Subjects -> ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (Total: 304 journals)
    - CLEANING AND DYEING (1 journals)
    - ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (237 journals)
    - FIRE PREVENTION (13 journals)
    - HEATING, PLUMBING AND REFRIGERATION (6 journals)
    - HOME ECONOMICS (9 journals)
    - INTERIOR DESIGN AND DECORATION (21 journals)
    - REAL ESTATE (17 journals)

ESTATE, HOUSING AND URBAN PLANNING (237 journals)            First | 1 2     

Showing 201 - 97 of 97 Journals sorted alphabetically
Territorios     Open Access  
Territorios en formación     Open Access  
The Evolving Scholar     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Journal of Integrated Security and Safety Science (JISSS)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
The Urban Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Tidsskrift for boligforskning     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for Kortlægning og Arealforvaltning     Open Access  
Town and Regional Planning     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Town Planning and Architecture     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Town Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
UPLanD - Journal of Urban Planning, Landscape & environmental Design     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Urban     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Urban Affairs Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
URBAN DESIGN International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Urban Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Urban Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Urban Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Urban Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Urban Land     Free   (Followers: 2)
Urban Planning     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Urban Planning and Design Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Urban Policy and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Urban Science     Open Access  
Urban Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Urban Studies Research     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Urban Transformations     Open Access  
Urban, Planning and Transport Research     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Urbanisation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Urbano     Open Access  
Vitruvian     Open Access  
Vivienda y Ciudad     Open Access  
Yhdyskuntasuunnittelu     Open Access  
ZARCH : Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Architecture and Urbanism     Open Access  

  First | 1 2     

Similar Journals
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The Urban Review
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.979
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 18  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-1960 - ISSN (Online) 0042-0972
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Racial Justice Beyond Credentials: The Radical Politic of a Black College
           Dropout

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      Abstract: Abstract The scholarly paper explores how racial justice and college credentials have become conflated despite the higher education system being a site of anti-Blackness. The argument is advanced through analyzing critiques of higher education—stratification, lack of support, un(der)employment, and consumerism—on Kanye West’s first album The College Dropout. I argue that a focus on college dropouts or the uncredentialed allows for a more evidence-based analysis of how higher education fails to be an equalizer for poor Black urban communities and provides lessons for how to imagine a radical education praxis not based on who has a degree but on human needs and Blackness as valuable.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Case Studies in Social Death: The Criminalization and Dehumanization of
           Six Black and Latino Boys

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      Abstract: Abstract To fully grasp the systems of oppression youth of color must navigate, educators must consider their experiences outside as well as inside the classroom. This paper adds to the small but growing body of literature across fields highlighting how Black and Latinx youth are simultaneously positioned by schools and the justice system as criminals that must be contained and removed from school and society. This paper argues that the concept of social death, which refers to social suffering as a result of criminalization and dehumanization, helps contextualize the process by which carceral oppression manifests in students’ lives. Based on an interview study with thirty adults who were first incarcerated as adolescents, this paper focuses on three Black and three Latino male participants’ experiences with social death in schools and their neighborhoods.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Examining the Effect of an Interdisciplinary Literacy Program on Student
           Learning

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      Abstract: Abstract The literacy design collaborative (LDC) was created to support teachers in implementing college and career readiness standards. Teachers work collaboratively with coaches to further develop their expertise and design standards-driven, literacy-rich writing assignments within their existing curriculum across content areas. The current paper reports on early student academic outcome results from a multi-year mixed methods study of the implementation and effect of LDC using a quasi-experimental design, as implemented in one large urban school district. We found LDC had statistically significant effects on Cohort 2 middle school students’ English language arts (ELA) performance, an effect size of (d = 0.15) for students receiving LDC instruction in the three core content areas LDC focuses on: ELA, science, and social studies/history.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • An Ecological Examination of School Counseling Equity

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      Abstract: Abstract Amidst the rapid expansion of education reform aimed at promoting educational equity, noticeably absent has been a focus on school counseling—a profession uniquely positioned to support students’ postsecondary, social emotional, and academic development. Despite research continually affirming the positive influence of counselors on students, uneven access to counseling support across US public schools, especially in urban areas, remains a reality today. Notably, high student-to-counselor ratios in schools that educate a large proportion of students of color and those living in low-income communities suggest that those students most in need of access to counseling support are the least likely to receive it. In this essay, we outline school counselors’ unique roles in supporting minoritized youth and draw on Bronfenbrenner’s (The ecology of human development: experiments in nature and design, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1979) ecological systems theory to consider the nested systems in which counselors work—systems which, we argue, place constraints on school counseling equity. This systems-level framing moves away from casting the limitations of our current student support model as an individual-level, personnel issue and instead conceptualizes it as an organizational one that must be remedied to ensure all students have equal access to critical counseling support.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Navigating (and Disrupting) the Digital Divide: Urban Teachers’
           Perspectives on Secondary Mathematics Instruction During COVID-19

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      Abstract: Abstract This study examines the perspectives and lived experiences of 10 urban secondary mathematics teachers from two epicenters of COVID-19 in the United States regarding their transition to digital learning during the 2019–2020 academic year. We use case study methodology with phenomenological interviews to gather insights into the teachers’ efforts to modify their mathematics instruction and curriculum while navigating observed digital inequities and new digital tools for mathematics teaching. We also report on the teachers’ targeted attempts to bridge home and school while problematizing the threatened humanistic aspect of remote teaching and learning. These frontline experiences recognize technology-associated systemic inequities in marginalized, urban communities and the need to strategize ways to implement equity-oriented technology integration that benefits all learners, especially urban youth. By critically examining digital education in the urban context, crucial conversations can transpire that critique (and disrupt) the digital divide in mathematics education and open doors for other stakeholders to broadly discuss the logistics and implications of digital education to enhance new ways of teaching and learning.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Countering Educational Disparities Among Black Boys and Black Adolescent
           Boys from Pre-K to High School: A Life Course-Intersectional Perspective

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      Abstract: Abstract Accounts of educational opportunity gaps for Black boys are overwhelmingly focused on later years of development. Achievement and discipline disparities are evident across their lifespan. Life course and intersectionality theories were used to develop a framework for understanding obstacles Black boys face during their preschool through high school years. Outlining the cumulative impact of threats and protective factors for their academic success provides insight for supporting Black boys at various developmental stages. Implications include tools for families, educators, and practitioners. This perspective will enhance the collective understanding of the resiliency of Black boys and support their educational success throughout the life course.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • What’s Best for My Child, What’s Best for the City: Values and
           Tensions in Parent Gentrifiers’ Middle and High School Selection
           Processes

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      Abstract: Abstract The growth of middle-class families in gentrifying neighborhoods has sparked questions about how these families select schools for their children. Research on elementary school selection has found that some parent gentrifiers are willing to try their neighborhood public schools. These parents are often motivated by civically oriented values, including supporting public education and supporting neighborhood schools. The field knows much less about parent gentrifiers’ decisions for middle and high school. This study draws on interviews with 20 parent gentrifiers in Washington, DC, to understand how parents choose middle and high schools. This study finds that secondary school selection is a fraught process throughout which parents weigh multiple sets of values, including civically oriented values and specific school attributes from which parents believe their children can derive value. This study’s findings underscore the tensions and contradictions of school choice and gentrifying contexts.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • A Grounded Model of How Educators Earn Students’ Trust in a High
           Performing U.S. Urban High School

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      Abstract: Abstract This article presents a grounded model of how educators earn students’ trust in a high performing U.S. urban high school. This long-term anthropological project set out to understand the beliefs and practices of experienced teachers and staff members nominated by students as helping them feel like they belonged in school. Analysis of study data revealed a process of mutual discernment whereby adults and young people were reading one another as they explored the possibilities of entering into learning partnerships. For the educators, study data led us to infer that their trust building strategies were largely based on imagining the student discernment process, and responding to a set of unspoken queries about them that, over time, they seem to have learned were often on the minds of students (e.g. “Why are they here'” “How much do they respect me'”). The grounded model and practice-based evidence presented here summarize the strategies and approaches educators used to respond to these unspoken queries and communicate to students various aspects of their selves and their stance, including their motivation, empathy and respect for students, self-awareness and credibility, their professional ability, and finally, their commitment to helping students and investing emotional labor in them. Throughout, data are also presented regarding how students perceived and experienced these strategies, and ultimately how they interpreted and appraised their relationships with educators, as trusting relationships were developed.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11256-022-00635-4
       
  • It Don’t Affect Them Like it Affects Us: Disenfranchised Grief of Black
           Boys in the Wake of Peer Homicide

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      Abstract: Abstract Black boys’ grief coping with peer homicide remain under-researched and undertheorized. This is especially significant when combined with the emerging understanding that Black boys may experience homicidal death in significantly different ways and durations than others. This manuscript examines the experiences of three Black boys attending an urban school, in the wake of the homicidal death of their peer. We purport the absence of grief counselors and the lack of administrative sensitivity, created a misalignment between the boys’ need to grieve, and systems within an urban school context that denied and erased trauma. Drawing from concepts of disenfranchised grief, we situate our analysis using a theory of proximal processes. This framework reveals a perspective that counters the hegemonic ontologies which deny Black boys’ the right to grieve. Furthermore, in examining one Black male mentor’s support of the boys in the aftermath of this tragedy, this manuscript contributes to an increased awareness of the need for urban school policies and practices that reflect reframed understandings of Black boys' mourning.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11256-021-00605-2
       
  • Underrepresented High Schoolers’ Interests, Engagement, and Experiences
           in an Information and Communications Technology Summer Workshop: A
           Three-Year Study

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      Abstract: Abstract In this paper we describe our investigation of underrepresented high school students’ interests, engagement, and experiences in design-based Information and Communications Technology (ICT) summer workshop activities; with the goal of identifying activities, aspects, and/or elements of the program that can be tailored or improved upon to attract, engage, educate, and retain high schoolers who have historically been underrepresented in ICT. Our primary research question is “which activities are most engaging for students typically underrepresented in ICT careers and programs,” and we additionally report on underrepresented students’ experiences and psychosocial changes across the summer workshops. A total of 139 high school students (of which 98 identified as being underrepresented female and/or racially minoritized students) participated in the ICT workshops hosted across three consecutive summers at a large, public, urban university in the Midwestern region of the United States. Employing a mixed methods design, our quantitative results and qualitative findings suggest that underrepresented students in our sample found the summer workshops’ group projects and hands-on courses to be the most engaging activities. Implications of our results/findings are further discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11256-021-00603-4
       
  • Feeling Displaced, Enacting Resistance: Race, Place, and Schooling in the
           Face of Gentrifying Forces

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      Abstract: Abstract Detroit is a dynamic city with a dynamic history, yet it has come to symbolize both White flight (beginning in the 1940s and accelerating in the late 1960s) and Black flight (beginning in the 1990s and reaching its apex in 2000). While Detroit’s Black population continues to decline, its White population increased by 22% between 2010 and 2015. Along with these shifting demographic trends comes shifting residential and educational landscapes that amplify the racial, economic, and spatial inequalities marking present-day Detroit. Drawing upon the literature of human geography and sociology of education, and utilizing GIS software, we overlay the mapping of demographic realities with the mapping of human stories. As a case study of how a non-profit, public charter school can be a vehicle for resisting gentrification, this paper examines the role of “place” in one school’s navigation of an increasingly gentrified Detroit and its commitment to primarily serving youth of its neighborhood. Using a multimodal and multiscalar approach, we find evidence of endogenous gentrification, intergenerational topophilia, and the school enacting resistance within a dialectic of its market-driven charter school status.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11256-021-00608-z
       
  • Assessing Systemic Inequity: Teacher Perspectives, Solutions, and
           “Radical Possibilities”

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      Abstract: Abstract We present analyses from focus group interviews with a geographically diverse set of experienced, urban teachers who point to systemic inequity as a major contributing factor to the problems they face in their schools and communities. To begin, we overview the literature relating to our development of this project, after which we outline the theoretical underpinnings of our analyses. Next, we outline our methods, process of analysis, and analytical approach. We then discuss our findings, highlighting how the teachers described the systemic nature of inequality, and the policy solutions they identified as potential avenues by which to address these inequalities.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11256-021-00606-1
       
  • Arrested Development: How This We Believe Utilizes Colorblind Narratives
           and Racialization to Socially Construct Early Adolescent Development

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      Abstract: Abstract Early adolescents go through developmental changes which are also mediated through social and structural forces that reproduce stratifying hierarchies around race, class, gender, and sexuality. Despite the intersection of early adolescent development with social and institutional forces, critical concepts such as race are often omitted in general discourses of middle level education. It is important that the leading body for middle level education, the Association for Middle Level Education (AMLE) and their doctrinal text, This We Believe, explicitly address the nexus of race, early adolescent development, and schooling. In this article, we draw upon critical race theory as a conceptual framework and critical race discourse analysis as methodology to examine how This We Believe negotiates the social construction of early adolescent development as rooted in whiteness in addition to the racialized realities of middle level education for students of color. Findings indicate This We Believe utilizes colorblindness alongside racialization discourses to create majoritarian narratives of middle level education and early adolescent development. In conclusion, we offer three alternative philosophical statements to This We Believe critical educators can adopt that are attentive to the intersection of race, adolescent development, and middle level education.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11256-021-00604-3
       
  • A Preliminary Analysis Assessing SWPBIS Implementation Fidelity in
           Relation to Disciplinary Outcomes of Black Students in Urban Schools

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      Abstract: Abstract Exclusionary school discipline practices and policies have contributed to the racial disparities in discipline for certain demographic of students, particularly Black students. As a result, many schools have adopted the school-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports (SWPBIS) framework to identify and address disproportionality, despite the inconsistent findings regarding the effectiveness of SWPBIS implementation in reducing discipline disproportionality. This study further examined the extent of the relationship between SWPBIS implementation fidelity and office discipline referrals received by Black students in urban elementary and middle schools. Findings are discussed and specific recommendations for enhancing cultural responsiveness within a SWPBIS framework are provided.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11256-021-00609-y
       
  • “Now, I See”: Multicultural Science Curriculum as
           Transformation and Social Action

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      Abstract: Abstract A case study for documentation of rich descriptive information about developing a multicultural science curriculum is the focus of this study. Three elementary preservice teachers challenge their ideas about science teaching and the urban context as they plan, teach, and assess their teaching of a multicultural science curriculum. Banks’ typology of multicultural curriculum reform was used as an instructional approach in a teacher education course and the analytical framework for this study. The findings of the study communicate three important points of discussion and implications for teacher education, science education, and multicultural curriculum development. Preparing teachers for urban schools dictates an explicit foundation and intentionality to expanding views about teaching and multiculturalism in urban classrooms, especially in the context of science education. The preservice teachers see the benefit of teaching science as Transformation and Social Action not only for their students but also for themselves as multiculturally-minded science curriculum developers.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11256-021-00602-5
       
  • Advancing Critical and Culturally Relevant Experiential Learning:
           Preparing Future Educators in Collaboration with Cooperating Teachers to
           Support STEM Engagement in Urban Schools

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      Abstract: Abstract In efforts to better prepare students for a technology-driven workforce, many states and districts have pushed for clustered teaching of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in K-12 schools, yet science and mathematics remain the cornerstones upon which broader opportunities in STEM education are built. Teachers serve as boundary spanners—connecting knowledge, experiences, and opportunities for access—and for that reason, we focus on teachers as the most promising change agents in science and mathematics education in urban schools. This qualitative study explores the potential for both initial preparation and continued development of practicing teachers to occur simultaneously through a co-learning university-school-community partnership model, summer residency, and coursework, using critical and culturally relevant outdoor experiential learning. Findings suggest that there was a clear shift with practicing teachers to be more open-minded about both the effectiveness and applicability of experiential outdoor learning in urban spaces, and the richness of urban schools and spaces themselves. Future Teachers were able to incorporate critical and culturally relevant experiential learning into their coursework and master’s project, and engage with their students and mentors in meaningful ways. The article suggests pathways for partnership development and implications for urban education classrooms.
      PubDate: 2022-01-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s11256-021-00633-y
       
  • Building Beloved Communities in Public School Classrooms

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      Abstract: Abstract This qualitative study examined the building of a beloved community in a seventh grade life science classroom while teaching and learning in a constricting institutional context (U.S. public school). Guided by a Critical Race Praxis for Educational Research lens (CRP-Ed), the findings demonstrated how building a beloved community while situated within an oppressive U.S. schooling system, supported students and teacher toward cultivating love and trust—with a collective commitment toward social-eco justice. As a result, this study contributes toward expanding the possibilities for teaching and learning toward social-eco justice in U.S. public schools that honors students’ and teachers’ agency, relationships, and cultivation of critical consciousness, while simultaneously pushing back on dehumanizing schooling policies and practices.
      PubDate: 2022-01-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s11256-021-00634-x
       
  • Exploring the Role of Family Support and Ethnic Pride in Cultivating the
           Academic and Career Resourcefulness of Underserved Youth in an Afterschool
           Program

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      Abstract: Abstract The purpose of this study was to identify the internal and external factors that support the academic and career resourcefulness of adolescents from underserved backgrounds. This mixed-methods study examined the experiences of 13 low-income adolescent participants who lived in public housing and participated in an afterschool program in the neighborhood. Data on participants’ feedback of the program was collected at the end of the school year through post-questionnaires that utilized open-ended and forced-choice questions. Qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) was used to analyze the post-intervention data, followed by quantitative tests including t-tests and correlations. Results showed that academic resourcefulness and career aspirations were positively associated with the students’ perception of their external supportive networks, such as the joint contributions of their participation in afterschool programming and their family support. The internal resource of ethnic pride was related to academic resourcefulness among ethnically minoritized middle school males and to career resourcefulness among ethnically minoritized high school females. Findings suggest that afterschool programs may benefit their students’ academic and career goals and trajectories by focusing their programming on direct and indirect pathways for strengthening family partnerships and students’ ethnic pride.
      PubDate: 2022-01-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s11256-021-00632-z
       
  • STEM Pathways for Black and Latinx Middle and High School Students

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      Abstract: Abstract Considering the growth and promising outlook of STEM occupations and the significant need to diversify STEM, the present study explored Black and Latinx youths’ situated experiences with and perspectives on STEM education. Informed by the major tenets of a grounded theory qualitative method, we interviewed 24 middle and high school students about their perceptions of their math and science preparation, their pursuit of STEM pathways, and their persistence in these fields. Results suggested a major theme related to participants’ experiences navigating uneven pathways towards academic and STEM success. In relation to this major theme, five open themes emerged which included: (1) characteristics, behaviors, and beliefs related to success in math and science; (2) familial role in achievement and success; (3) the lived experience of school and STEM classes; (4) external barriers and supports related to academic success; and (5) STEM careers and world of work. Identifying the challenges and opportunities that Black and Latinx youth face in their math and science education may inform the development of STEM education programs that meet the needs of this population.
      PubDate: 2022-01-18
      DOI: 10.1007/s11256-021-00631-0
       
  • Correction to: It Don’t Affect Them Like it Affects Us: Disenfranchised
           Grief of Black Boys in the Wake of Peer Homicide

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      PubDate: 2021-12-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s11256-021-00630-1
       
 
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