Subjects -> BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION (Total: 139 journals)
    - BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION (131 journals)
    - CARPENTRY AND WOODWORK (8 journals)

BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION (131 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 35 of 35 Journals sorted alphabetically
A+BE : Architecture and the Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Academia : Architecture and Construction     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ACI Structural Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Building Education     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Building Energy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Anales de Edificación     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Civil Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Journal of Construction Economics and Building     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Baltic Journal of Real Estate Economics and Construction Management     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bautechnik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Beton- und Stahlbetonbau     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Building & Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Buildings     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
BUILT : International Journal of Building, Urban, Interior and Landscape Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Built Environment Inquiry Journal     Open Access  
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Built-Environment Sri Lanka     Full-text available via subscription  
Case Studies in Construction Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Cement     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cement and Concrete Composites     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Cement and Concrete Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Challenge Journal of Concrete Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Challenge Journal of Concrete Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Change Over Time     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
City, Culture and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Cityscape     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Clay Technology     Full-text available via subscription  
Concreto y cemento. Investigación y desarrollo     Open Access  
Construction Economics and Building     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Construction Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Construction Management and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Construction Research and Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Construction Robotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Corporate Real Estate Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Dams and Reservoirs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Developments in the Built Environment     Open Access  
Energy and Built Environment     Open Access  
Engineering Project Organization Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Environment and Urbanization Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
FUTY Journal of the Environment     Full-text available via subscription  
Glass Structures & Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
HBRC Journal     Open Access  
Housing and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
HVAC&R Research     Hybrid Journal  
Indoor and Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Informes de la Construcción     Open Access  
Intelligent Buildings International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Advanced Structural Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Architectural Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Built Environment and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Concrete Structures and Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Construction Engineering and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Construction Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Masonry Research and Innovation     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Protective Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of River Basin Management     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Structural Stability and Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Sustainable Building Technology and Urban Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Sustainable Construction Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Sustainable Real Estate and Construction Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of the Built Environment and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Ventilation     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal for Education in the Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Aging and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Architecture, Planning and Construction Management     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Asian Architecture and Building Engineering     Open Access  
Journal of Building Construction and Planning Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Building Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Building Materials and Structures     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Building Pathology and Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Building Performance Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Civil Engineering and Construction Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Civil Engineering and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Computational Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Construction Business and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Construction Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Construction Engineering, Technology & Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Green Building     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Legal Affairs and Dispute Resolution in Engineering and Construction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Property, Planning and Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Structural Fire Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Sustainable Cement-Based Materials     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Sustainable Design and Applied Research in Innovative Engineering of the Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the South African Institution of Civil Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Transport and Land Use     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Urban Technology and Sustainability     Open Access  
Landscape History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Materiales de Construcción     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Mauerwerk     Hybrid Journal  
Modular and Offsite Construction (MOC) Summit Proceedings |     Open Access  
Naval Engineers Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Nordic Concrete Research     Open Access  
Open Construction & Building Technology Journal     Open Access  
PARC Pesquisa em Arquitetura e Construção     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Forensic Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Urban Design and Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Revista ALCONPAT     Open Access  
Revista de la Construcción     Open Access  
Revista de Urbanismo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Hábitat Sustenable     Open Access  
Revista Ingenieria de Construcción     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista INVI     Open Access  
RILEM Technical Letters     Open Access  
Room One Thousand     Open Access  
Ruang-Space: Jurnal Lingkungan Binaan (Journal of The Built Environment)     Open Access  
Russian Journal of Construction Science and Technology     Open Access  
Science and Technology for the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal  
Smart and Sustainable Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Steel Construction - Design and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Stroitel’stvo : Nauka i Obrazovanie     Open Access  
Structural Concrete     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Structural Mechanics of Engineering Constructions and Buildings     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sustainable Buildings     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sustainable Cities and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Technology|Architecture + Design     Hybrid Journal  
Terrain.org : A Journal of the Built & Natural Environments     Free   (Followers: 3)
The Historic Environment : Policy & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
The IES Journal Part A: Civil & Structural Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
The Journal of Integrated Security and Safety Science (JISSS)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Tidsskrift for boligforskning     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Cityscape
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1936-007X
Published by US Department of Housing and Urban Development Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Cityscape: Volume 24 Number 1 An Evaluation of the Impact and Potential of
           Opportunity Zones

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: skhanal
      Abstract: Periodicals: PeriodicalsCityscape Symposium
      An Evaluation of the Impact and Potential of Opportunity Zones Guest Editor's Introduction
      Daniel MarcinEnhancing Returns from OpportunityZone Projects by Combining Federal,State, and Local Tax Incentives toBolster Community Impact
      Blake Christian and Hank Berkowitz Missed Opportunity: The WestBaltimore Opportunity Zones Story
      Michael Snidal and Sandra Newman The Failure of OpportunityZones in Oregon: LifelessPlace-Based EconomicDevelopment ImplementationThrough a Policy Network
      James Matonte, Robert Parker, and Benjamin Y. Clark A Typology of Opportunity ZonesBased on Potential HousingInvestments and CommunityOutcomes
      Janet Li, Richard Duckworth, and Erich Yost Classifying Opportunity Zones—AModel-Based Clustering Approach
      Jamaal Green and Wei Shi The Impact of QualifiedOpportunity Zones on ExistingSingle-Family House Prices
      Yanling G. Mayer and Edward F. Pierzak Gentrification and Opportunity Zones:A Study of 100 Most Populous Citieswith D.C. as a Case Study
      Haydar Kurban, Charlotte Otabor, Bethel Cole-Smith, and Gauri Shankar Gautam Collaboration to Support FurtherRedevelopment and Revitalization inCommunities with Opportunity Zones
      Michelle Madeley, Alexis Rourk Reyes, and Rachel Bernstein Tax Cuts, Jobs, and Distributed Energy: Leveraging Opportunity Zones for Equitable Community Solar in the D.C. Region
      Sara Harvey Census Tract Boundaries and Place-Based Development Programs
      Joseph Fraker Refereed Papers Community Land Trusts for Sustainably Affordable Rental Housing Redevelopment: A Case Study of Rolland Curtis Gardens in Los Angeles
      Annette M. Kim and Andrew Eisenlohr DepartmentsData Shop Renters at the Tipping Point of Homeownership: Estimating the Impact of Telework
      Treh Manhertz and Alexandra Lee Exploring Unsheltered Homelessness, Migration, and Shelter Access in Kentucky
      Andrew Sullivan and Kotomi YokokuraForeign Exchange Connecting Housing, Health, and Social Supports for People Leaving Treatment:Housing Policy Lessons from Australia
      Cameron Duff, Nicholas Hill, Hazel Blunden, kylie valentine, and Sean RandallGraphic DetailMapping Equity and Exclusion in Neighborhood Associations in Bloomington, Indiana
      Deborah L. Myerson and Mark StosbergIndustrial Revolution How Can Construction Process Simulation Modeling Aid the Integration of LeanPrinciples in the Factory-Built Housing Industry'
      Ankur Podder, Shanti Pless, Isabelina Nahmens, Ondrej Labik, and Alison Donovan Policy Briefs An Overview of Flood Risk to the Housing Finance Ecosystem
      Michael CraigSpAM A Method for Defining Downtown Business District Boundaries in Pre-AutomobileTowns and Cities
      Andrew J. Van Leuven   Cityscape is published three times a year by the Office of Policy Development and Research (PD&R) of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Subscriptions are available at no charge and single copies at a nominal fee. The journal is also available on line at https://www.huduser.gov/periodicals/cityscape.html. PD&R welcomes submissions to the Refereed Papers section of the journal. Our referee process is double blind and timely, and our referees are highly qualified. The managing editor will also respond to authors who submit outlines of proposed papers regarding the suitability of those proposals...
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Mar 2022 19:01:37 +000
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2022)
       
  • Cityscape: Volume 24 Number 1 An Evaluation of the Impact and Potential of
           Opportunity Zones

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: skhanal
      Abstract: Periodicals: PeriodicalsCityscapeTax Cuts, Jobs, and DistributedEnergy: Leveraging OpportunityZones for Equitable CommunitySolar in the D.C. RegionSara HarveyFederally designated Opportunity Zones(OZs) can serve a key function in meeting the United States’climate and energy goals while spurring economic growth and upward mobility for low-income groups.However, the unclear eligibility criteria and cross-jurisdictional nature of the 2017 Tax Cuts andJobs Act complicates its implementation when maximizing co-benefits is a priority. This capstoneseeks to capture the ways in which federally designated OZs can be utilized to achieve equity-focusedclean energy outcomes in the Washington, D.C.-Maryland-Virginia region. In the few years since thelegislation was implemented, jurisdictions have tested its boundaries to create additional positiveoutcomes for constituents and the natural environment. Utilizing existing climate plans and clean energyinfrastructure in the District of Columbia (D.C.) as a case study, the author argues that OpportunityZones can and should serve as a vehicle to achieve our region’s climate goals. This article recommendspolicy changes to resolve barriers to entry and encourage community-invested solar projects that reduceutility costs, create jobs, and provide value to investors.
      Previous Article     Next ArticleDownload Link: ch9.pdfManaging Editor: Mark D. ShroderAssociate Editor: Michelle P. MatugaIssue Title: An Evaluation of the Impact and Potential of Opportunity ZonesIssue: Volume 24 Number 1
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Mar 2022 19:00:08 +000
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2022)
       
  • Cityscape: Volume 24 Number 1 An Evaluation of the Impact and Potential of
           Opportunity Zones

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: skhanal
      Abstract: Periodicals: PeriodicalsCityscapeCollaboration to Support FurtherRedevelopment and Revitalization inCommunities with Opportunity ZonesMichelle Madeley
      Alexis Rourk Reyes
      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Community Revitalization
      Rachel Bernstein
      College of William & MaryOpportunity Zones (OZs) were created to drive economic development and job creation in low-income,disinvested neighborhoods that need private investment to support new and improved spaces, services,and economic opportunities for their residents. Part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s)Office of Policy, the Office of Community Revitalization (OCR) supports community-driven efforts toimprove economic, environmental, community, and human health outcomes by convening community,local, state, federal, and private-sector actors that can help communities strategically plan for the use of public and private capital and implement their plans for economic growth and environmental protection.To support the more than 34.8 million people living in communities with Qualified Opportunity Zones(QOZs), OCR piloted an enhanced, focused technical assistance offering, strengthened interagencycollaboration, and expanded geospatial planning and analysis capabilities to support economicallydistressed communities in their revitalization efforts. OCR also played a role in facilitating internalcoordination across EPA and developed a community of practice with community development,sustainability, and brownfield revitalization staff in EPA’s 10 regions. The premise of this initiative wasthat without meaningful community engagement, traditional investment could result in unintendedadverse consequences, such as displacement of people, businesses, and cultures. Equitable investmentengages the community to define project benefits and seeks to create thriving, sustainable neighborhoodsof opportunity for all.
      Previous Article     Next ArticleDownload Link: ch8.pdfManaging Editor: Mark D. ShroderAssociate Editor: Michelle P. MatugaIssue Title: An Evaluation of the Impact and Potential of Opportunity ZonesIssue: Volume 24 Number 1
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Mar 2022 18:58:57 +000
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2022)
       
  • Cityscape: Volume 24 Number 1 An Evaluation of the Impact and Potential of
           Opportunity Zones

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: skhanal
      Abstract: Periodicals: PeriodicalsCityscapeGentrification and Opportunity Zones:A Study of 100 Most Populous Citieswith D.C. as a Case StudyHaydar Kurban
      Howard University
      Charlotte Otabor
      Office of the Chief Financial Officer, Washington, D.C.
      Bethel Cole-Smith
      Gauri Shankar Gautam
      Howard University
      Disclaimer: The views expressed herein are those of the authors and do not reflect the views of theirrespective affiliations.This article explores the role of gentrification in the selection of Opportunity Zone (OZ) census tracts, aswell as the potential impact of OZ on gentrification in the 100 most populous urban areas in the UnitedStates and in Washington, D.C. It analyzes the role of gentrification in the selection of OZ census tracts in100 core-based statistical areas (CBSAs). A CBSA is a geographic area defined in terms of counties, whichconsists of an urban area of at least 10,000 population and its surrounding socially and economicallyintegrated areas. Next, we test whether gentrification has differential impacts on economic activity inOZ and non-OZ neighborhoods in the 100 most populous metropolitan areas. If so, we then use theDistrict of Columbia (D.C.) as a case study to analyze the impact of gentrification on migration in D.C.and predict the impact of economic activity in OZ-eligible neighborhoods. We construct an educationbasedgentrification measure to analyze the relationship between OZs and gentrification in CBSAs. Ourdescriptive analysis of the 100 most populous urban areas in the United States (100 CBSAs) indicatesthat, although it appears that gentrified census tracts were not favored to receive OZ designation, thestatistical relationships between gentrification and business and residential vacancy rates are stronger inOZ-designated tracts. In D.C., we find that gentrification has been spreading to more neighborhoods in OZeligible neighborhoods. Using administrative data from the D.C. government, we find that in-migrationrates of higher income residents are significantly higher compared to their out-migration rates.We examine OZ eligible census tracts to understand the expected destination of new investment,measured as the number of permits, and find that census tracts with positive net migration and lowerbusiness vacancy rates are likely to receive increased financing.
      Previous Article     Next ArticleDownload Link: ch7.pdfManaging Editor: Mark D. ShroderAssociate Editor: Michelle P. MatugaIssue Title: An Evaluation of the Impact and Potential of Opportunity ZonesIssue: Volume 24 Number 1
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Mar 2022 18:57:50 +000
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2022)
       
  • Cityscape: Volume 24 Number 1 An Evaluation of the Impact and Potential of
           Opportunity Zones

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: skhanal
      Abstract: Periodicals: PeriodicalsCityscapeThe Impact of QualifiedOpportunity Zones on ExistingSingle-Family House PricesYanling G. Mayer
      CoreLogic, Inc.
      Edward F. Pierzak
      San Diego State UniversityThe views expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the position of CoreLogic, Inc., orits management. Established by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (TCJA),1 qualified Opportunity Zones (OZs) are a new place-based community development program that attempts to help economically challenged areas by encouraging private capital investment through the use of tax incentives. Although the program started at the beginning of 2018, implementation of the program has been slow, creating challenges for investors. The program’s structure may have also inadvertently created an environment ripe for surging property prices. This unintended consequence has the potential to reduce or eliminate investor tax benefits, stimulate community gentrification, and diminish affordability for residents. Recent studies have found evidence of material price “premiums” for some commercial real estate properties located in OZs (Pierzak, 2021; Sage, Langen, and Van de Minne, 2019). Recognizing the policy’s potential in driving increased investor interest in single-family home rentals, the authors of this study explore the impact of the program on existing single-family house prices and find that the community development program has led to excess home price appreciation totaling 6.8 percent from 2018 to 2020.
      Previous Article     Next ArticleDownload Link: ch6.pdfManaging Editor: Mark D. ShroderAssociate Editor: Michelle P. MatugaIssue Title: An Evaluation of the Impact and Potential of Opportunity ZonesIssue: Volume 24 Number 1
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Mar 2022 18:56:02 +000
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2022)
       
  • Cityscape: Volume 24 Number 1 An Evaluation of the Impact and Potential of
           Opportunity Zones

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: skhanal
      Abstract: Periodicals: PeriodicalsCityscapeClassifying Opportunity Zones—AModel-Based Clustering ApproachJamaal Green
      University of Pennsylvania

      Wei Shi
      Travelers Insurance

      Objective: Opportunity Zones (OZs) are the first major place-based economic development policyfrom the federal government in nearly two decades. To date, confusion persists among planners andpolicymakers in some places as to what features of OZ tracts matter for their inclusion, and, secondly,what features of OZ tracts make them attractive targets for potential investment. The authors developeda typology of OZ tracts in order to offer planners and policymakers alternative ways of organizing ahighly variable set of tracts.Methods: This study employs model-based clustering, also known as latent class analysis, to develop atypology OZ tracts from the population of all eligible tracts in the United States. The authors use publiclyavailable data from the U.S. Census Bureau and Urban Institute in developing the typology. Descriptivestatistics and graphics are presented on the clusters. Using Portland, Oregon, as an example city, theauthors present a cartographic exploration of the resulting typology.Results: OZs present with immense variation across clusters. Some clusters, specifically cluster 3 and9, are less poor, have a greater number of jobs and higher development potential than other clusters.Additionally, these exceptional clusters have disproportionate rates of final OZ designation compared toother clusters. In Portland, these less distressed clusters make up the majority of ultimately designatedOZ tracts in the city and are concentrated in the downtown area compared to the more deprived easternpart of the city.Conclusions: We find that OZ designation is disproportionately seen in particular clusters that are relativelyless deprived than the larger population of eligible tracts. Cluster analysis as well as other forms ofexploratory or inductive analyses can offer planners and policymakers a better understanding of their localdevelopment context as well as offering a more coherent understanding of a widely variant set of tracts.OZs, the newest federal government place-based economic development tool since the New Markets TaxCredit in the early 2000s, has reportedly marshaled more than $50 billion in investment in the 2 yearssince its passage (Drucker and Lipton, 2019). Opportunity zones allow investors to defer taxes on theircapital gains if they invest in qualified Opportunity Zone funds in development-starved census tracts.Recent investigations show a disproportionate amount of investment being steered into a minority oftracts that formally qualified for the program based on their income but are not suffering from a lack ofdevelopment (Buhayar and Leatherby, 2019; Drucker and Lipton, 2019; Ernsthausen and Elliott, 2019).A central tension in those articles concerning Opportunity Zone investment is that the Tax Cut and JobsAct of 2017 used a broad qualifying rule for Opportunity Zone designation based only on tract incometo maximize flexibility. It resulted in variations within designated Opportunity Zones in terms of theirsocioeconomic characteristics but also redevelopment attractiveness. An important issue for economicdevelopment researchers and analysts is to find alternative ways of organizing Opportunity Zones intomore useful categories of analysis than simply qualified or non-qualified Opportunity Zone designations.This paper presents model-based clustering, also known as latent class analysis. This unsupervisedmachine learning technique is one way to address the difficulties of classifying designated OpportunityZone tracts. The remainder of this article will offer background on some troubling OZ issues, adescription of latent class analysis through model-based clustering, and the results of cluster analysis andits relationship with Opportunity Zone designation. The findings contribute to a better understanding ofthe variation of eligible tracts and what features make the zones attractive for designation.
      Previous Article     Next ArticleDownload Link: ch5.pdfManaging Editor: Mark D. ShroderAssociate Editor: Michelle P. MatugaIssue Title: An Evaluation of the Impact and Potential of Opportunity ZonesIssue: 
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Mar 2022 18:54:46 +000
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2022)
       
  • Cityscape: Volume 24 Number 1 An Evaluation of the Impact and Potential of
           Opportunity Zones

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: skhanal
      Abstract: Periodicals: PeriodicalsCityscapeA Typology of Opportunity ZonesBased on Potential HousingInvestments and CommunityOutcomesJanet Li
      Richard Duckworth
      Erich Yost
      U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not represent the official positions orpolicies of the Office of Policy Development and Research, the U.S. Department of Housing and UrbanDevelopment, or the U.S. government. The Opportunity Zones tax incentive is a decentralized, large-scale, flexible, federal place-basedinitiative intended to bring investment to historically underinvested communities across the UnitedStates. Although the eligibility of Opportunity Zones was based on certain criteria, every state developedits own process for recommending eligible census tracts for designation. This fact, along with the diversityin the characteristics of eligible census tracts, led to broad variation across designated OpportunityZones. This variation means that evaluating the Opportunity Zones incentive will require differentapproaches for different types of communities. Using a combined principal components analysis andcluster analysis approach, the authors developed a typology of Opportunity Zones based on designatedtracts’ characteristics around socioeconomics and housing markets. Five types of Opportunity Zoneswere identified and described as, in order from most to least represented, (1) rural, small-town, andtribal communities (36 percent of OZs); (2) underinvested majority-Black communities (26 percent);(3) suburban majority-Hispanic families (19 percent); (4) growing job hubs (13 percent); and (5)metropolitan immigrant communities (6 percent). Potential investment outcomes and communityoutcomes for each type, and considerations for evaluating each type of Opportunity Zone, are discussed.This typology may be useful for Opportunity Zone stakeholders interested in housing investments andresearchers conducting future evaluations of the incentive.
      Previous Article     Next ArticleDownload Link: ch4.pdfManaging Editor: Mark D. ShroderAssociate Editor: Michelle P. MatugaIssue Title: An Evaluation of the Impact and Potential of Opportunity ZonesIssue: Volume 24 Number 1
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Mar 2022 18:53:07 +000
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2022)
       
  • Cityscape: Volume 24 Number 1 An Evaluation of the Impact and Potential of
           Opportunity Zones

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: skhanal
      Abstract: Periodicals: PeriodicalsCityscapeThe Failure of OpportunityZones in Oregon: LifelessPlace-Based EconomicDevelopment ImplementationThrough a Policy NetworkJames Matonte
      Robert Parker
      Benjamin Y. Clark
      University of Oregon The 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act created a new place-based economic development tool to induceeconomic activity in identified low-income census tracts throughout the United States. In response, theState of Oregon established 86 Opportunity Zones (OZs) at Governor Kate Brown’s direction (BusinessOregon, 2020). This report examines the rollout of Opportunity Zones in Oregon and what policymakerscan learn from its implementation. It looks at how well Opportunity Zones are understood in Oregonby local governments and economic development agencies and how local governments, local economicdevelopment agencies, and the private sector are using and marketing OZs. To assess these questions, wesurveyed individuals in the public sector in areas with Opportunity Zones across the state to assess theseactions. To supplement the survey, we conducted interviews with private sector actors and shadoweddevelopers in the Portland area to assess their engagement with Opportunity Zones. To analyze theimplementation of OZs in Oregon, we used the policy tools and networked implementation literature asa theoretical foundation. We conclude that Oregon lacks a hierarchal system to implement OZs, so thenetwork has to take a more substantial role in implementation. Opportunity Zones are a clear exampleof third-party implementation; because the government funds economic development activity through taxexpenditures, the private sector is taking the leading role in implementing these projects.
      Previous Article     Next ArticleDownload Link: ch3.pdfManaging Editor: Mark D. ShroderAssociate Editor: Michelle P. MatugaIssue Title: An Evaluation of the Impact and Potential of Opportunity ZonesIssue: Volume 24 Number 1
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Mar 2022 18:49:37 +000
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2022)
       
  • Cityscape: Volume 24 Number 1 An Evaluation of the Impact and Potential of
           Opportunity Zones

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: skhanal
      Abstract: Periodicals: PeriodicalsCityscape Missed Opportunity: The WestBaltimore Opportunity Zones StoryMichael Snidal
      Columbia University, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation
      Sandra Newman
      Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health This paper presents a qualitative evaluation of how Opportunity Zones (OZs) have attracted capital and economic development to highly distressed neighborhoods in West Baltimore. Based on 76 interviews with community and government officials, program managers, developers, businesses, and fund managers, we assess the strengths and weaknesses of OZs in West Baltimore and Baltimore City. We find that OZs are stimulating new investment conversations and building local economic development capacity. However, we also find OZs fail at oversight and community engagement, do not spur new development, and are a missed opportunity to incentivize actors and institutions critical to revitalizing distressed neighborhoods. To spur development in distressed neighborhoods, OZs require reporting standards, the removal of non-distressed census tracts, dollars for education and infrastructure, the incorporation of Community Development Financial Institutions, and incentives for non-capital gains holding investors.
      Previous Article     Next ArticleDownload Link: ch2.pdfManaging Editor: Mark D. ShroderAssociate Editor: Michelle P. MatugaIssue Title: An Evaluation of the Impact and Potential of Opportunity ZonesIssue: Volume 24 Number 1
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Mar 2022 18:48:27 +000
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2022)
       
  • Cityscape: Volume 24 Number 1 An Evaluation of the Impact and Potential of
           Opportunity Zones

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: skhanal
      Abstract: Periodicals: PeriodicalsCityscapeEnhancing Returns from OpportunityZone Projects by Combining Federal,State, and Local Tax Incentives toBolster Community ImpactBlake Christian
      Holthouse, Carlin & Van Trigt (HCVT)
      Hank Berkowitz The opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views andpolicies of HUD or the U.S. Government. Skeptics may call the federal Opportunity Zone (OZ) program a tax dodge for the wealthy, but thereis strong bipartisan support for the program at the federal, state, and local levels. Furthermore,underserved communities (and the small businesses therein) could benefit from billions of dollars in newinvestments in long-term capital that they might not have received through conventional bank loans orgovernment programs—especially given the current unique and challenging economy. The findings notedin this article are based on the authors’ presupposition that President Biden’s proposed tax increases haveincreased interest in the deferral and ultimate tax exemption aspects of the OZ program, and investmentmomentum is likely to continue for the foreseeable future.The authors’ data and interviews show that because the OZ program is not structured for real estatespeculators and flippers to trade during the OZ reinvestment period, the long-term investmentrequirement of the OZ program makes it stand out from other place-based incentive programs that havegenerally failed to live up to expectations. Furthermore, the authors dispute the notion that the OZprogram only benefits real estate investors. They believe that OZ investments have funded hundreds ofclean energy projects, biotechnology and medical infrastructure projects, active businesses, solar energyprojects, and many successful public-private partnerships. The authors also show that Congress placed no limits on the amount of federal, state, and local tax benefits, grants, or other incentives that can be layered into the OZ investment. As a result, OZ structures are being used in combination with Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) projects, New Market Tax Credit (NMTC) projects, Historical Tax Credit (HTC) projects, research and development, solar energy, cost segregation, and other alternative energy projects that generate accelerated depreciation and credits. This is generally referred to as “twinning” of various tax programs.The authors anticipate further extensions of the OZ investment window that will give taxpayers andfund managers sufficient time to make important investment decisions that result in significant economicimpact for underserved communities. How many other economic development initiatives can generatewin-win results for underserved communities, municipalities, small businesses, and investors alike'
      Previous Article     Next ArticleDownload Link: ch1.pdfManaging Editor: Mark D. ShroderAssociate Editor: Michelle P. MatugaIssue Title: An Evaluation of the Impact and Potential of Opportunity ZonesIssue: Volume 24 Number 1
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Mar 2022 18:47:08 +000
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2022)
       
 
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