster risks in Blantyre and Lilongwe cities. Citizen involvement in appropriate and effective land use planning process, regular communication on the availability of safety information, and robust emergency notification system can make communities in Lilongwe and Blantyre cities resilient from climate-related risks. The urban governance system has to be strengthened. There is need for adequate political will for mobilization of urban climate governance efforts.
      PubDate: 2022-02-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s12132-022-09459-7
       
  • Rethinking Effective Urban Land Governance in Sub-Saharan Africa: Moving
           Towards a Transcendental Critical Realist Approach

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      Abstract: Abstract Land provides a foundation for socio-cultural identity, economic survival and political stability in most sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries. However, land-related crisis in the wake of rapid urbanization without a corresponding rapid expansion of the urban economy has further taken a toll on access to land and tenure security and made effective urban land governance a challenge. Although many reforms have been enacted in the last few decades to formalize traditional customary landholding system in SSA, insecure land and property rights remain the major issues militating effective urban land governance in the region. This paper provides a new theoretical perspective to achieving effective urban land governance in the context of SSA. This new perspective, based on transcendental critical realism, offers a useful meta-theoretical foundation that looks beyond the discernible but complex social reality about land and the relations it entails to the underlying causal powers and generative mechanisms that have produced these evidential phenomena. Based on a critical analysis of existing literature, the paper argued that if the processes that generate the social phenomenon of landholding are better understood, more appropriate approaches for managing these generative causes can be devised rather than simply mitigating the effects.
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s12132-022-09457-9
       
  • Legislative Responses to the Challenge of Insufficient Data on Water
           Service Delivery in South African Cities

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      Abstract: Abstract This article investigates the existing legal responses to the challenge of insufficient data on water service delivery in cities. The article finds that no explicit duty exists for cities to collect the data or information that they are regularly required to provide. While such a duty may be implied from Sect. 69 of the Water Services Act 108 of 1997, there is no clear indication of what information cities would need to provide. Furthermore, an extensive analysis of the current national systems of information operated by the Department of Water and Sanitation reveals that there are numerous and significant issues on these databases, especially concerning the quality, integrity, and timeliness of the data. Finally, the article proposes that due to the unique position of cities concerning the provision of water services, and the need for complete and reliable data, the law should emphasise cities’ role in the collection of data.
      PubDate: 2022-01-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s12132-021-09456-2
       
  • Mobility, Access and the Value of the Mabopane Station Precinct

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      Abstract: Abstract Although mobility shapes the material landscape, for the majority of ordinary people, their movements are structured by space. For this reason, ordinary people bear the bodily and financial costs of commuting to the metropolitan core areas from their peripheries. In particular, the city’s core areas and peripheries are shaped by privatisation, racism and other forces of change, each driving urban change in particular, complementary ways (Pierce and Lawhon, 2018; Czegledy, 2004). That said, there are interpretations that the city’s core areas are multiple and shifting, with their peripheries being unstable and indeterminable. In this sense, the city’s peripheries do not always coincide with the spatial distribution of marginality and deprivation (Pieterse, 2019). Howe’s (2021) idea of popular centralities through popular agency may in some ways be seen to transcend these diverging accounts of the city’s uneven spatial structure. This paper uses the case of the Mabopane Station precinct in northern Tshwane to give content to this transcending idea of popular centralities. With respect to popular agency, Coe and Jordhus-Lier’s (2010) forms of agency (resilience, reworking and resistance) are useful for further analysing the resilience of the residents and commuters of northern Tshwane. The paper demonstrates some of the ways through which popular centralities are constituted—how movement becomes space; and also that it is in specific places (which are always constituted by the local and the elsewhere) where resilience is exercised in ways that perpetuate and even overcome peripherality. In this sense, the paper treats a social and cultural context seriously, highlighting ordinary people’s cautious uses of and intuitive, creative reuses of peripheral spaces as they turn some of them into urbanisms of self-realisation.
      PubDate: 2022-01-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s12132-021-09454-4
       
  • Reclamation and Expulsion. Frontiers of City Expansion and the Loss of
           Public and Communal Spaces at Abidjan’s Lagoonal Waterfronts

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      Abstract: Abstract The paper analyses the motivations of actors who reclaimed and appropriated the banks of the Ebrié Lagoon in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire, which were in many cases marginal lands under public ownership. The analysis focuses on the evolution of two unplanned settlements, Soweto (from 1964) and Adjahui (from 2011). Practices of incremental place-making and residential stories connect these places, which are located opposite to one another at the Bay of Koumassi. The research questions are as follows: Why and by who were waterfronts reclaimed and appropriated' And how does reclamation entail social-economic inequalities and the loss of public and communal spaces' Conceptually, lagoonal waterfronts are approached as waterscapes, cultural landscapes with discursive representations. Their evolution is analysed by using the concepts of fixity and flows by Desfor and Laidley (2011). Findings show although tenure was highly insecure in the legal sense, use rights, house ownership and local power relations in Soweto were fixed for decades despite the fact that buildings, residents, local arrangements and the spatial form constantly changed. Though inhabitants increasingly entered the water space and the lagoon, the material condition of the settlement seemed stable because the process took place over many decades before urban renewal set dynamics in motion that speeded up the reclamation process and brought the waterscapes into flow.
      PubDate: 2022-01-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s12132-021-09451-7
       
  • Impact of Virtual Cash Economy on Livelihood Outcomes of Informal Cross
           Border Traders in Gweru, Zimbabwe

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      Abstract: Abstract Informal Cross Border Trade (ICBT) is a viable economic activity for many people, in Zimbabwe, who have depended on it for survival during economic hardships. Due to climate change, agriculture cannot be depended upon for survival and people are increasingly depending on ICBT for a livelihood. Despite a crucial role in providing for many, ICBT has been negatively affected by changes in the fiscal economy, specifically, the adoption of virtual cash in a time of cash crisis. This paper examines the impact of the virtual cash economy on the livelihood of participants in ICBT in Gweru, Zimbabwe. Qualitative data was collected and subjected to inductive analysis. Results revealed a positive livelihood outcome for traders prior to the virtual cash economy, followed by a negative outcome when virtual cash payments increased. The paper presents a framework that highlights the importance of cash, to ensure the success and sustainability of ICBT in the city of Gweru. The paper concludes with the recommendation that ICBT should be integrated into policy to address identified issues that affect economic benefits of ICBT, to ensure its sustainability in the provision of essential livelihood needs in line with Sustainable Development Goals.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12132-021-09428-6
       
  • A Spatio-temporal Analysis of Commercial Parks in Cape Town, South Africa

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      Abstract: Abstract Cities undergo constant change and their industrial spaces are particularly impacted on by new technologies, changing industries and the vagaries of the global and national economies. This paper reports on an investigation of the changing commercial and industrial landscape in Cape Town, South Africa, by focussing on commercial park spaces, specifically those that have been purposely named as business parks, industrial parks and office parks. The study is grounded in the literature on the changing spatial economy of Cape Town. A comprehensive database of commercial parks was created from a host of online sources and documents as well as a field survey. The spatial distribution of commercial parks was analysed in relation to the 11 districts mapped by a previous spatial economic study of the city. It was found that while the commercial parks were predominantly located in four districts, a nuanced locational analysis of the three different types of parks provided evidence of subtle differences in their distribution. The commercial parks are located both in traditional industrial suburbs and in newer commercial spaces and, although most are new developments, some are housed in old industrial spaces that have been converted. Almost half of the commercial parks are managed as sectional title schemes which mirror the management model of gated communities. Purposely named commercial parks are essentially a post-apartheid phenomenon as the majority are post-1994 developments.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12132-021-09431-x
       
  • Spaces of Transformative Practice: Co-producing, (Re)Making and
           Translating Fractional Urban Space in Gugulethu, Cape Town

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      Abstract: Abstract Reimagining neglected urban space offers the potential for social cohesion, integration, and connectivity. The intimate, interstitial or fractional spaces of a city represent a key component of social infrastructure in a neighbourhood. The smallest of interventions in urban space adds value and complexity to urban life. However, fractional, yet deeply transformative, urban space is often unrecognised and undocumented. Transformative practice seeks to accommodate, anticipate and represent inclusive public life but requires discovering new content and definitions on public space to decode emerging processes of incremental place-making in an African context. The narrative focuses on a network of place-making intervention projects as part of an urban upgrading programme in Lotus Park informal settlement, located in Gugulethu, Cape Town. A set of tracings, integrated with theoretical frames, reveal the impact of upgraded urban space through firstly, emerging centres and the (re)making of place on the periphery; secondly, disrupting edges and the co-production process involved in the negotiation of space; and lastly, crafting shadows and interpreting traces of micro-interventions. The purpose is to explore urban space as continually adapting to the intrusions in the city grid to translate (1) innovative modes of spatial production; (2) dynamic forms of local agency; (3) marginal ways of operating; and (4) interconnected and multi-scalar urban processes of everyday place-making. The practice of co-producing and (re)making urban space in Gugulethu uncovers alternate mechanisms for governance, partnerships and operations.
      PubDate: 2021-07-31
      DOI: 10.1007/s12132-021-09436-6
       
  • Gendered Infrastructural Citizenship: Shared Sanitation Facilities in
           Quarry Road West Informal Settlement, Durban, South Africa

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      Abstract: Abstract One significant component of the South African citizenship narrative is centred around the right to basic services and corresponding elements, including dignity and a healthy living environment. This paper employs the concept of infrastructural citizenship, which draws on both infrastructure and citizenship discourses to explore how participants experience and challenge public infrastructure and as such engage with questions surrounding citizenship on an everyday basis (Lemanski, 2019a). Adopting a gendered approach, this paper draws on the empirical case of Quarry Road West, an informal settlement located in Durban, and uses a qualitative methodology. Residents have access to Community Ablution Blocks, free shared sanitation facilities provided by the eThekwini Municipality. This paper argues that restricted access to the facilities undermines perceptions of privacy and health and negatively impacts women individually and in the community. Furthermore, this paper evaluates civic responses to inadequate infrastructure in the form of participation, protest and state-directed actions. As such, it examines how women-state relationships are embedded in public infrastructure, and limitations in regards to infrastructure shape interactions and engagements with the state, their experiences of citizenship, actualisation of rights and identities.
      PubDate: 2021-07-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s12132-021-09421-z
       
 
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