Subjects -> BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION (Total: 146 journals)
    - BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION (138 journals)
    - CARPENTRY AND WOODWORK (8 journals)

BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION (138 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 35 of 35 Journals sorted alphabetically
A+BE : Architecture and the Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Academia : Architecture and Construction     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
ACI Structural Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Building Education     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Building Energy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Ambiente Construído     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Edificación     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Civil Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Construction Economics and Building     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Australasian Journal of Construction Economics and Building - Conference Series     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Baltic Journal of Real Estate Economics and Construction Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Baurechtliche Blätter : bbl     Hybrid Journal  
Bautechnik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
BER : Architects and Quantity Surveyors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
BER : Building and Construction : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
BER : Building Contractors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Building Sub-Contractors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Capital Goods Industries Survey     Full-text available via subscription  
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Building and Construction : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Beton- und Stahlbetonbau     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Building & Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Building Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Buildings     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
BUILT : International Journal of Building, Urban, Interior and Landscape Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Built Environment Inquiry Journal     Open Access  
Built-Environment Sri Lanka     Full-text available via subscription  
Case Studies in Construction Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cement and Concrete Composites     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Cement and Concrete Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Challenge Journal of Concrete Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Challenge Journal of Concrete Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Change Over Time     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
City, Culture and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Civil Engineering = Siviele Ingenieurswese     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Clay Technology     Full-text available via subscription  
Concreto y cemento. Investigación y desarrollo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Construction Economics and Building     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Construction Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Construction Management and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Construction Research and Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Construction Robotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Corporate Real Estate Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Dams and Reservoirs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Developments in the Built Environment     Open Access  
Energy and Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Engineering Project Organization Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Environment and Urbanization Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
FUTY Journal of the Environment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gaceta Técnica     Open Access  
GISAP : Technical Sciences, Construction and Architecture     Open Access  
Glass Structures & Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Handbook of Adhesives and Sealants     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
HBRC Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Housing and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
HVAC&R Research     Hybrid Journal  
Indoor and Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Informes de la Construcción     Open Access  
Intelligent Buildings International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Advanced Structural Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Architectural Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Built Environment and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Concrete Structures and Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Construction Engineering and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Construction Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Masonry Research and Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Protective Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of River Basin Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Structural Stability and Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Sustainable Building Technology and Urban Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Sustainable Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Sustainable Construction Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Sustainable Real Estate and Construction Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of the Built Environment and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Ventilation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal Sustainable Construction & Design     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal for Education in the Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Aging and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Architecture, Planning and Construction Management     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Asian Architecture and Building Engineering     Open Access  
Journal of Building Construction and Planning Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Building Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Building Materials and Structures     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Building Pathology and Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Building Performance Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Civil Engineering and Construction Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Civil Engineering and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Computational Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Construction Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Construction Engineering, Technology & Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Green Building     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Legal Affairs and Dispute Resolution in Engineering and Construction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Sustainable Cement-Based Materials     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Sustainable Design and Applied Research in Innovative Engineering of the Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the South African Institution of Civil Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Transport and Land Use     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Landscape History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Materiales de Construcción     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Mauerwerk     Hybrid Journal  
Modular and Offsite Construction (MOC) Summit Proceedings |     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Naval Engineers Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Open Construction & Building Technology Journal     Open Access  
Organization, Technology and Management in Construction     Open Access  
PARC Pesquisa em Arquitetura e Construção     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Forensic Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Urban Design and Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Revista ALCONPAT     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista de la Construcción     Open Access  
Revista de Urbanismo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Hábitat Sustenable     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista IBRACON de Estruturas e Materiais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Ingenieria de Construcción     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista INVI     Open Access  
RILEM Technical Letters     Open Access  
Room One Thousand     Open Access  
Ruang-Space: Jurnal Lingkungan Binaan (Journal of The Built Environment)     Open Access  
Russian Journal of Construction Science and Technology     Open Access  
Science and Engineering of Composite Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 62)
Science and Technology for the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Steel Construction - Design and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Stroitel’stvo : Nauka i Obrazovanie     Open Access  
Structural Concrete     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Structural Mechanics of Engineering Constructions and Buildings     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sustainable Buildings     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sustainable Cities and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Technology|Architecture + Design     Hybrid Journal  
Terrain.org : A Journal of the Built & Natural Environments     Free   (Followers: 3)
The Historic Environment : Policy & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The IES Journal Part A: Civil & Structural Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Tidsskrift for boligforskning     Open Access  
YBL Journal of Built Environment     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Miet- und Raumrecht     Hybrid Journal  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2223-7852
Published by U of Johannesburg Homepage  [3 journals]
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Developing a
           roadmap for resolving construction workforce challenges in Nigeria
    • Authors: Oni; Oluwole, Van Wyk, Jacobus, Crafford, Gerrit
      Abstract: The inadequate supply of skilled workforce in the Nigerian house construction sector has continued to retard the productivity of the sector and exacerbated the housing challenges of the country. Nigeria has a large and fast-growing population of over 140 million with an estimated growth rate of 3.2%. This has engendered increased investment in shelter provision; especially by individuals and families due to fast rising housing rents mainly in the urban centres. Previous policies have not adequately addressed the realities of the skills inadequacies in the sector and there remains a paucity of empirical studies into the dynamics that impact construction workforce supply in Nigeria. The fallout of this is manifested in the difficulties faced by developers in sourcing suitably qualified and experienced workmen for house construction projects. In response to this challenge, an upsurge of migrant artisans and craftsmen from neighbouring West African nations like Togo, Benin Republic and Ghana - into Nigeria has occurred in the recent times. This development is totally unacceptable as it exacerbates the overarching socio-economic problems in Nigeria, especially the already high unemployment rate which is estimated to be 23.9%. This study investigates the inadequate training of house construction artisans in South Western Nigeria; and it does so by employing a quantitative research survey. It canvassed the opinions of professionals and employers. The study evolves interventions and develops a strategic blueprint for resolving the workforce crisis in the house construction sector.
      PubDate: 2016-10-26T09:57:24Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Condition
           assessment of student hostel building on campuses of federal universities
           in north-central Nigeria
    • Authors: Adamu; Anita Dzikwi, Shakantu, Winston
      Abstract: Universities and many tertiary educational institutions in Nigeria are under pressure to preserve their built environment. The focus of this study is to assess the condition of on-campus hostel buildings at Nigerian public universities with the aim of generating information about the maintenance requirement of the buildings. Condition assessment is the most common method for measuring building performance and identifying maintenance needs of facilities. In the process, the efficiency of the current maintenance management strategies is determined. Primary data were generated with the aid of a condition survey guide and rating sheets. The results were computed in percentages and presented on bar charts. The assessment results revealed the conditions of the components within the hostel building at the three universities studied. The walls, floors and ceilings of the most of enclosed spaces such as the bedrooms, kitchens and washrooms are in various degrees of deterioration. In most of the bedrooms, there are minor cracks and worn-out finishing with evidence of inadequate routine maintenance. There are many doors and windows with major problems such as damaged locking devices or door handles. Cracked or broken window panes and door panels are common. The toilets and bathroom facilities are almost not operational and are in need of urgent major maintenance works. The building facades (ceilings, walls and floors) in the male and female hostels at university C are in good condition, signifying that the surfaces of the facades show slight soiling or discolorations or fading that affects mainly the aesthetic value of the buildings. Generally, the electrical and plumbing services at the hostels across all the universities studied are in poor conditions, some of the facilities were rated unsuitable for use.
      PubDate: 2016-10-26T09:57:23Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: A mini-factor
           health and safety compliance : a multivariate factorial analysis
    • Authors: Mustapha; Zakari, Aigbavboa, Clinton O., Thwala, Wellington D.
      Abstract: The construction industry employees all over the world experience serious injuries and deaths due to accidents in complex high-risk systems. These incidents have been attributed to conditions in which an employee is working or his actions that can result in human error or an unsafe action. Adherence to safety regulations features among Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs) contractors' in Ghana were confirmed through the use of a confirmatory factor analysis. Findings from the Structural Equation Modleing (SEM) analysis confirmed that the Rio coefficient and the Cronbach's alpha coefficient on the internal consistency were over 0.70 criteria for acceptability. The influence of adherence to safety regulations features on the Health and Safety (H&S) compliance was found to be statistically significant. Hence, strong in predicting H&S compliance among SMEs contractors'. The paper makes a significance contribution towards SMEs contractors' adherence to safety regulations. The paper provides a significant insight into how H&S compliance among SMEs contractors' adherence to safety regulations could be improved.
      PubDate: 2016-10-26T09:57:22Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Construction
           health and safety (H&S) performance improvement : are clients and
           consultants playing their part?
    • Authors: Kikwasi; Geraldine J., Smallwood, John
      Abstract: Performance improvement of Health and Safety (H&S) in the construction industry is invariably a result of a joint effort of the project team members. Clients and their consultants play an important role in ensuring that H&S is addressed throughout the project stages. The objective of the paper is to assess the roles of clients and consultants in improving H&S in the construction industry at the tendering and construction stages, and the pre-requisites thereto. Respondents were randomly selected from delegates of the Construction Industry Forum and data was collected using self-administered questionnaires and a review of literature. Findings indicate that with the exception of the role of ensuring that the contractor is complying with the H&S plan during construction, which is often done, other roles are fulfilled less frequently. Furthermore, it was revealed that those respondents that were more experienced in terms of H&S were more involved in H&S and contributed more to the improvement of H&S than those who were less experienced. The paper concludes that many consultants and their clients are not fully participating in H&S. The paper therefore recommends that current laws and regulations be reviewed and amended to include duties of clients and consultants, and that clients and consultants to be sensitized and empowered to fulfill their roles.
      PubDate: 2016-10-26T09:57:22Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Predicting the
           future of quantity surveying profession in the construction industry
    • Authors: Wao; Joel Ochieng
      Abstract: Quantity surveying profession has changed over time to adapt to the changing and increasing requirements of project owners. In the year 2007 to 2011, the construction industry experienced economic downturn causing uncertainty in the profession. This study examined the developmental trend of the quantity surveying profession in the construction industry to determine its future. The independent variable was the current level of satisfaction of quantity surveyors while the dependent variable was the future growth of the profession. The working hypothesis was that the profession would experience future growth. A survey questionnaire via Qualtrics online survey software was administered to quantity surveyors to determine their opinion of the profession. Data collected were analyzed using SAS v9.4 statistical analysis software. The results showed a greater level of satisfaction of quantity surveyors with the current developments in the profession. Further, the current level of satisfaction with the profession strongly correlated with the chances of growth of the profession, implying a greater likelihood of future growth in the roles of quantity surveyors in the next 10-15 years. Areas such as information technology and sustainable construction would favor the growth. Thus, the hypothesis was supported. Another finding was that females tended to be fewer in the profession. Thus, it was recommended that further research be conducted focusing on gender equality and propose ways to encourage women to join the quantity surveying profession. Overall, the study concluded that quantity surveyors should improve and diversify their roles more to provide greater value to project owners as the profession seemed promising.
      PubDate: 2016-10-26T09:57:21Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: The impacts of
           the demographic characteristics of residents on the perception of quality
           of off-campus student accommodation in South-South, Nigeria
    • Authors: Bella-Omunagbe; O.C., Shakantu, Winston, Van Eyk, Marle, Werner, Amanda
      Abstract: This study presents the findings of the evaluation of the impacts of the demographic characteristics of residents on the perception of quality of off-campus accommodation. It is limited to students who are currently residing in privately developed off-campus accommodation in selected universities, towns and cities in South-South, Nigeria. The data for this study were gathered between June and August, 2014 with the used of self-study structured questionnaire. A total of 520 respondents participated in the survey. The findings of the study revealed that though the demographic characteristics of students are essential in the determination of perception of quality of attributes of housing, the degree of influence differs among gender, age groups, income levels and the years of study of students. The influence of age, gender, income and year of study on the perception of quality of off-campus accommodation were also found to be statistically significant. The main implication of these findings is that investors in the student housing market can segment the development of off-campus accommodation to serve a selected demographic group(s).
      PubDate: 2016-10-26T09:57:20Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Mental stress
           among civil engineering construction site agents and foremen in the Nelson
           Mandela May Metropole
    • Authors: Haydam; Erich, Smallwood, John
      Abstract: The construction industry as a whole has been suffering from mental stress due to a range of stressors imposed on the work force, resulting in behavioural habits which are not conducive to a healthy lifestyle, physical symptoms signalling burnout, chronic stress, and depression. An empirical study was conducted among medium to large civil engineering contractors in the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropole the sample stratum including site agents and foremen. The salient findings include: using unreliable and old tools, using dirty toilet facilites, and working on an untidy site are the most significant physical stressors; limited time spent with loved ones, tight deadlines, inadequate reward system, and work-life imbalance are the most significant organisational stressors; headaches, tense muscles, and smoking cigarettes are the most significant behavioural activities and physical sensations experienced; tired, weak and no energy, restless and on edge, and irritable are the most significant sensations of stress; feeling sad or down, restlessness, and decrease/increase in appetite are the most significant symptoms of depression. The objective of the study was to ascertain what stressors are imposed on a sample of site agents and foremen in the civil engineering sector of the construction industry. Further to the aforementioned, the study intended to identify what forms of strain, as also, the degree of stress and depression experienced by the work force. It can be concluded that a vast array of stressors negatively affect the civil engineering sector of the construction industry. Subsequently resulting in stress, depression, and mental/physical strain.
      PubDate: 2016-10-26T09:57:20Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Volume 6 Issue
           1 June 2016 - full journal articles
    • Abstract: Volume 6 Issue 1 June 2016 - full journal articles
      PubDate: 2016-10-26T09:57:19Z
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 1 (2016)
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: A survey of the
           perception of quantity surveyors regarding tender-price indices in South
           Africa
    • Authors: Cruywagen; J.H.
      Abstract: Different indices are encountered in the building industry for use by built environment professionals, such as input-price indices, output-price indices and seller's-price indices. Currently there is only one tender-price index (or output-price index) that is published on a regular basis in South Africa, through the University of Stellenbosch Bureau of Economic Research (BER) building cost index. This article is based on information gathered from two questionnaire surveys conducted among quantity surveyors in South Africa regarding their perception of tender-price indices (TPI) in South Africa. The research findings indicate that a TPI is an important tool for use by quantity surveying practices. One of the problems related to the accuracy of the BER index is the lack of information provided by quantity surveying practices. A suggested remedy for this problem can be the involvement of the ASAQS. There may be room for a new, alternative TPI, based on recent information, in the South African building industry.
      PubDate: 2016-01-22T11:36:40Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Contextualising
           urban engineering education for future cities
    • Authors: Das; Dillip K., Emuze, Fidelis A.
      Abstract: While rapidity in service activities have strengthened the role of urban areas as engines of economic growth, high population density and increased industrialization, has brought needless social and environmental complaints in cities. This phenomenon necessitates a change in societal attitude in favor of the creation of responsible living conditions, which demands requisite skills and knowledge that would shape the cities. Thus, this paper explores the adequacy of current urban engineering education in terms of the knowledge, skills and competencies required to plan and develop future cities. The paper examines how "wicked problems" that marginalize effective sustainable city planning can be addressed through astute understanding of social and environmental challenges, urban governance systems and stakeholder involvement. Based on current education system, initial findings suggest that competencies in urban planning will not necessarily enable students to address challenges related to the development of smart and sustainable cities. Rather, engineering, science and social knowledge, which would engender the ability to predict future social dynamics, should enable graduates to become active drivers of sustainable and livable cities.
      PubDate: 2016-01-22T11:36:39Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Significant
           waste factors influencing delivery cost performance of design and build
           low-cost housing projects in Imo State Nigeria
    • Authors: Obi; Lovelin, Arif, Mohammed, Awuzie, Bankole
      Abstract: Effective performances particularly on low-cost housing projects has been a major problem in many developing countries. In Nigeria, public sector clients have adopted the design and build (DB) procurement strategy as one of the strategies to deliver Low-cost housing (LcH) projects following potential benefits to facilitate improved performances particularly as it pertains to project cost. Yet, many design and build low-cost housing (DBLcH) projects are not delivered within expected target cost performances resulting from the influences of waste factors amongst several others identified. This paper aim to identify the waste factors that significantly influence poor cost performances of DBLcH projects based on the investigation of the LcH sector in Imo State Nigeria. A mixed method design, using literature review and survey questionnaire, was adopted in this study, to identify and validate contextual waste factors influencing DBLcH project cost performances. Findings revealed the significant waste factors influencing poor cost performances of DBLcH projects. This study's findings is expected to increase the awareness of the project team on the significant waste factors that will need to be mitigated towards improving the cost performances of DBLcH projects in Imo State Nigeria.
      PubDate: 2016-01-22T11:36:38Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Eliminating
           enforced idleness of resources and job waiting time in time-constrained
           construction activities using waiting line theory
    • Authors: Olugboyega; Oluseye
      Abstract: Waiting of labour on construction site is a waste of energy and has been described as a shortcoming and production waste that can affect work performance and profitability of contractors. Labours are expected to be flowing through the construction site and not to be stationary; but when activities are not well-designed, their capacities are withheld and are forced to be idle. Also, conventional job-design techniques focus on planning of operations and required operatives without considering the elimination of waste related to operatives. Hence, this study explored the application of waiting line theory to eliminating the cost of waiting time of resources using the construction of a hypothetical upper floor slab. The practical application of waiting line theory was demonstrated and conclusions were drawn from the findings of the study. The findings revealed that waiting line theory can be applied in the design of time-constrained construction activities so as to eliminate enforced idleness on construction sites through reduction in the waiting time of resources.
      PubDate: 2016-01-22T11:36:37Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: An empirical
           assessment of ineffective communication inherent in the attributes of mass
           housing projects
    • Authors: Kwofie; Titus E., Adinyira, Emmanuel, Fugar, Frank D. Kofi
      Abstract: Mass housing projects (MHPs) continue to experience significant communication difficulties among the project teams in their delivery which is largely perceived to be due to the influence of its unique characteristics. However, what is less known is the extent and nature of the communication problems caused by the unique features of MHPs. Through a structured questionnaire survey, empirical data were drawn from mass housing project team leaders of real estate organizations who have been actively involved in the execution of mass housing projects in Ghana. The crux of the survey was to identify the communication ineffectiveness among the project team that are inherent in the unique features of MHPs. Through the use of factors analysis as the analytical approach, three underlying clusters named in order of their significance as component 1: Access to information challenges, component 2: Challenges in flow of information and component 3: Import of information challenges were identified as the main communication ineffectiveness inherent in the unique features of MHPs experienced among the project team. These findings provide the necessary foundation towards planning and formulating communication strategies as well as developing behavioural skills needed to engender communication effectiveness in mass housing delivery. The findings 'misunderstanding' and lack of defined roles' emerging as communication ineffectiveness peculiar to MHPs also reinforce the uniqueness of mass housing projects compared to traditional construction building projects and thus useful for practitioners to gain insight into the project attributes and management intuition on MHPs.
      PubDate: 2016-01-22T11:36:37Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Predicting the
           future of quantity surveying profession in the construction industry
    • Authors: Wao; Joel Ochieng
      Abstract: Quantity surveying profession has changed over time to adapt to the changing and increasing requirements of project owners. In the year 2007 to 2011, the construction industry experienced economic downturn causing uncertainty in the profession. This study examined the developmental trend of the quantity surveying profession in the construction industry to determine its future. The independent variable was the current level of satisfaction of quantity surveyors while the dependent variable was the future growth of the profession. The working hypothesis was that the profession would experience future growth. A survey questionnaire via Qualtrics online survey software was administered to quantity surveyors to determine their opinion of the profession. Data collected were analyzed using SAS v9.4 statistical analysis software. The results showed a greater level of satisfaction of quantity surveyors with the current developments in the profession. Further, the current level of satisfaction with the profession strongly correlated with the chances of growth of the profession, implying a greater likelihood of future growth in the roles of quantity surveyors in the next 10-15 years. Areas such as information technology and sustainable construction would favor the growth. Thus, the hypothesis was supported. Another finding was that females tended to be fewer in the profession. Thus, it was recommended that further research be conducted focusing on gender equality and propose ways to encourage women to join the quantity surveying profession. Overall, the study concluded that quantity surveyors should improve and diversify their roles more to provide greater value to project owners as the profession seemed promising.
      PubDate: 2016-01-22T11:36:36Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Managing
           quality on construction sites in South Africa : an Eastern Cape study
    • Authors: Emuze; Fidelis A., Mhlwa, Christopher
      Abstract: In South Africa, construction projects still experience non-conformance to quality requirements as well as cost and schedule overruns to the detriment of clients. For project success to be attained, conformance to these parameters is the minimum expectation in the face of other considerations related to client satisfaction. Thus, through the use of existing literature, and a field study conducted among site management employees working for general contractors (GCs) in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa, the management of quality on construction sites was examined. The study that was descriptive in nature shows that lack of skilled general workers and artisans contribute to poor quality control and management processes; while defects and rework form the main reason for project quality deviations on the sampled sites. The quality deviations in turn influence the level of cost and time overrun experienced on construction projects. The study corroborates the literature reviewed in that there is an interrelationship between cost, quality, and time in South African construction. For example, when the quality of work is below the required threshold, it leads to cost and time overruns due to rework that requires extra effort and expense. The value of this explorative study is that both site management and workers should be hands-on in terms of managing quality on project sites as failure to do so could have a domino effect relative to other project considerations.
      PubDate: 2016-01-22T11:36:35Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Winter cycling
           in very cold climate - a case study in Calgary
    • Authors: Sadeghpour; Farnaz, Isaac, Shabtai, Amiri, Mona
      Abstract: A survey was conducted among cyclists in the city of Calgary, Canada, to identify the characteristics of winter cyclists in a metropolitan area with a very cold climate, and to investigate what variables are most likely to affect their cycling behavior. The findings of the survey reveal that even very low temperatures do not appear to be a major concern for most participants. Instead, the majority of cyclists mentioned road surface conditions, rather than the weather itself, to be the major deterrent to winter cycling. In order to analyze the direct and indirect relationships between the different variables affecting winter cycling, a multi-layered model was developed. The model distinguishes between the cyclists' inherent characteristics, cycling behavior variables and motivating factors that could both affect cycling behavior and be affected by inherent characteristics. Since the cyclists' inherent characteristics, such as age and gender, cannot be changed, identifying and addressing the cyclists' motivating factors could be a key to influencing cycling behavior.
      PubDate: 2016-01-22T11:36:34Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Using system
           dynamics modelling principles to resolve problems of rework in
           construction projects in Nigeria
    • Authors: Aiyetan; Olatunji A., Das, Dillip
      Abstract: Rework in construction projects has brought in two major challenges: cost overruns and delay. In this regards a study was conducted by considering various construction projects in the South West part of Nigeria to understand the causes of rework and the interventions to mitigate it. Survey research methodologies followed by the conceptual system dynamics (SD) modelling were used in the analysis. This study identified the sources of rework in construction projects from the design related, the client related and the contractor related issues and attempted to derive policy/strategic interventions to limit or eliminate rework on construction projects and its delivery by using conceptual SD models based on the influence of the variables on rework. The findings include that inappropriate scheduling for time pressure or delay at the planning stage, lack of adherence to the specifications, and non-availability of skilled human resource are the major causes of rework. However, rework in construction projects would be reduced or eliminated through policy interventions, such as, achieving client satisfaction with scheduling for time pressure or delay at the planning stage, adherence to specifications ensuring quality of work resulting in client satisfaction, and the availability of skilled manpower ensuring quality management.
      PubDate: 2016-01-22T11:36:33Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Managing
           construction stakeholders for effective project delivery : a case of
           consultant quantity surveyors
    • Authors: Eyiah-Botwe; Emmanuel, Aigbavboa, Clinton, Thwala, Wellington
      Abstract: Meeting stakeholders' needs and satisfaction is a primary project success factor in addition to cost, time and quality. Though studies have suggested stakeholders' dissatisfaction with project success, however, there is lack of studies on quantity surveyors' role and management in developing countries in achieving project success. This paper explored and evaluated quantity surveyor's consultant's management approach as part of a broader study aimed at 'Developing sustainable stakeholder management framework for construction projects in Ghana'. Firstly, literature on construction stakeholder management from journals and published dissertations were reviewed. Whilst, GETFund tertiary education projects in Ghana were used as case study for the research. Data was analysed using the stakeholder circle, salience and matrix approaches suggested by scholars and used in similar researches to identify and evaluate key stakeholders role and management. The study confirmed the identification and role of Quantity Surveyors as key stakeholders,though not managed as such by project managers. Project failures was also establish the an effect of stakeholder management absence and recommends the education, consideration of stakeholder management by project managers, keeping Quantity Surveyors well informed, monitored and actively involved in the project planning.
      PubDate: 2016-01-22T11:36:32Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Volume 5 Issue
           2 December 2015 - full journal articles
    • Abstract: Volume 5 Issue 2 December 2015 - full journal articles
      PubDate: 2016-01-22T11:36:29Z
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2016)
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Global slum
           upgrading practices : identifying the contemporary challenges
    • Authors: Iweka; Anthony C.O., Adebayo, Anthony K.
      Abstract: Over the years, human settlement experts have utilized a number of intervention strategies for integrating slums and informal neighbour-hoods into their larger urban context. Yet these practices are continually trailed by challenges and reactions from built-environment professionals and other stakeholders. It is therefore imperative that the quest for an acceptable approach to slum intervention is yet to abate. A literature review methodology was adopted to identify and appraise the various intervention models that were practiced in some developing nations. Although slum upgrading option was adjudged to be the current global best practice, it is still besieged by several imperfections. Some weaknesses and challenges that are applicable to developing countries, particularly Nigeria were identified in this study. The paper suggests policy measures for mitigating these challenges.
      PubDate: 2015-08-27T08:57:55Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: The limit of
           land regularisation as poverty alleviation strategy in informal
           settlements : empirical evidence from Lagos, Nigeria
    • Authors: Agunbiade; Muyiwa E., Olajide, Oluwafemi A., Bishi, Hakeem
      Abstract: Some studies have linked land titling to economic growth and poverty alleviation through access to credit facilities, housing improvement and security against eviction. However, many other studies have equally argued otherwise. It remains an ongoing debate. This paper, contributes to the ongoing debate on the nexus between land titles and poverty alleviation in informal settlements. It demonstrates that land titling, on its own, will not necessarily leads to poverty alleviation, as the intended beneficiaries are largely not interested in the programme. In addition, empirical evidence from Lagos and some other developing regions of the world suggests that land tiling has not and may not achieve many of the benefits appropriated to it by its proponents. Where it seems to have achieved some of its benefits, it has largely not been to the advantage of the poor. This paper, therefore, concludes that the policymaker must exercise caution on the issue of land titling as a solution to the endemic poverty in informal settlements. They should also explore the option of land tenure continuum. It recommends that an effective poverty alleviation strategy must incorporate the range of assets required to build a sustainable livelihood. It must also take into considerations the complexity of vulnerabilities the urban poor encounter as they pursue their livelihoods objectives.
      PubDate: 2015-08-27T08:57:54Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Socioeconomic
           dynamics and environmental health outcomes in informal settlements of Port
           Harcourt, Nigeria
    • Authors: Nwokoro; Immaculata, Lawanson, Taibat, Ebuethi, Olufunke, Fadare, Samson, Agwu, John, Soyinka, Oluwole
      Abstract: Although many studies have shown strong evidence of a direct relationship between the human environment and health, they have been too generic in nature, concentrating on community patterns and largely ignore the link between environmental health outcomes and specific socioeconomic indices manifesting at the household level. This study, therefore, seeks to understand the interface between household socioeconomic indices and the urban environment in six informal coastal settlements of Port Harcourt Nigeria. It further examined how these interactions affect environmental health. It questions the extant belief that living in a deprived neighbour-hood is bad for one's health, hence the focus on the households level. Issues examined include housing and environmental conditions like sources of water, sanitation methods, drainage conditions and quality of toilet and kitchen facilities as well as socio-economic characteristics such as age, gender, income and household size. Health seeking behaviour and recent self-reported illnesses associated with poor environmental conditions were also considered. Data collection was by mixed methods integrating simple random sampling on household heads as well as focus group discussion with community leaders in Andoni, Bundu, Captain Amangala, Emenike, Marine Base and Rex Lawson communities respectively. Data analysis was by simple descriptive statistics as well as chi square test of relationships.
      PubDate: 2015-08-27T08:57:53Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Urban planning,
           demolition of property and citizens' deprivation in African cities : a
           polycentric planning perspective
    • Authors: Akinola; Samson
      Abstract: This paper used the Institutional Analysis and Development (IAD) framework to analyse the missing links between urban managers and urban residents in Angola, Ghana and Kenya. The paper found that urban governance structures in the three countries are centralised and deviate from planning norms and people-centred governance, hence urban managers and citizens are not operating in synergy. The rapidly growing urban population makes infrastructure to be deteriorating; thus, creating slums and squatter settlements that warrant eviction and demolition by governments. Eviction and demolition generate adverse consequences on socio-economic well-being of citizens - property destroyed, while children education was affected. This paper provides case studies to demonstrate principles and practices needed to make polycentric planning and community initiatives resolve conflicts of interests on urban space. The paper argues that, for urban governance to benefit urban residents, it has to proceed from the people and be guided by them in decisions on all urban matters, including planning and modification of plans on competing urban land uses. Using Polycentric Planning and Poverty Reduction Strategy (PPPRS), this paper designs an African Polycentric Urban Environmental Governance Model (APUEGM) capable of mainstreaming citizens-centred institutions in urban areas into socio-economic and political decision making so that citizens (including the urban poor) can participate effectively in decisions on redevelopment, thus entrenching good urban governance, citizens-centred environmental planning and development in Africa.
      PubDate: 2015-08-27T08:57:52Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Framework for
           the sustainability of housing co-operatives in South Africa
    • Authors: Van Wyk; Kobus, Jimoh, Richard
      Abstract: The current difficulties in obtaining credit for housing, following the global economic crisis, show that private individual home-ownership is not effective enough in addressing the housing needs of the low and middle income groups. As a result of this and coupled with the limited studies in South Africa on co-operative housing at that time, the need to find an option that will solve the housing needs of the people became intense. The study developed a framework for the sustainability of housing co-operatives through the administration of 176 self-addressed structured questionnaires to housing co-operatives based on the strategies identified from literature. The data was analysed using mean score and Cronbach's Reliability Coefficient Test. Based on the findings, framework for sustainable housing co-operatives in South Africa was developed from the strategies. The strategies were categorised into the following factors : policy and legislation; support services; education, training and information; and governance. The framework developed has practical relevance to government officials in the Department of Human Settlements at the Municipal, Provincial and National level in terms of policy formulation in areas of co-operative housing sub-sector and also the various housing co-operatives in the area of governance of their members. Apart from these categories, the roles to be played by organisations such as South Africa Housing Co-operatives Association (SAHCA), Housing Development Agency, Social Housing Regulatory Agency and financial institutions were enunciated.
      PubDate: 2015-08-27T08:57:51Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Analysis of
           
    • Authors: Adebowale; Oluseyi J., Ayodeji, Fapohunda J.
      Abstract: Irrespective of significant relevance of construction industry to economic growth of developed and developing nations, labour efficiency in the construction industry remains relatively low and thus affects construction project delivery and client's satisfaction. This paper aims at exploring adverse construction related factors contributing to the shortfall of construction labour efficiency in the South African construction industry. The study adopts mixed methodological approach,administering closed ended questionnaires to construction professionals on Western Cape and Gauteng construction sites, while experienced construction site supervisors were interviewed to validate quantitative data obtained. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (Version 22) and content analysis were used respectively to analyse data obtained. Communication ability of site managers, construction skills of site supervisors and effective site planning ability of contractors were found as the predominant construction related factors affecting the efficiency of construction labour. This study is restricted to contractors, site supervisors and site managers' related factors affecting the efficiency of construction labour. Adequate application of findings presented in this study will significantly reduce the current prevalent construction time and cost overruns through an improved construction workforce performance. Enhanced construction productivity is a product of construction labour efficiency that ensures achievement of construction project objectives and heightens contribution to South African economic development.
      PubDate: 2015-08-27T08:57:50Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Volume 5 Issue
           2 June 2015 - full journal articles
    • Abstract: Volume 5 Issue 2 June 2015 - full journal articles
      PubDate: 2015-08-27T08:57:48Z
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: The impact of
           mining induced urbanization : a case study of Kathu in South Africa
    • Authors: Emuze; Fidelis, Hauptfleisch, Cornel
      Abstract: Rapidity in urbanization has continued in the past decade despite the realisation that resources are finite. Commerce, migration, employment, industry configuration and population increases are factors that contribute significantly to the urbanization phenomenon. With respect to the contributions of commerce, mining activities have led to the advancement and regression of cities. An abundance of literature exists on the negative effects of urbanization and mining on the environment. The main reason for the research that produced this initial findings was to determine how urbanization, when induced by mining, impacts on the environment and how to ensure future sustainable urbanization. The research was done qualitatively through interviews of knowledgeable individuals within the relevant industries within the mining town of Kathu, in the Northern Cape of South Africa. The research found that centralization of employment, resources and trade lead to urbanization, which is primary driven by the mining industry. In addition, it was observed that mining as a factor that accelerates urbanization, also impact negatively on the environment. Thus, there is a need for a rethink about mining induced urbanisation so as to reduce pollution and other adverse event of secondary activities that support the primary industry of mining.
      PubDate: 2015-02-06T11:20:45Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Use of
           ICT-based systems in site security management : a South African study
    • Authors: Ozumba; Aghaegbuna, Mapatha, Dikeledi, Shakantu, Winstion
      Abstract: Adoption of information and communications technology systems for the enhancement of security management on construction sites is presented in this paper. The site security situation, key influencing factors, use, and impact of ICT-based security systems are examined in the context of South Africa as an emerging economy. The paper uses a purposive sample of special informative literature on construction in developing countries, technology transfer, ICT in Construction, and site security management. Deductions from literature review are complimented with field work using a case study of construction sites. Limitations of access to data sources were placed on the study. Nevertheless the case study approach ensured richness of data collected. Findings suggest the occurrence of security lapses and an appreciable need for site security on local construction sites. While there is availability of ICT-based security systems, there is an apparent lack of expedient adoption considering the benefits, and threats to site security. There is also attestable difference in the impact of adoption amongst adopters and rate of theft on sites which depend on manual systems for security management. Major implications include the need for more adoption of such technologies in site security management, especially in remote areas. In addition there is need to seek ways of using ICT-based systems to enhance the performance of manual systems in site security management. Furthermore the need to adopt such ICT should reflect on tenders for contracts ab initio. Findings from the study add value to the local body of knowledge on ICT in Construction, with regard to possibilities for site security management.
      PubDate: 2015-02-06T11:20:44Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Diffusion of
           innovations : an assessment of building information modelling uptake
           trends in South Africa
    • Authors: Froise; Tim, Shakantu, Winston
      Abstract: Building information modelling (BIM) is currently being adopted by the South African industry, although current uptake is lagging behind other countries. The construction industry internationally is realising the benefits of using a single source of construction information, and the increasing functionality of the hardware, software and connectivity is providing an environment for the different organisations involved with a construction project to collaborate. The study evaluates adoption in South Africa and other countries using the line of enquiry known as the 'diffusion of innovations' to determine a trend in South Africa and to predict rates of adoption based on those of other countries. Factors that inhibit take-up in South Africa are examined and recommendations are made based on the findings of the research.
      PubDate: 2015-02-06T11:20:44Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: A qualitative
           review of the health and safety leadership roles of managers in South
           African construction
    • Authors: Okorie; Victor, Emuze, Fidelis, Smallwood, John, Van Wyk, Jacobus
      Abstract: Top management in an enterprise has decisive roles to play in terms of health and safety (H&S) management. A key role in this context pertains to leadership. The study that is reported upon assessed the H&S leadership styles and behaviours of managers in South African construction. The study, which follows the phenomenological approach, obtained information that highlights H&S practices in terms of leadership styles, behaviours and attitude of managers in the construction sector. The themes of the findings show that managers play critical leadership roles in managing workers' H&S on site; managers' leadership styles and behaviours have considerable influence on workers' at-risk work practices, and managers have the capability to drive team performance by creating an enabling environment for zero tolerance for H&S failures on project sites. Thus, the leadership styles and behaviours of construction managers is undoubtedly an important factor in shaping workers' H&S behaviours in the workplace. In promoting and sustaining optimum H&S in construction, managers should endeavour to appropriate management skills that embrace transformational leadership styles, commitment to H&S, and qualities that will help them to instil and maintain a positive H&S culture.
      PubDate: 2015-02-06T11:20:43Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Smart city
           perspectives of Bloemfontein, South Africa
    • Authors: Das; Dillip, Emuze, Fidelis
      Abstract: To handle rapid urbanization, there is need to find new ways to manage complexity, increase efficiency, reduce expenses, and improve quality of life. The new ways are rooted in the concept of 'smart city'. The concept theorize that emerging technologies would shape urban environments in varying ways that would include but not limited to the economy, mobility, governance, and living conditions of a city. While this concept is now a reality in major cities in developed economies, this is not the case in South Africa and the region. Against this background, an evaluation of socio-economic and environmental capital of Bloemfontein has been used as a case example to demonstrate the transformational requirements for a 'smart city' in South Africa. The evaluation utilised 74 indicators, and 30 factors of six smart characteristics, which include economy, environment, governance, living and mobility. Reviewed literature and semi-structure surveys were used for the evaluation, which suggests that Bloemfontein is lagging behind concerning key development indicators. In particular, the evaluation indicates that the city lag performance relative to mobility, economy, people and living sector, although environment and governance features appear to be promising. An overall evaluation of the indicators and factors points to a major scope for the city to transform to a smart city, if plausible actions are taken.
      PubDate: 2015-02-06T11:20:43Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Knowledge and
           usage of the seven basic quality control tools by producers of precast
           concrete products in Ghana
    • Authors: Adinyira; Emmanuel, Ayarkwa, Joshua, Aidoo, Isaac
      Abstract: For very small organisations, the root cause of quality problems may be obvious, but once it gets beyond small businesses, most decision points and problem root causes will remain vague until valid data are studied and analysed. It is for such cases that quality management tools play an important role in helping improve the quality of products and processes. This research seeks to explore the level of knowledge and usage of the seven basic quality control tools by producers of precast concrete products in Ghana. A survey of 42 producers of precast concrete products in the cities of Accra and Tema was conducted to elicit the desired data. The data was basically analysed using gap and quadrant analyses. The study revealed very limited levels of both knowledge and usage of the said tools by these organisations even though their perception of quality was very good. Again, the survey identified some practical measures to help improve the quality of the operations of these organisations. Chief among these measures is training and education of the work force on the use of the seven basic quality control tools. Even though the findings are limited to data from only two cities, they tend to support earlier findings from similar studies, thus providing useful lessons for manufacturers of such products.
      PubDate: 2015-02-06T11:20:42Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Exploring the
           knowledge function in the adoption of ICT in site management in South
           Africa
    • Authors: Ozumba; Aghaegbuna, Shakantu, Winston
      Abstract: The study is centred about the adoption of ICT-based products in the site management process in South Africa. Selected constructs derived from innovation adoption, diffusion and technology transfer are used to examine aspects of ICT adoption in the South African site management scenario. Knowledge and awareness, and skills and utilisation of ICT are examined in association with adoption of ICT in site management. A purposive sample of literature on the aforementioned concepts, construction, site management and ICT adoption in construction is used to frame the study. Analysis of a recent practitioner survey using a mix of qualitative and quantitative data is applied to arrive at results which further the discussion on ICT adoption in local site management. Limitations of the research emanate mainly from the unknown size of the target population, a measure of purposiveness in the sampling for the study and the numerical strength of the final sample. With the use of a snowball effect, a response sample rate of approximately 80%, based on an effective sample population, was utilised for the research. However the survey was administered at a national level which ensured appreciable spread in terms of administration and demographics of respondents. Results point to considerable information related factors, which constitute hindrance to expedient adoption of ICT in the local site management. Such factors relate to the extent of awareness, skills and working knowledge of ICT in construction, especially site management. Results suggest the need for more awareness of potential in ICT, acquisition of ICT skills, and appreciable working knowledge of available ICT-based technologies which are relevant to site management. The results have implications for the diffusion of ICT in the local construction scenario, especially in the site management process. It also adds value by improving on the scarcity of relevant local information within this area of study.
      PubDate: 2015-02-06T11:20:41Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation:
           Importance-performance analysis for modelling maintenance prioritisation
           in higher institutions
    • Authors: Simpeh; Fredrick, Mohamed, Zainu, Hartmann, Andreas
      Abstract: University maintenance departments are usually constrained by limited funds. To set priorities therefore becomes important as it ensures the suitable utilisation of resources. The research on which this article reports applied an importance-performance analysis (IPA) to aid the process of prioritising the lecture theatres performance parameters (maintenance needs) according to students' expectation and satisfaction. Three lecture theatres were selected by means of a purposive sampling method as cases for the study; a questionnaire, with both closed and open ended questions was then used to collect data from the students. The IPA model together with both descriptive and inferential statistics was used to analyse the data. The study revealed that students perceived the satisfaction of all the performance parameters of lecture theatres as below the level of importance. However aesthetics, structural safety and lighting appear to be performing satisfactory even though they were below student's satisfaction; whereas, thermal comfort, ventilation, fire safety & exit, acoustic control, and cleanliness are clearly underperforming and require immediate attention. The recommendations based on the findings can help the maintenance department of the institution to prioritise the maintenance needs of the lecture theatres to enhance performance (utility). With this article the author also demonstrates the practicality of the use of IPA model to aid the process of prioritising the maintenance needs of the buildings in an institution.
      PubDate: 2015-02-06T11:20:41Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Property
           development : a business process model
    • Authors: Botha; Brink, Adendorff, Christopher, Smallwood, John
      Abstract: Property development constitutes one of the largest business enterprises and gross domestic product contributors of the world. The business of property development however incurred substantial losses over the centuries as a result of non-compliance to good governance in terms of considering all factors influencing perceived success of property development projects. The primary objective of this study was to develop a business process model for perceived success of property development projects, enterprises and role players. This model should guide role players, enterprises and actors within the property development business towards pro-active, effective and relevant decision making in achieving success in property development. To address the primary objective, a number of secondary objectives were raised whereby a conceptual model constituting identified variables was developed based on a comprehensive survey of the related literature. Appropriate hypotheses were formulated constructing a path diagram between the dependant variable and subsequent anteceding and intervening variables. Data was gathered using an electronic survey measuring primary data sourced from the identified international population of property development practitioners. This data was empirically analysed by means of structural equation modelling. The factors were namely financial risk forecast, consumer confidence and ability, procurement, urban planning, financial feasibility and practical viability considerations and professional feasibility and viability reporting, identified in the business process model affecting success of property development projects. This research broke new ground relative to the profession of property development in introducing the business process model for perceived success of property development.
      PubDate: 2015-02-06T11:20:40Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Volume 4 Issue
           2 December 2014 - full journal articles
    • Abstract: Volume 4 Issue 2 December 2014 - full journal articles
      PubDate: 2015-02-06T11:20:38Z
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation : Supplement 1:
           Determinants of compliance with health and safety regulations in Nigeria's
           construction industry
    • Authors: Umeokafor; Nnedinma, Umeadi, Boniface, Isaac, David
      Abstract: The accident rate of the construction industry is disproportionate to the number of its workers compared with other industries. Despite this, the Nigerian construction industry lags behind in tackling the health and safety (H&S) challenges posed by the hazardous activities of the industry and contextual issues. Compliance with H&S regulations is one of the pillars to achieving optimum H&Sin the workplace; regrettably, its level is low in Nigeria. This low level of compliance with H&S regulations in Nigeria remains one of the major factors blamed for the challenging state of H&S in Nigeria, especially in the construction industry. Hence, this paper examines the determinants of compliance with H&S regulations in Nigeria's construction industry, unearthing the salient issues to compliance with H&S regulations in Nigeria's construction industry.Using compliance theories, it explains the compliance behaviour of the Nigerian construction industry. Although studies on compliance with H&S regulations in developed countries abound, contextual influence prompts a study peculiar to Nigeria. A systematic review of available literature gathered through desk literature search and qualitative content analysis were conducted. The result of this study shows that key determinants to compliance with H&S regulations in the Nigerian construction industry include: culture, client influence, inadequate legislation, activities of the informal construction sector, beliefs, enforcement of H&S regulations, bribery and corruption. It is evident from this study that contextual issues may explain compliance behaviour. This paper goes further to conclude that irrespective of the inadequate regulations and lack of governmental support, stakeholders in the construction industry and trade unions can improve H&S. It also recommends that: building planning departments in local councils be involved in H&S enforcement; in tender selection, preference should be given to construction contractors with good safety records; H&S professionals should exploit the economic benefits of good H&S management system to attract management commitment.
      PubDate: 2014-12-03T14:00:11Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation : Supplement 1:
           Remedies to timely delivery of construction projects in Lusaka, Zambia -
           an exploratory study
    • Authors: Mukuka; Mulenga, Aigbavboa, Clinton, Thwala, Wellington
      Abstract: The construction industry is a key sector in the development and economic growth of Zambia, however, the industry has not escaped the challenges facing other countries worldwide in terms of delivering construction projects on time as stipulated in the contracts. This paper assesses the construction professionals' perception on the measures of minimising construction project delays in Lusaka - Zambia. The data used in this paper were derived from both primary and secondary sources. The secondary data was collected via a detailed review of related literature. The primary data was collected through a well-structured questionnaire which was distributed to construction professionals, which include: Architects, quantity surveyors, builders, civil engineers, land surveyors and project managers. Out of the 50 questionnaires sent out, 32 were received back representing 64% response rate. Data received from the questionnaires was analysed using descriptive statistics procedures. Findings from the study revealed that site management and supervision, effective strategic planning, clear information and communication channels, use proper and modern construction equipment and proper project planning and scheduling were the major measures of minimising construction project delays. The study contributes to the body of knowledge on the subject of minimising construction project delays in Lusaka, Zambia.
      PubDate: 2014-12-03T14:00:10Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation : Supplement 1:
           A review of construction management and economics research outputs in
           Nigeria : towards a sustainable future
    • Authors: Ejohwomu; Obuks Augustine, Oshodi, Olalekan Shamsideen
      Abstract: Construction related research holds the key to a sustainable future. This is because of the potential of research to improve practice. In order to identify the current state of knowledge in construction management and economics research. This article aims to unpack the question by evaluating three (3) decades of longitudinal data into construction management and economics research across seven (7) foremost Nigerian universities. A review of completed PhD studies was done to identify dominant research topics, methods and trends over the study period. It is evident from qualitative analysis that 69.9% of the critical investigation focused on topics related to procurement/project performance, maintenance, cost modelling/construction economics and human resource/productivity. Despite, a moving trend in the topics investigated. There was no evidence of critical research in the area of sustainability. Besides a call for paradigm shift in present day research activities, the concept of sustainability, which has become a dominant policy in the developed world, needs to be enshrined. In other words, there is a need to really examine the extent to which current policies and activities pertaining to sustainability in the construction industry is been integrated into built environment planning and development in Nigeria.
      PubDate: 2014-12-03T14:00:10Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation : Supplement 1:
           An assessment of professionals' perception of the sustainability
           performance of infrastructure projects in Nigeria
    • Authors: Emmanuel; Amadosi-Jesse, Ibrahim, Ahmed Doko, Adogbo, Kulomri Jipato
      Abstract: Construction activities lead to the provision of infrastructure. However, these activities have undesirable impact on the environment. Various management approaches have evolved to guide construction participants in achieving better sustainability performance of infrastructure project. However, methods for evaluating the sustainability performance of infrastructure projects across economic, social and environmental aspects are not covered in literature. This paper aimed to assess professionals' perception of sustainability performance of infrastructure projects in Nigeria. The research adopted a questionnaire survey of professionals in the Nigerian Construction industry. 100 questionnaires were distributed and a total of 72 valid responses were obtained and used in the analysis. The research found that sustainability performance of infrastructure projects in Nigeria fall between moderate performances to high performance. Some factors whose performance falls below a set standard and adversely affect sustainability performance include ozone protection, modular and standardised design, discharge of water. The study recommends that government policies which incorporate the assessment of proposed infrastructure across social, economic and environmental impacts should be formulated to improve sustainability performance of infrastructure projects.
      PubDate: 2014-12-03T14:00:09Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation : Supplement 1:
           
    • Authors: Ametepey; Simon Ofori, Ansah, Samuel Kwame
      Abstract: Construction activities impact on the environment throughout the life cycle of development. These impacts occur from initial work on-site through the construction period, operational period and to the final demolition when a building comes to an end of its life. Even though the construction period is comparatively shorter in relation to the other stages of a building's life, it has diverse significant impacts on the environment. This study investigates the major impacts of construction activities on the environment in Ghana. Thirty-three possible impacts of construction activities on the environment were identified from literature. These impacts were further categorized into nine major groups and were subjected to a cross-sectional survey. Questionnaire and interview were used to elicit the views of respondents. Questionnaires were distributed to 100 randomly selected construction practitioners made up of 58 architects, 37 quantity surveyors and 5 structural engineers registered with their professional bodies. Semi-structured interview was conducted amongst purposively selected contractors and consultants. The respondents were asked to identify the most important environmental impacts. The relative importance of the impacts identified were calculated and ranked by the relative importance index. According to the results of the study, the respondents agreed that resource consumption group impacts ranked highest among the major impacts of construction activities on the environment in Ghana. The resource consumption group impacts were raw materials consumption, electricity consumption, water consumption and fuel consumption. Biodiversity impact was second followed by local issues impacts. The paper recommends that stakeholders in the construction industry should come up with special legislations, codes or standards relating to sustainable construction practices specific to Ghana's construction environment and ensure proper and effective implementation.
      PubDate: 2014-12-03T14:00:08Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation : Supplement 1:
           Volume 4 Supplement 1 June 2014 - full journal articles
    • Abstract: Volume 4 Supplement 1 June 2014 - full journal articles
      PubDate: 2014-12-03T14:00:07Z
      Issue No: Vol. 4 (2014)
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Principal
           component analysis (PCA) of the activities of informal construction
           workers / artisans in Nigeria
    • Authors: Odediran; Sunday Julius, Babalola, Olubola
      Abstract: Every employment has deposit of activities to be performed by her employees. These activities vary with industries and who performs each of these activities is determined by how significance they are to the employment operation. Construction is one of such industries whose activities necessitate the growth and development of infrastructure needs of the societies. The activities in the construction industry are performed by different trades' artisans refer to as informal workers/artisans in this paper. Hence, this paper examines the activities of informal construction workers/artisans in Nigeria with a view to classify these activities according to various trades in the industry. A comprehensive list of construction activities was made and informal workers/artisans were asked to rank these activities based on the frequency of how they are being performed on construction projects. Data collected were analyzed using factor analysis which classified these activities into principal components that described construction trades. The result of the study shows that the most frequent activities are associated with demolition & reconstruction and woodwork while the least frequent activities associated with electrical works. The result also classifies activities in the industry into various trades including plumbing installations, masonry & blockwork, steelworks, woodworks, electrical installations, painting & decoration; and demolition & reconstruction. The finding of this study provides information on the activities of the informal workers/artisans in the construction industry for the professionals, employers and policy makers to provide enabling and friendly environment for efficient service delivery in the construction industry.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:30:09Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Evaluation of
           the barriers to the use of appropriate constructability practices on
           construction projects
    • Authors: Windapo; Abimbola Olukemi, Ogunsanmi, Olabode Emmanuel
      Abstract: Within the Nigerian and Sub-Saharan African construction industries generally there has been a lack of research profiling the constructability practices of contractors and possible barriers to the use of appropriate methods. The aim of this study was to assess constructability practices of contractors in construction projects in this context. The objectives were to identify current constructability practices, and to examine the barriers typically affecting constructability practices. Convenience sampling was used to select 19 contractors in Lagos state, Nigeria, who were interviewed using a structured interview protocol. The data collected was analysed using descriptive statistics. Results indicated that constructability practices common to contractors include checking M & E drawings for clashes and errors; site-layout planning; and preparation of schedule/construction programmes. In-situ constructions, crane/lifting equipment, formwork technologies and external scaffolding systems were used during site operations. Barriers affecting constructability practices stem from contractors' internal conditions, external factors, and project-related factors including design, lack of knowledge in construction methods, and project size and complexity. The findings have important implications for policy and practice. We recommend public laws making it mandatory for projects to implement constructability reviews and analyses. We also recommend that practice-experienced constructors be employed on projects, and that professional bodies train and educate members on constructability principles and practice for the better management of projects.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:30:08Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Exploring the
           importance of emotional quotient in construction : perspectives from
           health and safety professionals in South Africa
    • Authors: Smallwood; John, Emuze, Fidelis, Bloomberg, Charissa
      Abstract: Self-regard, emotional self-awareness, flexibility, problem solving, and stress tolerance, inter alia, constitute attributes that affect how well activities are carried out by individuals. Thus, construction activities that are people intensive require a measure of emotional quotient (EQ) to enhance project performance, especially with regard to health and safety (H&S). EQ is important due to: intrapersonal EQ; relationship with one self; interpersonal EQ; stress management; adaptability, and general mood of employees. The aforesaid in due course impact on performance related to the project parameters in the sector, inter alia, cost, H&S, time, quality, and productivity. The purpose of the paper is to present the findings of an exploratory study that was conducted to determine the perceived importance of EQ in terms of managing construction H&S and the extent to which EQ contributes to optimising H&S performance on projects in South Africa. This is aimed at contributing to the enhancement of H&S performance in construction.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:30:08Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: A comparison of
           construction related rework in Uganda and Mozambique
    • Authors: Kakitahi; John M., Alinaitwe, Henry M., Landin, Anne, Rodrigues, Marcelino J.
      Abstract: The realisation of the expected minimum client quality requirements in both the products and processes in the construction industry remains challenging. The effects have been increased wastage and value loss through rework in both public and private sector initiatives providing social services in developing countries. The purpose of the research was to compare the impact of construction related rework on project budgets and schedule in public building construction in both Uganda and Mozambique, being examples of developing countries. The objective of such comparison is to document where focus should probably be placed in ensuring that quality requirements in construction are achieved. Case study approach was adopted and separate case study protocols prepared. The scope of study in the Ugandan project involved construction of classroom blocks, health centres and staff housing between 2008 and 2011. The scope of study in the Mozambique project involved the construction of 209 public housing units in Mozambique. The units of study were rework-related project budget and schedule overruns with further comparison of rework-related impacts on both project budgets and schedules under study. In Uganda, the mean percentage rework range was 12.45% - 15.58% of the construction contract scope. It was determined that the mean percentage of rework-related impact on project budget and schedule was 4.53% and 8.42% respectively. In Mozambique, the mean percentage rework range was 3.35% - 4.40% of the construction contract scope. It was determined that the mean percentage of rework-related impact on project budget and schedule was 0.56% and 12.0% respectively. Acknowledging the differing cultural contexts of both countries where the study was conducted, these findings could improve governance and strengthen the regulatory framework on quality management in both Uganda and Mozambique.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:30:07Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Rework cost on
           building projects in the south western part of Nigeria
    • Authors: Aiyetan; Olatunji Ayodeji
      Abstract: Right-first-time is a principle that evaluates the competence of firms, quality of product and the expertise of a professional. Rework is doing something at least one extra time due to non-conformance to requirements, could suggest the abovementioned parameter negatively either on organisation or individual. Human beings are not perfect, based on this, errors occur that may lead to rework on site and should be accommodated adequately for an uninterrupted flow of construction activities and non-delay of delivery of projects. The south western part of Nigeria was the area of study. The quantitative and descriptive research approaches were used. The questionnaire survey and historical data were the two method used for the collection of data for the study. Simple statistical means were used for data analysis. The research findings indicate that incorrect lying of forming course, poor quality of concrete, poor plastering, and construction errors during excavation dominate relative to areas of rework. Therefore, the study suggests that in order to eliminate or reduced drastically the occurrence of rework on future projects, consideration should be given to the following: the setting aside of a sum of money equal to the value of 0.6 - 5.0% of initial contract sum, engagement of knowledgeable foremen or having regular training of foremen, the correct construction processes should be followed in the execution of construction activities, and materials that are of good quality only should be used for constructional purposes.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:30:07Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Constraints to
           the development of professional project management practices in the
           Ghanaian construction industry
    • Authors: Kissi; Ernest, Ahadzie, Divine Kwaku, Badu, Edward
      Abstract: Evidence of Professional Project Management Practices in the Ghanaian Construction Industry (GCI) dates back to the 1980s. However, to date not much has been achieved in its advancement and deployment especially in an era where project management is considered as an important management philosophy in achieving project success. This paper reports on a study to determine the constraints that exist in the advancement of project management practices in the GCI. The paper adopted a two-stage data-gathering approach involving qualitative and quantitative techniques. The qualitative approach helped in identifying eighteen (18) Project Management (PM) variables that stakeholders believe are posing challenges to effective PM practices in Ghana. Out of the eighteen variables, nine supported existing literature while the remaining nine appear to be peculiar to the Ghanaian context. Subsequently, questionnaire containing the eighteen (18) variables were administered to 183 professionals who are involved in PM practices and then subjected to factor analysis. The paper highlights five (5) major underlying constraints namely: weak project management knowledge base, lack of clearly defined role for project managers, poor understanding of procurement practices, weak institutional framework and poor communication practices. The paper therefore recommends that, it is important for these underlying factors to be addressed conscientiously as they provide firm basis for advancing professional project management practices in the GCI.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:30:06Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Retention bond
           and performance of construction projects in Nigeria
    • Authors: Oke; Ayodeji, Ogunmola, Peter
      Abstract: Retention bond guarantees that the contractor will carry out all necessary work to correct structural and/or other defects discovered immediately after completion of the contract, even if full payment has been made to the contractor. This research work assesses the effects of retention bond on construction project performance in Nigerian construction industry. Cost data were collected through the distribution of sixty (60) questionnaires of which fifty-seven administered questionnaires were retrieved. Data were analysed using correlation and regression methods of analysis. The findings from the study indicated that there is a significant relationship between retention bond and construction project performance in terms of cost and time. The study recommends that professional bodies should encourage the use of retention bond in the Nigerian construction industry by sensitizing professionals of its importance which is to enable effective delivery of projects within its initial cost and time. Also, contractors should encourage their clients to always include sum to cover up for retention bond in their contract sum.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:30:06Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Is
           build-operate-transfer (BOT) system an effective initiative compared with
           traditional procurement method in student housing provision in an emerging
           economy?
    • Authors: Gbadegesin; Job Taiwo, Oyewole, Matthew Oluwole
      Abstract: BOT is a scheme or private finance initiative (PFI) or alternative procurement method in which a government contractually grants to a private sector entity a concession requiring the entity to obtain financing for design, build and operate a public facility or infrastructure for a fixed period of time, during which the private entity can recover its costs of construction, plus profit, by charging fees or tools for its use and at the end of the concession period, transfer ownership and operation of the facility back to the government. This paper examines stakeholders' perception in Nigeria on the effectiveness of BOT as a private finance initiative (PFI) for student housing provision and compares it with traditional procurement method (TPM). It also determines the association between the respondents' years of experience in BOT procurement and the outcome of assessment based on the identified factor frameworks. To achieve these objectives, questionnaires were administered on a sample of the core professionals and experts who are staff in Physical Planning and Development Units (PPDU), Housing unit, Works and Maintenance sections of the selected tertiary institutions in Nigeria. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Chi-square and t-test. The result indicates higher level of effectiveness in favour of BOT than TPM. It also found that, except for cost/funding, there is a significant relationship between the respondents' years of experience and other factors. It also found that there is significant difference in the respondents' assessment of BOT and TPM.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:30:05Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Infrastructure
           project challenges : the case of Dr Kenneth Kaunda District Municipality
    • Authors: Van der Waldt; Gerrit
      Abstract: Project management as an application is utilised increasingly by municipalities in South Africa to render services on time, within budget, and according to quality and performance specifications. But the translation of integrated development planning (IDP), top-layer service delivery and budget implementation plans (SDBIPs) into successful projects often do not yield the desired results. This is especially true for capital-intensive infrastructure projects. Typical municipal infrastructure projects entail the construction of roads, pavements and bridges and storm water systems. It also include the provision of electricity (generation, transmission and reticulation e.g. street lighting), water (e.g. dams, reservoirs, and water purification), and sanitation (e.g. reticulation and sewerage purification). This article reports on empirical findings of research conducted at the Dr Kenneth Kaunda District Municipality (henceforth referred to as Dr KKDM), North-West Province, which include four local category B) municipalities, namely Maquassi Hills, Matlosana, Tlokwe, and Ventersdorp local municipalities. The aim of the study was to explore practices and challenges associated with the design and execution of infrastructure (capital) projects and to uncover best practice for innovative project governance. Case study methodology was utilised in the research.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:30:04Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Evaluation of
           safety and quality management in construction projects - a study of IBOM
           Tropicana construction projects
    • Authors: Ogwueleka; Amaka Chinweude, Mendie, Emaeyak I.
      Abstract: The nature of the construction industry necessities dangerous activities and the proper implementation of safety and quality management is essential to control hazards and wastes, and also to improve project success. This paper aims at adopting failure mode, effect and criticality analysis on an on-going project to investigate on how to improve safety and quality management in construction projects. In order to achieve this, the study evaluates the most critical factors influencing safety and quality management. Normative and empirical approaches are used for data collection. The possible failure mode of structural components and accident occurrence rate are analysed using the failure mode, effect and critically analysis sheets. Research findings reveal the possible causes and effects of failures and accidents. From the decision rule, the risk priority number is less than decision index number, which implies that risks/hazards can be accepted and mitigated through the safety and quality policy designed to resolve the identified possible causes. The most critical safety and quality factors are identified as parameters for policy implementation.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:30:04Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: An assessment
           of construction professionals' level of compliance to ethical standards in
           the Nigerian construction industry
    • Authors: Adeyinka; Busayo Funmilola, Jagboro, Godwin Onajite, Ojo, Grace Kehinde, Odediran, Sunday Julius
      Abstract: The study assessed the compliance of construction professionals to ethical standards in the Nigerian construction industry. The study area was Lagos State and the target respondents were the registered professionals including architects, quantity surveyors, builders and engineers. A total of one hundred and seventy (170) questionnaire were randomly administered on the professionals and one hundred and thirty eight (138) were retrieved representing 81.18% response rate. Findings revealed that professionals displayed high level of compliance to clients service delivery with Mean Item Score (MIS) ranged between 3.22 to 3.79, educational and professional qualification with Mean Item Score (MIS) ranged 3.18 to 3.71 and standards of practice with Mean Item Score (MIS) ranged between 3.16 to 3.63. The overall rating revealed that professionals have highest level of compliance to standards of practice with 54.76%, while the least ranked ethical standards was fair compensation with 49.31%. ANOVA test established a statistical significant difference among the professionals view about compliance of the professionals to clients service delivery (F value=2.447, P value=0.020) and professional development (F value=3.774, P value = 0.001). The overall level of compliance of construction professionals to ethical standards was 52.37%. It was concluded that clients service delivery; educational training and professional qualification and standards of practices are the most significant ethical standards among construction professionals in Nigeria. Therefore, the study concluded that professionals satisfactorily complied with the ethical standards.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:30:03Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Volume 4 Number
           1 May 2014 - full journal articles
    • Abstract: Volume 4 Number 1 May 2014 - full journal articles
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:30:01Z
      Issue No: Vol. 4 (2014)
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Contributors to
           schedule delays in public construction projects in Saudi Arabia : owners'
           perspective
    • Authors: Mahamid; Ibrahim
      Abstract: This study aims at identifying the contributors to delays in public construction projects in Saudi Arabia from owners' viewpoint. To do so, 22 public owners of construction projects completed a structured questionnaire survey. 35 factors were identified through literature review. The results indicated that the top delay contributors are: bid award for lowest price, poor site management, poor communication and coordination between construction parties, payments delay, poor labor productivity, and rework. These findings can support the Government in improving the regulations to meet the construction market needs, owners in planning and designing and evaluating policy, contractors and managers in planning and taking external and internal risks when costing and scheduling contracts, consultants in applying comprehensive contract information, and workers in conducting their day-to-day activities. Results will fill an important research and practice gap and help in improving time performance in public construction projects in Saudi Arabia and other developing countries.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:59Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Level of
           compliance of core construction professionals to ethical standards in
           Nigeria
    • Authors: Adeyinka; B.A., Jagboro, G.O., Ojo, G.K., Odediran, S.J.
      Abstract: The study assessed the level of compliance of construction professionals to ethical practices in the Nigerian construction industry. The study area was Lagos State and the target respondents were the registered professionals including architects, quantity surveyors, builders and engineers. A total of one hundred and seventy (170) questionnaire were randomly administered on the professionals and one hundred and thirty eight (138) were retrieved representing 81.18% response rate. Findings revealed that professionals displayed high level of compliance to clients service delivery with Mean Item Score (MIS) ranged 3.22 to 3.79, educational and professional qualification MIS ranged 3.18 to 3.71 and standards of practice MIS ranged 3.16 to 3.63. The overall rating revealed that professionals have highest level of compliance to standards of practice with 54.76%, while the least ranked ethical standards was fair compensation with 49.31%. ANOVA test established a statistical significant difference among the professionals view about compliance of the professionals to clients service delivery (F value=2.447, P value=0.020) and professional development (F value=3.774, P value = 0.001). The overall level of compliance of construction professionals to ethical standards was 52.37%. The study concluded that professionals have average level of compliance to the ethical standards. The study therefore recommended that professionals should continue to uphold good ethical conducts, for better project performance and delivery in the Nigerian construction industry.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:58Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Determining the
           effectiveness of concurrent engineering through the analytical hierarchy
           processing of project success criteria
    • Authors: Aniekwu; N.A., Igboanugo, A.C., Onifade, M.K.
      Abstract: The emergence of Concurrent Engineering (CE) as the Project Procurement method of choice for effective integration and coordination into construction has been gaining grounds. However, this is based mainly on empirical data that were derived majorly from the implementation of CE within the manufacturing environment. Thus the theoretical foundations of CE has been more empirical that statistical. Although science is driven by data, strong theoretical foundations must exist in order to explain that data. This work seeks to confirm statistically, the prominence of concurrent engineering as the method which offers the most scope for effective attainment of construction objectives of Cost, Time, Quality and Clients Satisfaction. Using the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) model, these project success criteria were used as the primary criteria, along with its sub-criteria, to calculate the Eigen-vectors, in order to synthesize a pair-wise comparison matrix of the criteria. Thus the priority weight vectors were obtained and used for the ranking of the four principal construction delivery methods: Traditional method, the Design and Build method, the Programme management method and the Concurrent Engineering method. The results of the data computations gave a ranking of the four (4) principal project delivery methods of; Traditional sequential delivery, Programme management, Design and build and CE, with the values 0.0001, 0.1027, 0.2062 and 0.6910 respectively. CE ranked highest in its effectiveness in attaining construction goals. The work thus confirm statistically, the prominence of concurrent engineering as the method which offers the most scope for effective attainment of construction objectives of Cost, Time, Quality and Clients Satisfaction.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:58Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Assessment of
           knowledge management among construction professionals in Nigeria
    • Authors: Oke; A.E., Ogunsemi, D.R., Adeeko, O.C.
      Abstract: Knowledge management is a developing area in the construction industry that can contribute immensely to the success of any organisation. This research work therefore examined the areas of the construction industry that will improve as a result of the contributions of knowledge management. Data for the analysis were collected through questionnaires administered on construction professionals using convenient sampling method. The data were analyzed using percentiles and mean item score. The study revealed that the knowledge management adoption is being hindered the most in Nigeria by funding as there is no adequate fund to carry it out in construction organizations. Assessment of the level of sharing knowledge among construction professionals showed that Architects ranked first in sharing knowledge with other construction professionals while top managers, Quantity surveyors, Estate Surveyors, and Civil Engineers followed respectively. In conclusion, it was observed that colleague's experience was ranked first among the sources of knowledge available to construction professionals in Nigeria as most construction professionals in Nigeria don't read much and are not exposed to other methods of acquiring knowledge within the organisation, and fund is the highest ranked problem hindering the adoption of knowledge management among Construction Professionals. It was then recommended that Civil Engineers, Builders, Middle managers, Lower managers and Technicians should improve in the level at which they transfer and share knowledge with other construction professionals and that the Federal Government of Nigeria should inject more fund to the construction industry of the country as this is a very productive sector of the economy.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:57Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Towards a
           systemic construction industry development : a research agenda for a
           fragmented industry in Africa
    • Authors: Gyadu-Asiedu; Williams
      Abstract: In spite of the several attempts by African countries to address their infrastructure needs, and despite the enormous investments injected into infrastructural development, much has not been achieved. The central problem is that researches and development issues in the industry have not taken into consideration its fragmented nature and how this impacts on the efforts being put in place. Relying on the survey of literature review, this paper proposes a research agenda for the construction industries in Africa and other developing countries in which a concerted effort based on systemic approach should be used to address the problem. It is conceived that the research and development objective of the industry in Africa could be better achieved if it is considered as a system of fragmented components. This will provide a framework in which the General Systems Theory which will enable the application of laws and theories from other disciplines in the industry's research and hence its development. The expected results is that improvements and developments programmes shall be focused on individual component parts whose interactions, if properly managed, will result in the development of the whole. In the process better and realistic results of infrastructural developmental agenda will be achieved.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:56Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Volume 3 Number
           2 December 2013 - full journal articles
    • Abstract: Volume 3 Number 2 December 2013 - full journal articles
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:55Z
      Issue No: Vol. 3 (2014)
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Conceptual
           models for assessing adversarial business relationship and improvement of
           engineering and design service delivery (EDSD) in Ghana
    • Authors: Orgen; N.K., Ahadzie, D.K., Ayarkwa, J., Badu, E.
      Abstract: Cordial, harmonious business relationship and collaborative business culture that are essential tools for improvement of construction supply chains and networks seem to have eluded Engineering and Design Service Delivery (EDSD) activities despite several years of useful interventions. The aim of this paper was to develop models: to show current EDSD business relationship problems with the view of improving the EDSD activities. The modeling development followed action oriented system theory, system thinking and rethinking. The way of dealing with construction issues in the traditional procurement system in Ghana have been revealed to be adversarial. These offered specific background to demonstrate why the action oriented system theory; system thinking and rethinking were useful in Supply Chain Relationship Management (SCRM) improvement modeling. Further, SCRM improvement modeling is to provide indicative illustration model to overcome the business relationship problems, which have impeded the improvement and continuous improvement of EDSD activities in the past. The desk based search of literature as well helped to develop the models through induction and deduction inferences. These processes were robust attempts pursued based on action oriented system theory, system thinking and rethinking, and relevant literature concepts. Also two separate models for the improvement of the EDSD activities were developed, using performance feedbacks, traditional non adversarial methods/review and innovative information exchange among EDSD practitioners and between them and contractors. One model produced three-stage improvement approach and the other comprising five maturity categorization regions for determination of nine levels of EDSD improvement assessment and continuous improvement in current procurement practice in Ghana.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:54Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Human capital
           theory : implications for the Ghanaian construction industry development
    • Authors: Fugar; F.D.K., Ashiboe-Mensah, N.A., Adinyira, E.
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to identify from the literature the effect of human capital development on growth, profitability and competitive success of organisations and to argue that the development of the Ghanaian construction industry, its capacity to remain pivotal to the nation's economic growth and the ability to become globally competitive are directly linked to investment in the development of its human capital. This theoretical paper reviewed the literature to identify empirical evidences of the correlation between human capital development and organisational success and profitability. The findings reveal that investment in education has positive correlation with high performance of other industry categories. The research has also revealed some criticisms of the theory of human capital development and provided insights into the barriers to human capital development within the construction industry in developing countries such as Ghana. The paper presents empirical evidence of the benefits that accrue to organisations that invest in human capital development and provides a training and development model that could serve as a framework for training and developing employees within the Ghanaian construction industry.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:54Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Evaluation of
           waste management strategies adopted in Tshwane building industry
    • Authors: Chikezirim; Okorafor, Mwanaumo, Erastus
      Abstract: The minimisation and disposal of construction wastes has become one of the most construction and environmental issues in recent years. The disposal of waste can have a significant impact on the environment as total volume of available landfill is decreasing and cost associated in its disposal are quite enormous. Primary data were obtained using structured questionnaire, interviews and site visits. The questionnaire was also designed in line with the method to cover various factors that lead to wastages on construction sites, waste control measures, existence of waste management plan in contractual process and remedies to the problem. The findings indicate that waste of materials in the building industry is fairly high and that a large variability in waste incidence is found across different projects. The study established that the strategies adopted in minimising material wastes in the City of Tshwane building industry were good but evidence on site reveal to the contrary.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:53Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Benefits
           derived by District Assemblies from their project consultants
    • Authors: Ayarkwa; J., Baiden, B.K., Osei-Asibey, D., Sabah, C.B.S.
      Abstract: Many of the problems in construction at the local level can be traced to consultants who supervise projects on behalf of local government agencies. Consultants therefore need to be evaluated regularly to ensure that they are delivering the expected benefits to their clients. This study seeks to assess the benefits District Assemblies (DAs) in Ghana derive from their consultants who supervise projects funded through the District Assemblies' Common Fund. The study involved a postal survey of 80 DAs and identified the expected benefits the DAs would like to attain through the services of their consultants and the perceived actual benefits they had received. The one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (p=0.05) was used to determine the significance of the differences between the expected and the actual benefits. The findings revealed that, of the documented benefits DAs would expect to receive from the professional services rendered by their consultants, increasing accuracy of project budget estimation, saving cost, minimizing risk through improved tender documents, promoting better communication with clients, and meeting clients' deadline were considered important benefits by the DAs. There were significant differences between the expected benefits and the level of benefits achieved from consultants. The actual benefits were generally lower than that expected by the DAs. The paper is of value to local government agencies wishing to obtain greater benefits from their project consultants, and consultants wishing to realize their weaknesses for continual improvement.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:52Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Illegal
           appendages to residential buildings in Kumasi, Ghana - a case study of
           North Suntreso
    • Authors: Adinyira; E., Anokye, P.
      Abstract: Global estimates suggest that much of the anticipated growth in the world will occur in the developing world of which Ghana is no exception. As at 1985, it was estimated that if Kumasi could achieve a room occupancy rate of three, then its housing stock should at least double at the time. This evident inadequacy of urban space particularly for housing development and the continuous population growth in Kumasi has fuelled the proliferation of illegal appendages to residential buildings at an alarming rate. Illegal appendages, have been an aspect of the after construction process that have been ignored by many the world over. This paper examines the extent of this occurrence, its causes and effects on the health and safety (H&S) of inhabitants of the area as well as on the physical planning of the area and the value of such properties. A questionnaire survey approach coupled with physical inspection was adopted for the study. Data from the survey was largely analyzed using descriptive statistics. The study confirmed 'population growth', 'inadequate space', 'commercialisation of facilities' and 'inadequate knowledge of the Building Regulations' as the major causes of this phenomenon. Findings from the study points to 'effect on the value of such properties', 'effect on spatial planning', 'effect on indoor conditions such as lighting and ventilation' and 'structural effects' as the most significant effects of such additions to buildings. This paper provides the much needed insight into the problem and makes recommendations to include in the formulation of effective building safety policies for such urban areas.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:52Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Investment
           methodology in planning and development of infrastructure : an unbalanced
           growth approach
    • Authors: Ojuri; Omoleye B.
      Abstract: The economic as well as efficient use of scarce resources is one of the challenges in developing countries. This paper aims at providing an investment methodology to infrastructure planning and development agencies. To achieve the goal, the paper specifically analyses the unbalanced growth concept in prioritizing investment in infrastructure development. It further examines in detail the investment policies in infrastructure development in Sri-Lanka. Based on that, this paper carried out an extensive survey of the literature pertaining to available social infrastructure and the social status of Nigerian Niger Delta (ND) region. In looking for broad correlations, this paper sets aside a crucial issue - given that investment capital is scarce and living standards are low, what should get priority in terms of investment between consumption and productive activities? The study employed. An adaptation of photovoice methodology is used to collect primary data on the status of infrastructure facilities in the ND. The methodology is adopted to identify scope not captured through quantitative measures. The methodology combines photography with grassroots social action through interviews. The sample size is based on purposive sampling technique because the methodology requires adults that can participate in interview survey and handle instruments to be used for data collection. Based on that, fifty seven participants were first selected and subdivided into eight groups. The findings establish that social overhead capital (SOC) investments are more beneficial than direct productive activities (DPA) during early phase of infrastructural development and thus be given priority because the provision of SOC is relevant to addressing the appalling state of living of the people of the Nigerian ND region and thus improve the region's human capacity. The paper concludes that the measure of self-reliance of poor people is a strong indicator of the long-term poverty reduction impact of infrastructure development. Policy recommendations and specific actionable targets are suggested.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:51Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Understanding
           complexity within energy infrastructure delivery systems in developing
           countries : adopting a viable systems approach
    • Authors: Awuzie; B.O., McDermott, P.
      Abstract: Infrastructure delivery systems involve high complexity. This stems from numerous factors: a diverse range of skilled professionals, diverse cultural affiliations, incomplete contracts and complex contractual relationships among stakeholders, government policies, finance and regulatory issues, and high levels of asset specificity. The degree of complexity is enhanced in projects requiring high levels of specialization. Energy infrastructure projects can be described as possessing a relatively high degree of complexity. The ability to understand and manage such complexity directly affects project performance. Previous studies into the failure of most of these projects have traced project failures to several factors such as corruption, lack of transparency in the procurement process, lack of proper regulatory frameworks, and lack of political willpower. Surprisingly, few studies have attempted to spearhead a concise understanding of the inherent complexities in delivery systems. This paper attempts to contribute to the literature on project delivery process and its inherent complexities. This study proposes a viable systems model approach to understanding complexities in energy infrastructure delivery systems in developing countries. This is based upon the premise that a system must be understood properly to enable effective diagnosis. It argues that whereas the aforementioned factors adversely affect the performance of the infrastructure projects, a better understanding of the delivery process would allow for timely and appropriate solutions to be proffered. The viable systems model is premised on the concept of systems thinking and cybernetics-science of communication and control. It has proven effective in diagnosing organizations. It is hoped that this study, which forms part of an on-going PhD study, would elicit further discourse in the application of the viable systems model in diagnosing and re-designing infrastructure delivery systems within the energy sector of developing economies.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:51Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Apoptosis in
           city systems : a biomimetic approach to city regeneration
    • Authors: Ajadi; Stephen
      Abstract: Over the past few years there have been a number of cases of large scale urban translocation, city division, and new formations of contemporary settlements in various parts of the world. An increase in the ubiquity of civil unrest around the world and mass uprisings are typical causes of these processes. This poses a serious threat to the efficacy of classical urban and architectural design strategies, and their motive. Since this is a new development which urban and architecture hardly anticipated, it is imperative to seek new ways to curb, manage or mitigate the proliferation of extemporaneous city mutations. The effort here is to employ chiefly the idea of biomimetics in an analytical juxtaposition of natural processes like apoptosis, pyknosis, karyorrhexis, and karyolysis with certain city processes and systems. The aim is to establish a new environmentally friendly motive for the disintegration and integration of settlements. Aided with streamlined programmatic principles, computational and algorithmic design, city systems are studied in an African context. The biomimetic approach to the study of city mutations is tailored to provide a design and management platform that attempts to predict and/or manage unanticipated shifts of settlements within city systems at various levels of urban and architectural schemes in West Africa, especially Nigeria.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:50Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Conceptualizing
           the liveable African city
    • Authors: Lawanson; Taibat, Salau, Taofiki, Yadua, Omoayena
      Abstract: This paper attempts to conceptualize the liveable African City using indices of liveability as advanced by Africans. The concepts of City Liveability and the City as a living system are used as the theoretical underpinnings to the study. A purposive online questionnaire survey of 453 Africans, living both in Africa and the Diaspora was conducted to elicit their perspectives on what they consider the most important indices for a Liveable African City. The data was disaggregated on locational basis. This was done to determine whether ones location i.e. living at home or in the Diaspora contributes significantly to one's opinion on the identified issues. Issues investigated include governance, safety and security, culture and global identity, environmental indices and infrastructure. Furthermore, the inherent contradictions between western and African concepts of liveability were examined. The study revealed that 67% of all respondents consider governance to be the most important determinant of city liveability. Cultural heritage and city image were considered the least important indices of urban liveability. In determining the choice of where to live, 82.2% of respondents consider quality of life, while few differentials existed based on location, safety and security, particularly violent crime and the threat of terror were considered extremely important by respondents living in the Diaspora. The study concludes by recommending the application of broad based urban management strategies combined with good urban governance mechanisms to improve city liveability across the continent.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:50Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Volume 3 Number
           1 May 2013 - full journal articles
    • Abstract: Volume 3 Number 1 May 2013 - full journal articles
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:48Z
      Issue No: Vol. 3 (2014)
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Educational
           building performance evaluation practices and perceptions : a case of
           federal universities in South East Nigeria
    • Authors: Okolie; K.C., Shakantu, W.M.
      Abstract: This paper assesses the level of awareness, perception and practice of Building Performance Evaluation (BPE) in the management of educational buildings. Hitherto performance evaluation of buildings has not received significant attention in Nigerian Universities. Universities procure buildings that neither respond to the demands of changing needs, nor fit for purpose. This study relies on current literature to explore how the constructs of BPE can be utilized to improve the design and management of educational buildings in the Nigerian university system. Data were generated using a convenient sample of construction professionals holding key positions in the physical planning and works departments of four Federal Universities in South East Nigeria. Data analyses were conducted using Excel and statistica; Version 9.0. The findings suggest that there appears to be an apparent lack of a systematic mechanism for measuring the success or performance of completed and occupied buildings in the universities. The absence of a performance evaluation database in the institutions explains this situation. The study reveals inadequate funding and lack of skilled personnel to conduct the performance evaluation of buildings. Consequently, the interaction between users and buildings did not add value to learning and working experiences. The paper concludes that a significant number of buildings in the case organisations were not fit for purpose. Furthermore, building performance indicators/measures identified as specific design objectives seem not have been explicitly expressed in most of the buildings investigated. The study emphasizes the need for designers and facilities managers to acquire skills on critical aspects of building performance evaluation as a means of meeting the increasing demand for higher quality in education. The exploratory nature of this research clarifies the problems that need to be addressed in future studies and so raised a number of theoretical and conceptual issues that must be explored in the performance evaluation of educational buildings.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:47Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Perspectives
           for the implementation of lean construction in the Ghanaian construction
           industry
    • Authors: Ayarkwa; J., Agyekum, K., Adinyira, E., Osei-Asibey, D.
      Abstract: Lean construction, if adopted could prove to be highly rewarding to Ghanaian construction organizations, resulting in the reduction of waste and improvement in productivity. This paper presents results of a study to assess the perceptions of Ghanaian construction practitioners of the lean construction philosophy and to identify the level of knowledge in the construction industry. Structured questionnaire survey was conducted on technical managers of construction organizations and consultants to assess their perceptions of the lean construction philosophy and to identify the level of knowledge in the Ghanaian construction industry and measures to bridge the knowledge gap. A quantitative approach to data analysis was employed using mean scores of factors studied. There is the existence of a good level of awareness, but a low level of familiarity and application of lean construction among practitioners in the Ghanaian construction industry. Majority are considering the application of lean concepts in future. Lean principles are considered transferable to construction in Ghana and construction practitioners suggest that to deal with the knowledge gap, firms should change organizational culture that does not promote lean construction and the construction industry should organize workshops and conferences to increase the level of awareness and bridge the knowledge gap on lean construction in Ghana. The study should have covered all categories of contractors but due to lack of reliable information on small scale construction organizations, only large firms in the highest financial classes were covered. The findings from the study enable the Ghanaian construction industry to organize training workshops and conferences for key players in the industry to increase their level of awareness and to bridge the knowledge gap on lean construction. The findings of the study are of value to construction organizations seeking to improve productivity and work quality through the adoption of the lean construction approach.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:46Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Exploring key
           performance indicators for joint venture construction projects in Lagos
           State, Nigeria
    • Authors: Famakin; I.O., Ogunsemi, D.R.
      Abstract: One acceptable way to extend company presence into a new market is through strategic alliances and joint ventures. These methods are being used with increasing frequency by engineering companies with mixed results. This research seeks to assess the key performance indicators for the performance of partners in joint ventures projects in Nigeria. Primary data were collected through the administration of questionnaire to partners and consultants who have engaged in joint venture construction project in partnership with the Lagos State Development and Property Corporation. The data obtained were analyzed using Mean Item Score, Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney (U-test) test and Kruskal-Wallis (H-test) test and factor analysis. The study revealed that all the performance indicators identified were significant to joint venture construction projects with time performance, client satisfaction, cost performance and sharing resources ranked as the most important performance indicators for joint venture construction projects in Nigeria. A KMO value of 0.774 was gotten indicating the suitability of the data for factor analysis. The research would assist in deciding key performance indicators for joint venture construction projects for inclusion in the drafting of joint venture agreements. The three groupings from factor analysis and their relationship will help in developing a framework for joint venture construction projects. The factors extracted help to identify the high prioritized performance indicators which could be used as an assessment tool to evaluate the performance of partners and thus help to identify areas for improvement.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:46Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Public-private
           partnership for lean sustainable development in construction
    • Authors: Ayman Othman; Ayman, El-Gendawy, Alaa Hosny Shaaban
      Abstract: Sustainability of construction projects has become a major issue facing decision-makers, developers, city and urban planners as well as designers worldwide. Construction projects are characterised with the excessive use of natural resources and consumption of energy, which have a crucial impact on the environment and future generations. This called for the construction industry to adopt the Lean principles as an approach to achieve sustainability objectives. Due to its achievement, partnership between public and private sectors turned into a strategic option to promote sustainability of construction projects. The increasing recognition and apparent success of lean principles called for focusing on utilising the knowledge and skills of project participants to develop sustainable construction through enhancing values and eliminating wastes. This paper aims to investigate the role of public-private partnership (PPP) in applying Lean principles as an approach for sustainable development in construction. A research methodology is developed to accomplish four objectives. Firstly, literature review is used to build a comprehensive background about the research topic including partnership, sustainable development and lean principles. Secondly, case studies are presented to explain the role of partnership in delivering sustainable construction projects. Thirdly, developing a framework to facilitate the creation and implementation of partnership between public and private sector towards lean sustainable development in construction. Finally, summarising research conclusions and recommendations for governmental authorities, construction professionals and further research. Research findings showed that creating a partnership between the public and private sectors could play a significant role towards achieving sustainability in construction through lean principles application.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:45Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Ghanaian
           construction professionals' perception on challenges to female retention
           in the construction industry
    • Authors: Ayarkwa; J., Agyekum, K., Acheampong, A.
      Abstract: The flow of knowledge from higher learning institutions into the construction industry is always disrupted when female graduates are not retained in the Ghanaian construction industry. This paper assesses challenges to female graduates' retention in the Ghanaian construction industry, and recommends measures to promote their retention and participation in infrastructure development. Questionnaires were administered through purposive sampling to 51 groups of male and female construction professionals in order to establish the gender differentiated perceptions on the challenges and measures to retain female construction graduates within the construction industry. Professionals from construction companies and consultancy firms were surveyed using self-administered questionnaires. Data was encoded into SPSS and analysed using both one sample t-test and Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney two-sample rank-sum test. The survey instrument assessed the views of respondents on issues relating to the under-representation of women in the construction industry, challenges to their retention and measures to retain them in the construction industry. Professional men and women in the construction industry see better prospects in other industries, family commitments, long working hours and stressful work environment as some of the factors which push women away from the industry. Professional associations and regulatory bodies should use strategies such as mentoring, increase in role models, eliminating gender bias factors, giving career guidance, and increasing construction higher education to attract and retain professional women in the industry. The strategies suggested in this paper will help attract and retain female graduates in the Ghanaian construction industry to enable them effectively participate in infrastructure development. The barriers to female retention, the strong push factors identified and the measures suggested for female retention are of value to construction practitioners and learning institutions in Ghana and other African countries.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:45Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: A thermal
           comfort evaluation of a junior high school building in Accra, Ghana
    • Authors: Appah; D.J., Koranteng, C.
      Abstract: A field study of students' and teachers' thermal comfort in a school building (St. Andrews Junior High School) was carried out at Madina, Accra. The building was chosen due to the sustainable design principles (e.g. form, orientation and ventilation) employed in the design and construction of the school. The aim of the study was to investigate peoples' perception of comfort as well as examine the prevailing thermal conditions in the classrooms. Moreover, a comparative analysis of the results with the worldwide accepted ASHRAE recommendations was carried-out. The study employed the use of subjective assessments through questionnaires and physical measurements. The measured environmental parameters required the use of Hobo data sensors, these measured temperature and relative humidity values. The subjective responses concerned the occupants’ judgement about their thermal environment. One significant conclusion drawn was that the classroom spaces on the ground floor experienced lower temperatures, whilst those on the first floor had a higher temperature (difference of 2°C). The first floor classrooms experienced higher thermal conditions as a result of the absence of a ceiling. In addition, though a large majority of the respondents accepted their overall thermal conditions, a number of them still voted below the standard set by ASHRAE of 80% positive votes by occupants for thermal comfort. The study also showed that respondents in tropical countries such as Ghana may have a higher heat tolerance, since most of the interviewees accepted the existing thermal conditions which exceeded the standard of between 26°C and 28°C (summer comfort range) by 1°C to 5°C.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:44Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: State of public
           buildings in Ghana after the passage of the Persons with Disability Act
           (Act 715) : the case of tertiary institutions
    • Authors: Ansah; Samuel K., Owusu, Kwaku
      Abstract: Persons with disability Act (ACT 715) makes it mandatory to put up buildings that are disabled friendly but most designers and contractors in Ghana fail to factor the disabled people in the design and construction of infrastructure. In most cases where attention has been given, the provision of the person with disability has been misconstrued by some building industry players to mean provision of ramps to ground floors. After the passage of the persons with disability Act, in 2006, it has become necessary that all public buildings in Ghana have to be designed and built to incorporate the required features that will aid the disabled to have a comfortable access to all public places. This study is therefore carried out to investigate into the state of public buildings in Ghana after the passage of the persons with disability Act (ACT 715) with particular emphasis on public tertiary educational institution buildings in Ghana. To achieve the study objectives, the paper adopted research survey method which includes the use of questionnaire and interview conducted among Contractors and Clients representatives as well as officials from the Law Enforcing Agency who are directly involved in the construction of public buildings. The study considered four public tertiary institutions and the type of buildings considered under these institutions are lecture halls, students’ hostel, offices and residential flats for staff. The results showed that though the disability law has been passed, out of 31 buildings investigated, 9.68% of the buildings were fully factored with disability facilities, 67.74% partially factored and 22.58% not factored at all. The study concluded that law enforcing agency should ensure that construction professionals fully factor disabled people in their building designs and construction. Massive education should also be given to the general public and clients about the need to make buildings disabled friendly.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:43Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: An assessment
           of building elements' proneness to variation in Nigeria
    • Authors: Olusola; Babatunde Solomon, Olubola, Babalola, Onajite, Jagboro Godwin, Akintayo, Opawole
      Abstract: Variations in construction had been studied by a number of researchers in the light of its causes and effects on project delivery, thereby taking for granted the susceptibility of building elements to variation. Thus, this paper becomes imperative to fill the gap with a view to examining the proneness of building elements to variation and assessing the control measures of proneness of building elements to variation before and during construction process. Data were collected using structured questionnaires administered on construction professionals in Lagos metropolis. Systematic sampling technique was employed in the administration of the questionnaire to consulting firms, contracting firms and client organizations within the built environment in the study area. The data were analyzed using statistical methods of average, percentage, relative significant index (RSI) and Spearman rank-order correlation coefficient. The results of the analysis revealed that excavation and fillings, concrete work at substructure, block work at substructure, roof and wall finishes were ranked highest of the building elements that were highly susceptible to variation. While internal doors, disposal installation, water installation, ventilation system, windows and external doors respectively were less susceptible to variation during construction processes of educational building projects in Nigeria. The paper further identified involvement of professionals at initial stage of project, client's involvement at planning and design phase, clear and thorough project brief and thorough detailing of design respectively as control measures of proneness of building elements to variation. The study recommended that the identified building elements which have been known to have a high degree of susceptibility to variation are to be given utmost consideration during the design and construction process in order to minimize their effects and contributions to variation with overall aim to improving construction project delivery.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:43Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: An
           investigation of rural - urban linkages of the Lagos megacity, Nigeria
    • Authors: Lawanson; Taibat, Yadua, Omoayena, Salako, Idris
      Abstract: This paper has investigated the environmental challenges faced by Peri urban settlements in the Lagos Megacity. An intense study of the Isheri, Ibafo and Sagamu Interchange areas along the Lagos Ibadan Expressway axis was done. Socio economic characteristics, housing and environmental conditions as well as rural urban linkages were done to determine the flow of interaction between the settlements and the Lagos Metropolis. Data collection was by the administration of structured questionnaires on household heads of which 46 were sampled in Isheri, 113 in Ibafo and 191 in Sagamu Interchange areas respectively. Survey was by systematic random sampling. The study revealed a high level of interaction between the settlements and the Lagos Megacity as over 60% of respondents in the study area commute daily to work in Lagos. The study also revealed that land value, rental value in these peri-urban settlements had increase since 2005 when the highest rate of population influx was observed. Furthermore, environmental challenges especially poor infrastructure and security concerns had exacerbated. The paper concluded by suggesting strategies for mitigating these challenges and they include the introduction of participatory planning mechanisms as well as the enforcement of development control
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:42Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Volume 2 Number
           2 December 2012 - full journal articles
    • Abstract: Volume 2 Number 2 December 2012 - full journal articles
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:38Z
      Issue No: Vol. 2 (2014)
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Analysis of
           infrastructure development for sustainable housing in Lagos megacity,
           Nigeria
    • Authors: Ilesanmi; Adetokunbo O.
      Abstract: Studies which confirmed the huge urban housing and infrastructure deficits in Lagos, Nigeria have often considered urban housing in isolation from its infrastructure. This paper analysed the link between infrastructure development and sustainable housing through the comparative case-studies of three housing sectors in Lagos megacity. The study stressed the importance of infrastructure to human and economic development, with the objective of determining the sustainability of urban housing development in the context of neighbourhood infrastructure provision in the study area. It analysed the state of physical and social infrastructure especially as they relate to urban housing, distinguishing between public, organized private and popular housing sectors. Primary data were obtained from an on-going research project on the Lagos megacity, complemented by secondary data from related literature. The paper identified the associative factors for the housing deficit and those implicating deficiencies in infrastructure development, to include: one-off and ad-hoc approaches to housing problems; inappropriate implementation of housing and urban policies; inaccessibility and high costs of lands; under-investment in infrastructural expansion; poor maintenance and upgrading culture; systemic failures in mortgage schemes for home-ownership; and problems related to urban governance. The paper offered recommendations of options to consider in addressing the issues of housing and infrastructure deficits. It concluded on the need for housing developments that enhance mixed neighbourhoods, cost-efficient infrastructure management, and an integrated approach to resolving the deficit challenges in the built environment.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:36Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Estimating cost
           contingency for construction projects : the challenge of systemic and
           project specific risk
    • Authors: Buertey; J.I.T., Abeere-Inga, Emmanuel, Kumi, Theophilus Adjei
      Abstract: The challenge of poor scope definition resulting in scope creep is recognized as the major driver for construction project and cost overruns. All construction projects are associated with both systemic uncertainty and project specific uncertainty. The epistemic ambiguity in risk estimation could be considered as an opportunity or threat, a gain or loss, positive or negative; while project specific risk are in relation to project cost which makes its estimation untoward. Out of 204 questionnaires distributed to the Built Environment Professionals to determine the impact of systemic and project specific risk factors on the estimation of cost contingency, 118 were retrieved representing 57.8%. Data analysis using FMEA as a qualitative risk tool and univariate statistical analysis as a quantitative risk tool revealed that systemic risk accounted for approximately 64% of the cost drivers related of the construction cost uncertainty whilst projects specific risk accounted for 36% of the risk impact. Scope changes, incomplete scope definition, design status and changes in specification were revealed as high-impact systemic risk which has a high propensity of cost overrun effect on cost contingency. The impact of systemic risks can be managed through a design management effort by confirming the certainty of owner related issues during project definition and planning stage through historical based models relying on organizational process asset. The research revealed that the effect of project specific risk including natural and force majeure conditions and economic indicators are beyond the prediction and stochasticity effort of the project team. Project specific risk can be managed only through collaborative communicative effort of the project team with simulation to enable the right construction technologies to be selected and risk impact to be curtailed.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:36Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Practical
           application of risk management techniques in infrastructural delivery : a
           case study of Ghanaian construction industry
    • Authors: Buertey; J.I.T., Abeere-Inga, F., Kumi, T.A.
      Abstract: Risk is seen as the chance of something happening that will have an impact on the achievement of the objectives of an organization or a project. Risk management is a key project management knowledge area and a tool applicable in management of project uncertainties. Project professional acquire knowledge through education or experience through practice. In their daily decision making process, practitioners rely on their expert judgment, past experience, intuition, acquired and accumulated knowledge and gut feelings to make decisions, the absence of risk management which possess a great level of uncertainty. The paper discusses some theories related to risk management, the risk management process and unveils the extent of application of risk management techniques by professionals in the infrastructural and development industry to achieve project success. The research is based on the mixed method: qualitative and quantitative approach. Analysis of structured questionnaire distributed to professionals in the built environment indicates that some 71% of built environment professionals have no knowledge about risk management theories and techniques with only 6.2% of respondents have applied a risk management tool before in their professional practice. The paper concludes by recommending that some key project management knowledge areas be included in curricula of built environment programmes to enhance professional responsibility through rather than relying on experience alone. Thus if the deficit in infrastructural development is to be closed, the key agents of infrastructural development must be abreast with effective technological know-how through varying risk techniques.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:35Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: A conceptual
           system dynamic model to describe the impacts of critical weather
           conditions in megaproject construction
    • Authors: Boateng; P., Chen, Z., Ogunlana, S.
      Abstract: In Africa, critical weather conditions (CWCs) such as snow, heat waves, harmattan and storms are increasing in frequency and severity. The ability of players in the construction industry to plan against such CWCs and cope with their immediate impact on construction activities is critical to the contractor, client and the community that is affected. As part of a funded research scheme by the Heriot Watt University in Edinburgh, UK and the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (ECOST), this paper aims to introduce a system dynamic (SD) model to describe the impacts of critical weather conditions in megaproject construction for more accurate construction planning against project delays and cost overrun at the strategic level of megaproject management. The SD methods have been used extensively over the last 35 years on complex projects and have proven track records of project management performance in project lifecycle. The SD approach to megaprojects construction planning is first based on extensive literature review into current research practice in mega construction projects in Africa in incorporation with authors' experience related to megaproject management and research across the world. An experimental SD model is then illustrated for the OR Tambo International Airport (ORTIA) project in South Africa. The paper further discusses the use of such a SD model for better understanding of the impacts of critical weather conditions and to improve accuracy of construction planning in megaprojects management in Africa.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:35Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Prospects and
           issues of railway infrastructure and development in Ghana
    • Authors: Dinye; Romanus D.
      Abstract: Railways combine speed, carriage space and weight at less expense over long distances than any other mode of land transport. In Ghana, however, the railway subsector holds less than two percent of freight movement alongside with a less than one percent of passenger carriage in the transport economy. Provided that, rehabilitation and maintenance of existing stock, construction of new lines, efficiency and reliability services are enhanced, the railway system will play a vital role in the movement of more goods and people, thus spurring trade and increased commodity production. It will open up the investments frontiers for raw material extraction, commercial agriculture, competitive industrialisation and high quality services' delivery for the country's development. The Government of Ghana has plans to upgrade the existing system and construct new lines to expand it and link it with the railway infrastructure in the Economic Community of West African States and eventually the rest of Africa. This paper examines the current state of the railway system in Ghana, highlighting its socioeconomic contribution and prospects to national development albeit inherent problems. The prospects and issues associated with its development as a significant and an inevitable infrastructural component in the country's socio-economic development. Data for the paper are drawn through goggle documentary investigation and subjected to contingent content analysis and evaluation. A private-public partnership approach to the development and management of the railway system is proposed within the context of the liberalization policy in Ghana's national development framework.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:34Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Assessment of
           the role of private property developers in the provision of
           infrastructures in Karu, Keffi and Nasarawa in Nasarawa State, Nigeria
    • Authors: Yacim; A.J., Bello, A.V.
      Abstract: Infrastructure crisis in Nigeria has left private sector with no other option than to provide alternative infrastructure to enhance the well-being and quality of life of the people. This current empirical study assesses the participation of private property developers in the provision of alternative infrastructures to their properties and residential environment in Karu, Keffi and Nasarawa council headquarters of Nasarawa State. A total number of 270 (two hundred and seventy) private property developers were selected using the simple random sampling technique and questionnaires were administered to the number out of which 216 (two hundred and sixteen) of the questionnaires were returned for analysis. Descriptive Statistical Method (Percentile and the Weighted Mean Score) were used in the analysis. Findings show that there are dearth of and non-functional public infrastructures in the study locations. The result also show that well and borehole ranked high among the alternative infrastructures provided by private developers in Karu, Keffi and Nasarawa respectively while very few of them provided generator sets and private security guard in their premises. On the other hand provision of major infrastructures such as roads, culverts among others is practically beyond the scope of private developers in the study areas due to cost implications and even when they strive to provide them through joint efforts, the result had being failures and frustration because of uncooperative attitude of other developers. It is therefore recommended that joint efforts should be fostered with little support from government to enable private developers provide alternative infrastructures that are capital intensive in the study areas in particular and Nigeria in general.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:34Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: The role of
           city authorities in contributing to the development of urban slums in
           Ghana
    • Authors: King; R.S., Amponsah, O.
      Abstract: Urban planning in Ghana in the last few decades has been constrained by the rapid pace of urbanisation. Despite the prospects of urbanisation in economic growth and socio-political advancement, it has the tendency to generate unprecedented cultural, political, social and environmental challenges which limit the effectiveness of urban planning. Evidence the world over reveals that though there is no rigid blue-print for urban planning, the traditional planning practices have been renounced to contain the current trends in urban spread and development. In Ghana however, the traditional planning practices are still in use manifesting in poor coordination among urban planners and the use of obsolete city bylaws, which results in creating further urban problems such as slums development. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that poor coordination among city authorities and inflexible city bylaws and regulations could lead to the formation of slums. Quantitative and qualitative data on access to basic infrastructure and utilities were gathered from households, enterprise owners and community leaders at Old Fadama in Accra, Amui Dzor in Ashaiman and Akwatia Line in Kumasi, using semi-structured questionnaires and interview guides, respectively. Key informant interviews were also held with utility providers to understand how they work together as a team. The findings show that traditional bureaucratic cultures contributed to the development of informal settlements in Ghana. Electricity Company of Ghana, the Ghana Water Company Limited and the Town and Country Planning Department has not been working closely with slum dwellers that also form part of the urban milieu. Thus, access to basic life-sustaining utilities is limited and unplanned resulting in losses to the utility companies due to illegal tapping of such services. The paper concludes that where coordination among the city authorities is weak and regulations are inflexible, the development of slums is very fast and at an unprecedented rate, as is observed in the three informal settlements studied.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:33Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Volume 2 Number
           1 August 2012 - full journal articles
    • Abstract: Volume 2 Number 1 August 2012 - full journal articles
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:31Z
      Issue No: Vol. 2 (2014)
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Housing
           delivery through public-private partnership in Nigeria and the case for
           beneficiaries' involvement
    • Authors: Adeogun; Olumiyiwa B., Taiwo, Abraham A.
      Abstract: Over the years successive governments have devised and launched strategies to tackle the huge housing deficit in Nigeria. In the recent past, public-private partnership was embraced and employed in a number of low-income housing schemes across the country. Four such schemes which represented a partnership between the state government and private developer, and between the federal government and private developer, were chosen as case studies. They are Sunshine Gardens and HOB Estate, both in Akure, the Doma Road Estate in Lafia and Shelter-View Estate in Ado Ekiti. The study sought to identify beneficiaries' participation in the schemes. It was established that there was an absence of meaningful community/beneficiaries' participation in these schemes. This absence of participation impinged on the overall performance of these shelter projects. A case was therefore made for beneficiaries' participation in PPP arrangement for low-income housing in Nigerian cities. The advantage of having this third partner needs to be utilised to improve success on the present and future low-income housing schemes.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:30Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Managing risk
           in tourism development projects : a case study of Nigeria
    • Authors: Awodele; Oluwaseyi Alabi, Ayeni, Dorcas A.
      Abstract: Tourism is the fourth largest industry in the global economy. In 2009 the industry was described by the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) as an industry that helps promote peace and stability in developing countries through its jobs provision, income generation, economy diversification, environment protection and promotion of cross-cultural awareness. However, due to inherent risks in terms of some key issues, in tourism development projects, all efforts made by successive governments in Nigeria to develop this important sector of the economy have yielded few positive results. Although there had been several studies on tourism in developing countries, little is known to exist on managing risk in tourism development projects in Nigeria. The main objective of the paper therefore is to provide better understanding of risk and its management in tourism development in Nigeria. Through a sequential mixed-method approach involving a qualitative/quantitative sequence, this paper reveals that a shortage of infrastructure; poor market demand; immature financial markets; and lack of competent manpower were among the significant risk factors affecting successful development of tourism in Nigeria. The paper also identified effective mitigation measures for these risk factors. It is recommended that every stakeholder involved in tourism development projects must be involved in risk management (i.e. in identifying, analysing, developing responses, and controlling risk). Moreover, risk management should also be integrated with the decision-making processes in managing tourism development projects, as risk management reveals the rationales for making appropriate decisions.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:29Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Assessing the
           impact of delays on the productivity of concrete placement by cranes in
           Nigeria
    • Authors: Olatunde; Olaoluwa, Okunlola, Ojo Stephen, Abiodun, Adesanya David
      Abstract: Infrastructural construction investment in Nigeria is currently estimated at US$5bn annually and of the key trades in the industry, concreting makes up about 15% of the total frequency of operations. One of the most dominant concrete-placement methods in Nigeria is by crane and skip and it has been established that fractional delay (delay time expressed as a fraction of pour duration) is the most significant factor affecting its productivity. This study therefore focused on evaluating the extent of delays on craned concrete placement in Nigeria and determining their effects on concreting productivity. The study involved a close observation of 35 daily concrete pours placed by crane and skip on 25 project sites selected through stratified random sampling procedure in Lagos. Productivity data obtained were analysed by multiple regression to obtain a model relating productivity to fractional delay. The results showed an average delay of above 23% of the pour time while the productivity is reduced by more than 2.5 m3/h for every 10% increase in delay. The latter is over 5 times the productivity reduction obtained in Hong Kong study for the same percentage increase in delay and confirms that delay has a far greater impact on the productivity of concrete placement by cranes in Nigeria than in other countries. It was recommended that serious, and concerted, managerial actions be directed at proper planning and scheduling of material deliveries as well as labour and equipment inputs by adopting the developed model to monitor and eliminate most delays and sustain productivity.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:29Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Strengths,
           weaknesses, opportunities, and threats for public-private partners in
           infrastructure delivery in Nigeria
    • Authors: Adeniyi; O., Aje, I.O., Ogunsemi, D.R.
      Abstract: Public-private partnership (PPP) is basically the collaboration between a public and a private organisation in order to achieve a specific goal. This paper examines the capabilities of partners and the environment in which they operate in Nigeria using a case-study approach. Data for the study were collected from written documents, inter alia company's business brochures, official reports, unpublished performance data on resources and operations; interviews were also conducted with 8 professionals from public and private parties. Data analysis was done using analytical induction, content and logical analysis. The study revealed that diversity and multidisciplinary attributes, and ready access to consultants are among the major strengths of the public partners, while its weakness is insufficiency of arm. The passing of relevant laws was seen as an opportunity by both parties, while lack of understanding of roles by ministries, and an unfavourable banking climate were identified as threats by the public partner. The private partner identified creativity and innovativeness, high knowledge of business and superb negotiation ability among its strengths and saw poor federal influence as a major weakness with poor local understanding of PPP as a threat. The study concluded that the success of partnerships depends much on cordial relationships between partners.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:28Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Building
           maintenance systems of public health institutions in Ghana : a case study
           of La General Hospital - Accra
    • Authors: Mustapha; Zakari, Agbevade, Justice
      Abstract: It is highly desirable but hardly feasible to produce buildings that are maintenance free although much can be done at the design stage to reduce the amount of subsequent maintenance works. The research aim was to examine the various maintenance systems in use at La General Hospital in Accra. Field surveys and administration of questionnaires were used to collect the data. Most of the building structures in the institution have outlived their service period. Corrective maintenance was found to be in use and was ineffective in ensuring prompt remedial works. The level of manpower required (skilled) was also lacking. In view of these findings and by way of recommendations, it was suggested that management should adopt a maintenance policy for effective use in the institution and the entire scheme of corrective maintenance be re-structured. Furthermore, training, seminars and workshops should be organised for estate/maintenance officers to update their knowledge with regard to effective maintenance practices.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:27Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Volume 1 Number
           2 December 2011 - full journal articles
    • Abstract: Volume 1 Number 2 December 2011 - full journal articles
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:26Z
      Issue No: Vol. 1 (2014)
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: An
           investigation into contractors' evaluation of risks associated with the
           JBCC principal building agreement in South Africa
    • Authors: Othman; Ayman, Harinarain, Nishani
      Abstract: Construction is a risky business, and risk management is an essential responsibility in managing construction projects and organisations. Hence, construction contracts have been developed to organise the relationship between project participants and manage associated risks. This paper provides an investigation into the contractors' responses and feedback obtained through the application of an innovative framework developed by the authors towards identifying, quantifying and classifying the risks associated with the Joint Building Contractors Committee Principal Building Agreement Series 2000 (JBCC PBA) in South Africa. Qualitative and quantitative techniques have been used in this study for data collection and analysis. Purposive sampling was adopted to identify the respondents, and 9 construction managers were interviewed. The interviews were structured so that they were carried out in a free and unbiased manner and responding contractors were asked to complete a questionnaire. Analysis of responses showed that the developed Identification, Quantification and Classification Framework (IQCF) is an innovative and accepted tool that is able to fill the gap in managing project risks and will complement current practices. It is seen to be of benefit to firms in assisting with training of employees and helping junior employees understands and uses the JBCC (PBA). Investigating the validity and reliability of the developed framework is of prime importance to ensure its suitability to manage risks associated with the JBCC (PBA). For this reason contractor's responses and feedback are based on the practical application of the framework which ultimately increases its value and contribution to the construction industry. The adoption and application of the framework will enable contractors to enhance the risk-management process in South Africa.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:25Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Causes and
           effects of delayed payments by clients on construction projects in Ghana
    • Authors: Ansah; Samuel K.
      Abstract: Delayed payments of work done by clients on construction projects in the Ghanaian construction industry are considered to be a factor of significant concern. It causes severe cash-flow problems to contractors and this can have a devastating effect down the contractual payment chain. It is not uncommon to find a contractor or sub-contractor who has not been paid what is due to him threatening to suspend work under the contract until the balance due to him is paid in full. The practice of efficient and timely payment in construction projects is a major factor that can contribute to the success of a project. This study was conducted to identify the causes and effects of delayed payments for work done in the Ghanaian construction industry. In order to obtain indicative data for the study, questionnaires were designed and distributed to a randomly selected sample of 210 individuals among contractors, subcontractors and clients in the Ghanaian construction industry. In total, 174 completed questionnaires were returned and then analysed statistically. The Relative Importance Index was used to determine the ranking of the results of the study. Employers' poor financial management, conflict among parties involved in the contract, and delay in certification are some of the potential causes of delayed payment identified in the study. Withholding or delaying payment creates financial hardship for the construction companies and its impacts are sometimes so harsh that some companies have to close down. To improve the payment situation, the findings of the study suggest that there must be enforcing clauses of delayed payment in contracts, i.e. levying charges on overdue payments and the establishment of a payment department which would be responsible for keeping records of the history of delayed payment and penalties given to those who fail to pay on time as stipulated in the contract.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:24Z
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Volume 1 Number
           1 November 2011 - full journal articles
    • Abstract: Volume 1 Number 1 November 2011 - full journal articles
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:23Z
      Issue No: Vol. 1 (2014)
       
  • Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation: Housing economy
           : use of interlocking masonry for low-cost student housing in Nigeria
    • Authors: Adedeji; Y.M.D.
      Abstract: This paper examines the overriding benefits of interlocking masonry over the conventional types in housing delivery in Nigeria. The study summarises and interprets the findings from an empirical survey of students' housing projects in selected institutions in South-western Nigeria and Abuja, the capital city of Nigeria through case studies, interview schedules, and observations. Professionals like architects, engineers, quantity surveyors and building contractors involved in the designs and supervision of these projects were interviewed to obtain their views on the subject. Research variables investigated include: size of buildings; number of labourers engaged in masonry works; cost of masonry works; curing and setting time for concrete blocks; productive hours of labourers employed; and willingness to use these materials. Some selected buildings observed in the field that have been constructed using mortarless masonry construction systems are presented next. Data obtained from the field through observations and interview schedules were analysed and compared with both descriptive and inferential statistics. Analysis of results revealed the following: a high preference of professionals for the use of interlocking masonry over the conventional methods; faster construction time; labour and material cost savings with interlocking blocks. The limitations of the use of interlocking blocks for housing projects were also observed. This paper recommends the use of the accelerated dry masonry system in housing projects and concludes that interlocking masonry is a good replacement for the conventional types of construction used in student housing projects in Nigeria.
      PubDate: 2014-10-30T02:29:23Z
       
 
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