Subjects -> RECREATION, TRAVEL AND TOURISM (Total: 204 journals)
    - HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS (2 journals)
    - LEISURE AND RECREATION (24 journals)
    - RECREATION, TRAVEL AND TOURISM (178 journals)

RECREATION, TRAVEL AND TOURISM (178 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted by number of followers
Annals of Tourism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Translation Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Current Issues in Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Tourism Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Sustainable Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Culture Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Asia Pacific Journal of Tourism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Tourism Geographies: An International Journal of Tourism Space, Place and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Travel & Tourism Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Tourism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Environmental Management and Tourism     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Tourism and Himalayan Adventures     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Travel Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Heritage Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Applied Earth Observations and Geoinformation     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Tourism Anthropology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
American Journal of Tourism Management     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Tourism Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Almatourism - Journal of Tourism, Culture and Territorial Development     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Tourism Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Mobilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Hospitality Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
American Journal of Tourism Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Hospitality & Tourism Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Tourism and Cultural Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Nepalese Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Tourism Planning & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Tourism     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Hospitality Marketing & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Information Technology & Tourism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
E-Journal of Tourism     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Tourism Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Tourism & Management Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Digital Culture and Electronic Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Cornell Hospitality Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Sport & Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Policy Research in Tourism, Leisure and Events     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Religious Tourism and Pilgrimage     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Event and Festival Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Tourism Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Tourism Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Anatolia : An International Journal of Tourism and Hospitality Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Tourism Management Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Studies in Travel Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Tourism Culture & Communication     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of China Tourism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Hospitality Management and Tourism     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Tourism Review International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Antarctic Magazine     Free   (Followers: 5)
Space and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Hospitality and Tourism Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Event Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Quality Assurance in Hospitality & Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
ASEAN Journal on Hospitality and Tourism     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Knowledge Management in Tourism and Hospitality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Tourism Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Recreation and Sports Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Tourism Cities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Outdoor Recreation and Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Tourism Recreation Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Tourism Research & Hospitality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Visitor Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of Tourism, Hospitality and Recreation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Tourist Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Globe, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Hospitality and Event Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ecotourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Contemporary Tourism Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Gastronomy and Tourism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Hospitality & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Tourism Futures     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Business & Hotel Management     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Tourism, Hospitality and Sports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hospitality, Leisure, Sport & Tourism Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Caderno Virtual de Turismo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Craft Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Tourism in Marine Environments     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Podium Sport, Leisure and Tourism Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Turismo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Park and Recreation Administration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Turismo y Sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Applied Sciences in Tourism and Events     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Vacation Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
The Journal : Tourism and Hospitality Essentials Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Travel Medicine and Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Multidisciplinary Academic Tourism     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Entertainment Technology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Acta Economica Et Turistica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anatolia : A Journal of Tourism Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Tourism & Adventure     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Mondes du Tourisme     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Franco-Irish Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Educación física y deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
40 [degrees] South     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Travel Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Gestion Turistica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Infinitum: Revista Multidisciplinar     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Rangeland Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Kyiv National University of Culture and Arts. Series in Tourism     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Place Management and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Recreation and Society in Africa, Asia and Latin America     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Marketing & Tourism Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tourism Critiques : Practice and Theory     Open Access  
ARA : Revista de Investigación en Turismo     Open Access  
Tourism and Heritage Journal     Open Access  
Journal of Tourism and Heritage Research     Open Access  
Perspectives in Asian Leisure and Tourism     Open Access  
Juara : Jurnal Olahraga     Open Access  
Sasdaya : Gadjah Mada Journal of Humanities     Open Access  
New Approaches in Sport Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Geoheritage and Parks     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Sciences in Travel and Hospitality     Open Access  
Gaze: Journal of Tourism and Hospitality     Open Access  
Journal of Tourism and Hospitality Education     Open Access  
Journal of International and Thai Tourism     Open Access  
Sport i Turystyka : Środkowoeuropejskie Czasopismo Naukowe     Open Access  
Dusit Thani College Journal     Open Access  
Journal of Halal Product and Research     Open Access  
Tourism and Travelling     Open Access  
Güncel Turizm Araştırmaları Dergisi     Open Access  
Gastroia : Journal of Gastronomy And Travel Research     Open Access  
Journal of Tourism Intelligence and Smartness     Open Access  
Jurnal Destinasi Pariwisata     Open Access  
Jurnal Analisis Pariwisata     Open Access  
Jurnal IPTA     Open Access  
Jurnal Kepariwisataan dan Hospitalitas     Open Access  
Jurnal Pariwisata Terapan     Open Access  
Via : Tourism Review     Open Access  
Matkailututkimus     Open Access  
Revista Internacional de Turismo y Empresa     Open Access  
Revista Internacional de Derecho del Turismo     Open Access  
Revista Iberoamericana de Ciencias de la Actividad Física y el Deporte     Open Access  
ROTUR : Revista de Ocio y Turismo     Open Access  
Jurnal Pariwisata Pesona     Open Access  
Geotourism/Geoturystyka     Open Access  
Revista Organizações em Contexto     Open Access  
Geofronter     Open Access  
Espiga     Open Access  
Revista Eletrônica de Administração e Turismo     Open Access  
Revista Eletrônica Academicus     Open Access  
Matrik : Jurnal Manajemen, Strategi Bisnis dan Kewirausahaan     Open Access  
Cenário : Revista Interdisciplinar em Turismo e Território     Open Access  
Turystyka Kulturowa     Open Access  
Jurnal Master Pariwisata (Journal Master in Tourism Studies)     Open Access  
RACE - Revista de Administração, Contabilidade e Economia     Open Access  
Research in Hospitality Management     Open Access  
Revista Interamericana de Ambiente y Turismo     Open Access  
Revista de Gestão Ambiental e Sustentabilidade - GeAS     Open Access  
Revista de turism - studii si cercetari in turism     Open Access  
Multiciencias     Open Access  
Téoros     Open Access  
Polish Journal of Sport and Tourism     Open Access  
Journal of Hospitality Financial Management     Open Access  
TRANSIT     Open Access  
EchoGéo     Open Access  
Journeys     Full-text available via subscription  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Place Management and Development
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.347
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 1  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 2 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 1753-8335 - ISSN (Online) 1753-8343
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • Amenity mix of innovation districts

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      Authors: Viriya Taecharungroj , Steve Millington
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast amenity mixes of innovation districts worldwide and to identify the types of amenities in the districts. Urban amenity data were collected from Google Maps as 31,236 points of interest (POIs) in 24 innovation districts. The data were compared and categorised based on the density and diversity of amenity mixes using correspondence analysis. An overall amenity space of the 24 innovation districts was created using correlation and social network analyses. This study found that innovation districts have broad ranges of diversity and density. Five groups were identified by correspondence analysis, including retail, foodie, balanced, emerging and health-care districts. The amenity space of innovation districts created using correlation and social network analyses categorised amenities into four broad types – necessary, anchor, vibrant and contextual amenities – based on eigenvector centrality scores and density. To improve their innovation districts, managers are encouraged to create a foundation of innovations with anchor amenities, to ensure the “live-work-play” environment with necessary amenities, to foster buzz and vibes with vibrant amenities and to strengthen the identity and authenticity with contextual amenities. Despite some understanding, no previous research has thoroughly analysed the amenities available in innovation districts. This study is the first to comprehensively explore the amenities in innovation districts using data from Google Maps. Place managers can use the method introduced in this research to analyse innovation districts and other kinds of places.
      Citation: Journal of Place Management and Development
      PubDate: 2022-09-22
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMD-05-2022-0042
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Gender and placemaking: talking to women about clean air and sustainable
           urban environments in changing cities

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      Authors: Maria Loroño-Leturiondo , Sam Illingworth
      Abstract: This purpose of this study is to explore the voices of women in conceptualizing a city with clean air, and how this relates to urban structural changes being made more environmentally and socially sustainable. A growing body of research suggests that gender is central to placemaking, and in dealing with environmental sustainability, fear of crime, longer life expectancy, unpaid work and economic inequality shape mobility and experiences of the city for women. In this context, the authors conducted a series of interviews with women in Greater Manchester and explored how they envision a city with clean air. Findings suggest that the conceptualization of a city with cleaner air is influenced by a range of both direct and indirect factors including safety, pleasantness, greenspace, litter and homelessness. Consequently, these can be powerful elements in designing relevant policies for women and for society at large and in communicating them effectively. The major limitation of this study is that whilst it gives voice to women with different backgrounds (e.g. age, ethnicity or professional background) and experiences (e.g. number of children or preferred form of transport), it is not an encompassing voice of all women. For example, although the professional backgrounds of these women are diverse, they all hold a position of relative economic privilege, and as such it is important to acknowledge that these findings do not fully incorporate the voices of other, less privileged, women. These interviews and their analysis present a novel exploration of the question of air quality and placemaking from a gender perspective, highlighting both a willingness to change and to support structural changes.
      Citation: Journal of Place Management and Development
      PubDate: 2022-08-31
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMD-04-2021-0035
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Towards ecological place management in UK housing associations: organising
           tomorrow’s places

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      Authors: James Scott Vandeventer , Javier Lloveras , Gary Warnaby
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to conceptualise how place management practices in UK housing associations (HAs) involve processes of ecological place management. Ethnographic fieldwork focusing on how communal spaces are organised on a housing estate in a UK city revealed the importance of negotiation with other actors, including an HA which is responsible for managing the estate. The authors draw on extensive participant observation with residents, as well as interviews with both residents and employees of the HA, to show the wider forces and complexities involved in these ecological place management practices. This paper identifies hybrid socio-ecological, socio-political and political-economic dynamics unfolding as places are managed and organised. These widen the scope of place management research and practice to account for multiple ways places are organised. This paper offers a critical perspective on place management, developing an ecological approach that is applicable both to the relatively new context of housing and to more established sites in town and city centres. This paper’s findings point to ways that housing and place management practitioners, both in the UK and elsewhere, can use an ecological approach to re-frame their strategic and practical actions with regards to “place”. This paper contributes to unveiling the complexity involved in place management and organisation, thereby encouraging place managers to embrace ecological thinking capable of addressing future challenges.
      Citation: Journal of Place Management and Development
      PubDate: 2022-08-11
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMD-11-2021-0113
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Rescripting Riyadh: how the capital of Saudi Arabia employs urban
           megaprojects as catalysts to enhance the quality of life within the
           city’s neighborhoods

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      Authors: Anna Klingmann
      Abstract: This study aims to investigate whether the correlation between Saudi Arabia’s social and economic reforms, urban megaprojects and sustainable urbanism can lead to an increased quality of life (QoL) in the capital, create a comprehensive lifestyle setup for Riyadh’s residents while also aiming to attract foreign investment. This research examines five government-sponsored mega-destinations and their master plans against the objectives of Saudi Arabia’s Vision 2030’s Quality of Life Program. Furthermore, the author analyzed to what extent the proposed projects fulfill global mandates of sustainable urban development and how they might help raise the QoL for Riyadh’s residents. The author’s methodology rests primarily on detailed policy evaluation proposed by Vision 2030, literature research and data collected from proposed urban development plans. In parallel, the author conducted informal conversations with people living in affected areas and architectural offices who are involved in the design of the five megaprojects. After collecting the data for each project, the author compared the QoL Program criteria to the data of the proposed megaprojects to examine to what extent the proposed designs implement the QoL criteria of Vision 2030. In the last step, the author evaluated whether and how the proposed plans adhere to globally established guidelines of sustainable urban revitalization by studying possible overlaps and contingencies on an urban level. The analysis reveals that although each case study project targets one or more specific lifestyle domains, the projects combined fulfill all lifestyle categories specified in Saudi Arabia’s QoL program. In addition, each project contributes measures to improve livability in the categories of urban design and environment, infrastructure and transport, social engagement and safety while also providing a range of economic and educational opportunities for different demographics. In terms of sustainable development criteria, the analysis demonstrates that all case studies provide ample measures to enhance Riyadh’s mobility by providing greenways for pedestrians and cyclists, which connect to public transport. Furthermore, when strategically combined as a series of urban layers, the projects demonstrate potential to form urban synergies among different lifestyle domains that could positively affect existing and proposed neighborhoods, particularly when extended through an inclusive, participatory planning framework, which, in turn, could significantly raise the QoL for a broad socioeconomic demographic. This research reveals the complex role of megaprojects as change agents for socioeconomic reforms, as signifiers of livability and as planning frameworks to implement sustainable urbanism in Saudi Arabia’s capital, while also creating a lifestyle infrastructure for Riyadh’s residents. With their sensitive approach to climate, ecologically driven landscape projects and regionalist architecture inspired by the traditional Arab city, these case study projects may serve as an example to other countries in hot arid zones on sustainably revitalizing their urban environments. This study demonstrates how social and economic reforms intertwine with sustainable urban planning and placemaking to create a comprehensive lifestyle setup for Riyadh’s residents that has not previously existed. On the planning side, this includes creating a massive public infrastructure that encourages walkability and residents’ active participation in recreational, cultural, entertainment and sports activities. However, as the analysis has also revealed, while offering a large number of public facilities, the projects do not embrace a mixed-income project model, which would allow low-income families to live within a market-rate environment. In addition, one of the projects entails the displacement of benefit low-income and migrant communities. Although the government has a separate program that specifically aims at providing affordable housing in other areas of the city, these model destinations primarily target luxury tourists and affluent Saudis, potentially cementing existing socio-spatial divides in the city. Consequently, the megaprojects demonstrate Saudi Arabia’s conflicted response to the logic of entrepreneurial neoliberalism: on the one side, progressive attempts to promote an egalitarian approach to urban livability; on the other, strategic efforts to use megaprojects as spectacular showcases in the global marketplace. The correlation between Saudi Arabia’s socioeconomic reforms, megaprojects and sustainable urbanism in Riyadh has not been previously explored. Compared to Western countries’ cities, few attempts have been made to investigate the role of livability in the context of emerging countries’ fast-growing urban areas. This paper presents a considerable case study in Saudi Arabia that ties into a more extensive debate on cultural globalization where cities, particularly in the developing world, use megaprojects as change agents to reconstruct their urban territories according to standardized livability indices to elevate their image in the global marketplace.
      Citation: Journal of Place Management and Development
      PubDate: 2022-08-05
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMD-06-2021-0062
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Façades as product wrap: a typology to identify the consumers
           affected by product design

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      Authors: Muhammad Aljukhadar
      Abstract: The elevation of a residential building, or façade, affords aesthetic and functional value to tenants. Façades embody the design of the core product, i.e. the building’s unit. When carefully executed, they contribute to the attractiveness, livability and sustainability of urban areas. The purpose of this study is to show how façades influence consumer decision, and to identify the consumers affected more by façades, i.e., product design. Hinging on notions from product design and appearance, this research underscores the ways by which façades affect potential tenants. It also proposes that personality dimensions (i.e. concern with own physical appearance and view of achievement) identify the tenants affected more by façades. A study involving 1,091 consumers was performed to test the hypotheses. Functional and aesthetic façades facilitated the tenant decision to buy or rent a living unit in three ways: attraction, convection and conversion. Two tenant segments (performers and egotists) were the most affected by façades. Hence, key consumer segments including self-actualizers would be less influenced by product design. Construction companies should focus on delivering functional, aesthetic and well-maintained façades to boost satisfaction and sales. They should view the resources allocated to this purpose as an investment. Certain tenants are more affected by façades. Companies should identify the consumer segments more affected by design cues to better respond to their preferences. Policymakers are encouraged to set guidelines that foster well-executed façades in urban areas. This research underscored the ways by which the façades of residential buildings shape consumer decision. In addition, it provided a typology to help pinpoint the tenants more affected by façades. Finally, it elaborated design theories in the context of residential building façades, which can be used by future researchers to understand the role of façade in fulfilling tenants’ needs and expectations.
      Citation: Journal of Place Management and Development
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMD-10-2021-0102
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Sustainable city branding narratives: a critical appraisal of processes
           and outcomes

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Laura Ripoll Gonzalez , Fred Gale
      Abstract: This study aims to explore whether adopting a sustainability narrative in city branding and urban development strategies results in more inclusive governance arrangements (process) and a more pluralistic approach to generating sustainability value (outcome), in line with the triple bottom line approach advocated by the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The authors argue that a necessary step to enable meaningful sustainable urban development is to rethink the way in which “value” and “value creation” are being interpreted in urban development policies and city branding narratives. Mixed-methods case study of New York City’s (NYC) urban development and city branding strategies (2007–2019) combining analysis of academic and grey literature on NYC’s urban development and city branding, value hierarchies in NYC urban development strategic plans and local media reports covering NYC’s development and branding processes. Despite claiming commitment to urban sustainability, NYC’s urban development and branding narratives reveal a clear dominance of interpreting “value” primarily as “exchange value”, thus prioritising economic growth. In the authors’ view, a systemic, systematic and structured approach to generating “sustainability value” is necessary if city branding is to become a governance tool to support sustainable urban development. A “tetravaluation” approach is recommended as a practical, structured framework that can bridge across the ideas of “sustainability value” and “pluralistic governance”, ensuring effective implementation. Further investigation in additional urban contexts is required. The research contributes to current scholarly debates towards more balanced and pluralistic conceptions of “value” and place branding as a more holistic, participatory and democratic governance model for sustainable urban development.
      Citation: Journal of Place Management and Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-07
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMD-09-2021-0093
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Enacting safe places – a study of (im)balancing acts in everyday
           city centre management

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Cecilia Cassinger , Ola Thufvesson
      Abstract: The aim of this study is to outline a practice approach towards safety in public places whereby safety and place is understood as simultaneously produced in everyday work practice. Hence, the focus is shifted from place safety as a manageable asset to safe places as ongoing accomplishments. This study focuses on practices of enacting safe places on the municipal level in Sweden. Thus, the focus of analysis is on the meanings of safety. The empirical material was collected during the period 2017–2019 in the Swedish cities of Stockholm, Helsingborg and Malmö. In different ways, these cities struggle with navigating safety issues in public places. The study demonstrates how urban places are enacted as safe in and through practice. The findings include some of the ways in which safe places are accomplished, such as maintaining and caring for places, countering negative rumours and news reports and forming collaboration across sectors and actors. To gain a better understanding of safety in city centres, the study illuminates competing meaning-making processes in management work practice whereby places are negotiated as safe. The existing research on safety in public places is scattered across disciplinary fields and dominated by a fortress approach to safe places. By contrast to the top-down view of safety as a measure of control, this study generates knowledge of how safe places are continuously construed in the junction of management practices and practices of everyday life.
      Citation: Journal of Place Management and Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-27
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMD-07-2021-0075
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The permanency of temporality: how grassroots festivals in Indonesia
           create places in informal settlements

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      Authors: Poeti Nazura Gulfira Akbar , Alexander Jachnow
      Abstract: This paper aims to investigate the impact of place-making on the quality of place through community-organised art festivals, with two case studies in urban informal settlements or kampungs in Indonesia. Findings presented here are based on data collected and 39 in-depth interviews conducted in 2017 in two kampungs, namely, Kampung Dago Pojok, Bandung and Kampung Bustaman, Semarang. This paper argues that place-making can happen through temporary practices, such as festivals, and improve the quality of place in informal settlements. It indicates and analyses the kinds of activities that increase the aesthetic value of spaces and build a positive image of the kampungs. The study concludes with the finding that place-making through temporary interventions has the potential to permanently change and reshape public space. At the core of these activities is the collective and voluntary work known as kerja bakti that is done by the kampung communities and the civil society organizations involved. The paper offers a fresh perspective in the context of understanding the implications of place-making in the Global South. Assessing the development of public space, the paper provides insights into the use of grassroots festivals as a tool to permanently reshape urban spaces and engage the local community throughout the process.
      Citation: Journal of Place Management and Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMD-06-2020-0062
      Issue No: Vol. 15 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Giving and taking ownership of a destination brand: mechanisms of
           stakeholder engagement

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      Authors: Alberte Tøttenborg , Can-Seng Ooi , Anne Hardy
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore the complexities of engaging with local stakeholders in destination branding. As the main creators and drivers of the destination brand, many brand authorities metaphorically “give ownership” of the brand to local stakeholders, for them to “take ownership” of it. This paper examines the inherent challenges of this process. In the Tasmanian destination branding process presented here, the Tasmanian authorities used best practices to generate a sense of ownership of the destination brand among local tourism businesses. Some players engaged, but many did not. The study shows the necessity to understand the dynamics between giving ownership of the brand and the various local tourism business stakeholders actually taking ownership. This study looks at an Australian destination branding experience, namely, Tasmania’s “Go Behind the Scenery”. Primary data were gathered through 14 in-depth interviews with tourism operators, selected through a purposive sampling approach, based on their various levels of participation in the branding processes. The interviews aimed to understand how they variously engaged with the brand and processes of ownership. This study shows that a relatively open interpretation of the brand can welcome wider engagement and generate a sense of ownership through the local businesses’ own interpretations. But there are also barriers for these stakeholders in developing an even stronger sense of ownership. They need more support in addressing their individual circumstance before the brand can align with their business. This paper accentuates an ownership gap, understood as the gap between giving ownership (mechanisms to transfer ownership from brand authorities to stakeholders) and taking ownership (stakeholders assume responsibility for and manifest the brand). In identifying a gap between these two aspects of engagement, this paper initiates a more nuanced discussion on the mechanisms of stakeholder engagement in the branding process.
      Citation: Journal of Place Management and Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-06
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMD-12-2020-0124
      Issue No: Vol. 15 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • What if the local community is already well-off enough'
           Stakeholders’ conflicts over sustainable tourism development in remote
           communities

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      Authors: Islam Elgammal
      Abstract: This study aims to explore community involvement in sustainable tourism development (STD) at Siwa Oasis, Egypt, and examines the perspectives of local communities, visitors and governmental decision makers concerning the area’s STD plans. It provides a brief discussion on the stakeholders’ conflict of interest alongside exploring the costs and benefits of STDs for the community. This study examines the area’s problems and challenges and expands the discussion on STD by providing a deep understanding of the oasis context, which involves a broad range of issues. In this exploratory study, 18 semi-structured interviews were conducted with three groups of stakeholders (local community, governmental decision makers and visitors) to investigate the current practices of STD and the future vision for the area. Data were coded and interpreted using thematic analysis. This paper provides empirical insights into how STDs can be practised in an oasis context. It suggests there is a conflict between the governmental vision for the area and the community’s needs that could lead to a failure to implement STDs. Themes related to environmental, social and economic STD dimensions are discussed. The findings provide managerial and practical implications for decision makers on the promotion of STDs in remote communities. Because of the chosen research approach, the results may lack generalizability. Therefore, future studies are encouraged to test the study’s propositions further by using a mixed-methods approach, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper has implications for STD within an oasis context, particularly concerning balancing the economic, environmental, political and social aspects of STD. This paper fulfils an identified need to study how STD can be practised when most of the local community is already comparatively well-off economically.
      Citation: Journal of Place Management and Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-19
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMD-02-2021-0020
      Issue No: Vol. 15 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Coronavirus’ exposure of food, place and community resilience: a Welsh
           local authority perspective

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      Authors: Rebecca Jones , Eifiona Thomas Lane , Luke Prosser
      Abstract: Coronavirus has accentuated the cracks within the fragile UK food system. Empty shelves and empty stomachs, the damaging consequences of coronavirus have led to an unprecedented increase in food insecurity and food access. The purpose of this paper is to provide in-depth insight into varied and innovative rural localised responses to food access during the pandemic. This study draws on multiple perspectives of those working to combat food insecurity, inequality and inaccessibility in Gwynedd, exploring food access initiatives and their responses to the pandemic, innovative food distribution collaborations and the role of maintaining already fragile rural communities. This study concludes that the need for transformative place-making to build stronger, more resilient communities has never been more pressing, with support from public sector funding to help alleviate some of the hardships and pressure with the rise in poverty and austerity, coronavirus imposed or not. This study focuses on a single local authority area in North Wales, Gwynedd, an area where little food research has been published to date. The coronavirus pandemic also places the timely research within the scope of food access and distribution during hardship. This study discusses the impacts exposed by the pandemic and lessons that can be drawn and reflected on for future benefit.
      Citation: Journal of Place Management and Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-13
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMD-02-2021-0014
      Issue No: Vol. 15 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Place branding in a bottle: management strategies for unplanned messages

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      Authors: Maria Briana
      Abstract: This paper explores an important yet overlooked concept in place branding literature, unplanned messages. Focusing on unplanned messages, this study aims to contribute to a better understanding of the concept of spontaneous order in place branding and how to manage the unplanned communication process so as to ensure a high reputational status for a place. This paper builds on past research on place brand communication and proposes a conceptual framework for unplanned messages. Classification schemes for places and place brands are proposed, contributing to place brand management in three aspects: reviewing of decisions and strategies undertaken, assessing current situation and planning way forward when it comes to priorities for place management and development. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper that introduces the emergent image and presents a classification scheme for places that contributes to a strategic management program of unplanned messages in place branding.
      Citation: Journal of Place Management and Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-17
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMD-01-2021-0003
      Issue No: Vol. 15 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • The territorial segmentation of coastal tourism areas

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      Authors: Moisés Simancas Cruz , María Pilar Peñarrubia Zaragoza , Raúl Hernández-Martín , Yurena Rodríguez Rodríguez
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to analyse the potential benefits of identifying homogeneous territorial units of the urban-tourism space at a local scale. The territory is an essential variable for designing tourist activities adapted to the characteristics of each urban-tourism space. However, your consideration presents a series of problems, including the lack of alphanumeric, microscale, georeferenced statistical information. The territorial segmentation of the tourist accommodations supply is approached as a methodology, a technique and an instrument that can be used to apply marketing strategies in coastal tourism areas. One of the most important results is that territorial segmentation is a methodology and technique that can mitigate this issue because it is well-suited to defining spatial patterns of tourist behaviour through the delimitation of territorial units that have a certain degree of homogeneity. The idea of territorial segmentation is the ideal technique for understanding tourists and their behaviour in the territory by integrating all the variables that intervene in a trip, the different aspects of the destination and data regarding tourist behaviour, allowing them to be understood at the greatest level of territorial disaggregation and making it a good tool for public and private actors, capable of facilitating intelligent decisions in strategic territorial planning and in defining the marketing approach of tourism companies.
      Citation: Journal of Place Management and Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-05
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMD-01-2021-0005
      Issue No: Vol. 15 , No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Role of place satisfaction and residents’ ambassadorship behaviours
           (RAB) on place attachment to city and neighbourhood

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      Authors: Mohammad Shahidul Hasan Swapan , Saalem Sadeque , Md. Ashikuzzaman
      Abstract: This study aims to investigate how place satisfaction (SAT) and residents’ ambassadorship behaviour (RAB) are related to residents’ place attachment (PAtt). In addition, this relationship is examined at the city and the neighbourhood levels. This study is based on a questionnaire survey of 1,160 residents from Khulna city in Bangladesh. This research model is tested using structural equation modelling. The findings support the four-dimensional (place dependence, place social bonding, place identity and place affect) second-order construct of PAtt. It also highlights that RAB mediates the relationship between residents’ SAT and PAtt at the city and neighbourhood levels. Future research can investigate how RAB changes over time. In addition, the research model can be tested in multi-city and multi-country contexts. The results from this study emphasise the need for urban planners to satisfactorily meet the needs of the residents to engender positive word-of-mouth, which can lead to greater PAtt. This study contributes by improving the understanding of the way PAtt is influenced by SAT and RAB. Furthermore, it shows that this influence varies across city and neighbourhood levels.
      Citation: Journal of Place Management and Development
      PubDate: 2021-12-22
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMD-04-2021-0042
      Issue No: Vol. 15 , No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Does entrepreneur perception of the city’s decline matter to place
           attachment'

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      Authors: James M. Wilkerson , Frank M. Sorokach , Marwan A. Wafa
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to explore the association between local entrepreneurs’ perception of the city’s decline and their place attachment (measured in terms of commitment to the declining city and sense of how the declining city compares to other cities). The authors surveyed entrepreneurs in a relatively small sample (N = 105) from a declining city of about 78,000 residents in the USA. The authors found significant inverse correlations and found that, after controlling for length of residency, the entrepreneur’s perception of the city’s decline predicted lower place attachment. The authors also tested a moderation hypothesis and observed that, whereas professional-service entrepreneurs with both stronger and weaker perceptions of the city’s decline showed similar place attachment, non-professional entrepreneurs showed significantly more variation, displaying both the highest place attachment when weak in perceptions of the city’s decline and the lowest place attachment when strong in perceptions of the city’s decline. The authors discuss implications for place attachment, place image and place branding research, as well as for the study of place context’s effects on entrepreneurship. Results hold implications for place branding’s participative development and for reasons to expect some difficulty in place branding when the context is a declining city. Relative to prior research in place management, the research features a neglected segment of the city’s population, business owners, to study place attachment. Relative to prior entrepreneurship research, the authors advance the study of context’s effects on entrepreneurship by extending it to the place context of declining cities, which are not usually featured in entrepreneurship studies.
      Citation: Journal of Place Management and Development
      PubDate: 2021-12-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMD-06-2021-0064
      Issue No: Vol. 15 , No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Questing a walkable city: a case of urban neighbourhood walkability
           environment in Bangladesh

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      Authors: A.S.M. Shuaib , Md Masud Parves Rana
      Abstract: What makes neighbourhood environment more walkable is an important question for urban planning and design research. The purpose of this paper is to explore this question through a case study of urban sidewalks in different contexts of urban neighbourhoods in Rajshahi city of Bangladesh. Using participatory observation, Google street view and photography techniques, it examines the quality of the street facilities by demonstrating physical attributes of sidewalks and by analysing how various obstructions on them characterize neighbourhood walkability environment. The findings suggest that the unusable sidewalks in Rajshahi city, Bangladesh, are a production of inadequate and inappropriate planning and design that unable to capitalize the functionality of sidewalks as a means of walking. It further argues that the urban planners and designers of streets have paid little attention to the diverse requirements of sidewalks in accordance with spatial and socio-economic categories of urban neighbourhoods. This study adds insights about the urban sidewalks planning and design in the context of a developing country. It provides an empirical evidence about the constraints and potentials of making a walkable city.
      Citation: Journal of Place Management and Development
      PubDate: 2021-11-01
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMD-11-2020-0108
      Issue No: Vol. 15 , No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Street-level bureaucrats: tensions and challenges in online placemaking

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      Authors: Pieter Breek , Jasper Eshuis , Joke Hermes
      Abstract: Social media have become a key part of placemaking. Placemaking revolves around collaboration between multiple stakeholders, which requires ongoing two-way communication between local government and citizens. Although social media offer promising tools for local governments and public professionals in placemaking, they have not lived up to their potential. This paper aims to uncover the tensions and challenges that social media bring for public professionals at the street level in placemaking processes. This study aims to fill this gap with a case study of area brokers engaged in online placemaking in Amsterdam. In total, 14 in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted, focusing on area brokers’ social media practices, perceptions and challenges. The authors used an open coding strategy in the first phase of coding. In the second phase, the authors regrouped codes in thematic categories with the use of sensitizing concepts derived from the theoretical review. The use of social media for placemaking imposes demands on area brokers from three sides: the bureaucracy, the affordances of social media and affective publics. The paper unpacks pressures area brokers are under and the (emotional) labour they carry out to align policy and bureaucratic requirements with adequate communication needed in neighbourhood affairs on social media. The tensions and the multidimensionality of what is required explain the reluctance of area brokers to exploit the potential of social media in their work. Several studies have addressed the use of social media in placemaking, but all neglected the perspective of street-level bureaucrats who shape the placemaking process in direct contact with citizens.
      Citation: Journal of Place Management and Development
      PubDate: 2021-10-14
      DOI: 10.1108/JPMD-01-2021-0008
      Issue No: Vol. 15 , No. 4 (2021)
       
  • Journal of Place Management and Development

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