Subjects -> COMMUNICATIONS (Total: 518 journals)
    - COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)
    - DIGITAL AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION (31 journals)
    - HUMAN COMMUNICATION (19 journals)
    - MEETINGS AND CONGRESSES (7 journals)
    - RADIO, TELEVISION AND CABLE (15 journals)

MEETINGS AND CONGRESSES (7 journals)

Showing 1 - 8 of 8 Journals sorted by number of followers
Discourse Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Language and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Image and Video Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Media and Cultural Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Bulletin du centre d’études médiévales d’Auxerre     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Buddhist-Christian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brookings Trade Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Argumentation and Advocacy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Brookings Trade Forum
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1520-5479 - ISSN (Online) 1534-0635
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • The Economic and Environmental Effects of Border Tax Adjustments for
           Climate Policy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: For the foreseeable future, climate change policy will be considerably more stringent in some countries than in others. Indeed, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change explicitly states that developed countries must take meaningful action before any obligations are to be placed on developing countries.However, differences in climate policy will lead to differences in energy costs, and to concerns about competitive advantage. In high-cost countries, there will be political pressure to impose border tax adjustments (BTAs), or "green tariffs," on imports from countries with little or no climate policy and low energy costs. The BTAs would be based on the carbon emissions associated with the production ... Read More
      Keywords: Tariff; Climatic changes; Greenhouse gas mitigation; Energy policy; Foreign trade regulation; Environmental policy; Technology transfer; Environmental responsibility
      PubDate: 2019-08-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • International Trade Law and the Economics of Climate Policy: Evaluating
           the Legality and Effectiveness of Proposals to Address Competitiveness and
           Leakage Concerns

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: There is a growing consensus that a market mechanism that puts a price on carbon, such as a cap-and-trade system or a carbon tax, should be at the heart of the most flexible and cost-effective way to address climate change.1 Ideally, such an approach would be adopted as part of a multilateral agreement. The reason is that carbon is a global pollutant, so a ton of carbon emitted in Beijing contributes to climate change just as much as a ton of carbon emitted in New York. This tragedy-of-the-commons nature of climate change raises concerns that any unilateral effort by the United States to put a price on carbon could disadvantage U.S. industrial firms or undermine the measure's environmental objective. These two ... Read More
      Keywords: Tariff; Climatic changes; Greenhouse gas mitigation; Energy policy; Foreign trade regulation; Environmental policy; Technology transfer; Environmental responsibility
      PubDate: 2019-08-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Addressing the Leakage/Competitiveness Issue in Climate Change Policy
           Proposals

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Of all the daunting obstacles faced by the effort to combat global climate change, the problem of leakage is perhaps the most recent to gain serious attention from policy makers. Assume that a core of rich countries is able to agree for the remainder of the century on a path of targets for emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs), following the lead of the Kyoto Protocol, or to agree on other measures to cut back on emissions, and that the path is aggressive enough at face value to go some way toward achieving the GHG concentration goals that environmental scientists say are necessary. Will global emissions in fact be reduced' Even under the business-as-usual scenario—that is, the path along which technical experts ... Read More
      Keywords: Tariff; Climatic changes; Greenhouse gas mitigation; Energy policy; Foreign trade regulation; Environmental policy; Technology transfer; Environmental responsibility
      PubDate: 2019-08-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Technology Transfers and Climate Change: International Flows, Barriers,
           and Frameworks

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Discourse concerning international technology transfers to address climate change issues is typically based on a paradigm that is focused on North South technology flows and financial flows, especially in the context of official development assistance programs or offset projects under the Clean Development Mechanism of the Kyoto Protocol. This paradigm is useful for many analytic and negotiating agendas. However, it reflects an overly narrow conceptualization of the nature, sources, and methods of international technology transfers. It thus neglects important issues that need to be addressed in order to utilize more fully the potential of international technology transfers for climate change mitigation and/or ... Read More
      Keywords: Tariff; Climatic changes; Greenhouse gas mitigation; Energy policy; Foreign trade regulation; Environmental policy; Technology transfer; Environmental responsibility
      PubDate: 2019-08-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Five "Gs": Lessons from World Trade for Governing Global Climate Change

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Reversing the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of the world's $60 trillion economy will be among the most complex international governance challenges ever—rivaling the forty-year effort to dramatically reduce tariffs and establish a rules-based trading system. Given that nearly fifteen years have passed since the completion of the last global trade pact, it is easy to forget that the World Trade Organization (WTO) stands tall among the great successes of global governance, precisely because it was so difficult to accomplish. A counterpart twin tower—a global system to address climate change—can mimic the trade regime's most successful governance principles, and learn from its structural weaknesses. Perhaps more ... Read More
      Keywords: Tariff; Climatic changes; Greenhouse gas mitigation; Energy policy; Foreign trade regulation; Environmental policy; Technology transfer; Environmental responsibility
      PubDate: 2019-08-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Climate Commons and a Global Environmental Organization

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Over the period 2000 to 2008, the United States maintained a largely hostile posture toward multilateralism, ranging from military adventurism to rejection of international norms for human rights and climate change. Its support for the Doha Round of multilateral trade negotiations was undercut by a failure to live up to global commitments to foreign assistance (the Millennium Challenge) and protectionist and retrograde 2008 agricultural legislation. If this experience shows America anything, it is that renouncing its role as a constructive multilateral leader (dating to 1945) has been a disaster for its foreign policy and the esteem in which it is held.This desultory period is now at an end, and a fresh start can ... Read More
      Keywords: Tariff; Climatic changes; Greenhouse gas mitigation; Energy policy; Foreign trade regulation; Environmental policy; Technology transfer; Environmental responsibility
      PubDate: 2019-08-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Reflections on Climate Change and Trade

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Let me start with a general comment that is relevant as background to the theme of this book, and then move on to some of the specifics of the interface between trade, the World Trade Organization, and the environment that many of the chapters above have addressed. At the outset, we need to remember that those who work on trade (mostly academics) and those who work on the environment (mostly activists) have traditionally been at loggerheads from time to time.Why' One important philosophical difference that underlies much of this tension, which I think we tend to forget, is that trade economists are typically considering and condemning governmental interventions (specifically, protectionism, such as the imposition ... Read More
      Keywords: Tariff; Climatic changes; Greenhouse gas mitigation; Energy policy; Foreign trade regulation; Environmental policy; Technology transfer; Environmental responsibility
      PubDate: 2019-08-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Foreword

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: This volume is the latest demonstration of the commitment by Brookings tocontribute in every possible and appropriate way to finding a solution tothe existential problem of climate change. The debate on this subject has shiftedfrom science to public policy. Though no consensus has emerged, it is clearthat addressing climate change effectively will require understanding the deepinteractions between it and other policy areas. Reaching an international agreementfor meaningful global action will require diplomacy at the highest level.Sustaining lower levels of greenhouse gas emissions will require a new energyinfrastructure. And reducing emissions could end up reshaping almost everyaspect of nations’ domestic ... Read More
      Keywords: Tariff; Climatic changes; Greenhouse gas mitigation; Energy policy; Foreign trade regulation; Environmental policy; Technology transfer; Environmental responsibility
      PubDate: 2019-08-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Editor's Overview

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Global climate change has leapt to the forefront of the public conscience.As policymakers grapple with the challenge of shaping policy to achievea domestic and international consensus, attention has turned to the role thattrade- related measures could play. In both Europe and the United States, policymakershave considered implementing so- called border adjustments ongoods coming from countries with few or no climate change policies. Thesepolicymakers argue that such measures would protect domestic firms from“unfair” competition abroad and provide a stick to discipline laggard countriesinto implementing their own climate change policies.Although this “negative” agenda of trade- as- stick has garnered most of ... Read More
      Keywords: Tariff; Climatic changes; Greenhouse gas mitigation; Energy policy; Foreign trade regulation; Environmental policy; Technology transfer; Environmental responsibility
      PubDate: 2019-08-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.238.72.180
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-