Subjects -> BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION (Total: 146 journals)
    - BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION (138 journals)
    - CARPENTRY AND WOODWORK (8 journals)

BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION (138 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 35 of 35 Journals sorted alphabetically
A+BE : Architecture and the Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Academia : Architecture and Construction     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Building Education     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Building Energy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Ambiente Construído     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anales de Edificación     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Civil Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Construction Economics and Building     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Australasian Journal of Construction Economics and Building - Conference Series     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Baltic Journal of Real Estate Economics and Construction Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Baurechtliche Blätter : bbl     Hybrid Journal  
Bautechnik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
BER : Architects and Quantity Surveyors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
BER : Building and Construction : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
BER : Building Contractors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Building Sub-Contractors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Capital Goods Industries Survey     Full-text available via subscription  
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Building and Construction : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Beton- und Stahlbetonbau     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Building & Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Building Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Building Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Buildings     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
BUILT : International Journal of Building, Urban, Interior and Landscape Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Built Environment Inquiry Journal     Open Access  
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Built-Environment Sri Lanka     Full-text available via subscription  
Case Studies in Construction Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Cement and Concrete Composites     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Cement and Concrete Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Challenge Journal of Concrete Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Challenge Journal of Concrete Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Change Over Time     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
City, Culture and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Civil Engineering = Siviele Ingenieurswese     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Clay Technology     Full-text available via subscription  
Concreto y cemento. Investigación y desarrollo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Construction Economics and Building     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Construction Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Construction Management and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Construction Research and Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Construction Robotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Corporate Real Estate Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Dams and Reservoirs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Developments in the Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Energy and Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Engineering Project Organization Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Environment and Urbanization Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Facilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
FUTY Journal of the Environment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gaceta Técnica     Open Access  
GISAP : Technical Sciences, Construction and Architecture     Open Access  
Glass Structures & Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Handbook of Adhesives and Sealants     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
HBRC Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Heritage Matters : The Magazine for New Zealanders Restoring, Preserving and Enjoying Our Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Housing and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
HVAC&R Research     Hybrid Journal  
Indoor and Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Informes de la Construcción     Open Access  
Intelligent Buildings International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Advanced Structural Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Architectural Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Built Environment and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Concrete Structures and Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Construction Engineering and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Construction Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Masonry Research and Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Protective Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of River Basin Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Structural Stability and Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Sustainable Building Technology and Urban Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Sustainable Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Sustainable Construction Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Sustainable Real Estate and Construction Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of the Built Environment and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Ventilation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal Sustainable Construction & Design     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal for Education in the Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Aging and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Architecture, Planning and Construction Management     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Asian Architecture and Building Engineering     Open Access  
Journal of Building Construction and Planning Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Building Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Building Materials and Structures     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Building Pathology and Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Building Performance Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Civil Engineering and Construction Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Civil Engineering and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Computational Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Construction Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Construction Engineering, Technology & Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Construction Project Management and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Facilities Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Green Building     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Legal Affairs and Dispute Resolution in Engineering and Construction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Property, Planning and Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Structural Fire Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Sustainable Cement-Based Materials     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Sustainable Design and Applied Research in Innovative Engineering of the Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the South African Institution of Civil Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Transport and Land Use     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Landscape History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Materiales de Construcción     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Mauerwerk     Hybrid Journal  
Modular and Offsite Construction (MOC) Summit Proceedings |     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Naval Engineers Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Open Construction & Building Technology Journal     Open Access  
Organization, Technology and Management in Construction     Open Access  
PARC Pesquisa em Arquitetura e Construção     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Forensic Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Urban Design and Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Revista ALCONPAT     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista de la Construcción     Open Access  
Revista de Urbanismo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Hábitat Sustenable     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista IBRACON de Estruturas e Materiais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Ingenieria de Construcción     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista INVI     Open Access  
RILEM Technical Letters     Open Access  
Room One Thousand     Open Access  
Ruang-Space: Jurnal Lingkungan Binaan (Journal of The Built Environment)     Open Access  
Russian Journal of Construction Science and Technology     Open Access  
Science and Engineering of Composite Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 62)
Science and Technology for the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Smart and Sustainable Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Steel Construction - Design and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Stroitel’stvo : Nauka i Obrazovanie     Open Access  
Structural Concrete     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Structural Mechanics of Engineering Constructions and Buildings     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sustainable Buildings     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sustainable Cities and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Technology|Architecture + Design     Hybrid Journal  
Terrain.org : A Journal of the Built & Natural Environments     Free   (Followers: 3)
The Historic Environment : Policy & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The IES Journal Part A: Civil & Structural Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Tidsskrift for boligforskning     Open Access  
YBL Journal of Built Environment     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Miet- und Raumrecht     Hybrid Journal  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Building Services Engineering Research & Technology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.583
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 3  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0143-6244 - ISSN (Online) 1477-0849
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1141 journals]
  • Practical Applications
    • Pages: 251 - 252
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Volume 42, Issue 3, Page 251-252, May 2021.

      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-04-16T07:35:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01436244211013982
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • The need for decarbonisation
    • Authors: Special Issue Editor Ewan Jones
      Pages: 253 - 255
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Volume 42, Issue 3, Page 253-255, May 2021.

      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-04-16T07:34:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01436244211004788
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Static grid carbon factors – Can we do better'
    • Authors: Jamie Risner, Anna Sutherland
      Pages: 257 - 277
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Volume 42, Issue 3, Page 257-277, May 2021.
      The average carbon intensity (gCO2e/kWh) of electricity provided by the UK National Grid is decreasing and becoming more time variable. This paper reviews the impact on energy calculations of using various levels of data resolution (half hourly, daily, monthly and annual) and of moving to region specific data. This analysis is in two parts, one focused on the potential impact on Part L assessments and the other on reported carbon emissions for existing buildings.Analysis demonstrated that an increase in calculated emissions of up to 12% is possible when using an emissions calculation methodology employing higher resolution grid carbon intensity data. Regional analysis indicated an even larger calculation discrepancy, with some regions annual emissions increasing by a factor of ten as compared to other regions.This paper proposes a path forward for the industry to improve the accuracy of analysis by using better data sources. The proposed change in calculation methodology is analogous to moving from using an annual average external temperature to using a CIBSE weather profile for a specific city or using a future weather file.Practical application: This paper aims to quantify the inaccuracy of a calculation methodology in common use in the industry and key to building regulations (specifically Building Regulations Part L – Conservation of Fuel and Power) – translating electricity consumption into carbon emissions. It proposes an alternative methodology which improves the accuracy of the calculation based on improved data inputs.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-02-12T05:49:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143624421991964
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • The potential for the Passive House standard in Longyearbyen – the
           High Arctic
    • Authors: Josien AJC Buijze, Andrew J Wright
      Pages: 307 - 325
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Volume 42, Issue 3, Page 307-325, May 2021.
      Passive building design reduces a building’s energy consumption through mainly non-mechanical design strategies. The Passive House (or Passivhaus) Standard certifies such buildings that comply with its strict energy performance criteria. Achieving the Standard is very challenging for dwellings in extreme climates. There is limited knowledge of the Standard’s potential in Arctic regions, particularly the High Arctic. Through a review of the literature and energy modelling of a hypothetical dwelling, the challenges in achieving the Standard in Longyearbyen (78°N), Norway are investigated. Very low temperatures and 112 days without daylight create a high heating demand. Whereas previous studies measured actual building performances or used simple calculations, the findings in this investigation show the limitations of individual design parameters and technical limits of the building envelope. In theory the Standard can be achieved in Longyearbyen; however, the potential in practice is low due to the very tight margins in the heating criteria. The results show the significant impact of applying contextual (climatic) adjustments to the boundary conditions of the Standard. The investigation could contribute to a discussion on modifying the Passive House Standard for dwellings in the High Arctic and improving building design for the region.Practical application: Current knowledge regarding energy efficient building performance in Arctic climates is limited, while the urgency for improved efficiencies is extremely high. The modelling in this work shows the valuable impact of contextual adjustments to the Passive House boundary conditions; the impact of individual design parameters; and the potential for significant energy savings through adopting passive house principles for dwelling design in Longyearbyen or similar climates. This investigation could encourage new policy making, additional research and the development of an optimized Passive House Standard that considers High Arctic climate conditions, thus encouraging new energy efficient building construction in cold climates.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-03-06T05:53:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143624421996989
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Potential carbon emissions reduction related to the recovery of unutilised
           waste heat
    • Authors: Lina Aglén
      Pages: 327 - 332
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Volume 42, Issue 3, Page 327-332, May 2021.
      The introduction of district heating will have a significant impact on the building services industry, from the architecture of a building to its operation. This technical note investigates a delimited portion of the potential of currently unutilised heat which has the possibility to supply district heating networks in the UK. The UK industrial sector, wastewater treatment facilities and the existing UK waste incineration plants all produce waste heat available in a temperature range suitable for extraction into district heating networks via commercialised techniques broadly used in other countries.This technical note presents a comparative literature review, comparing UK statistics and studies with performance data based on Swedish operational facilities. It finds 51.7TWh of currently unutilised heat could be recovered annually, with a significant associated emission decrease if incorporated into the heat supply of the UK building stock.A quantitative analysis is carried out to compare the identified potential with the current UK heat demand and the potential impact on the UK carbon emissions is estimated. The calculations indicate a reduction of 14% in the required UK total domestic heat supply, despite only including a limited fraction of the available waste heat potential.Practical application: This technical note serves to highlight and emphasise the large amount of available waste heat potential currently not utilised in the UK. By estimating the impact of waste heat utilisation and incorporation into district heating and heat networks in the UK, the technical note aims to fuel discussion around the further incorporation of waste heat to be utilised in the UK heat sector.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-01-11T04:38:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143624420986279
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Research on the design and application of capillary heat exchangers for
           heat pumps in coastal areas
    • Authors: Zhenpeng Bai, Yanfeng Li, Jin Zhang, Alan Fewkes, Hua Zhong
      Pages: 333 - 348
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Volume 42, Issue 3, Page 333-348, May 2021.
      This study investigated the optimal design of a capillary heat exchanger device for the heat pump system and its innovative engineering application in a building. The overall aim was to use a capillary heat exchanger to obtain energy in coastal areas for promoting renewable energy in low-carbon building design. Initially, the main factors affecting the efficiency of the capillary heat exchanger were identified, a mathematical model was then established to analyse the heat transfer process. The analysis showed the flow rate and the capillary length are the key factors affecting the efficiency of the capillary heat exchanger. Secondly, to optimize the structural design of the capillary heat exchanger, the heat energy transfer is calculated with different lengths of the capillary under various flow rates in summer and winter conditions, respectively. Thirdly, a typical building is selected to analyse the application of the capillary heat exchanger for extracting energy in the coastal area. The results show the performance of the selected capillary heat exchanger heat pump system, in winter, the heat energy transfer rate is 60 W/m2 when the seawater temperature is 3.7 °C; in summer, the heat energy transfer rate is 150 W/m2 when the seawater temperature is 24.6 °C. Finally, the above field test results were examined using a numerical simulation model, the test and simulation results agree with each other quite well. This paper is conducive in promoting the development of the capillary heat exchanger heat pump as an innovative sustainable technology for net-zero energy and low carbon buildings using renewable energy in coastal areas.Practical application: A recently proposed capillary heat exchanger is used as an energy extraction and utilisation device to obtain energy in coastal areas for promoting renewable energy in low-carbon building design. This paper explores the application of a capillary heat exchanger as both cold and heat sources for application in typical low-rise buildings. The analysis of the heat energy transfer rate of a typical low-rise building located in a coastal area in summer and winter provides guidance for the application of capillary heat exchangers.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-03-11T04:24:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01436244211001497
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Net zero carbon: Energy performance targets for offices
    • Authors: Robert Cohen, Karl Desai, Jennifer Elias, Richard Twinn
      Pages: 349 - 369
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Volume 42, Issue 3, Page 349-369, May 2021.
      The UKGBC Net Zero Carbon Buildings Framework was published in April 2019 following an industry task group and extensive consultation process. The framework acts as guidance for achieving net zero carbon for operational energy and construction emissions, with a whole life carbon approach to be developed in the future. In consultation with industry, further detail and stricter requirements are being developed over time. In October 2019, proposals were set out for industry consultation on minimum energy efficiency targets for new and existing commercial office buildings seeking to achieve net zero carbon status for operational energy today, based on the performance levels that all buildings will be required to achieve by 2050. This was complemented by modelling work undertaken by the LETI network looking into net zero carbon requirements for new buildings. In January 2020 UKGBC published its guidance on the levels of energy performance that offices should target to achieve net zero and a trajectory for getting there by 2035.This paper describes the methodology behind and industry perspectives on UKGBC’s proposals which aim to predict the reduction in building energy intensity required if the UK’s economy is to be fully-powered by zero carbon energy in 2050.Practical application: Many developers and investors seeking to procure new commercial offices or undertake major refurbishments of existing offices are engaging with the ‘net zero carbon’ agenda, now intrinsic to the legislative framework for economic activity in the UK. A UKGBC initiative effectively filled a vacuum by defining a set of requirements including energy efficiency thresholds for commercial offices in the UK to be considered ‘net zero carbon’. This paper provides all stakeholders with a detailed justification for the level of these thresholds and what might be done to achieve them. A worked example details one possible solution for a new office.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-02-10T04:40:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143624421991470
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 3 (2021)
       
  • Examining the magnitude and perception of summertime overheating in London
           care homes
    • Authors: Rajat Gupta, Alastair Howard, Mike Davies, Anna Mavrogianni, Ioanna Tsoulou, Eleni Oikonomou, Paul Wilkinson
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper brings together objective and subjective data on indoor temperature and thermal comfort to examine the magnitude and perception of summertime overheating in two London-based care homes occupying modern and older buildings. Continuous monitoring of indoor and outdoor temperature, relative humidity and CO2 levels was conducted in summer 2019 along with thermal comfort surveys and semi-structured interviews with older residents and staff of the care settings. Indoor temperatures were found to be high (>30°C) with bedroom temperatures often higher at night than daytime across both care settings. Limited opening due to window restrictors constrained night-time ventilation. Overheating was prevalent with four out of the five monitored bedrooms failing all four overheating metrics investigated. While 35–42% of staff responses perceived indoor temperatures to be uncomfortably hot, only 13–19% of resident responses were found to do so, indicating that elderly residents tend to be relatively insensitive to heat, leaving them open to overheating without realising it. Residents and staff in the modern care setting were less satisfied with their thermal conditions. As hybrid buildings, care settings need to keep both residents and staff comfortable and healthy during hot weather through night-time ventilation, management of heating and supportive institutional practices.Practical application:Care home designs have focused on keeping residents warm through the winter, neglecting the risks of summertime overheating. Care homes are hybrid buildings serving as living spaces for vulnerable older residents and offices/workspaces for staff. Providing comfort to both groups during periods of hot weather is challenging. Opportunities for ventilation are limited by Health & Safety regulations that mandate up to 10 cm maximum window openings and institutional practices that result in windows routinely kept closed, particularly at night. Utilising natural and where possible cross-ventilation should be considered along with external shading. Heating should be managed to avoid unwanted heat gains in the summer.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-05-03T04:54:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01436244211013645
       
  • Perception of wellbeing in educational spaces
    • Authors: Chloe Agg, Samana Khimji
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Ahead of Print.
      Wellbeing and mental health are important pillars of sustainability, as recognised by the WELL Building Standards. With higher education facing a mental health crisis, which has been exacerbated by the pandemic, all potential solutions must be investigated. Applying WELL to educational spaces could help to improve student and staff wellbeing. However, the constant change in occupancy of teaching spaces within higher education alters how design factors influence wellbeing outcomes as compared to standard office or domestic occupancy. This study collects student and staff responses on their experience of wellbeing in educational spaces, together with indoor environment quality data for validation. It found that whilst the perception of the quality of spaces did not necessarily align with the measured quality, it was the perceived quality that impacted wellbeing.Practical applicationDesign for wellbeing is a growing market and a costly investment, it is important therefore that this investment is having the impact anticipated. This research demonstrates the importance of designing a space taking into account user perception rather than focusing solely on space performance, and perceived space quality impacts on occupant wellbeing.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-04-24T05:16:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01436244211009828
       
  • Managing the risk of the energy performance gap in non-domestic buildings
    • Authors: David Thompson, Esfand Burman, Dejan Mumovic, Mike Davies
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Ahead of Print.
      Energy use in buildings accounts for one-third of the overall global energy consumption and total building floor area continues to increase each year as new developments are constructed and delivered. If stringent climate goals are to be met, these buildings will need to consume less energy and emit less carbon. However, design intentions for energy efficient buildings are not always met in practice. This performance gap between calculated and measured energy use in buildings threatens the progress necessary to meet these energy targets. The aim of this paper is to identify the factors that contribute to the performance gap and propose solutions for reducing the gap in practice. A quantitative and qualitative analysis of two research programmes completed in the past few years was utilized for an in-depth look at the performance of around 50 non-domestic buildings in the United Kingdom. While no direct links were found between any one variable and the performance gap, several correlations exist between contributing factors indicating a complex, entangled web of interrelated problems. The multitude of the variables involved presents a formidable challenge in finding practical solutions. However, the results indicate that the combination of the ventilation strategy of a building and the building services control strategy during partial occupancy is a key determinant of the performance gap. A more straightforward procurement approach with clearly delineated targets and responsibilities, along with advanced and seasonal commissioning instituted at the beginning of a project and implemented after building completion can also be very effective in reducing the gap. Finally, mandatory requirements or an appropriate system of incentives for monitoring and disclosure of performance data can help identify many of the underlying issues affecting performance in-use and untangle some of the web of complex issues across the building sector.Practical applicationAwareness of the performance gap and knowledge of the factors contributing to its impact on the building industry is important for all stakeholders involved in the design, construction, operation and occupation of non-domestic buildings. Understanding potential solutions to mitigate these risks may help to reduce the prevalence and magnitude of the performance gap.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-04-23T05:13:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01436244211008319
       
  • Managing energy performance in buildings from design to operation using
           modelling and calibration
    • Authors: Nishesh Jain, Esfand Burman, Dejan Mumovic, Mike Davies
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Ahead of Print.
      To manage the concerns regarding the energy performance gap in buildings, a structured and longitudinal performance assessment of buildings, covering design through to operation, is necessary. Modelling can form an integral part of this process by ensuring that a good practice design stage modelling is followed by an ongoing evaluation of operational stage performance using a robust calibration protocol. In this paper, we demonstrate, via a case study of an office building, how a good practice design stage model can be fine-tuned for operational stage using a new framework that helps validate the causes for deviations of actual performance from design intents. This paper maps the modelling based process of tracking building performance from design to operation, identifying the various types of performance gaps. Further, during the operational stage, the framework provides a systematic way to separate the effect of (i) operating conditions that are driven by the building’s actual function and occupancy as compared with the design assumptions, and (ii) the effect of potential technical issues that cause underperformance. As the identification of issues is based on energy modelling, the process requires use of advanced and well-documented simulation tools. The paper concludes with providing an outline of the software platform requirements needed to generate robust design models and their calibration for operational performance assessments.Practical applicationThe paper’s findings are a useful guide for building industry professionals to manage the performance gap with appropriate accuracy through a robust methodology in an easy to use workflow. The methodological framework to analyse building energy performance in-use links best practice design stage modelling guidance with a robust operational stage investigation. It helps designers, contractors, building managers and other stakeholders with an understanding of procedures to follow to undertake an effective measurement and verification exercise.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-04-20T05:12:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01436244211008317
       
  • What do we know about indoor air quality of nurseries' A review of the
           literature
    • Authors: Shuo Zhang, D Mumovic, Samuel Stamp, Katherine Curran, Elizabeth Cooper
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Ahead of Print.
      Considering the alarming rise in the rate of asthma and respiratory diseases among school children, it is of great importance to investigate all probable causes. Outside of the home, children spend most of their time in school. Many studies have researched the indoor environmental quality of primary and secondary school buildings to determine the exposure of school children to indoor air pollution. However, studies of very young children in nurseries are scarce. Unlike at elementary schools or universities, children in nurseries are more vulnerable due to their physiology, inability to articulate discomfort and to adapt their behaviour to avoid exposures. This article reviews current studies on the indoor environment in nurseries. It summarizes air pollution levels and related environmental and behavioural factors in nurseries that have been reported in the literature. Additionally, exposure to indoor air pollution and related potential health outcomes are examined. This review concludes that indoor air pollution in nurseries often exceeds current guidelines, and designers and policymakers should be made aware of the impact on the health and wellbeing of children in nurseries. Proper interventions and guidelines should be considered to create a healthy indoor environment for nursery children.Practical application: Previous IAQ assessments have mainly focused on indoor temperatures and CO2 levels. Data on comprehensive monitoring (including PMs, NO2, O3 and other pollutants) of indoor air quality of nurseries are scarce. Particularly in the UK, studies about indoor air quality in nurseries have not been founded. This paper categorized relevant articles according to the focus of the study, to provide evidence to a better understanding of current indoor air quality in nursery environments.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-04-13T05:43:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01436244211009829
       
  • Overheating assessment in flats with glazed balconies in warm-summer humid
           continental climate
    • Authors: Magdalena Grudzińska
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Ahead of Print.
      Greenhouse systems in the form of glazed balconies may be accomplished both in the newly designed buildings and in the existing ones, raising their energy standard in a quick and inexpensive way. However, basic parameters influencing the efficiency of the systems are often chosen intuitively, not allowing to fully benefit from the sunspaces or causing overheating of the rooms and discomfort for the users. These issues are common drawbacks of passive systems and may become especially important in the aspect of anthropogenic climate changes, including temperature rise and summer heatwaves. The paper presents results of a long-term summer temperature monitoring in flats with glazed balconies of different construction. They were located in prefabricated multi-family buildings, in residential districts of Lublin and Zamość. The cities are situated in the south-eastern part of Poland, belonging to the warm-summer humid continental climate area. The monitoring enabled overheating assessment according to the concept of adaptive comfort and connecting it with the sunspace construction and the inhabitants’ behaviour. These issues are new aspects in the research area, and the work is a part of extensive studies including monitoring and dynamic simulations of dwellings with passive greenhouse systems in Poland.Practical application: Glazed balconies raise the energy standard of buildings in a quick and inexpensive way, but it is important to consider their function not only during the heating season but also in the summer. Recording of temperatures enabled the monitoring of thermal conditions in the flats and the overheating assessment. It is possible to keep the internal temperature in the rooms within the desired range thanks to the sunspace ventilation and occupants’ behaviour.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-04-13T05:43:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01436244211008690
       
  • Study of novel solar assisted heating system
    • Authors: Gareth Davies, John Blower, Richard Hall, Graeme Maidment
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Ahead of Print.
      The potential for energy, carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) and cost savings when using low emissivity (low-ε) transpired solar collectors (TSCs), combined with heat pumps in a range of configurations, has been investigated using computer modelling. Low-ε TSCs consist of metal solar collector plates with a spectrally sensitive surface, perforated with holes. Ambient air is drawn through the holes and heated by convection from the solar collector plate, increasing the air temperature by up to 25 K. The heated air can be used for e.g. space heating, or pre-heating water in buildings. The models developed have been used to compare the performance of low-ε TSC/heat pump heating systems in small and large buildings, at a range of locations. The model results showed savings in energy, CO2e and costs of up to 16.4% when using low-ε TSCs combined with an exhaust air heat pump compared with using the exhaust air heat pump alone.Practical application: If the UK is to meet its target of reaching net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, it will be necessary to adopt low or zero carbon heating technologies. The novel low emissivity transpired solar collector device investigated can contribute to this. Its advantages include: (i) utilising solar radiation; (ii) readily integrated with existing heating systems e.g. heat pumps; (iii) significant energy, CO2e emissions and cost savings; (iv) low cost device; (v) minimal energy input i.e. one small fan; (vi) can be retrofitted to existing buildings; (vii) its benefits were applicable at all of the (wide range of) locations tested.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-04-13T05:43:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01436244211008689
       
  • Climatic zoning for the building thermal design in China's rural areas
    • Authors: Yao Chen, Zhiwei Wang, Peng Wei
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Ahead of Print.
      Building climatic zoning is a prerequisite for implementing building energy efficiency technology, which can help code makers and architects have an accurate understanding of the local climatic conditions. It takes the extreme monthly average temperature as the zoning index in the existing climatic zoning of rural areas in China. There will be unreasonable design phenomena of insufficient or excessive thermal insulation for a building envelope in rural areas. Aiming at the above problems, this paper modifies the current zoning. This research established the cooling and heating degree-day indexes HDD14 and CDD30 based on the thermal comfort characteristics of rural occupants and used the threshold method to subdivide rural areas into eight sub-zones. The results show that the problem of insufficient or excessive thermal insulation in rural areas can be effectively solved by replacing the extreme monthly average temperature index with the degree day index and the annual cumulative building load can be reduced by 6.4% on average without increasing the insulation cost. After more detailed zoning, the variance within the group is reduced and it accurately describes climate diversity, which is conducive to implementing climate-responsive energy-saving design in each subzone.Practical application: The major purpose of this paper is to solve the problem of unreasonable climate zone boundaries specified in the existing Design Standard for Energy Efficiency of Rural Residential Buildings. The existing zoning has led to conflicts between the actual heating demand and the building envelope thermal parameter limits specified in the standard. This work redefines the boundaries of the existing map using more up-to-date weather data to provide the right guidance for architectural designers.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-04-04T05:47:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01436244211008116
       
  • Our climate conditions are already changing – Should we care'
    • Authors: Drury B Crawley, Linda K Lawrie
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Ahead of Print.
      The IPCC and many others predict significant changes to our climates over the rest of this century, including average temperature increases for 2–5°C. However, we can see possible indications of change already – increasing frequency of severe storms and other weather events. However, many of the major weather data sets used around the world for building energy simulation are more than 15 years old. Does it matter' This paper compares several of the major data sets used in building performance simulation against newer data derived from the past 15 years. Ten of the past 15 years are the hottest on record and this rapidly changing climate already is evident in the temperature record. We use energy simulation to demonstrate how the various data sets impact energy use. In addition, the design conditions for heating and cooling calculations are already seeing slight changes over the past 20 years. Data for 12 locations around the world is used to demonstrate the changing climate that we already see.Practical application: This paper encourages building designers to use the most up-to-date climatic data in their design and evaluation of building performance.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-03-29T06:36:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01436244211004279
       
  • Maxmaladaptation, occupant behaviour and energy performance gap
    • Authors: Geoffrey Levermore
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Ahead of Print.
      Occupant behaviour is a key factor in the energy consumption and performance of a building. However, it is difficult to model and simulate hence there is often a mismatch between the predicted and actual performance of a new or refurbished buildings and surprising variations in the consumptions of similar and identical buildings. Although environmental conditions affect people significantly, there are also non-environmental factors including how well employers manage people and how well dwelling occupants understand their controls. Rarely are these factors considered in building performance, especially commercial buildings. Poor management can lead to varying degrees of occupant maladaptation. Maladaptation taken here to mean behaviour patterns that are detrimental to the optimal functioning of the building. This paper proposes a novel concept for designers that examines the worst possible energy performance gap (“extreme” scenario testing) where the theoretical occupants do their best to make the building consume as much energy as possible. The novel concept is called “maxmaladaptation”. By considering maxmaladaptation, designers can attempt to reduce it, so reducing the energy gap. This paper briefly reviews the energy gap and social psychology and its contribution to understanding energy consumption with some examples, underlying the concept of maxmaladaptation.Practical application: Building energy performance gaps often exist because predicted design consumptions are often less than actual consumptions due to the occupants not behaving as designers expect. Using the concept of maxmaladaptation, an extreme scenario of maximum energy use by occupants, designers can design buildings to avoid unexpected energy consumption. Often the influences of occupant behaviour are not considered in detail. Social psychology gives an insight into non-environmental factors that can cause maladaptation, a constituent of maxmaladaptation.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-03-16T04:21:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01436244211000990
       
  • A review of research on dynamic thermal comfort
    • Authors: Shuanghua Cao, Xin Li, Bing Yang, Fan Li
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Ahead of Print.
      Nowadays, people’s requirements for comfort are getting higher and higher, and traditional steady-state thermal comfort environment sometimes cannot meet people’s requirements. Dynamic thermal comfort is considered to meet people's requirements for comfort better than traditional thermal comfort, and it is also conducive to the health of occupants and building energy conservation. Therefore, this article reviews the literature on dynamic thermal comfort. First, this article briefly describes the transition from a steady-state thermal environment to a dynamic thermal environment. Next, this article reviews the research related to dynamic thermal comfort, such as the frequency of airflow fluctuations, simulation of natural wind, thermal prediction models, the use of intelligent detection equipment, and personal environmental control. This article summarizes the related research and development of dynamic thermal comfort from the aspects of dynamic airflow parameters, indoor thermal environment regulation, thermal experience, etc. This article aims to illustrate the necessity of the development of dynamic thermal comfort and its current results. The results show that under the trend of the artificial intelligence era, dynamic thermal comfort still has broad development potential. This article It can provide some research ideas for subsequent thermal comfort research.Practical application: This paper summarizes the research and development of dynamic thermal comfort from dynamic airflow, indoor thermal environment control, thermal experience, etc., and makes appropriate extensions and prospects accordingly. At the same time, the necessity of combining thermal comfort with AI trends is emphasized. This paper can provide references and ideas for thermal research on thermal comfort.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-03-16T04:21:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01436244211003028
       
  • Towards implementing an indoor environmental quality standard in
           buildings: A pilot study
    • Authors: Sunil Kumar Sansaniwal, Shailendra Kumar, Nikhil Jain, Jyotirmay Mathur, Sanjay Mathur
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper demonstrates the implementation methodology for India’s first IEQ standard (ISHRAE Standard-10001:2016) in actual buildings. The IEQ standard encompasses the definitions of IEQ elements (i.e. thermal comfort, indoor air quality, visual comfort, and acoustic comfort), threshold values of IEQ parameters determining these elements, specifications of measuring instruments, and methodology to undertake IEQ assessments in buildings. The pilot study identified the preliminary findings to understand and evaluate the practical implementation of the IEQ standard through field measurements. The quantitative measurements of IEQ elements were carried out in two academic buildings in the Jaipur climate (warm and humid as well as hot and dry and cold). The occupant’s subjective evaluation was made through a questionnaire survey administrated concurrently with physical measurements of IEQ parameters. This study provides the clarity of method for taking IEQ measurements and comments on the availability of instruments and their specifications as recommended by the standard.Practical application: The present study is the practical implementation of the IEQ standard in buildings. This standard provides the threshold limits of IEQ parameters by classifying them into three classes covering international and local benchmarking. The standard also specifies the research methodology including field measurement protocol and specification of monitoring devices for IEQ assessment. This standard is useful for evolving IEQ rating of buildings in India where the majority of the building stocks are yet to be built.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-03-08T01:31:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143624421997989
       
  • Energy performance and loss analysis of 100 kWp grid-connected rooftop
           solar photovoltaic system
    • Authors: Anupama KhareSaxena, Seema Saxena, K Sudhakar
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Ahead of Print.
      In the present work, simulation and energy analysis of a grid-tied 100 kWp solar photovoltaic power plant mounted on an institute's building rooftop in Bhopal city of India are carried out. The present study provides insight into the solar power plant's performance linked to the medium range grid under actual operating conditions in Central India. It is observed that the standard performance ratio and the capacity factor of the plant are 80.72% and 19.27% respectively. The average monthly energy produced is highest in April and lowest in July. Simulation results using different simulation tools have been compared and are shown to be in near agreement with the real calculated values. This plant set-up is expected to gain profit after a period of 5.9 years with a capacity to mitigate 136 tons of CO2 emission annually.Practical application: This study estimates the energy output, system losses and performance parameters for a 100 kWp rooftop grid connected solar photovoltaic system. This helps to check the feasibility of such a system at this location. Also the payback period and reduction in carbon footprint are calculated to highlight the economic and environmental benefits. This would attract public interest for installation of more such plants on rooftops of buildings in the near future.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-03-06T05:53:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143624421994224
       
  • A combined sound field prediction method in small classrooms
    • Authors: Da Yang, Cheuk Ming Mak
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Ahead of Print.
      In this paper, a new combination method for sound field prediction is proposed. An optimization approach based on the genetic algorithm is employed for optimizing the transition frequency of the combined sound field prediction method in classrooms. The selected optimization approach can identify the optimal transition frequency so that the combined sound field prediction can obtain more efficient and accurate prediction results. The proposed combined sound field prediction method consists of a wave-based method and geometric acoustic methods that are separated by the transition frequency. In low frequency domain (below the transition frequency), the sound field is calculated by the finite element method (FEM), while a hybrid geometric acoustic method is employed in the high frequency domain (above the transition frequency). The proposed combined prediction models are validated by comparing them with previous results and experimental measurements. The optimization approach is illustrated by several examples and compared with traditional combination results. Compared to existed sound field prediction simulations in classrooms, the proposed combination methods take the sound field in low frequencies into account. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed model.Practical applications: This study proposes a combined sound field prediction method separated by transition frequency. A genetic algorithm optimization method is employed for searching the optimal transition frequency. The outcomes of this paper are essential for acoustical designs and acoustical environmental assessments.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-02-21T03:48:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143624421994229
       
  • Feasibility study to detect occupant thermal sensation using a low-cost
           thermal camera for indoor environments in Indonesia
    • Authors: Faridah Faridah, Memory Motivanisman Waruwu, Titis Wijayanto, Rachmawan Budiarto, Raditya Cahya Pratama, Septian Eka Prayogi, Nur Muna Nadiya, Ressy Jaya Yanti
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper concerns the feasibility study of 7 classes of thermal sensation detection in Indonesia's indoor environment using a low-cost thermal camera through face skin temperature. This study is required as an initial step to build a thermal comfort sensor system of HVAC control systems to produce a comfortable indoor environment with minimum and efficient energy use. The feasibility study was started by studying the thermoregulation system of respondents in Indonesia through measuring their body and facial skin temperatures under heating and cooling conditions, including their relationship with thermal sensations. The facial skin temperature variable, which is covered by four measurement points, namely forehead, nose, cheeks, and chin, represents the MST variable by the coefficient of determination of 0.54. The thermal sensation detection algorithm based on Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is 35.7% of accuracy. The thermal sensation questionnaire with 7 class categories is unsuitable for Indonesian respondents, and the number of the category classes predicted too much compared to the number of inputs. The detection algorithm has better accuracy with a smaller number of classes, namely 52.2% and 68.70% for the 5 and 3 classes of thermal sensation.Practical application: The air conditioning buildings system is possible to influence a thermal environmental control system to meet the occupants' thermal comfort level requirement in an indoor environment if the system is equipped with a sensor that can detect the occupants' thermal sensations. The thermal camera can be used as a non-contact sensor, detecting the occupant’s thermal sensation by reading the occupant's face skin temperature in an indoor environment.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-02-16T04:45:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143624421994015
       
  • Performance study on photovoltaic thermal building façade component in
           multi-energy generation during winter
    • Authors: Ahmad Riaz, Chao Zhou, Ruobing Liang, Jili Zhang
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Ahead of Print.
      Photovoltaic thermal systems have gained tremendous popularity in the production of electric and thermal energy. In this paper, the photovoltaic thermal modules for the building façade assisted by heat pump system is proposed which combines the photovoltaic modules with an evaporator part of the heat pump system to produce hot water and electrical energy. Also, the photovoltaic thermal panels are used to preheat the cold ambient fresh air without heat pump operation. The proposed system was constructed at the Institute of Building Energy, Dalian University of Technology, China to study the ambient fresh air heating characteristic, electrical power generation, and hot water generation through performance evaluation indices under natural weather conditions. It was found that the average electrical, thermal, and overall efficiencies are 8.8%, 26%, and 50%, respectively during the pre-heating of fresh air. While the average air temperature is 15.2°C inside an air gap. The average COP for water heating is 3.91 during the water heating mode. This study could be used as a guide for photovoltaic thermal solar-assisted heat pump systems on building envelopes in a multi-energy generation under different weather conditions.Practical application: The study considers the photovoltaic thermal modules for building façade not only to generate the electrical energy and pre-heated fresh air but also to generate the hot water when assisted with the heat pump system. This research could assist researchers and engineers in the field of photovoltaic thermal façade systems in multi-energy generation such as for the production of electricity, heated/cooled fresh air, and hot water generation.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-02-08T06:40:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143624421991970
       
  • Price structures for electricity supply and potential consequences for
           building services systems
    • Authors: Roger Hitchin
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Ahead of Print.
      Policies to reduce carbon emissions are leading to substantial changes in the demand for electricity and to the structure of electricity supply systems, which will alter the cost structure of electricity supply. This can be expected to result in corresponding changes to the price structure faced by customers. This note is an initial exploration of how possible new price structures may impact on HVAC system and building design and use.Practical applicationChanges in the price structure of electricity supply (separately from changes in price levels) can significantly affect the cost-effective design and operation of building services systems; especially of heating and cooling systems. The nature and implications of these changes can have important implications for future system design and operation.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2021-01-26T06:03:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143624421990814
       
  • Residential retrofit in the UK: The optimum retrofit measures necessary
           for effective heat pump use
    • Authors: Joseph Lingard
      Pages: 279 - 292
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Volume 42, Issue 3, Page 279-292, May 2021.
      The Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy and the Committee on Climate Change place high dependency on the electrification of heat and use of heat pump systems to achieve net zero emissions by 2050. Energy efficient buildings are essential for effective heat pump operation. However, the UK’s housing stock is amongst the least energy efficient in Europe. Household electricity demand will increase with heat pump use, meaning reinforcement to infrastructure and generation capacity. This study uses dynamic simulation modelling to determine the optimum energy efficient retrofit required to minimise energy use and electrical demand for an average semi-detached dwelling using a heat pump. Solid wall insulation is found to be critical in energy abatement, although the heat pump operates at a high demand compared with low voltage network design. A whole house retrofit in-line with current Building Regulations reduces the heating demand and emissions by 65%, and lowers the input electrical demand for the heat pump to under 1 kW. Solid wall insulation and low U-value glazing are the cost-optimal solution, achieving similar abatement. Measures that exceed building regulations are shown to lower heat demand and carbon emissions by almost 80%, highlighting scope for improvement in retrofit standards.Practical application: At present, UK policy makers have a preferred alternative to high carbon fossil fuels that is a system heavily reliant on heat pumps powered by low carbon electricity. Heat pump systems require energy efficient buildings to operate effectively. A key factor when improving building efficiency is fabric standards, which can dramatically impact the heat transfer coefficient. Retrofit of energy efficiency measures is key to future net zero success and will have large implications to consumers and supply chains alike.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2020-11-29T04:35:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143624420975707
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 3 (2020)
       
  • Opportunities and barriers to business engagement in the UK domestic
           retrofit sector: An industry perspective
    • Authors: Ben Butt, Rory V. Jones, Alba Fuertes
      Pages: 293 - 305
      Abstract: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology, Volume 42, Issue 3, Page 293-305, May 2021.
      This paper investigates the opportunities and barriers to business engagement in the UK domestic retrofit sector. There are approximately 28 million UK dwellings accounting for 30% of UK total energy consumption. Almost all of the existing housing stock will require some form of retrofit in order to meet the UK Government’s Net Zero emissions target by 2050. However, adoption has been much lower than required. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with industry professionals to investigate the key barriers and opportunities for businesses in the retrofit market. The results suggest that there is significant opportunity for businesses, but engagement has been suppressed by three main categories of barriers: (1) Those that cause lack of consumer demand; (2) Those that constrain retrofit projects, limiting their volume and scalability; (3) Those resulting from a lack of government will or direction. Business opportunity for retrofit was seen to extend globally, with substantial market growth possible. The paper suggests potential roles and solutions key stakeholders could take to achieve the volume of retrofit required. The findings should be of interest to all stakeholders who wish to overcome the multitude of barriers to business engagement in the retrofit sector and realise the potential opportunities.Practical application: This study aims to understand the barriers preventing the large-scale adoption of domestic retrofit in the UK in order to identify avenues for increasing business engagement in the sector. Potential areas believed to present significant opportunity for businesses when engaging in, developing and upscaling the retrofit process and solutions are highlighted. This paper should be of interest to building industry professionals already or wanting to undertake domestic retrofit works in future. The paper also gathers the views of current building industry professionals through semi-structured interviews providing an industry centric assessment of the sector’s challenges and possible solutions.
      Citation: Building Services Engineering Research and Technology
      PubDate: 2020-11-25T10:35:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0143624420975640
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 3 (2020)
       
 
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