Subjects -> BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION (Total: 139 journals)
    - BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION (131 journals)
    - CARPENTRY AND WOODWORK (8 journals)

BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION (131 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 35 of 35 Journals sorted alphabetically
A+BE : Architecture and the Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Academia : Architecture and Construction     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ACI Structural Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Building Education     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Building Energy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Anales de Edificación     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Civil Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Australasian Journal of Construction Economics and Building     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Baltic Journal of Real Estate Economics and Construction Management     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bautechnik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Beton- und Stahlbetonbau     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Building & Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Buildings     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
BUILT : International Journal of Building, Urban, Interior and Landscape Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Built Environment Inquiry Journal     Open Access  
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Built-Environment Sri Lanka     Full-text available via subscription  
Case Studies in Construction Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Cement     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cement and Concrete Composites     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Cement and Concrete Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Challenge Journal of Concrete Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Challenge Journal of Concrete Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Change Over Time     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
City, Culture and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Cityscape     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Clay Technology     Full-text available via subscription  
Concreto y cemento. Investigación y desarrollo     Open Access  
Construction Economics and Building     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Construction Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Construction Management and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Construction Research and Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Construction Robotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Corporate Real Estate Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Dams and Reservoirs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Developments in the Built Environment     Open Access  
Energy and Built Environment     Open Access  
Engineering Project Organization Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Environment and Urbanization Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
FUTY Journal of the Environment     Full-text available via subscription  
Glass Structures & Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
HBRC Journal     Open Access  
Housing and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
HVAC&R Research     Hybrid Journal  
Indoor and Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Informes de la Construcción     Open Access  
Intelligent Buildings International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Advanced Structural Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Architectural Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Built Environment and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Concrete Structures and Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Construction Engineering and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Construction Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Masonry Research and Innovation     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Protective Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of River Basin Management     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Structural Stability and Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Sustainable Building Technology and Urban Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Sustainable Construction Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Sustainable Real Estate and Construction Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of the Built Environment and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Ventilation     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal for Education in the Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Aging and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Architecture, Planning and Construction Management     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Asian Architecture and Building Engineering     Open Access  
Journal of Building Construction and Planning Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Building Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Building Materials and Structures     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Building Pathology and Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Building Performance Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Civil Engineering and Construction Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Civil Engineering and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Computational Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Construction Business and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Construction Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Construction Engineering, Technology & Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Green Building     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Legal Affairs and Dispute Resolution in Engineering and Construction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Property, Planning and Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Structural Fire Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Sustainable Cement-Based Materials     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Sustainable Design and Applied Research in Innovative Engineering of the Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the South African Institution of Civil Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Transport and Land Use     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Urban Technology and Sustainability     Open Access  
Landscape History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Materiales de Construcción     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Mauerwerk     Hybrid Journal  
Modular and Offsite Construction (MOC) Summit Proceedings |     Open Access  
Naval Engineers Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Nordic Concrete Research     Open Access  
Open Construction & Building Technology Journal     Open Access  
PARC Pesquisa em Arquitetura e Construção     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Forensic Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Urban Design and Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Revista ALCONPAT     Open Access  
Revista de la Construcción     Open Access  
Revista de Urbanismo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Hábitat Sustenable     Open Access  
Revista Ingenieria de Construcción     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista INVI     Open Access  
RILEM Technical Letters     Open Access  
Room One Thousand     Open Access  
Ruang-Space: Jurnal Lingkungan Binaan (Journal of The Built Environment)     Open Access  
Russian Journal of Construction Science and Technology     Open Access  
Science and Technology for the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal  
Smart and Sustainable Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Steel Construction - Design and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Stroitel’stvo : Nauka i Obrazovanie     Open Access  
Structural Concrete     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Structural Mechanics of Engineering Constructions and Buildings     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sustainable Buildings     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sustainable Cities and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Technology|Architecture + Design     Hybrid Journal  
Terrain.org : A Journal of the Built & Natural Environments     Free   (Followers: 3)
The Historic Environment : Policy & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
The IES Journal Part A: Civil & Structural Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
The Journal of Integrated Security and Safety Science (JISSS)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Tidsskrift for boligforskning     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.387
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 4  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 1 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 1759-5908 - ISSN (Online) 1759-5916
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • Adaptation measures on hydrological risks and climate change impacts in
           urbanized sub-region, Thailand: a case study in lower Chao Phraya River
           basin

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      Authors: Sutinee Chao-Amonphat , Vilas Nitivattananon , Sirinapha Srinonil
      Abstract: This study aims to explain the existing adaptation practices in an urbanized sub-region in the lower Chao Phraya River basin (CPRB) across different scales and dimensions. It offers an overview of water hazards in urban areas along the river basin to discover ways to deal with and recover from hazards via understanding the implications of existing and potential practice for the mitigation of hydrological hazards. First, this study collected current adaptation strategies and measures from interview, focus group discussion, workshop organization, etc. to get the current adaptation strategies/measures for the whole CPRB and each specific area. Second, this study identified a set of criteria for evaluation from review of current publications and official reports. Then, the current adaptation strategies/measures were examined through a set of criteria to obtain the current situation of existing practices. Finally, analysis of key challenges and opportunities was done to propose supporting guidelines to reduce hydrological risks and incorporate further adaptation measures needed to boost resilience in the area. Adaptation methods should focus on mixed adaptation, which integrates structural, social, organizational and natural adaptation, and to develop multi-dimensional collaboration. The adaption strategy has restricted the usage of some technologies and technical know-how, particularly in the area of climate change. As a result, intentional adaptation to become more inventive is required, to reduce hazards and improve disaster-response capacity. The various adaptation measures should be more integrated or more adaptive and to achieve greater cohesion and mutual benefit of individual measures, such as community-based adaptation or community-driven slum upgrading. Hydrological risks are wreaking havoc on social, economic and environmental elements, particularly river flood, flash flood and drought in the Asia-Pacific region. Twenty-two existing adaptation options were evaluated with evaluation criteria such as scales of risks/impacts reduction, benefits of environmental and socio-economic and institutional aspects. The findings highlight the current situation of existing practices, key challenges and opportunities, which emphasized on natural-based solutions, raising knowledge and awareness and lessons learned on adaptation of hydrological risks. The existing adaptation measures will be suggested as supporting guidelines and master plans to minimize the hydrological risks.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-05-09
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-08-2021-0113
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Assessment and appraisal of local governance on urban flood resilience in
           Bangkok Metropolitan Region: perspectives of SDGs 11 and 13

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      Authors: Indrajit Pal , Jose Luis Arboleda , Vilas Nitivattananon , Nonthakarn Benjachat
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to understand through the qualitative assessment, how the current strategy plans are geared toward reducing urban flood risks and achieving Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) 11 and 13. The Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR) plays a major role in Thailand’s economic development. Thus, when the 2011 Thailand flood disaster occurred, BMR suffered major economic and social losses, which impacted the rest of the country. This mega disaster prompted policymakers, the academe and other relevant stakeholders to reevaluate and amend the current urban flood risk reduction measures and governance. The present study attempts to evaluate and compare the post-2011 Thailand flood disaster strategy and master plans, policies and reports that directly and indirectly reduce urban flood risks in the provinces of BMR. Basing on SDGs 11 and 13 targets that impact urban flood risk and resilience, a set of criteria was developed to screen, score and asses the selected documents. A screening process of three levels are conducted to limit the documents to be reviewed, and subsequent content analysis for scoring also has been done. The projected results indicate the need for improved and increased number of localized strategic plans and policies, which are more comprehensive and integrated as risk governance documents. Furthermore, it is projected that there is need to integrate measures to increase adaptive capacity for BMR. This study is original, and methodology can be replicated for other urban areas for flood risks and resilience assessment.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-04-28
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-08-2021-0108
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The “disaster cycle” (DC) and actors in disaster management

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      Authors: Murat Balamir
      Abstract: The purpose is to indicate that the conventional graphical expression of cyclic stages of stages of disaster activities is still irrelevantly used in communications. Latent assumptions of the disaster cycle (DC) depiction are scrutinized. The nature of current organizational units responsible for carrying out related tasks and equipped with contemporary technology and know-how are clarified. It is indicated that the operations of these organizations today have no resemblance to any cyclic sequence. With all of its various mutations, DC does not only represent an outdated conceptualization of disaster-related activities but also conceals the globally adopted priority currently given to risk reduction policy. The contemporary organizational setup based on mitigation efforts depends on highly specialized units and teams simultaneously dedicated to the different aspects of risk management tasks. DC is to be taken as a representative understanding of a past policy environment. It is no more an explanation of current disaster affairs and must be removed from circulation. The argument serves to disregard past policy concepts, clarify the new organizational setup in disaster management and help adopt communications to current realities.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-04-25
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-01-2022-0008
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Waterlogging mitigation and safe water supply: lessons learnt from
           low-lying areas of Basirhat municipality, India

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      Authors: Aniruddha Dey , Sheikh Tawhidul Islam , Biplabketan Paul , Swarnabha Bandyopadhyay , Piu Sengupta , Nandini Sanyal , Krishna Prosad Mondal , Al Jubaer , Rangeet Mitra
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to develop a replicable model that ensures Household Water Treatment and Safe Storage as well as water treatment facilities at the community level by providing total service coverage at community scale. An intervention was implemented in one of the low-lying areas of Basirhat Municipality (West Bengal, India) that included a number of action programs in order to address household- and community-level water-induced challenges. A research study was undertaken to identify the root causes of the problems that are generally spawned from geomorphological, hydro-fluvial, climatic factors and processes and the situation becomes complicated when many other cumulative problem-contexts layovers the existing ones. A number of social and technological innovations were tested in the field and this paper critically examined the intervention processes and outcomes. It was implemented through participatory process by involving related stakeholders working at that scale so that necessary public acceptance is received for scaling up, at least, in the similar physical, social, economic and institutional contexts. The problem conceptualization process, spatial assessment for contextualizing the problem, design of interventions for different scales, development of project deployment strategies from field-based learnings contributed in developing a total solution based on fusing of household-level technical solutions, social innovations and actions for community engagements towards sustainability. Mobilized community members in addressing local inundation and waterlogging crisis. Satellite image-based maps shown to make them understand the upper-lower connection of drainage. People also developed their own action plans and engaged themselves in resuscitation of an old canal, removed the garbage that resulted in improved drainage conditions in the area. Pandemic due to COVID 19 and its related prolonged lock down, West Bengal State Assembly Election, closure of municipal governance system due to the forthcoming municipal election, closure of educational institutions, closure of Anganwadi Centre in the field area were the limitations. Due to the lock down, it was difficult for the team to maintain the time frame as well as the budget. As per the Election’s Code of Conduct gets released no public meeting was allowed without permission, people in the vicinity became suspicious, hence movement of the team members got restricted. Due to the COVID protocols, the team could not organise mass training programs. It was difficult for the team members to commute in public/private transport, hence filed work got impacted. As the team could not access data from the health department, they developed a strategy of generation data on body mass index, mid-upper arm circumferences and waist-to-hip ratios to understand the status of health and nutrition of the community. It was difficult to access the Public Health Engineering Department’s laboratory situated in the municipality for water sample test. Cost escalated due to extension of the project time. During the second phase (wave) when people lost access to health facilities they requested the team to stop field visit. Women’s empowerment through acquiring knowledge and skill on treatment and safe storage of drinking water at home. Men appreciated and recognized this, which improved the status of women in the society. Children after expressing their willingness to learn the new technology of water purification were given handholding training by their mothers and knowledge transfer has taken place in the next generation. Mobilized community members in addressing local inundation and waterlogging crisis. Satellite image-based maps to understand the upper-lower connection of drainage helped them develop their own action plans and engaged themselves in resuscitation of an old canal, removed the garbage that resulted in improved drainage conditions in the area. Household-level solutions include supply of low cost, easy operable, sustainable water purifiers, community-level solution focused on securing water-related challenges at social/public gathering places and wider catchment area level solutions include the engagement of local communities to drain out stagnant waters by clearing drains, creating/digging small canals through collective actions. Geo-spatial techniques (topographical mapping, spatial survey, water quality tests) along with social methods such as participatory appraisals for gathering information on human health, public awareness campaigns and partnership development with local government agencies were the major activities performed as part of the implementation of interventions. It is imperative to mention that water-related challenges in the low-lying settlement areas of Basirhat Municipality have effectively been addressed by relying on necessary theoretical underpinnings (Disaster risk reduction/humanitarian principles) transmitted through application of scientific techniques and mediated through local people and their agencies.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-04-13
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-08-2021-0106
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Multihazard risk assessment of educational institutes of Dehradun,
           Uttarakhand

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      Authors: Shivani Chouhan , Aishwarya Narang , Mahua Mukherjee
      Abstract: In the event of a disaster, educational institutions like schools serve as lifeline buildings. Hence, it is crucial to safeguard these buildings for the communities that may depend on the school as a disaster shelter and aid center. Thus, this paper aims to conduct a multihazard risk assessment survey at 50 schools (with 246 building blocks) in Dehradun. The past few decades have witnessed the impact of multihazard frequency in Uttarakhand, India, due to the geographical features of the Himalayas and its neo-tectonic mountain-building process. Dehradun is the capital of Uttarakhand state and comes under seismic zone IV, which is highly prone to earthquakes. The hazard assessment is divided into two types of surveys: first, building-level surveys that include rapid visual screening, nonstructural risk assessment and fire safety audit, and second, campus-level surveys that include vulnerability analysis for earthquake, flood, industrial hazard, landslide and wind. This paper will list several gaps and unrecognized practices in the region that increase the schools’ multihazard risk. The study’s outcome will help prioritize the planning of disaster awareness, retrofitting execution, future construction practices and decision-making to minimize the risk and prepare the school for the upcoming disasters. Physical data were collected by the author to determine the multihazard risk analysis in 50 schools in the Dehradun District of Uttarakhand, India. The building- and campus-level surveys have been used to generate a database for the retrofit and renovation process for each individual school to use their budget fruitfully and in a planned way. The survey conducted is more effort and a more detailed risk evaluation which necessitates effectively mitigating and ensuring the potential safety of the region’s schools.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-04-12
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-08-2021-0091
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Resilient WASH development for urban poor: the case of Ahmedabad slums

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      Authors: Akshat Yaumin Thakore , Mona Iyer , Gargi Mishra , Siddh Doshi
      Abstract: Climate variability, accompanied by rapid urbanization and rising population disproportionality, impacts urban poor settlements. This paper aims to analyse the climate resilience for the urban poor in Ahmedabad through the lens of WASH development strategies. To assess the adaptive capacities of urban poor communities, a framework in the form of a vulnerability matrix has been used consisting of four key parameters – tenure, basic services, mobilization and partnership and disaster management capacities. The matrix implicitly recommends area-specific interventions to boost adaptive capacities and improve resilience based on WASH services. This paper was designed to assess the climate resilience of WASH services in the urban poor settlements of Ahmedabad city. In all, seven slums were selected using a stratified sampling approach considering topography, access to WASH services and urban heat island effect. These slums were then assessed using a theoretical framework having four key parameters – tenure, basic service, mobilization and partnership and disaster management capacities. The data for the analysis was collected from both secondary and primary sources. For the latter, semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders, observational field visits and focused group discussions with the communities were done. A ladder form of assessment matrix was derived from a thorough literature review and various pre-existing theories. This matrix consists of four key parameters – tenure, basic service, mobilization and partnership and disaster management capacities. The slums were evaluated by applying this framework, and direct and indirect relationships were established between the said parameters. This paper was adapted in the light of various obstacles put forward by the Covid-19 pandemic. Some of the interviews with the bureaucrats and external researchers were conducted online, while the engagement with the slum dwellers was in-person, considering appropriate social and/or physical distancing norms. Implications of the Covid-19 second wave restricted the involvement of researchers with the communities at an ethnographic level. The ladder form of vulnerability assessment framework has been developed and contextualized using the insights from literature review, field visits and multi-stakeholder consultations. It was helpful in identifying aspects that require suitable interventions for improving and imparting resilience among the urban poor settlements. The learnings from this paper are significant for planners and decision-makers in identifying and prioritizing context-specific future projects for a city.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-04-07
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-08-2021-0104
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • How embankment influences coastal livelihood in the context of climate
           adaptation – a case study of Indian Sundarban Delta

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      Authors: Senjuti Saha , Somnath Hazra , Tuhin Ghosh
      Abstract: The decision of livelihood based on the embankment characters is essentially multivariate. Making an effort to do the bivariate modelling may eliminate the useful socio-economic information in the interdependent and simultaneous adaptation choices (Dorfman, 1996). Hence, the more appropriate method is multiple-choice decisions to livelihood adoption based on the embankment category. The purpose of this study is to find out whether the inhabitants of Sundarban really consider embankment as their “lifeline”, what they think about its sustainability and what the outer world thinks about the embankment. To analyse this study, the multinomial logit (MNL) model has been used. This model gives a platform to study the influence of the factors on livelihood choice decisions. In this MNL model, the livelihood decisions are categorized based on their primary livelihood status at the survey. Thus, the choice of livelihood among individuals is explained in terms of the livelihood and the household characteristics. This result can possibly explain the fact that increasing population or man power and increasing annual income and protection from embankment failure may reduce the need to choose any other form of economy apart from the indigenous one, as the society is dominated by farmers who own very small plots of land and face consequences like crop failure every year because of natural calamities. A unit increase in annual income would result in a 0.53% decrease in the probability of choosing labourer as occupation and 0.57% decrease in the probability of choosing fishing/“meen” collection as occupation. The district is vast enough, and it is difficult to study all the blocks. Initially, nine blocks were identified as affected blocks from various literature reviews. Those blocks are Sagar, Patharpratima, Kultali, Gosaba, Kakdwip, Canning I, Canning II, Namkhana and Basanti. Pilot surveys were done to all those nine blocks identified above. After such a long and rigorous procedure, blocks were verified from available secondary data. Villages from vulnerable and less vulnerable parts of the later mentioned blocks are picked up as purposive sample, and household surveys are done on the basis of random sampling. If the year of schooling is enhanced, then the tertiary sector gets benefited, but the indigenous society of Sundarban cannot depend on such a sector as the scope for development is very limited. Consequently, policies aiming at promoting adaptation to challenged livelihood need to emphasize the crucial role of providing basic needs for better production techniques; and more investment in this sector will surely enable villagers to adapt cultivation following age-old tradition. The study uses the MNL model to investigate the factors guiding household choices of different occupational adaptation methods, and cultivation is found to be the automatic choice for the inhabitants of Sundarban. Cultivation is impossible without embankment. Thus, the embankment in Sundarban is considered, as “lifeline” is established. So it can be said that livelihood in this region depends on the stability of embankment. This age-old structure is susceptible to vulnerability because of its unscientific construction and improper maintenance. The main objective of this study is to find out whether the inhabitants of Sundarban really consider embankment as their “lifeline”, what they think about its sustainability and what the outer world thinks about the embankment.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-03-31
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-08-2021-0119
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Addressing housing needs of the displaced people promoting resilient and
           sustainable communities

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      Authors: Chathuranganee Jayakody , Chamindi Ishara Malalgoda , Dilanthi Amaratunga , Richard Haigh , Champika Liyanage , Mo Hamza , Emlyn Witt , Nishara Fernando
      Abstract: Addressing the housing needs of the displaced communities is an essential part of a recovery programme that has distinct links to livelihoods, health, education, security and social and family stability. The housing factor acts as a social centre for family and friends, a source of pride and cultural identity and a resource that commands both political and economic importance. Therefore, addressing the housing needs of the displaced communities should be seen as a mode to promote resilience and sustainable communities. Instead, the consideration of housing needs merely as a physical need results in many issues to the communities, including no access to livelihood, poor living condition, health problems, lack of financial independence, lack of social satisfaction and social cohesion, and sometimes even recreates and worsens the existing vulnerabilities of displaced communities. Within this context, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors to consider when addressing the housing needs of the displaced communities, promoting resilience and sustainable communities. The research team of the project titled REbuildinG AfteR Displacement (REGARD) conducted 47 in-depth interviews in four partner countries (the UK, Sweden, Estonia and Sri Lanka) with officials, community representatives, social support networks, agency networks, etc. Apart from that, focus group discussions were conducted with the community members in Sri Lanka covering both conflict-induced and disaster-induced displacement. The findings of this paper revealed that the housing factor has a significant role in rebuilding communities and determining the long-term satisfaction of displaced communities. Further, the results present eight essential factors to consider when addressing the housing needs of the displaced communities, promoting resilient and sustainable communities. The findings are helpful for future planners, urban designers, architects and policymakers who work in the resettlement field. Planners, urban designers and architects can use these identified factors to cross-check their resettlement planning and designing strategies in addressing the housing needs of the displaced communities. Further, policymakers can mainstream these identified factors into the resettlement housing-related policies and regulations. Addressing the housing needs of the displaced communities is an essential part of a recovery programme that has distinct links to livelihoods, health, education, security and social and family stability. The housing factor acts as a social centre for family and friends, a source of pride and cultural identity and a resource that commands both political and economic importance. Therefore, addressing the housing needs of the displaced communities should be seen as a mode to promote resilience and sustainable communities. Instead, the consideration of housing needs merely as a physical need results in many issues to the communities, including no access to livelihood, poor living condition, health problems, lack of financial independence, lack of social satisfaction and social cohesion, and sometimes even recreates and worsens the existing vulnerabilities of displaced communities. Within this context, this paper investigates the factors to consider when addressing the housing needs of the displaced communities, promoting resilience and sustainable communities.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-03-30
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-09-2021-0124
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Sustainable management of coastal critical infrastructure: case study of
           multi-purpose cyclone shelters in South Asia

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      Authors: Ankit Jaiswal , Anil Kumar , Indrajit Pal , Bhushan Raisinghani , Tushar H. Bhoraniya
      Abstract: To minimize risk of coastal communities arising from cyclones, several risk mitigation initiatives have been taken in countries. Cyclone shelters have proven to be an important critical infrastructure in saving lives from cyclones. A large number of coastal critical infrastructure in the form of multi-purpose cyclone shelters (MPCS) are built to provide safe shelter during disasters. Often observed, such critical infrastructures are non-operational during the normal period, which makes them difficult to use during any disaster. Efforts have been made to keep these infrastructures in working condition. This research paper aims to bring together various management practices adopted for the MPCS in the South-Asian region with a focus on Bangladesh, and India. It also suggests ways to improve these practices for sustainable management of the MPCS. India and Bangladesh are the most vulnerable countries in the South Asian region. As per the Global Climate Index, India and Bangladesh come in the list of “in extreme risk” countries in the world and are vulnerable to several natural hazards, especially climate-induced hydrometeorological hazards. India has a vast coastline and out of 7,516 km of coastline, a large extent, i.e. 5,700 km is prone to cyclones and that keeps 40% of the population vulnerable living within 100 km of the coastline. On the other hand, Bangladesh has a coastline of 580 km, which is equally vulnerable to tropical cyclones. Safeguarding communities from impending coastal risk through coastal cyclone shelters are of prime concern. This paper uses a qualitative approach to analyze secondary data, and literature in the field of critical infrastructure, sustainability, cyclone shelter, and management practice for cyclone shelters. To provide sustainability and community ownership of the MPCS, various service plans are adopted in different countries. This paper provides insights on service and sustainability efforts made for the proper functioning of the MPCS in India and Bangladesh. It also provides insight into the roles played by different institutions involved in maintaining the MPCSs. The research reiterates understanding of the cyclone shelter management from different geographic locations in the South Asian region. Various gaps identified in shelter management practices are discussed in the paper and key recommendations are proposed for better management of cyclone shelters.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-03-25
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-08-2021-0115
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Conjoint assessment of rural water security and system sustainability in
           Nagpur, India

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      Authors: Vibhas Sukhwani , Rajib Shaw
      Abstract: In spite of the growing usage of “water security” as a policy template, the sustainable delivery of adequate quantity/quality of water remains a major challenge, specifically in the rural areas of developing countries. Focusing on the specific case of Nagpur (India), this study aims to establish a broader understanding of rural water security and (water supply) system sustainability issues at grassroots-level. Taking due account of the existing assessment methods and the study context of Nagpur, contextualized indicator-based frameworks have been developed for conjointly assessing both the research subjects. Within the identified eight rural clusters (comprising 72 settlements), focus group discussions (with the residents) and semi-structured interviews [with the members of village water and sanitation committees) (VWSCs)] are then conducted to methodically investigate the local stakeholder perception. Through the rural water security (state change) assessment in selected settlements, the water accessibility indicators are consistently reported to have witnessed mostly positive changes, whereas contrasting changes have been reported for various indicators of availability, quality and risks. Superimposing these findings with those of system sustainability assessment (e.g. only 56% VWSCs are reported to be actively functioning), it has been realized that the sustainability of water supply systems is imperative to attain water security goals in the long term. Through the conjoint assessment of water security and system sustainability issues, this research responds to the growing call for a broader consideration of these concepts. Moreover, it reports practical ground-level challenges based on primary surveys.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-03-23
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-08-2021-0093
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Urban search and rescue (USAR) simulation in earthquake environments using
           queuing theory: estimating the appropriate number of rescue teams

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      Authors: Navid Hooshangi , Navid Mahdizadeh Gharakhanlou , Seyyed Reza Ghaffari-Razin
      Abstract: The duration of an urban search and rescue (USAR) operation directly depends on the number of rescue teams involved. The purpose of this paper is to simplify the earthquake environment and determine the initial number of rescuers in earthquake emergencies in USAR operation. In the proposed methodology, four primary steps were considered: evaluation of buildings damage and the number of injured people by exerting geospatial information system (GIS) analyses; determining service time by means of task allocation; designing the simulation model (queuing theory); and calculation of survival rate and comparison with the time of rescue operations. The calculation of buildings damage for an earthquake with 6.6 Richter in Tehran’s District One indicated that 18% of buildings are subjected to the high damage risk. The number of injured people calculated was 28,856. According to the calculated survival rate, rescue operations in the region must be completed within 22.33 h to save 75% of the casualties. Finally, the design of the queue model indicated that at least 2,300 rescue teams were required to provide the calculated survival rate. The originality of this paper is an innovative approach for determining an appropriate number of rescue teams by considering the queuing theory. The results showed that the integration of GIS and the simulation of queuing theory could be a helpful tool in natural disaster management, especially in terms of rapid vulnerability assessment in urban districts, the adequacy and appropriateness of the emergency services.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-03-23
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-09-2021-0122
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Systems thinking approach for disaster resilient and climate smart
           agriculture in Bangladesh

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      Authors: Sheikh Tawhidul Islam , Md. Kamruzzaman Akand , Md. Nurul Islam , Soumic Samad , Faiyad H Rishal
      Abstract: Linear and narrow focus of climate change and disaster impact assessments on agriculture turns out as a limiting factor to understand how impact conditions trigger changes in the whole system resulting to make problems complicated. The paper aims to identify the micro-level challenges of the agriculture sector and then shows how macro-level planning could be developed and may help the rural peasants of Bangladesh to better cope with the adverse conditions generated as a result of disaster impacts and/or climate change-induced threats. The paper, based on a secondary literature review and primary data generated by the author, shows that agriculture happens as a system where many microelements and processes contribute and benefits from it do not only confine into the final product generation. Using both the primary and secondary data, the paper shows how simplistic approaches to assess disaster impacts on agriculture in Bangladesh are taking place and thus leaving scopes to read properly the more complex and cyclic forms of hazard impacts in the sector by using the systems thinking approach and complex systems methodology. The paper finally suggests how a better and comprehensive understanding of disaster and climate change impacts on agriculture would provide arguments for mainstreaming climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction actions into regular development planning of the government. The authors declare that this submission is their own work, and, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, it contains no materials previously published or written by another person or substantial proportions of material which have been accepted for the award of anywhere else.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-03-08
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-08-2021-0114
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Investigating the role of risk perception in place-based responses: case
           studies of the 2003 Bam and 2017 Ezgeleh-Sarpol Zahab earthquakes

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      Authors: Saeedeh Asadi , Ali Sharghi , Zoheir Mottaki , Bahram Salehsedghpour
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to clarify changes in people-place interrelationship and hidden layers of survivors psychological challenges in the reconstructed housing environment, the 2003 Bam and 2017 Ezgeleh-Sarpol Zahab earthquakes occurred in Iran, because perception of earthquake risk in residential dwellings and traumatic experiences during and after its occurrence are among stressful events making communities face with various spectrum of emotional and cognitive consequences. Such events shape memory “traumascapes” and cause changes in mental schemas and as a result, altering decisions and behavioral responses in long-term familiar environments. Because, in the disaster-affected communities, psychological recovery will be greatly influenced by residential experiences. The current research was performed with a qualitative and multicase study design, and data were collected using deep and semistructured private interviews and discussions in focus groups with participation of 33 people by narrative technique. According to findings, people are facing enduring cognitive disruptions regarding home concept and its location as a safe and secure paradigm. Findings showed that there are a considerable amount of behavioral responses and emotional consequences in the form of protective behaviors, severe sensitivity to environmental stimuli, fears, phobias in residential dwellings and disturbances in place attachments. It is noteworthy that despite all time and place differences, the two studied communities had significant similarities in earthquake traumatic experiences and perceptions and also resulting conscious and subconscious responses.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-03-02
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-08-2021-0079
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Vulnerability assessment of Balikpapan (Indonesia) for climate
           change-induced urban flooding

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      Authors:   Ariyaningsih , Vibhas Sukhwani , Rajib Shaw
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to examine the inter- and intra-relationships between climate change and urban flood risk in Balikpapan city. This study adopts a qualitative method by applying the driver–pressure–state–impact–response (DPSIR) framework, which helps to determine the strategies for reducing flood vulnerability in response to drivers, pressures, states and impacts. A secondary survey was conducted to understand the DPSIR. The key drivers are identified as the population growth, land-use change, climate change and urbanization. Secondary data show that population growth due to urbanization in Balikpapan city is very high, which means that there is a lot of demand for land in the city, and the city’s current responses are mostly focused on building flood control and prevention infrastructures like detention ponds, zero Q technology policies and green open space. The study reveals that the responses that have been implemented in Balikpapan are mostly ineffective problem-solving, which cannot reduce vulnerability to flooding for the long term. To the author’s knowledge, this is the first instance of the DPSIR framework being applied to Balikpapan city. It is, therefore, hoped that the study results will provide feasible directions to the city government for managing the future flood risks
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-02-25
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-08-2021-0111
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Providing a framework for post-disaster resilience factors in buildings
           and infrastructure from end-users’ perspectives: case study in Caribbean
           island states

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      Authors: Shawn Hezron Charles , Alice Chang-Richards , Tak Wing Yiu
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to elicit the expectations for resilient post-disaster rebuilds from Caribbean project end-users. In anticipation of future climatological, meteorological, hydrological or geophysical disasters disaster, key stakeholders can articulate and incorporate strategies for resilience development, thus leading to improved end-users’ satisfaction and confidence. This paper engages the results of a systematic literature review that identified 24 empirical resilience factors for post-disaster reconstruction projects. These factors informed a semi-structured questionnaire to elicit the perspectives of Caribbean end-users on a seven-point Likert scale. The quantitative analysis of both factor ranking and principal component analysis was performed to identify correlations and provides further interpretations on the desires of the end-users for resilient rebuilds. The results presented in this paper highlight the collective perspectives on the Caribbean end-users on what they perceived to be aiding more resilient reconstruction projects. They identified reconstruction designs mindful of future hazards, policies that aid climate change mitigation, active assessment of key structures, readily available funding sources and ensuring stakeholder’s unbiased interest as the top-most empirical factors. Factor analysis suggested collaborations with inclusive training and multi-stakeholder engagement, critical infrastructure indexing and effective governance as the critical resilience development factors. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper is first of its kind to explore the perspective of the Caribbean people regarding disaster reconstruction projects. It addresses developmental avenues for measurement indicators towards resilience monitoring and improvement. Additionally, the perspectives can provide construction industry professionals with tools for improved operational resilience objective-setting guidance, for Caribbean construction.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-02-21
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-02-2021-0020
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Interpreting sustainability and resilience in the built environment

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      Authors: Elisabeth C. Marlow , Ksenia Chmutina , Andrew Dainty
      Abstract: Conceptual interpretations of sustainability and resilience are widening with discursive use and altering the relationship and understanding of both concepts. By using three city case studies in the USA, this paper aims to consider which conceptual interpretations are operational and what is being measured in the context of city policy, municipal planning and built environment practice. With increasing pressures of urbanisation, it is imperative to consider which conceptual interpretations of resilience and sustainability are being measured in frameworks for the built environment if Risk-Informed Sustainable Development across multiple sectors is to be delivered. Three case studies with semi-structured interviews have been thematically analysed to explore how sustainability and resilience have been operationalised at policy, planning and practice levels. City policies, municipal planning and practitioners are working with different interpretations. Collectively Risk Informed Sustainable Development is not formally recognised. Policies recognise GHG reductions and natural hazard events; planning guidance stipulates Environmental Impact Assessments based on legal requirements; and practitioners consider passive-survivability and systematic thinking. Across the sectors, the Leadership in Environmental and Energy Assessment Method provides a common foundation but is used with varying requirements. Decision-makers should incorporate risk-informed sustainable development, update codes of practice and legal requirements leading to exemplary practice becoming normalised. Passive-survivability should be affordable and adopt risk-informed sustainable development principles. Three US city case studies with data collected from interviews have been analysed simultaneously at policy, planning and practice levels. Interrelated implications have been outlined on how to improve decision-making of sustainability and resilience across sectors.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-02-21
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-07-2021-0076
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The impact of COVID-19 pandemic on public engagement approaches to
           disaster preparedness for foreign residents: case of Tokyo Metropolitan
           Area, Japan

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      Authors: Bismark Adu Gyamfi , Rajib Shaw
      Abstract: Foreign residents in Japan are classified as one vulnerable group at risk of disasters. Therefore, various measures are in place to engage, educate and offer first-hand experiences of disaster countermeasures required to overcome systematic disaster preparedness problems. However, the need for Japan to prevent the spread and infection of COVID-19 has necessitated measures that prohibit public gatherings and other social activities. This study aims to look at how these arrangements have impacted public engagement approaches to disaster preparedness for foreign residents within the Tokyo Metropolitan Area. This study identifies local organizations and examines their methods of engagement that enhance the disaster preparedness of foreign residents in the Tokyo Metropolitan Area. The activities are examined in the context of when there was no COVID-19 pandemic and the current state of the pandemic. A change in activities attributed to the COVID-19 pandemic is then extracted and explained through field surveys and interviews with the relevant organization. This study reveals that most disaster preparedness activities were best accomplished through in-person engagements. Nevertheless, online engagements have become the alternative option because of COVID-19 infection prevention. This change has widen the coverage of some activities but major setbacks include events cancelations and technical and technological challenges attributed to using online platforms. This study did not examine the effectiveness of pre-COVID-19 pandemic engagement approaches and current changes attributed to the pandemic; many public engagement literatures acknowledge success to include the number of participants, the abilities of organizations to find ways to effectively and positively engage their stakeholders for meaningful partnerships, the number of clicks, access to a website and comments made online. Therefore, as organizations in this study have shown a glimpse of the above characteristics, there are indications of some level of effectiveness in their engagement approaches even amid a pandemic. To avoid such situations in the future, there is the need for the Tokyo Metropolitan Government, local governments and associated organizations to develop public engagement approaches that are flexible to resist or cope with in-person, remote encounters, or sudden circumstances that could potentially derail planned activities. The most effects attributed to the COVID-19 pandemic are the cancelation of many disaster drill exercises, community disaster walks, training of volunteers for foreign residents’ assistance and many hours of “Yasashii Nihongo” lesson. The cancelation of activities is a setback to the efforts of self-help and mutual aid campaigns by authorities to reduce the impacts of disasters. The spirit of inclusion has been an embodiment of disaster management approaches in Japan for years for which policy recognitions have been tagged along the dimensions of public aid, self-help and mutual aid. These are aimed at engaging the populace, especially foreign residents in disaster training and exercises, language study and other communal activities for disaster preparedness. However, to prevent the spread of COVID-19, there have been a series of restrictions on gathering and inter-personal public engagement activities in Japan. As foreigners are classified as the most vulnerable to disaster in Japan, it is important to understand how these restrictions will/are affecting the efforts of integration and disaster preparedness, which are a crucial part of the Government’s effort to reduce casualties and damage in the anticipated Nankai megathrust earthquake. Besides the results being useful for government interventions, it also adds to the knowledge of the repercussion of COVID-19 and how to plan for emergencies.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-02-21
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-08-2021-0095
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Climatic disasters within a flood-prone coastal slum in Lagos: coping
           capacities and adaptation prospects

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      Authors: Olumuyiwa Bayode Adegun
      Abstract: Climate impacts are a significant challenge in slums and informal settlements, most of which are located along the coast. This article aims to show coping strategies and flood adaptation opportunities through the case study of a coastal slum in Lagos, Nigeria. A mixed-method approach is used in Idi-Araba settlement, Oworonshoki, Lagos – the case study area. Data collection involved semi-structured interviews with 15 purposively selected residents and a survey (sample size = 300 residents). A town hall meeting was convened to disseminate the findings and gather feedback from the community. Being an informally developed settlement, flooding affects the poor-quality buildings – a situation made worse by absence of infrastructure and services. Coping with flooding involves structural strategies (raising building’s foundation, re-roofing, sand-filling the surrounding, etc.), failed attempt through green infrastructure, nonstructural measures through dietary pattern, dressing, etc. These measures emanate from self-help and community efforts, attesting to notable social capital in the study area. They are minimally effective and limited, which highlights adaptation gaps and opportunities. This study calls for transformative adaptation, beyond the current coping and maladaptation. It argues that local strategies need to meet with innovative substantive external initiatives from the state and third sector. This study considers the single case of a coastal settlement in Lagos. This focus allowed detailed examination within a representative settlement, much unlike city-wide, cross-settlement considerations in many other studies. It provides additional empirical evidence on limitations of self-help flood coping measures and adaptation prospects in the often overlooked low-income, informal urban sector.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-02-21
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-11-2021-0154
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The role of disaster knowledge management in improving housing
           reconstruction outcomes: with particular reference to Postearthquake
           reconstruction in Pakistan

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      Authors: Saima Shaikh , Andre Brown , Wallace Imoudu Enegbuma
      Abstract: Rural building practices, especially in developing communities, are often plagued by inadequate local construction knowledge and a limited understanding of the best building practice guidelines. This has contributed significantly to compounding the effect of significant catastrophic events. The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential impact of disaster knowledge management (DKM) on improving housing resilience and makes particular reference to the 2005 earthquake in rural Pakistan. Our research uses a comprehensive literature review that involves a qualitative approach to research aimed at understanding the 2005 earthquakes, their impacts, reconstruction challenges and DKM. Conventional published journals, articles, previous case studies and books were included. But importantly, to take in relevant local information, the review also took in published government reports, disaster mitigation policy documents, national and international NGOs publications, conference proceedings and news articles. More than 80 research papers and conference proceedings over 21 years, from 2001 to 2021, were analyzed in eight major online databases. These include Google Scholar, Science Direct, Research Gate, Scopus, Jstor, Springer, Emerald and Semantic Scholar. The investigation identified that DKM has an important role to play in capacity building and technical knowledge transmission relating to seismic guidelines aimed at improving housing resilience. Consequently, a theoretical framework was developed, focused primarily on the post-2005 rural reconstruction mechanism and the identification of key challenges to disseminating seismic guidelines effectively in relation to rural construction practices. This paper makes an original contribution by developing a DKM framework via the identification of key challenges that need to be addressed, in relation to rural construction practices, generally, but particularly in the Pakistan context.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-02-08
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-07-2021-0074
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Examining the potential of damage in threat zones around LPG storage
           sphere in Hassi R’Mel city, Algeria

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      Authors: Youssef Taibi , Mohamed Chadli , Mahfoud Ziane
      Abstract: This study aims to determine the maximum extent of damage in the threat zones, the result of a catastrophic failure in one liquefied petroleum gas storage sphere, located in storage and transfer center in Hassi R’Mel city, Algeria. To reach the desired results, we relied on ALOHA® v. 5.4.7 software (Areal Locations of Hazardous Atmospheres) for accidents simulation, and on Google Earth as an output tool to show results on the city map. The results prove that the city of Hassi R’Mel is almost completely threatened by thermal effects resulting from a boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion phenomenon, which can reach a distance of 3.9 km. Determining the extent to which the damages resulting from an industrial accident may reach is of great importance in preventing industrial hazards, as well as in decision-making in the field of urbanization.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-01-11
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-07-2021-0063
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Review of Tsunami early warning system and coastal resilience with a focus
           on Indian Ocean

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      Authors: Indrajit Pal , Subhajit Ghosh , Itesh Dash , Anirban Mukhopadhyay
      Abstract: This paper aims to provide a general overview of the international Tsunami warning system mandated by the United Nations, particularly on cataloging past studies and a strategic focus in the Indian Ocean, particularly on the Bay of Bengal region. Present research assimilates the secondary non-classified data on the Tsunami warning system installed in the Indian Ocean. Qualitative review and exploratory research methodology have been followed to provide a holistic profile of the Tsunami rarly warning system (TEWS) and its role in coastal resilience. The study finds the need for strategic focus to expand and interlink regional early warning cooperation mechanisms and partnerships to enhance capacities through cooperation and international assistance and mobilize resources necessary to maintain the TEWS in the Indian Ocean region. The enhanced capacity of the TEWS certainly improves the resilience of Indian Ocean coastal communities and infrastructures. The study is original research and useful for policy planning and regional cooperation on data interlinkages for effective TEWS in the Indian Ocean region.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-01-04
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-12-2020-0124
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Seismic building design work process using building information modeling
           (BIM) technology for Malaysian Government projects

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      Authors: Siti Zati Hanani Mahamood , Mohamad Syazli Fathi
      Abstract: This paper aims to improve the seismic building design (SBD) work process for Malaysian Government projects. Semi-structured interviews were virtually conducted to a small sample size of internal and external stakeholders from the Malaysian Government technical agency. There were seven of them, comprising Structural Engineers, an Architect, a Quantity Surveyor and consultants-linked government projects. The respondents have at least five years of experience in building design and construction. The paper evaluates the current SBD work process in the government technical agency. There were four main elements that appear to need to be improved, specifically in the design stage: limitations in visualization, variation of works, data management and coordination. This study was limited to Malaysian Government building projects and covered a small sample size. Therefore, further research is recommended to extend to other government agencies or ministries to obtain better results. Furthermore, the findings and proposal for improvements to the SBD work process can also be replicated for other similar disasters resilience projects. The findings and proposal for improvements to the SBD work process can also be replicated for other similar disasters resilience projects. This study was limited to government building projects and covered a small sample size. Therefore, further research is recommended to extend to other government agencies or ministries to obtain better results. Furthermore, the findings and proposal for improvements to the SBD work process can also be replicated for other similar disasters resilience projects. This study provides an initial step to introduce the potential of building information modeling for SBD in implementing Malaysian Government projects. It will be beneficial both pre-and post-disaster and is a significant step toward a resilient infrastructure and community.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-02-17
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-10-2021-0135
      Issue No: Vol. 13 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Local climate zones and its potential for building urban resilience: a
           case study of Lahore, Pakistan

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      Authors: Ayman Aslam , Irfan Ahmad Rana , Saad Saleem Bhatti
      Abstract: Urban built-up has been increasing exponentially in the world. Urban population growth and migration are depleting the land resources and creating thermal discomfort. Cities all around the world are facing urban heat island effects and increased temperatures. This study aims to map land cover and formulate local climate zones for enhancing urban resilience against disaster and climate risks. This study uses exploratory research to identify local climate zones for Lahore, Pakistan. Landsat 8 imagery was used to develop a land use land cover map. For mapping local climate zones, the standard World Urban and Access Portal Tool procedure was used. Results have revealed that Lahore has grown exponentially. Compact low rise and open low rise were the two most common local climate zones prevalent in the city. In contrast, the outer regions of the city consisted of LCZ D (low plants) and LCZ F (bare soil). This study highlights the need to consider local climate zones in future development plans and policies for ensuring sustainable, resilient and climate-friendly cities. Local climate zone studies are missing in Pakistan. This study has empirically analyzed the ground situation of local climate zones for Lahore metropolitan city. This study will provide baseline support for future studies on urban heat island and climate change adaptation planning.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-02-15
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-08-2021-0116
      Issue No: Vol. 13 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Role of information and communication technologies in Build Back Better to
           post disaster recovery practices: insights from Bangladesh

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      Authors: Sakib Rahman Siddique Shuvo , Md. Nurul Islam , Sheikh Tawhidul Islam
      Abstract: This study aims to examine the role of information and communication technology (ICT)-based communication technologies to create a sustainable recovery strategy through Build Back Better practice in the existing policy framework of Bangladesh. Its purpose is to analyse the problems associated with the current recovery process of the country and how the ICT-based communication technology can improve the situation. Nevertheless, the aim also extends towards the limitation of the technology and the infrastructures and possible adjustments in this regard. To achieve the aim, the study conducted an extensive literature review of numerous grey literature, policy papers and scientific/academic articles in an exploratory approach. The result shows that the disaster recovery process of Bangladesh is slow, and there are some mismanagements (the lengthy risk assessment using ancient data generation processes, lack of accessibility and report-based data product) which was a cause behind the massive destruction done by recent cyclones. The ICT-based methods (proper database, many to many communications, GIS) can make this response faster, transparent and easy to access. The research results may lack generalizability due to the research approach of the study. Thus, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed propositions further. The study includes some possible adjustments to the argument for the existing policy infrastructure and scope of communication technology to bridge the theory and practice. The study also includes some suggestions to engage society in disaster recovery processes. This paper urges to study the implication of technology in terms of disaster recovery on a broad scale.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-02-10
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-08-2021-0097
      Issue No: Vol. 13 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Windbreak stonewalls in a mountainous village of Japan: a case study of
           Tsuchigoya in Hongu-cho, Tanabe city

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      Authors: Chiho Ochiai
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine how people protect against strong seasonal winds from the mountains and to examine the relationship between windbreaks and local settlements. The study site was the Tsuchigoya area of Hongu-cho in Japan. Measurement surveys were conducted to record the distribution, heights, widths, types and current conditions of the stone walls. At the same time, interview surveys were conducted to gather information about the history and local practices of coping with strong winds. This study contributes knowledge of different methods of coping with strong winds, such as windbreak forests, stone walls, local stones and metal wire and bars. The sloping terrain and strong winds contributed to the construction of stone walls, which influenced the residential property layout and settlement layout. Abundant stones were available at nearby rivers and it is evident that masonry craftsmanship shaped the stone walls and landscape, which should be considered as holding cultural value for the village. This study has some limitations. First, because of it being the case study of one study area, the findings cannot represent all the possible situations or contexts in different regions or countries. Further studies are necessary to understand the climate-responsive knowledge of other locations to address and establish a comprehensive understanding and future suggestions. By re-examining the stone walls assembled by the people, this study was able to gain insight into such matters as the wind conditions, local topography and geography, acquisition of materials, masonry craftsmanship and social conditions such as flood influences in the area. The study showed the climate-responsive local knowledge and influence on local settings. It is now necessary to record traditional disaster prevention methods, even in such small villages, to consider how the diverse methods of disaster management and resilience against climatic conditions have been preserved through the ages. The stone walls and landscape should be considered to have cultural value for the village. The study showed that climate-responsive local knowledge and settlement layout have been developed through the local topography, weather conditions, resource availability and social conditions.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-02-03
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-08-2021-0090
      Issue No: Vol. 13 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Investigating the level of functional preparedness of selected Tehran
           hospitals in the face of biological events: a focus on COVID-19

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      Authors: Esmail Heidaranlu , Asghar Tavan , Mohsen Aminizadeh
      Abstract: This study aims to evaluate the functional readiness of selected hospitals in Tehran in the face of biological events focusing on the Coronavirus. The current study is a cross-sectional, descriptive-analytical study, with the research population consisting of four hospitals in Tehran (Ministry of Health, Social Security, Azad and Military University). This study used data collection tools, standardized functional preparedness tools for hospitals using a biological approach and a standardized checklist of biological event preparations for the American Hospital Association. Interviews with the incident and disaster committee director and observation of each hospital’s existing documents, were used to collect data, which was then analyzed using SPSS-16 software. According to the results, the average percentage of total hospital preparedness in biological events is 36.9%. With 53.3%, the selected military hospital has the most preparation, whereas the Ministry of Health has the lowest preparation with 28.3%. Surge capacity management and communication had the most remarkable preparedness rate of 68.75% (adequate preparedness), biological consultants, meeting management and post-disaster recovery had the lowest preparedness rate of 0% (extremely weak preparedness). The average functional preparedness of selected hospitals in Tehran was assessed at an insufficient level in this study. Given the recurrence of disease waves, these results are helpful in increasing hospital preparedness for impending events. Improving preparedness in most areas, especially in post-disaster recovery seems necessary. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, it is important to assess hospitals’ readiness to increase capacity and respond to this scourge. Few studies have been done in this field in the world. This study investigates this issue in the capital of Iran. The finding of this study suggest authorities’ attention to this issue and the creation of severe and prompt solutions and measures and the use of military hospital experiences to improve biological threat preparedness.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-01-10
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-08-2021-0088
      Issue No: Vol. 13 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Measuring capacities and protecting communities: strengthening regional
           resilience in the flooded industrial area in Thailand

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      Authors: Tadashi Nakasu , Ruttiya Bula-Or , Sutee Anantsuksomsri , Sutpratana Duangkaew , Kullachart Prathumchai , Korrakot Positlimpakul , Akiyuki Kawasaki
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to measure the capacities and identify the vulnerabilities of the communities to contribute to their flood disaster risk management. Questionnaire-style surveys and interviews in the four target communities and 25 critical facilities have been used. Their flood experience is also collected to explore the practical risk management solutions and preserve those as their local assets. Findings show the capacity gaps among the target communities. For instance, the relatively populated urbanized communities tend to have high capacities. On the other hand, the not-so-populated farmer-based communities have low capacities, tending to focus more on droughts than floods, and lack scientific information. This research also identifies vulnerability groups and critical facility locations on the map with narratives. The findings enable the communities to clarify their updated capacities, examine the vulnerabilities, identify the risks with possible hazard information and guide them to cope with flood risk to protect them with self, mutual and public help. This study can contribute to other industrial parks/estates in Thailand and anywhere in the world as an insightful reference to build resilient industrial complex areas.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-01-10
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-08-2021-0120
      Issue No: Vol. 13 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Cooperative education during Covid-19 pandemic: enhancing legal rights and
           professional development of interns in Thailand

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      Authors: Shubham Pathak , Siwarut Laikram
      Abstract: The study aims at enriching the existing cooperative education sector in Thailand. Adequate cooperative education has direct impacts upon graduates’ future professional development, employability and enhanced professional skills. The cooperative education framework in Thailand is relatively a recent concept and lacks detailed research. The methodology adopted in this study is mixed-method, inclusive of qualitative methodology where data were collected through key informant interviews and; quantitative methodology involving survey questionnaires with a sample of 350 respondents. The data analysis included the quantitative analysis with Chi-square and excerpts from the key informant interview respondents. Additional strength, weakness, opportunity and threat analysis is performed to provide for gaps at various levels of cooperative education and the potential opportunities to the graduates in Thailand. The findings depict a lack of legal framework for effective skill development, uncertain moral and physical security of the interns and absence of legal rights for interns, minimal support and assistance from the government sector, reduced future employability and insufficient financial resources among poorer students. Lack of student and cooperative database with the government departments. The Thai Qualification Framework has been adopted in a majority of universities, however, the quality assurance does not cover the student’s perspectives, financial and social limitations towards attending the cooperative education. With enhanced vulnerabilities due to the Covid-19 pandemic, adverse impacts are analysed and recommendations are provided for enhancing cooperative education opportunities towards students. This research aims to understand the perspectives of the students who graduated with cooperative education and are currently working professionals.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-01-03
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-08-2021-0098
      Issue No: Vol. 13 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Suggestions for large-scale, postdisaster reconstruction involving
           indigenous populations: a participatory approach to recovery after Typhoon
           Morakot

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      Authors: Sung Lun Tsai , Chiho Ochiai , Min Hui Tseng , Chuan Zhong Deng
      Abstract: The participatory method, a major factor for a successful post-disaster reconstruction (PDR) project, is applied in various stages of the PDR. However, the application of this method for PDR involving indigenous populations is underexplored. Therefore, this paper aims to analyze the critical factors that can influence the participatory PDR in the indigenous context. Two large-scale, indigenous, post-disaster relocation projects after the 2009 Typhoon Morakot were selected as case studies. The qualitative and quantitative methodology (semi-structured interview and questionnaire) were applied in the research. A participation-friendly policy, community organization, the extent of damage, flexibility of nongovernmental organizations, understanding of the participatory concept and mutual trust were found to be essential factors that profoundly influence participation in PDR projects. This study contributes by providing guidelines for future participatory PDR projects, especially in the indigenous context.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2022-01-03
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-08-2021-0085
      Issue No: Vol. 13 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Applicability of drywall technologies for disaster-induced housing
           reconstruction

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      Authors: Nimasha Dilukshi Hulathdoowage, Chandanie Hadiwattage
      Abstract: The sluggish progression of disaster-induced housing reconstruction (DHR) in Sri Lanka provoked the assessment of drywall technologies as a mode of improving efficiency. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the applicability of drywall technologies to adopt a technical solution to DHR. The research contextualized a mixed research design via a case-study strategy integrating semi-structured interviews, documentary reviews and observations. Two cases based on the 2016 Samasarakanda landslide were investigated. Within-case-analysis and cross-case-analysis were performed to derive conclusions. Enablers for drywall technologies application are time saving, cost-saving, less water consumption and logistical easiness. Less strength of drywall technologies will not be a critical obstruction owing to the expected disaster resilience from the concrete frame and the subsequent requirement of non-load bearing walls for landslide DHR. Labor source, community acceptance, durability are potential settings of barriers. Observing model houses, researching the resistance of drywall technologies to landslide-induced vibrations and impulsive waves are some further research areas discovered. Empirical findings are centered on the 2016 Samasarakanda DHR. Because of many issues in updating guidelines, drawings and BOQs, a protocol should be gazetted in the parliament to improve its updating flexibility allowing provisions to apply novel technologies for DHR. Being one of the very first of this kind of research, contextually, the research is original. This study provokes insightful investigation of drywall technologies for DHR beyond its overlooked properties. This study reveals many wall construction challenges of the 2016 Samasarakanda DHR which have not yet been explored in research.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-07-05
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-01-2021-0001
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Exploring awareness and application of disaster risk management cycle
           (DRMC) from stakeholder's perspective

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      Authors: Siti Aisyah Ahmad Basri, Sharifah Akmam Syed Zakaria, Taksiah A.Majid, Zulkifli Yusop
      Abstract: The disaster risk management cycle (DRMC) is a part of the important efforts designed to handle disaster risk. DRMC contains the following four phases: response, recovery, mitigation and preparedness. This paper aims to determine the awareness of stakeholder on DRMC and to explore the application of DRMC from stakeholder’s perspective. Disaster is an extreme event that causes heavy loss of life, properties and livelihood. Every year, Malaysia has been affected by disasters, whether natural or manmade. DRM is the management of resources and the responsibility for dealing with all aspects of an emergency. An effective DRM requires a combination of knowledge and skills. Questionnaires were distributed to the construction industry players and flood victims. Results obtained on the basis of the survey revealed that a majority of respondents are unaware of DRMC. In addition, combination of professional and non-professional respondent’s perspectives in each phase of DRMC and effects of disaster are presented by the hierarchy. The study of DRMC is commonly about the explanation or comparison of the concept but infrequently in the application of the DRMC. This study will fill the gap between theory and application of DRMC. The study aimed to determine whether the construction industry player and community aware of DRMC and to explore DRMC of flood event from perspective of industry players and flood victims. From this comparison, the management can create a better cycle of disaster management to handle various type disaster and to anticipate disaster risks.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-06-22
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-09-2020-0105
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Determinants of post COVID-19 food security policy success

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      Authors: Fadillah Amin, Wibisono Poespito Hadi, Soesilo Zauhar, Bambang Santoso Haryono
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to analyze and examine the influence of the role of the central government, the role of local government, community participation, governance on the success of post-COVID-19 food security policies. This study conducted a quantification study related to phenomena related to the success of post-COVID-19 food security policies. The data used are primary data with a research instrument in the form of a questionnaire. Data analysis using the measurement model Structural Equation Model (SEM). The population in this study was all people in the city of Bandung, Indonesia. The role of the Central Government (X1), the role of the Local Government (X2) and Public Participation (X3) is very important for improving Governance (Y1) and Food Defense Policy (Y2). Thus, the conditions of the role of the Central Government (X1), the role of the Local Government (X2) and Public Participation (X3) must always be maintained. Efforts to maintain the role of the Central Government (X1) and the role of the Local Government (X2) can be done by paying attention to the organizing aspect. This indicator is known to have a very important influence in reflecting the role of the Central Government (X1) and the role of the Local Government (X2). On the other hand, efforts to increase Public Participation (X3) can be done by paying attention to the Psychological indicators (X31). The government must take steps to prevent a food crisis. Apart from that, the government is also deemed necessary to map existing agricultural potentials, stabilize food prices, carry out consolidation related to agricultural land and also make regulations related to existing food problems. Apart from the role of the government, the public can also take part in maintaining food security to avoid a food crisis. Communities have the opportunity to build food sovereignty and self-sufficiency. During a pandemic like this, people tend to be more creative and can be creative to outsmart existing situations. This includes maintaining access to food. The community is expected to have the awareness to undertake at least independent planting to meet their own food needs.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-06-10
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-11-2020-0118
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Humanitarian supply chain management: modeling the pre and post-disaster
           relief operations

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      Authors: Sachin Agarwal, Ravi Kant, Ravi Shankar
      Abstract: This study proposed a mathematical model for decision-making in the pre- and post-disaster phases. This research aims to develop a mathematical model for three important fields in the context of humanitarian logistics; stock prepositioning, facility location and evacuation planning in the humanitarian supply chain (HSC) network design. This study applied three optimization techniques; classical approach (CA), pattern search algorithm (PSA) and Genetic Algorithm (GA) to solve the proposed mathematical model. The proposed mathematical model attempts to minimize the total relief items supply chain cost and evacuation chain cost of the HSC. A real case study of cyclone Fani, 2019 in Orissa, India is applied to validate the proposed mathematical model and to show the performance of the model. The results demonstrate that heuristic approach; PSA performs better and optimal solutions are obtained in almost all the cases as compared to the GA and CA. This study is limited to deterministic demands in the affected regions, and different scenarios of the disaster events are not considered. The finding reveals that the proposed model can help the humanitarian stakeholders in making decisions on facility location, relief distribution and evacuation planning in disaster relief operations. The results of this study may offer managerial insights to practitioners and humanitarian logisticians who are engaged in HSC implementation.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-06-07
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-10-2020-0107
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Optimization of spatial distribution of hospitals for better earthquake
           recovery using GIS and imperialist competition algorithm (case study:
           Gorgan, Iran)

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      Authors: Mohammad Hossein Saraei , Ayyoob Sharifi , Mohsen Adeli
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to optimize the location of hospitals in Gorgan, Iran, to provide desirable services to citizens in the event of an earthquake crisis. This paper, due to target, is practical and developmental, due to doing method is descriptive and analytical and due to information gathering method is documental and surveying. In the present study, the capabilities of genetic algorithms and imperialist competition algorithm in MATLAB environment in combination with GIS capabilities have been used. In fact, cases such as route blocking, network analysis and vulnerability raster have been obtained from GIS-based on current status data, and then the output of this information is entered as non-random heuristic information into genetic algorithms and imperialist competition algorithm in MATLAB environment. After spatial optimization, the hospital service process has become more favorable. Also, the average cost and transfer vector from hospitals to citizens has decreased significantly. By establishing hospitals in the proposed locations, a larger population of citizens can access relief services in less time. Spatial optimization of relief centers, including hospitals, is one of the issues that can be of significant importance, especially in the event of an earthquake crisis. The findings of the present study and the originality, efficiency and innovation of the used methods can provide a favorable theoretical framework for the success of earthquake crisis management projects.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-12-30
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-05-2021-0049
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • A hybrid risk assessment approach for assessing the earthquake risks in
           worn-out urban fabrics: a case study in Iran

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      Authors: Jalal Sadeghi , Mohsen Oghabi , Hadi Sarvari , Mohammad Sediegh Sabeti , Hamidreza Kashefi , Daniel W.M. Chan , Aynaz Lotfata
      Abstract: To reduce financial and human losses, managing risks associated with earthquakes is essential in practice. However, in using common risk management methods, experts are often faced with ambiguities that can create profound challenges for risk management. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a logical and straightforward risk assessment model to provide scientific and accurate answers to complex problems. This study aims to recommend an innovative combined method based on the probability-impact (P-I) approach and intuitionistic fuzzy set theory to identify and prioritize the essential earthquake risks associated with worn-out urban fabrics in the context of Iran. The opinions of 15 experts in the fields of civil engineering and urban construction were gathered during brainstorming sessions. These brainstorming sessions were conducted to determine the probability of risks and the effect of identified risks. After calculating the severity of risks using the P-I approach and converting them to intuitionistic fuzzy sets, the risks were measured and prioritized based on their individual scores. The study results indicated that risk of damage due to buildings’ age and flooding risk had the highest and lowest priorities in causes of financial damage, respectively. Furthermore, the risk of damage due to building quality (demolition) and building age was the most important. The risk of flooding and damage to communication networks has the lowest importance among causes of fatalities in worn-out urban fabrics. The study findings and recommendations can be served as a policy and consultative instrument for the relevant stakeholders in the area of urban management.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-12-27
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-09-2021-0128
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • A local smart city approach in the context of smart environment and urban
           resilience

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      Authors: Mücella Ateş , Deniz Erinsel Önder
      Abstract: Although smart city studies have increased recently, smart city discussions are made based on general concepts not specific to the region. The region-specific local smart city strategy in the built environment is key to climate resilience in the built environment in the face of natural disasters. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the smart environment, which expresses the spatial dimension of smart cities. This research defines a region-specific smart city model and revealing the role of this model in the resilience against disasters of the built environment. The analytical hierarchy process (AHP) method was conducted in four steps. In Step 1, the authors suggested new smart environmental assessment criteria with climatic and geographical data within the scope of the collective mind of the region. In Step 2, they determined the expert group to evaluate within the scope of the AHP method and then compared the significance levels of the current and suggested smart environmental assessment criteria by the AHP method. From the results, it turned out that smart urbanization processes, which are trying to relate to local characteristics, are of great importance in terms of ensuring urban resilience. The results also highlight that the existing smart environmental assessment criteria in the literature are insufficient to ensure the climatic resilience of the built environment in the face of natural disasters. The study is in an intermediary section, which has a gap in the literature due to its subject. Although it has focused on an acute problem and a current research problem, the lack of literature on the field has been a limitation. Determining the cities where the field studies would be conducted has been a major limitation. For an objective hypothesis test within the scope of the AHP method, the sample group should consist of experts working in smart city projects in cities that are in the top 3 in five different smart city rankings, where field studies are conducted. Within this limited cluster, creating a large sample group was an important limitation. This research looks into the existing gaps of the relation between climate resilience of the built environment and the local smart city approach. This examination will foster a holistic approach in the practice of sustainable smart city in the built environment, thus reinforcing urban resilience and climate studies in the context of smart cities.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-12-13
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-07-2021-0064
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Understanding the impacts of post-disaster relocation on family dynamics
           and resilience

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      Authors: Paoloregel Samonte
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to arrive at a conceptual roadmap that may be used to analyze the impacts of post-disaster relocation on a family’s dynamics and how this, in turn, affects their resilience to future disasters. Existing literature shows that the role of the family as a social unit is often overlooked in disaster research. Ultimately, this paper seeks to elevate the place of the family and its internal dynamics as a vital determinant of family resilience in a post-disaster relocation setting. The study is a result of a systematic literature review of four interrelated topics, namely, families in disasters; post-disaster relocation; disaster resilience and family resilience. The literature review resulted in an exploration of the experiences of families amidst post-disaster relocation. Such findings were linked towards potential impacts on family dynamics, which then resulted in the study’s proposed roadmap. The study is a novel attempt at coming up with a conceptual framework that may guide future scholars in determining the effects of family dynamics on a family’s overall disaster resilience amid post-disaster relocation. It is hoped that the use of such a framework will guide policymakers in crafting institutional reforms that take into account family cohesion in disaster relocation efforts.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-12-02
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-03-2021-0026
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Exploring residential characteristics as determinants of household
           adaptation to climate change in Lagos, Nigeria

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      Authors: Olasunkanmi Habeeb Okunola , Abdullateef Iyanda Bako
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors influencing residents’ adaptation strategies to climate change effects in Lagos Metropolis, Nigeria. The metropolis was stratified into low, medium and high residential densities. Across the residential densities, questionnaires were administered on 384 residents. The questionnaire addressed issues on resident’s socio-economic and demographic attributes, awareness of climate change and factors influencing residents’ adaptation to climate change. Data were analysed using both descriptive and inferential statistics. Result indicated that the adaptation strategies adopted by residents in the different residential areas were similar but varied in magnitude as denoted by the resident response index RRI (RRIh = 3.32, RRIm = 3.39 and RRIl = 3.41). The multiple regression analysis computed indicated the residential characteristics such as education, average monthly income, age, house type and house ownership (p < 0.05) were significant factors influencing resident’s level of climate change adaptation strategies adopted. The study could be strengthened by looking at specific climate change effects such as floods or drought in major cities of Nigeria. Hence, the view presented in this paper may not be considered generalizable to the impacts of climate change in the study area. In recent years, research studies on human adaptation and coping strategies to climate change have generated considerable development interest. This study contributed to this growing area of research by examining the factors influencing residents’ adaptation strategies to climate change in Lagos Metropolis, Nigeria.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-06-2021-0060
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Land use change and precipitation implication to hydro-meteorological
           disasters in Central Java: an overview

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      Authors: Intan Hapsari Surya Putri , Imam Buchori , Wiwandari Handayani
      Abstract: This study aims to prove that land-use change plays a role in the occurrence of hydro-meteorological disasters in Central Java, especially in relation to its upstream and downstream. The paper presents empirical findings from quantitative research using a spatial analysis and descriptive analysis. The upstream and downstream area of Central Java is categorized as a rapid development area that results in changes in land use and land cover. The findings showed that there was an increasing number of hydrometeorological disasters such as floods and landslides as the impact of land-use change and rainfall conditions. Analysis of the relationship between rainfall and disaster events with more technical and specific analysis could be done in the further research. In this study, more analysis in the context of river basin systems including upstream and downstream in different periods to examine the linkage between them have been considered and incorporated.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-11-23
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-12-2020-0125
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Mapping direct flood impacts from a 2020 extreme flood event in Central
           Vietnam using spatial analysis techniques

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      Authors: Chinh Luu , Quynh Duy Bui , Jason von Meding
      Abstract: In October 2020, Vietnam was repeatedly hit by large storms, including Linfa, Nangka, Saudel and Molave, causing heavy rains and whirlwinds in the Central provinces of Vietnam. The heavy rain led to severe flooding in many localities. The water levels on major rivers broke records of historical flood events in 1950, 1979, 1999, 2007, 2010 and 2016. In response, this paper aims to quantify the impacts of 2020 flooding to support flood risk management activities and the relief agencies that can use the analysis. This study demonstrates an approach to quickly map flood impacts on population, schools, health-care facilities, agriculture, transportation and business facilities and assess flood risks using available data and spatial analysis techniques. The results show that all districts of Quang Binh were affected by the event, in which 1,014 residential areas, 70 schools, 13 health-care facilities, 32,558 ha of agriculture lands, 402 km road length, 29 km railway, 35 bridges on roads and 239 business facilities were exposed within flooded areas. This study is limited to direct or tangible impacts, including flooded residential areas, schools, health-care facilities, agriculture land categories, road networks and business facilities. Indirect or intangible impacts such as health, flood pollution and business disruption should be considered in further studies. These detailed impact maps can support decision-makers and local authorities in implementing recovery activities, allocating relief and devoting human resources and developing flood risk management action plans and land-use planning in the future. This study investigates the context of flood impacts on population, schools, health-care facilities, agriculture, transportation and business facilities. Based on this research, decision-makers can better understand how to support affected communities and target the most at risk people with interventions. This paper presents a framework to quantify the impacts of the 2020 extreme flood event using available data and spatial analysis techniques in support of flood risk management activities.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-11-12
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-07-2021-0070
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Survey on the dissemination of Web-based information on “evacuation and
           sheltering” in the context of COVID-19 by the Japanese Government

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      Authors: Hiroaki Sano , Yohei Chiba , Sachiko Maeda , Chiharu Ikeda , Nobuyuki Handa , Shinya Miura , Yuichiro Usuda
      Abstract: This study examines the websites of central government ministries, prefectures and municipalities to obtain a comprehensive bird’s-eye view of how they are preparing for natural disasters in the context of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. This study examines the websites of central government ministries, prefectures and municipalities in Japan to survey the actual status of information dissemination on “evacuation and sheltering” in the context of COVID-19. This study found that the central government issued many notices, notifications and administrative communications to prefectures, cities with public health centers and special wards, which were mainly related to opening, securing and operating evacuation centers and improving the environment. It was found that most prefectures disseminated information on both survival and living evacuation and did so from June onward, when the flood season was approaching. Among the municipalities, there were differences in information dissemination tendencies by prefecture, and it became clear that smaller municipalities were especially incapable of fully disseminating information via the Web. The data from the prefectures and municipalities surveyed in this study were collected from websites and do not necessarily represent the actual response to disaster-related evacuation in the context of COVID-19 in those areas. To clarify this evacuation, more detailed surveys are needed. This study is unique because no research has been conducted on the response of Japanese administrative agencies to disaster-related evacuation in the context of COVID-19; the actual situation was analyzed in this study by examining central government ministries, prefectures and municipalities as administrative agencies and comparing their responses.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-10-18
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-01-2021-0005
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Environmental concerns among the entrepreneurs: a disaster resilience and
           environment building during the second wave of the COVID-19

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      Authors: Bahadur Ali Soomro , Naimatullah Shah
      Abstract: Nowadays, nearly the whole globe is confronting a severe threat of the COVID-19. The purpose of this paper is to explore the predictors of environmental concerns during the COVID-19 among the entrepreneurs during a second pandemic wave. The deductive approach is applied based on cross-sectional data. An online response is gotten from entrepreneurs of Pakistan. A convenience sampling is applied to target the entrepreneurs. In total, 220 usable answers ensue for the outcome. The structural equation model (SEM) is used for the assessment of hypotheses. The results of this study highlight a significant and positive effect of uncertainty of COVID-19 (U19), Perceived vulnerability (PV), Risk perception of COVID-19 (RP) and Fear of COVID-19 (F19) on environmental concerns (EC) among the entrepreneurs. The research outcomes would provide the guidelines to policymakers and planners to develop the policies for reducing the fear, vulnerability, risk and uncertainties during the waves of the COVID-19. The findings of the study would make disaster resilience which COVID-19 creates. The results would provide the re-built environment guidelines by reducing fear, vulnerability, risk and uncertainties. Besides, the findings would help provide the knowledge and practical aspects of disasters in terms of anxiety, exposure, risk and uncertainties, which are hazardous for humans and the environment. This study provides the empirical evidence which is the first time conducted among the entrepreneurs. Besides, this study highlights the predictors such as fear, vulnerability, risk and uncertainties towards EC in the COVID-19 scenario.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-10-14
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-02-2021-0011
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Evacuation of vulnerable people during a Natech: a case study of a flood
           and factory explosion in Japan

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Nobuhito Ohtsu , Akihiko Hokugo , Ana Maria Cruz , Yukari Sato , Yuko Araki , Hyejeong Park
      Abstract: This study investigated pre-evacuation times and evacuation behaviors of vulnerable people during the 2018 flooding in Shimobara, Okayama, Japan, and the flood-triggered factory explosion, a natural hazard-triggered technological accident known as a natural-hazard-triggered technological accidents (Natech). This study examined factors that affected evacuation decisions and pre-evacuation time, estimated the evacuation time in case of no explosion and identified community disaster prevention organization response efforts for vulnerable people. Interviews with all 18 vulnerable people who experienced the event were conducted. Multiple regression analysis was used to examine the effect of six factors on evacuation time and reasons for delayed evacuation. Factors affecting evacuation decisions included the sound of the explosion, followed by recommendations from relatives and the community disaster prevention organization. Explosion-related injuries delayed early evacuation, but experience of previous disasters and damage had a positive effect on early evacuation. The explosion sound accelerated evacuation of non-injured people; however, explosion-related injuries significantly delayed evacuation of injured individuals. The Shimobara community disaster prevention organization’s disaster response included a vulnerable people registry, visits to all local households and a multilayered approach that enabled monitoring of all households. This is the first study to examine the evacuation behavior of vulnerable people and community responses during a Natech event.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-10-06
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-04-2021-0043
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Gender-based perception of civil engineering and construction students
           towards infrastructure and community resilience

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      Authors: Saeed Rokooei , Farshid Vahedifard , Solomon Belay
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of gender differences in the perception of civil engineers and construction (CEC) students toward resilience to natural hazards and extreme events in a changing climate. This study also explores to what extent CEC students perceive the status of the US infrastructure systems similar to an external evaluation model (i.e. American Society of Civil Engineers Infrastructure Report Card). An empirical study was conducted to examine the perception of resilience among 103 females and 279 male CEC students from 15 universities across the USA. The obtained data were quantified, and different statistical methods were used to explore the similarities and differences in the gender group responses. The results indicated a significant mean difference (disagreement) between male and female groups in the importance of community resilience, management and handling of natural hazards. In addition, while there was no meaningful difference between female and male students in their content knowledge, female students showed a more accurate perception about impacting factors involved. The findings of this study offer new insight into the impacts of gender differences in the perception of resilience, which can be used to enhance the educational experience of CEC female students in areas related to community and infrastructure resilience.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-10-04
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-03-2021-0030
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Identifying gaps in early warning mechanisms and evacuation procedures for
           tsunamis in Sri Lanka, with a special focus on the use of social media

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      Authors: Ravindu Udayantha Jayasekara , Gaindu Saranga Jayathilaka , Chandana Siriwardana , Dilanthi Amaratunga , Richard Haigh , Chaminda Bandara , Ranjith Dissanayake
      Abstract: The current National Early Warning System for Sri Lanka (NEWS: SL) was established after the devastations of the Indian Ocean Tsunami in 2004. Although early warning (EW) systems and evacuation procedures are in place, several areas which need improvements have been emphasized in recent studies carried out in the country. Therefore, this paper aims to outline the gaps in existing EW and EP related to tsunami and other coastal hazards with a special focus on the use of social media for disaster communication based on age groups. This study has drawn on a review of past studies carried out by the same research team to identify the scope of the study. In addition to that, a conceptual framework was developed for the use of social media in the event of a disaster. Based on this conceptual framework, an online questionnaire was administered to identify the current status of the use of social media in Sri Lanka during a disaster situation. In total, 408 responses were collected and analyzed using the binary logistic regression method to evaluate the variation of different predictors associated with the use of social media for disaster communication. Findings of the study revealed that the use of social media for disaster communication depends on the previous experience of users and their age. The gender of users does not affect the use of social media for disaster communication. Therefore, the accuracy and timeliness of disaster information distributed via social media should be improved further to enhance the use of social media for disaster communication. Moreover, the findings have highlighted unaddressed issues in areas such as governance; communication of technical agencies; evacuation and shelters; and response of the community. This paper has identified key areas that need attention in the process of enhancing the use of social media for disaster communication. More use of technological platforms such as social media for receiving disaster-related information can address issues such as bottlenecks in communication, poor awareness and lack of last-mile dissemination. Furthermore, this paper has proposed recommendations for addressing the identified gaps in the overall EW mechanisms and EP pertaining to tsunamis and other coastal hazards to enhance the coastal disaster resilience in Sri Lanka.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-09-27
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-02-2021-0012
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Simulation-based learning in tertiary-level disaster risk management
           education: a class-room experiment

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      Authors: Jerry Chati Tasantab , Thayaparan Gajendran , Toinpre Owi , Emmanuel Raju
      Abstract: Conventional lecture-based educational approaches alone might not be able to portray the complexity of disaster risk management practice and its real-life dynamics. One work-integrated learning practice that can give students practical work-related experiences is simulation-based learning. However, there is a limited discourse on simulation-based learning in disaster risk management education at the tertiary level. As tertiary education plays a crucial role in developing capabilities within the workforce, simulation-based learning can evoke or replicate substantial aspects of the real world in a fully interactive fashion. This paper aims to present outcomes of simulation-based learning sessions the authors designed and delivered in a disaster risk management course. The authors developed a framework to illustrate simulation-based learning in a disaster risk management programme. It was then used as a guide to design and execute simulation-based learning sessions. An autoethnographic methodology was then applied to reflectively narrate the experiences and feelings during the design and execution of the simulations. The evaluation of the simulation sessions showed that participants were able to apply their knowledge and demonstrate the skills required to make critical decisions in disaster risk reduction. The conclusion from the simulation-based learning sessions is that making simulation-based learning a part of the pedagogy of disaster risk management education enables students to gain practical experience, deliberate ethical tensions and practical dilemmas and develop the ability to work with multiple perspectives. The simulated workplace experience allowed students to experience decision-making as disaster risk management professionals, allowing them to integrate theory with practice.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-04-2021-0045
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Simulation analysis of critical factors of casualty transportation for
           disaster response: A case study of Istanbul earthquake

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      Authors: Nadide Çağlayan , Sule Itir Satoglu
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to statistically assess the effects of the design factors including usage of data-driven decision support tool (DST), classification of patients (triage), prioritization based on vital scores of patients, number of ambulances and hospital selection rules, on the casualty transportation system’s performance in large-scale disasters. Besides, a data-driven DST for casualty transportation is proposed to enhance the casualty survival and ambulance transportation times during the disaster response stage. In this study, the authors applied simulation and statistical analysis to evaluate the effects of usage of data-driven DST, classification of patients (triage), prioritization of the patients based on vital scores, number of ambulances and hospital selection rules, on the patient survival and transportation time of the casualty transportation system. An experimental design was made, and 16 scenarios were formulated. Simulation models were developed for all scenarios. The number of unrecoverable casualties and time-spent by the casualties until arriving at the hospital was observed. Then, a statistical analysis was applied to the simulation results, and significant factors were determined. Utilization of the proposed DST was found to improve the casualty transportation and coordination performance. All main effects of the design factors were found statistically significant for the number of unrecoverable casualties. Besides, for the Time spent Until Arrival of T1-Type Casualty at the Hospital, all of the main factors are significant except the number of ambulances. Respiratory rate, pulse rate, motor response score priority and hospital selection rule based on available hospital capacities must be considered to reduce the number of unrecoverable casualties and time spent until arrival of the casualties at the hospitals. In this study, the factors that significantly affect the performance of the casualty transportation system were revealed, by simulation and statistical analysis, based on an expected earthquake case, in a metropolitan city. Besides, it was shown that using a data-driven DST that tracks victims and intends to support disaster coordination centers and medical staff performing casualty transportation significantly improves survival rate of the victims and time to deliver the casualties. This research considers the whole systems’ components, contributes to developing the response stage operations by filling gaps between using the data-driven DST and casualty transportation processes.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-08-25
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-03-2021-0031
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Towards an improved understanding of participation in natural hazard early
           warning systems

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      Authors: Georgina Clegg , Richard Haigh , Dilanthi Amaratunga
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to improve the conceptual understanding of the process of participation in early warning systems (EWS) through a review of participatory EWS examples in the academic literature. Specifically, this paper asks: who is involved, what responsibilities do participants hold, what activities are they involved in, and what are the associated successes, issues and outcomes' A total of 30 cases of participation in EWS documented in the academic literature were identified through online searches. Existing concepts in participation (power and responsibility, communication) and people-centred early warning (risk knowledge, monitoring and warning, communication and dissemination and response capability) were used to examine each paper. Participation was found to take place through a range of activities across all elements of the EWS. Participation also varied in breadth of inclusion, ranging from the general public to selected volunteers. The majority of cases received support and facilitation from other actors, such as government and NGOs, but the extent of power and responsibility held by participants varied greatly within this. Common successes and issues associated with participatory EWS and the potential outcomes are presented, and the opportunities, challenges and gaps in knowledge are discussed. This paper links participation and EWS literature to form a clearer conceptualisation of participation in EWS in support of future research in the field. It provides unique insights into who participates, their roles and relations with other actors and the outcomes of participation.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-08-11
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-11-2020-0120
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • A sustainable post-disaster housing development framework for an
           indigenous Hao-Cha community in Taiwan: considering culture and livelihood
           in housing extensions

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      Authors: Sung Lun Tsai , Chiho Ochiai , Chuan Zhong Deng , Min Hui Tseng
      Abstract: Several post-disaster housing extension and modification studies have indicated that owner-driven modification behavior relates to socio-economic and livelihood factors. This study aims to clarify housing extension patterns and examine the relationships among spatial characteristics, sociocultural factors, livelihood factors and housing extensions. This research also highlights the implications of post-disaster housing design for indigenous communities. An indigenous community case study was conducted using a literature review. Moreover, interview surveys and housing measurements were implemented based on purposive sampling to diversify interviewees’ backgrounds and the extent of housing extensions. This study confirms that housing extensions are closely related to the number of household members and their associated functions and cultural and livelihood factors that were ignored during the design stage. Furthermore, the housing extension process was confirmed to match households’ economic recovery. A post-disaster housing implementation framework for the indigenous population is proposed. This research only targeted one indigenous community with a limited number of interviewees and samples because of the connection with households. The study’s proposed resilience post-disaster housing framework can be used to develop post-disaster housing design guidelines, which can benefit policymaking. The proposed participatory concept can be further adopted in future disaster risk-reduction programs. This study uniquely focuses on the pre- and post-disaster housing layout and the livelihood of an indigenous community. It offers valuable insights for post-disaster reconstruction planners and practitioners.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-08-09
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-02-2021-0019
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Flood susceptibility analysis of the Panjkora Valley Northern Pakistan,
           using frequencyratio approach

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      Authors: Munazza Afreen , Fazlul Haq , Zarka Mukhtar
      Abstract: Floods are considered as one of the most lethal natural disasters having the potential to cause havoc to entire communities. Pakistan is the land of wide topographic and climatic variations which make it vulnerable to floods. The purpose of this paper is to identify flood susceptible zones in the Panjkora Basin using frequency ratio model. A total of seven parameters or flood conditioning factors were considered, and weights were assigned according to the frequency ratio technique. For the preparation of layers, satellite imageries and digital elevation model data were used. Frequency ratio was calculated using correlation between these parameters and flood. Flood susceptibility index map was divided into five zones through quantile method in ArcMap. Findings of the study reveal that near half of the area (43%) is located in the very high susceptible zone, while only 20% area is classified as low to very low susceptible. This paper is entirely based on original research. The approach used in this study has not been applied to the study area before.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-08-07
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-09-2020-0104
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Post-disaster sheltering process after the 2019 floods, in Golestan
           province, Iran

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      Authors: Mahsa Shariat Alavi , Alireza Fallahi , Zoheir Mottaki , Fereshteh Aslani
      Abstract: As a flood-prone region in Iran, Golestan province has encountered various disasters in its history. The last one occurred in March 2019, affected Aq-Qala County and caused irreparable physical, economic, social and environmental problems. The purpose of this study is to investigate the process of providing shelter in emergency, rehabilitation and reconstruction phases after the floods in the villages of Aq-Qala. A research method is a hybrid approach. The collection of data involved a combination of qualitative and quantitative approaches in addition to reviewing the documented texts in resources to collect the required data using observations, field survey activities, questionnaires and in-depth interviews. From April 2019 to December 2019, nine separate visits have occurred to collect the needed information. This paper shows dissatisfaction with providing shelter and attempts to identify the factors which caused the challenges. The findings revealed issues such as hygienic problems in collective camps, lack of thermal resistance in temporary accommodations and rising material prices. These findings lead to a contributive list of suggestions avoiding the recurrence of the harms in the future. This study proposes solutions and approaches to improve the post-flood settlement process for possible floods in the future such as equipped camps, proper temporary housing, monitoring the reconstruction and the price of the materials. If these approaches are used by authorities and people in similar rural areas, the long-term effects of inadequate post-flood shelter can be reduced.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-08-03
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-03-2021-0023
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Hospital disaster resilience: development of an assessment tool using
           expert panel and fuzzy analytical network process

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      Authors: Saeed Fallah-Aliabadi , Abbas Ostadtaghizadeh , Farin Fatemi , Ali Ardalan , Esmaeil Rezaei , Mehdi Raadabadi , Ahad Heydari
      Abstract: Resilient hospitals have the vital role in reducing mortality, severity of injuries by providing required emergency services during accidents and disasters. This study aims to identify and prioritize key indicators on hospital resilience. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2019. The draft of the indicators obtained from the systematic review of the previous study was finalized, with three expert panel sessions and 14 experts in resilience fields. The outputs of these sessions were divided into three domains including constructive resilience, infrastructural resilience and administrative resilience, 17 sub-domains and 71 indicators. Then fuzzy analytic network process method was used to weight and prioritize the final indicators of hospital disaster resilience. Administrative resilience, logistic and financial management and strategic outsourcing agreement allocated the highest weight as domain, sub-domains and indicators, respectively. The weight of each sub-domain and indicator was also determined. Investigating the weight of domains, sub-domains and indicators shows the importance of managerial and operational issues in hospital resilience. By using the indicators and relative weights, a tool for measuring hospital disaster resilience can be created in further studies. The output of these assessments is effective in promoting safety and increasing awareness of hospital managers and health policymakers.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-07-26
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-11-2020-0119
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Disaster preparedness among disaster management agency officers: a study
           from rural and urban areas in Aceh, Indonesia

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      Authors: Cut Husna , Ridha Firdaus , Elly Wardani , Syarifah Rauzatul Jannah
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to identify the preparedness of disaster mitigation agency officers in both urban and rural areas as high vulnerability zones in Aceh, Indonesia, in dealing with disasters. This cross-sectional study adopted a conceptual framework from the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) and United Nations of Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)/International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (ISDR) (LIPI-UNESCO/ISDR, 2006), explaining the study of community preparedness in anticipating earthquake and tsunami disasters. The framework of the study consists of five disaster preparedness parameters, namely, knowledge and attitude to face disasters, policies and guidelines, emergency response plans, disaster early warning systems and mobilization of resources. This conceptual framework was developed after the 2004 tsunami through an analysis study in the three provinces in Indonesia (Aceh, Padang and Bengkulu) experiencing earthquakes and tsunamis. This conceptual framework serves as a guideline and is in line with the objective of the regional disaster management Agency to reduce disaster risk through increasing community preparedness, especially providers or officers in anticipating disasters. There was a significant difference in disaster preparedness among officers from the urban and rural areas. The area size, location accessibility, the communication network and disaster detection and warning facilities could associate with the results. The respondents were selected from only two districts in Aceh Province, Indonesia, which are vulnerable to disasters. The study only identifies the disaster preparedness among disaster management agency officers (DMAOs) adopted from LIPI-UNESCO/ISDR about community preparedness in anticipating disasters particularly tsunami and earthquake. Therefore, the results of this study may have limited generalizability to other areas in Indonesia and beyond. The results of this study could possibly serve as recommendations for policymakers and disaster management agencies, particularly in rural areas to prepare contingency plans that involve both internal and external institutions to arrange the regulations related to community-based emergency response plans and disaster early warning systems. Such programs of education, training and disaster drill needed to be in place and conducted regularly for the officers in a rural area. Finally, the other sub-scales showed no difference in disaster preparedness, however, collaboration and support to each other in disaster risk reduction plan by improving the capacity building, policy enhancement and disaster management guidelines are required. Also, attempts to optimize logistics adequacy, budget allocations and disaster preparedness education and training for both DMAOs are strongly recommended through the lens of the study. The results of the study might useful for further research that could be developed based on this current study. The emergency response plans and disaster early warning systems were significantly different between the rural and urban officers in disaster preparedness. Attending disaster management programs, experiences in responding to disasters and the availability of facilities and funds could be considered in ascertaining the preparedness of officers to deal with disasters.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-07-12
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-02-2021-0015
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Evaluation of societal trust on multi-hazard early warning (MHEW)
           mechanism: Sri Lankan context

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      Authors: Ishani Shehara Pitigala Liyana Arachchi , Chandana Siriwardana , Dilanthi Amaratunga , Richard Haigh
      Abstract: It is significant to assess the societal trust toward the new advancements in multi-hazard early warnings (MHEW) with the focus on disaster risk reduction (DRR). Based on this, the purpose of this paper is to examine the extent of societal trust behavior along with the parameters such as mode of communication and institutions of issuing early warnings (EWs). A field questionnaire survey was conducted to identify the extent of societal trust. This was conducted in ten selected Grama Niladari divisions in Sri Lanka based on a developed hazard matrix. The fuzzy logic approach was applied to examine the trust level of collected 323 responses obtained through this. The analysis was done based on the responses on mobile-based platforms in EW and the credibility level of the warnings received through different institutions. The analyzed survey responses indicated that society has a higher extent of trust toward the EWs disseminated through mobile-based platforms. Moreover, these represent a strong positive correlation among the societal trust level and the level of importance of EW dissemination through mobile-based platforms. Further, in terms of trusted stakeholders in issuing EW alerts, Disaster Management Center, Sri Lanka Police and Media ranked the highest in the Sri Lankan context. Overall, findings were visually mapped through the causal loop diagrams (CLDs). In enhancing the effectiveness of the existing MHEW mechanism, the policy implications could be done, based on the results obtained from this research study. These could be altered with the implementation of DRR strategies with a community focus. The fuzzy logic approach was used in the determination of the societal decision-making on the extent of trust level. Fuzzy triangulation is mainly applied in the interpretation of the results. Further, overall parameters that determine the community trust on MHEW are represented through CLDs through system dynamics application.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-07-09
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-01-2021-0010
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Indigenous knowledge of mud architecture: experiences of surviving against
           multiple natural hazards

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      Authors: Imon Chowdhooree , Kanu Kumar Das
      Abstract: Mud architecture as one of the expressions of vernacular architecture illustrates the success of indigenous knowledge of traditional communities. Due to the pressure of industrialization, urbanization and globalization, the trend of using non-traditional measures guided by the Western-Euro-centric knowledge and technologies considers the traditional practices as expressions of backward past, under-development and poverty. Though mud as a building material is usually assumed as a fragile and ephemeral material that cannot survive against natural hazards, the surviving traditional mud buildings are needed to be investigated to know their performances during and after different types of natural hazard incidents. This paper intends to study the available cases of mud architecture of Chattogram, Bangladesh to trace the history of their survival despite of experiencing multiple natural hazards and to understand their status and prospect of resisting hazards. Three individual homesteads are chosen as cases for conducting physical survey as well as engaging inhabitants and local masons of the locality in semi-structured interviews in a story telling mode to know the construction process and histories of experiencing natural hazards. Available literatures are reviewed, and experts are interviewed to understand the causes of their performances and possible ways to improve the quality. Collected information on mud architecture demonstrates their quality of surviving against many natural challenges and this hazard-resilient quality can be enhanced through using contemporary building technologies and materials, promising to co-exist with the global trend. This study as an attempt to reinvent the vernacular architectural heritage endorses the need of appreciating indigenous knowledge for enhancing community resilience against natural hazards.
      Citation: International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment
      PubDate: 2021-07-09
      DOI: 10.1108/IJDRBE-12-2020-0128
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment

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