Subjects -> OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS (Total: 33 journals)
Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
BMC Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 38)
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Career Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Formation emploi     Open Access  
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Work Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Career Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Vocational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Neurocritical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Palliative & Supportive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Performance Improvement Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Recherches & éducations     Open Access  
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Trabajo : Revista de la Asociación Estatal de Centros Universitarios de Relaciones Laborales y Ciencias del Trabajo     Open Access  
Vocations and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Career Development
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.655
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0894-8453 - ISSN (Online) 1556-0856
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1164 journals]
  • Social Emotional Learning and Career Development From Educators’
           Perspectives Grounded on the Turkish Context

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      Authors: Feride Bacanlı, Nurten Karacan Ozdemir, Lea Ferrari, Chong Myung Park, V. Scott H. Solberg
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to explore Social Emotional Learning (SEL) and its relevance to the career development of students from the perspectives of educators in Turkey. The participants included 69 educators (63% women). Data were collected by using a paper–pencil survey consisting of open-ended questions. Using a modified grounded theory approach, a three-stage data analytical procedure -open, axial, and selective coding, was followed. The analysis suggested two main categories: (a) SEL skills that students should be equipped with and (b) SEL skills that educators need to have, resulting in an SEL model that reflects the perspectives of Turkish educators. The findings were discussed within the Turkish context, including the education system and culture followed by implications for theory, research, and practice.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-10-08T03:19:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211050085
       
  • Work Values and Job Satisfaction: The Mediating Role of Basic
           Psychological Needs at Work

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      Authors: Mathieu Busque-Carrier, Catherine F. Ratelle, Yann Le Corff
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigated the mediating role of basic psychological needs at work in the association from work values to job satisfaction. Using a four-factor model of work values, we tested how each work value factor was related to basic psychological need satisfaction and frustration at work. The sample included 228 workers (72% female) surveyed twice over a 7-week interval. Results showed that need satisfaction at work was positively predicted by intrinsic and social work values and negatively predicted by extrinsic work values. Need frustration at work was positively predicted by extrinsic and status work values and negatively predicted by intrinsic work values. Also, need satisfaction fully mediated the relationship from intrinsic, extrinsic, and social work values to job satisfaction. These findings suggest that organizational and career development interventions aiming to enhance employees need satisfaction at work should aim to promote growth-oriented work values endorsement rather than instrumental work values.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-09-25T02:30:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211043878
       
  • Just and Inclusive Team Climates Affect Mentoring Satisfaction: The Roles
           of Negative Mentoring and Race

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      Authors: Kathrina J. Robotham, Isis H. Settles, Kendra Spence Cheruvelil, Georgina M. Montgomery, Kevin C. Elliott
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      As more work is being conducted in teams, mentees have increased opportunities to develop non-traditional mentoring relationships. We investigate how and when three aspects of team climate (procedural justice, interpersonal justice, and inclusion) influence mentoring satisfaction among mentees with an informal secondary mentor. Using survey data from 116 researchers on environmental science teams, we test whether (a) just and inclusive team climates are related to mentoring satisfaction through positive and negative mentoring experiences and (b) race moderates the relationships between just and inclusive team climates and mentoring satisfaction. We found that negative mentoring experiences mediated the relationships between just and inclusive team climates and mentoring satisfaction. Further, just and inclusive team climates were positively related to mentoring satisfaction, especially for people of color. These results suggest that positive team climates support informal mentoring in teams by reducing negative mentoring experiences and creating a welcoming environment for individuals from marginalized groups.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-09-23T03:50:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211044134
       
  • A Cultural Orientation Approach to Work Orientation: Mongolian Workers’
           Jobs, Careers, and Callings

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      Authors: Jiyoung Park, Yeeun Choi, Melody M. Chao, Uurtsaikh Beejinkhuu, Young Woo Sohn
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Culturally held beliefs about the self and its relations with others affect the way individuals view their work. In this study, we examined the associations between individualism-collectivism and the three work orientations (i.e., viewing work as a job, a career, or a calling). We also investigated whether the positive effects of a calling orientation can be generalized to a developing eastern country, Mongolia. Using a sample of 352 Mongolian workers, we found that those endorsing horizontal collectivism tended to view their work as a calling more than as a job or a career. Mongolians with a calling orientation reported having better satisfaction with job, salary, and life, more work meaningfulness, and less turnover intention than those viewing work as a job or a career. The results suggest that cultural orientations and work orientations are intertwined, and the positive roles of a calling orientation are generalizable to Mongolia.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-09-18T01:42:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211040811
       
  • Growth Opportunities and Entrepreneurial Performance: Testing Strengths
           Use and Meaning-Making as Moderators of the Relationship

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      Authors: Luca Tisu, Delia Vîrgá
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      The present study investigates how developable behavioral (strengths use) and cognitive (meaning-making) mechanisms moderate the relationship between personal growth opportunities and entrepreneurial performance. We relied on a cross-sectional design. Data were gathered from 208 Romanian entrepreneurs and analyzed via hierarchical multiple linear regressions. The employed moderators boost the investigated relationship, both separately and interactively. The three-way interaction shows that entrepreneurs have to employ strengths use and meaning-making concomitantly to be able to capitalize on growth opportunities effectively. Consequently, this will enable entrepreneurs to rate their business performance more positively because they will perceive they have the necessary resources to invest in the business. Conversely, at low levels of strengths use and meaning-making, the presence of growth opportunities erodes entrepreneurial performance. This study identifies strengths use and meaning-making as vital psychological tools that allow an increase in entrepreneurial performance thus altering business-related investment and continuance decisions.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-08-24T09:08:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211037397
       
  • Adolescents’ Future Expectations of Work and Education Within Adaptation
           Model of Career Construction Theory

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      Authors: Nurten Karacan-Ozdemir, Ahmet Ayaz
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      The current study suggested and tested a model to investigate the associations between adolescent future expectations of work and education (AFE-WE; adaptive responses) and positive future expectations (PFE; adaptivity) through concern, control, curiosity, and confidence (adaptability resources) as well as the role of the gender. The data were gathered from 806 high school students (59% girls), recruited from eight different public schools in Gaziantep, Turkey. Structural equation model was used. The results showed that the PFE predicted the AFE-WE and concern, control, curiosity, and confidence. Yet, concern contributed to the AFE-WE, only and partially mediated the relationships between the PFE and the AFE-WE. The proposed model did not change across gender. These findings were discussed within cultural context and addressed implications for theory, research, and practice.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-08-18T09:06:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211037043
       
  • Chinese University Faculty’s Occupational Well-Being: Applying and
           Extending the Job Demands–Resources Model

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      Authors: Chun Cao, Jian Zhang
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to explore predictors of Chinese university faculty’s occupational well-being in the reshaped work environment. To achieve this aim, the job demands-resources model was utilized to test the relationships of job demands (work–family conflict) and job resources (leader support) to occupational well-being among 375 university faculty (145 males and 230 females) at a comprehensive research university in China. We further intended to extend the theory by incorporating personal demands (the perfectionism personality) within the research model. Results indicated work–family conflict was indirectly related to job satisfaction via the mediator of emotional exhaustion. Leader support was indirectly related to job satisfaction via the mediators of emotional exhaustion and work engagement. The two perfectionism dimensions (concerns and strivings) functioned differently in the model. The concerns dimension positively predicted exhaustion but was nonsignificant for engagement. By contrast, the strivings dimension positively predicted engagement but was nonsignificant for exhaustion.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-08-06T09:20:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211037005
       
  • Development of STEM Vocational Interests During Elementary and Middle
           School: A Cohort-Sequential Longitudinal Study

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      Authors: Toni Babarović
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      This study explains the development of science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM) interest among elementary and middle schoolchildren. The cohort longitudinal design was applied, starting with three cohorts of students—fourth (10 years), fifth (11 years), and sixth (12 years) grade—followed for three consecutive years. A total of 947 pupils responded to general and specific STEM interest measures. The results show that the level of STEM interest of children is generally low. Gender differences in STEM interest in favor of boys are apparent in all STEM areas, except science. The observed gender gaps in interest over time are constant, except for a small increase in gender difference of engineering interest. The average rate of change of STEM interest over time is mostly insignificant. Large interindividual variability of interests’ scores and slopes indicates that the level of STEM interest and its change over time are highly individualized phenomena.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-08-06T09:19:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211036986
       
  • Predictors and Outcomes of U.S. Quality Maternity Leave: A Review and
           Conceptual Framework

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      Authors: Haley M. Sterling, Blake A. Allan
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Maternity leave includes the time that mothers take off from work to care for their baby and heal after childbirth. The United States’ maternity leave provisions lag behind other industrialized countries, resulting in poor quality maternity leave (QML) for many mothers. Accordingly, scholars have begun examining QML, a new construct that captures mothers’ subjective experiences of their leave, including dimensions like time off and flexibility. However, researchers know little about predictors and outcomes of QML. Therefore, in this literature review, we will integrate societal-, work-, and individual-level predictors as well as well-being and work-related outcomes of maternity leave into a testable conceptual framework for QML. This review has important implications for U.S. policy makers and organizations regarding their support of mothers. Future research should continue to build this framework to ensure that mothers and parents in the United States and internationally are provided the QML they need to thrive.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T09:20:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211037398
       
  • A Cross-Level Examination of the Relationship of Strengths-Based Human
           Resource System With Employee Performance

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      Authors: He Ding, Enhai Yu
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Given the great significance of employees’ strengths to employees’ optimal functioning, strengths-based human resource (HR) system has gradually reaped HR researchers’ attention. However, to date, there remains a lack of evidence supporting the effectiveness of strengths-based HR system. Therefore, this article aimed to bridge the gap in the literature by empirically testing the cross-level relationships between strengths-based HR system, employee strengths use, and supervisor-rated employee performance (i.e., task performance and innovative behavior). Data from 205 employees working in 56 organizations in China were collected at three points in time from different sources. The results of multilevel path analysis showed that strengths-based HR system has a positive relationship with employee strengths use, and employee strengths use is positively related to supervisor-rated employee task performance and innovative behavior. More importantly, strengths-based HR system had a positive relationship with employee task performance and innovative behavior via employee strengths use.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T09:19:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211037396
       
  • Examining the Career Construction Model of Adaptation Among Filipino
           Senior High School Students

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      Authors: Marc Sherwin A. Ochoco, Welison Evenston G. Ty
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Career development literature that tested the career construction model of adaptation has, thus far, examined adaptability resource as a mediator in the relationship between adaptive readiness and adaptation results; however, there remains a need to elaborate the links between adaptive resources, adapting response, and adaptation results. This research tested a path model among 331 Filipino senior high school students using hope, career adaptability, career engagement, and life satisfaction as measures of adaptive readiness, adaptability resources, adaptive response, and adaptation results, respectively. Analyses revealed a significant serial relationship from hope to life satisfaction through career adaptability and career engagement. Findings suggest that having career-related abilities may not be enough to promote well-being; rather proactive career behaviors may be taken as a route to a satisfying life. Implications on theory, research, and practice are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-08-05T09:18:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211037011
       
  • Impact of STEM Sense of Belonging on Career Interest: The Role of STEM
           Attitudes

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      Authors: Chao Xu, Renée E. Lastrapes
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Prior research has established a direct belonging–interest pathway among students underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields; however, evidence related to how a sense of belonging in STEM may operate to affect career interest remains limited. Drawing on data from 103 students (female: n = 70; male: n = 33) participating in grant activities at a Hispanic-serving institution, the present study seeks to address this gap by examining a model relating STEM sense of belonging, career interest, and STEM attitudes. Results of multigroup analysis revealed that, whereas female students’ STEM sense of belonging had an indirect impact on their career interest via its correlation with STEM attitudes, the impact of male students’ STEM sense of belonging on their career interest was both direct and indirect. Implications of the findings for educational and counseling practices on supporting women in STEM are discussed, along with future research directions.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-07-27T10:02:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211033025
       
  • The Role of Autonomy Support and Job Crafting in Interest Incongruence: A
           Mediated Moderation Model

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      Authors: Junyi Li, Lisa Y. Flores, Hui Yang, Qingxiong Weng, Linna Zhu
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Interest incongruence, or the mismatch between employees’ vocational interests and their work environments, tends to induce negative work attitudes and behaviors among employees. Combining conservation of resources theory and person–environment fit research, we propose a mediated moderation model explaining how autonomy support and job crafting mitigate the detrimental effects of interest incongruence on job satisfaction and absenteeism. Using data collected across two time periods from a sample of 428 Chinese employees from diverse occupations, we found that autonomy support buffered the relationships between interest incongruence and job satisfaction and interest incongruence and absenteeism. Moreover, job crafting also had a buffering effect on these relationships and further mediated the moderating effect of autonomy support. We discuss theoretical and practical implications for employees coping with interest incongruence in organizations.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-07-21T09:07:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211033903
       
  • Stay or Leave' The Role of Career Adaptability and Organizational
           Embeddedness for Turnover Intentions

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      Authors: Sieraadj Orie, Judith H. Semeijn
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this article is to investigate the relationship between career adaptability (CA) and organizational embeddedness (OE) and organizational and occupational turnover intention among employees in the Netherlands. Logistic regression analysis was utilized to examine survey data obtained from 173 employees with various occupations, who worked for (semi-)public and private organizations in the Netherlands. The variable measuring CA did not contribute to explaining organizational or occupational turnover intention. The variable measuring OE contributed to explaining organizational and, to a lesser extent, occupational turnover intention. In addition, for moderately to higher embedded workers, the odds of organizational turnover increased when they had higher CA. Our results suggest that the fostering of CA, in general, does not influence the likelihood of workers making transitions. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-06-30T09:35:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211028300
       
  • Linking Mentoring to Organizational Citizenship Behavior: The Roles of
           Protégés’ Task Performance and Job Satisfaction

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      Authors: Mi-Ting Lin, Kuo-Yang Kao, Hao-Hsin Hsu
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      There is currently a limited amount of research that explores how mentoring others can prove advantageous for mentors. Based on the job demands–resources model, we propose that individuals who act as mentors should be more willing to engage in behaviors that are beneficial to an organization and that mentoring others could improve their well-being. Moreover, we explore the bidirectional influences between the mentor and protégé by considering how the well-being outcomes and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) of mentors are shaped by the protégé’s job attitudes and behaviors. Two waves of data were collected from 352 employees (176 mentoring dyads) in Taiwan. Support was found for the positive effect of mentoring others on the exhibition of OCB as well as for lower burnout. Additionally, protégés’ job satisfaction and performance moderated the direct and indirect effects of mentoring others on OCB. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-06-30T09:35:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211027955
       
  • Cultural Values, Intergenerational Transmission of Internalized Racism,
           Education, and Career Goals in Chinese American Families

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      Authors: Daphne J. Hill, Danni Li, Jun Wang, Jeffrey Liew
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      The present study is the first of its kind using a dyadic and prospective research design to test whether traditional Asian cultural values and internalized racism among Chinese American adolescents and their first-generation immigrant parents are influential factors in the educational and vocational goals of the adolescents by the time they become young adults. While results show that traditional Asian cultural values and internalized racism were not related to adolescents’ educational aspiration or young adults’ major choice, results do show an intergenerational correlation in internalized racism. Furthermore, results show that youth who planned to pursue science/health professions had significantly higher levels of internalized racism than those who planned to pursue business/law professions. Findings suggest that internalized racism may restrict parents’ expectations and goals for their children and, in tandem, serve as a barrier for youths’ self-determination or sense of autonomy in their selection of college majors and career development.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-06-22T09:29:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211026973
       
  • Career Goal Profiles of Early Career Scientists: A Person-Centered
           Approach

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      Authors: Ruth Noppeney, Anna M. Stertz, Bettina S. Wiese
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Obtaining a doctorate offers various career options. This study takes a person-centered approach to identify interest profiles. Career goals (professorate, entrepreneur, etc.) were assessed at two time points (1-year interval) in a sample of doctoral students and doctorate holders from the STEM fields in German-speaking areas (NT 1 = 2,077). Latent profile analysis revealed that a four-profile solution provided the best data fit: At T1, 33.0% of the participants aimed for a management position in industry, 16.9% pursued an academic career, 30.1% were interested in activities without leadership responsibilities, and 20.1% had a relatively flat career-goal profile. Latent transition analysis indicated that most changes occurred for those classified into the flat profile, while strong interest in a management career was very stable over time. Additionally, the attainment of the doctorate seemed to be a good predictor for profile membership: Doctorate holders were more likely to be clearly dedicated to an academic career.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-06-16T06:28:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211017235
       
  • Jobs, Careers, and Callings: Exploring Work Orientation at Mid-Career

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      Authors: Janet Mantler, Bernadette Campbell, Kathryne E. Dupré
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Mid-career is a time when work orientation (i.e., viewing ones’ work as a job, a career, or a calling) comes into sharper focus. Using Wrzeniewski et al.’s tripartite model, we conducted a discriminant function analysis to determine the combination of variables that best discriminates among people who are aligned with a job, a career, or a calling orientation in a sample of 251 full-time, North American mid-career employees. Compared to those who approach work as a job, those with a calling orientation were more engaged in work. The career-oriented stood apart from the others as a function of shorter job tenure, greater turnover intentions, work engagement, career satisfaction, and a tendency to engage in career self-comparisons. Work-orientation groups did not differ significantly in terms of family centrality, work–life balance, life satisfaction, or well-being. The results suggest that the work orientations represent distinct and equally valid ways to approach work.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-06-11T09:34:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211022845
       
  • Am I Gonna Get a Job' Graduating Students’ Psychological Capital,
           Coping Styles, and Employment Anxiety

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      Authors: Michelle A. Belle, Collins O. Antwi, Seth Y. Ntim, Emmanuel Affum-Osei, Jun Ren
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Thoughts about life after school can be frightening for college students. The uncertainty about employment expectancies can engender crippling anxiety, especially in a time of a major pandemic—COVID-19, and urgent attention is needed. This study, drawing on the self-determination theory, demonstrates preliminary protective effect of positive psychological capital (PsyCap) on employment anxiety among a relatively understudied group—graduating college students (Chinese sample = 546). It further illustrates the mediating mechanism of coping styles in this relation. Thus, the motivational impetus of PsyCap facilitates positive coping style (PCS) while diminishing negative coping style (NCS) which, in turn, hinders students’ employment anxiety. Furthermore, the results revealed that students’ internship experience strengthens the influence of graduating students’ PsyCap on their PCS, but that with NCS and anxiety was nonsignificant. This research proffers valuable insights on college students’ from-school-to-work transition for higher education institutions and career counselors, particularly in this turbulent labor market.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-05-28T09:22:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211020124
       
  • The Effects of Peers’ Career Goal Appraisals on School to Work
           Transition Outcomes

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      Authors: Britta Ruschoff, Thomas Kowalewski, Katariina Salmela-Aro
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the growing body of research on the transition from school to work, an important aspect of young people’s social realities in this phase has been largely overlooked: their peers. This study investigates to what extent peer networks in late adolescence, and particularly peers’ appraisals of their own career goals, are related to young people’s subjective early transition outcomes in a Finnish sample (N = 322) between the ages 17 and 20. The results show that having peers who positively appraise their goals as attainable is associated with more positive transition outcomes as young people more often reported having reached a (temporarily) satisfactory transition outcome which they intended to maintain unchanged. Negative peer appraisals showed no associations with transition outcomes. The present study offers an important step toward a comprehensive understanding of the social lives of young people in career transitions and provides new directions for research and counseling.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-05-28T09:05:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211020132
       
  • Strengths-Based Leadership and Employee Psychological Well-Being: A
           Moderated Mediation Model

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      Authors: He Ding, Enhai Yu
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing upon ability-motivation-opportunity model, the present study attempts to inspect the association of strengths-based leadership with employee psychological well-being and the mediational role of employee strengths use and the moderating role of job autonomy in the linkage. Data were gathered using a three-wave survey from a sample of 308 employees working in a wide variety of organizations in China. Results of multiple regression analyses with bootstrapping procedure revealed that strengths-based leadership positively relates to employee psychological well-being even after controlling for employee core self-evaluation. In addition, employee strengths use was found to partially mediate the relationship of strengths-based leadership with employee psychological well-being, and this study demonstrated job autonomy to positively moderate the direct relationship of strengths-based leadership with strengths use of employee and the indirect association of strengths-based leadership with employee psychological well-being through employee strengths use. The present study advances strengths-based leadership and psychological well-being theories and research.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-05-25T09:07:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211018807
       
  • Focused for Some, Exploratory for Others: Job Search Strategies and
           Successful University-to-Work Transitions in the Context of Labor Market
           Ambiguity

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      Authors: Belgin Okay-Somerville, Dora Scholarios
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the role of student job search strategies that differ in goal-directedness (focused, exploratory, and haphazard) in achieving successful university-to-work transitions (i.e., employment in jobs with high skill use/development and qualification–job match). The relationship between job search and employment outcomes is considered in two labor market contexts—high or low ambiguity—which are represented by the comparison between arts, humanities, and social sciences (AHSS) and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduates, respectively. Using two-wave survey data, we find that job search strategies during university do not explain, yet differentially impact, successful outcomes one year after graduation. Fully exploring opportunities was particularly beneficial for STEM graduates (low ambiguity context) and more focused job search was beneficial for AHSS graduates (high ambiguity context). Paradoxically, findings both question and reinforce the efficacy of career agency for overcoming barriers to labor market entry, depending on the job search context. The study contributes to the agency and context debates relevant for school-to-work transitions.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-05-18T08:50:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211016058
       
  • Exploring Mechanisms in the Entrepreneurial Passion–Entrepreneurial
           Behavior Relationship: Mediating Role of Growth-Oriented Intentions

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      Authors: Shanshan Qian, David L. Brannon, Filiz Tabak
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      This research explores the mechanisms that connect entrepreneurial passion (EP) to entrepreneurial behavior. We investigate the mediating impact of growth-oriented intentions on the relationship between EP and behavior. We conducted a two-wave longitudinal survey study and recruited a sample of 235 undergraduate students from a business school in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States. Our findings indicate EPs for inventing and for founding are significantly related to entrepreneurial behavior and that growth-oriented intentions partially mediate the relationships between passions for founding and for inventing with behavior. We discuss implications of our findings.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-05-18T08:29:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211005848
       
  • When Their Voices Are Heard: Bilingual Paraeducators and Organizational
           Dynamics

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      Authors: Lijuan (Rachel) Shi
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Paraeducators play a marginal yet essential role in fulfilling teaching-related tasks in many international classrooms in China. In order to meet high standards of education, schools often provide professional training to paraeducators. However, in the training process, schools primarily focus on their own needs and rarely consider the personal condition or positionality of paraeducators. Informed by positioning theory, this study argues that overlooking paraeducators’ needs and positions can be detrimental to the success of institutionally provided training. This case study, which spans the course of 2 years, explores how Chinese bilingual paraeducators’ self-positioning impacts their responses to professional training, their daily teaching practices, and their subsequent professional development. Findings suggest that paraeducators should not remain peripheral figures in an organization because hearing and understanding their self-positioning practices and concerns can be beneficial to both paraeducators’ professional learning and schools’ organizational development.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-05-07T08:59:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211005007
       
  • Nonreligious Employees’ Perceptions of Microaggressions and Their
           Relationship With Job Satisfaction as Moderated by Calling

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      Authors: Jessica N. Schultz, Melanie E. Leuty, Emily Bullock-Yowell, Richard Mohn
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Workplace microaggressions are related to person–organization fit (P-O fit) and job satisfaction. Additionally, P-O fit and calling predict job satisfaction. Given the religious connotations of calling, research has excluded study of these relationships in nonreligious samples, a growing segment of the U.S. population. To address this, it was predicted that P-O fit would mediate the relationship between microaggressions and job satisfaction, and calling would moderate the relationship between microaggressions and P-O fit. In a sample of 296 nonreligious employed adults, microaggressions predicted job satisfaction, while calling predicted P-O fit and job satisfaction; however, P-O fit did not mediate these relationships, and calling did not moderate microaggressions and P-O fit. Post hoc analyses revealed that calling moderated microaggressions and job satisfaction. Implications for research and vocational guidance with nonreligious individuals are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-05-06T09:34:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211013398
       
  • Barriers to the Successful Mentoring of Faculty of Color

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      Authors: Tangier M. Davis, Martinque K. Jones, Isis H. Settles, Paulette Granberry Russell
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Mentoring is important for career success and has been suggested to promote the advancement of faculty of color (FOC). However, some mentoring experiences may be negative and impede faculty’s success. Building upon social cognitive career theory (SCCT), the current study examines whether FOC perceive challenges around receiving mentoring and applies an intersectional lens to assess whether these challenges vary by race/ethnicity and gender. We interviewed 118 tenure-track FOC from a predominantly White, research-intensive institution. We found that FOC experienced four mentoring challenges: negative mentoring experiences, difficulty finding mentors, insufficient institutional support for formal mentoring, and lack of post-tenure mentorship among tenured faculty. We also found that Black and Latinx women were most likely to describe barriers to mentoring whereas Asian and Black men reported the fewest. We discuss the implications of our findings within the framework of SCCT, along with potential interventions that may increase positive mentoring experiences for FOC.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T09:50:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211013375
       
  • An Essential but Overlooked Workforce: Elevating the Need to Investigate
           the Career Development of Paraeducators

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      Authors: Conra D. Gist, Amaya Garcia, Yukari Takimoto Amos
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Recent research documents the positive impact that paraprofessionals have on student learning. Given these strengths, states and districts across the country have developed programs to attract and prepare paraprofessionals to become certified teachers. Despite increased interest in expanding pathways for the paraeducator workforce, research has also consistently revealed that paraeducators encounter obstacles along the career development continuum from recruitment, preparation, placement, and induction. Given the professionalization challenges paraeducators face, this special issue introduction highlights paraeducator research studies that describe innovative program design features, draw from and build on paraeducators’ funds of knowledge and community cultural wealth, and identify organizational structures in schools essential to supporting paraeducators’ development. We conclude with a recommended set of three core commitments for program designers, researchers, policy makers, or community and school district leaders dedicated to ensuring equitable paraeducator professional pathways in the educator workforce.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-05-04T09:36:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211010968
       
  • The Relationship Between Work Study and Career Development for
           Undergraduate Students

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      Authors: Patrick Akos, Bryant Hutson, A. Joshua Leonard
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      One route toward career preparation for college students comes from work experience. Internships demonstrate benefits, but there is limited inquiry on the career development benefits of Federal Work Study (FWS). Archival data from nearly 600 students at one Southeastern research I institution suggest a significant and positive relationship between FWS participation and career clarity, decisiveness, and satisfaction. We outline the opportunity for further inquiry on process variables and the potential impact of FWS on the career development of our most vulnerable college student populations.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-05-03T09:15:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211012787
       
  • Career Adaptability and Career Decision Self-Efficacy: Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Graham B. Stead, Lindsey M. LaVeck, Sandra M. Hurtado Rúa
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      The relationship between career adaptability and career decision self-efficacy was examined due to its importance for clients in the career development and career decision-making process. Multivariate meta-analyses using 18 studies with a total population of 6,339 participants were employed. Moderator variables important to this relationship were country of participants, mean age, and career adaptability measures. Estimated correlations between career adaptability subscales and career decision self-efficacy measures ranged from .36 to .44. Findings are discussed in relation to career research and counseling.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-04-30T06:44:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211012477
       
  • Career Exploration and Decision-Making Learning Experiences (CEDLE)
           Scales: Validation Among Chinese Vocational College Students

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      Authors: Yingwen Zhou, Guoqing Xu
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      This research aimed to conduct a validation study of a Chinese version of the Career Exploration and Decision-Making Learning Experiences (CEDLE) scales among 2,372 Chinese vocational college students. In Study 1, an exploratory factor analysis was conducted to evaluate the factor structure of the CEDLE among 625 samples. We obtained both a four-factor model and a five-factor model. Study 2 examined the structure of the CEDLE among 1,747 students, and the results demonstrate the superiority of the five-factor model. A multigroup confirmatory factor analysis supported the measurement invariance for the gender groups. The Chinese version of the CEDLE had excellent reliability values from .80 to .88, and the findings demonstrated that the Chinese CEDLE was a valid and reliable measure of self-efficacy-related learning experiences. This study contributes to the literature on prior learning experiences regarding students’ career behavior by providing evidence of the applicability of the CEDLE-Chinese version.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T07:18:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0894845321998004
       
  • Gender Differences in the Structure of Holland’s Personality Model
           in South Korea

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      Authors: Donghyuck Lee, Hang-Shim Lee, Wooyoul Na, Mae Hyang Hwang
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the structure of Holland’s personality model (HPM) among male and female South Korean college students using the Korean version of the Self-Directed Search (K-SDS) and investigated gender differences in the circular structure of HPM and circular plots of the K-SDS subscales (i.e., activities, competences, vocations, and self-estimates). The study outcomes were as follows: Our findings supported the validity of HPM among Korean college freshmen. However, there were gender differences in the fit between the data and the circular ordering model. Also, the differences in the realistic, investigative, artistic, social, enterprising, and conventional (RIASEC) circular plots and the magnitude of the correlations among the RIASEC types across the four subscales and gender were found. These results suggest that practitioners should cautiously interpret and communicate the results of the SDS to college students considering cultural and gender specificity. Implications and limitations of the present research are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-04-23T07:07:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211004780
       
  • Validation of a French Version of the Career Decision-Making Difficulties
           Questionnaire: Relationships With Self-Esteem and Self-Efficacy

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      Authors: Jérôme Rossier, Shékina Rochat, Laurent Sovet, Jean-Luc Bernaud
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study was to validate the French version of the Career Decision-Making Difficulties Questionnaire (CDDQ) and to assess its measurement invariance across gender, age groups, countries, and student versus career counseling samples. We also examined the sensitivity of this instrument to discriminate a career counseling population from a general student sample. Third, we studied the relationship between career decision-making difficulties, career decision-making self-efficacy, and self-esteem in a sample of 1,748 French and French-speaking Swiss participants. A confirmatory factor analysis confirmed the overall hierarchical structure of the CDDQ. Multigroup analysis indicated that the level of invariance across groups almost always reached configural, metric, and scalar invariance. Differences between countries were very small, whereas differences between the general population and career counseling subsamples were much larger. Both self-esteem and self-efficacy significantly predicted career decision-making difficulties. Moreover, as expected, self-efficacy partially mediated the relationship between self-esteem and career decision-making difficulties.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-04-20T07:28:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211009975
       
  • Socioculturally Mediated Academic Advising: A GYO Approach for Supporting
           Bilingual/Bicultural Paraprofessionals

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      Authors: Diana Gonzales Worthen, Christine Smart, Sandra Gaye Bowman, Eva Ileana Diaz, Conra D. Gist
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      This case study examined how the academic advising (hence, advising) component of a Grow Your Own (GYO) teacher program can be tailored to honor bilingual/bicultural paraprofessionals’ (hence, BL/BC paras) assets and differential needs. Data collection strategies included participant observation, interviews, a focus group, field notes, and documentation. Thematic data analysis suggested that socioculturally mediated advising involves some aspects of mentoring and includes (a) taking the time to know and value paraprofessionals’ biographies, (b) personalizing and attending to paraprofessionals’ psychosocial needs, (c) building supportive relationships through the GYO seminar, and (d) advocating for institutional accommodations. Implications for future research consider how socioculturally mediated advising including aspects of mentoring needs to be better understood in BL/BC paras teacher pipeline programs and the field of teacher development.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-04-14T07:14:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0894845321994918
       
  • Latina Paraeducators’ Stories of Resistance, Resilience, and Adaptation
           in an Alternative Route to Teaching Program

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      Authors: Gisela Ernst-Slavit, Sarah N. Newcomer, Steven J. Morrison, Lindsay K. Lightner, Judith A. Morrison, Yuliya Ardasheva, Kira J. Carbonneau
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Adichie asserts that “stories matter” because they help us to humanize and empower one another. Stories allow us to make sense of our experiences or the “lived stories” of our lives. This qualitative case study draws from a federally funded, multiyear mixed-methods study focusing on an alternative route to teaching program designed to certify English language learning and bilingual teachers. Using Yosso’s Community Cultural Wealth (CCW) model and the Funds of Knowledge (FoK) framework via the analysis of video-recorded classes, observations, interviews, and written artifacts, we explore how six Latina paraeducators draw from their personal FoK and CCW to overcome great challenges before, during, and after they obtained their teaching credentials. This study points to the need for institutions of higher education, particularly teacher education programs, to apply asset-based perspectives in the recruitment, retention, and graduation of culturally and linguistically diverse teachers.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-04-08T07:56:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211005000
       
  • Career Adaptability Profiles and Their Relations With Emotional and
           Decision-Making Correlates Among Belgian Undergraduate Students

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      Authors: Michaël Parmentier, Thomas Pirsoul, Frédéric Nils
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      This study used a person-centered approach to investigate university students’ profiles of career adaptability and determine whether different combinations of concern, control, curiosity, and confidence could be identified. We also explored the relations of these profiles with emotional intelligence, anticipatory emotions, and career decision-making self-efficacy. We found six distinct profiles of career adaptability among 307 university students who differed both on their level and on shape. Emotional intelligence was associated with profiles displaying higher levels of career adaptability. Furthermore, profiles of career adaptability significantly displayed differences in terms of positive anticipatory emotions at the prospect of the school-to-work transition and career decision-making self-efficacy but not in terms of negative anticipatory emotions. These results highlight that differentiating profiles of career adaptability provide insights for the design and the implementation of career-related interventions among university students.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-04-01T09:11:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211005553
       
  • Tenure Expectations and Career Aspirations Among Female Assistant
           Professors in STEM

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      Authors: Margo A. Gregor, Ingrid K. Weigold, Caitlin A. Martin-Wagar, Devynn Campbell-Halfaker
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      This study used social cognitive career theory to predict the career aspirations and tenure expectations of untenured female science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) assistant professors. We hypothesized that contextual variables (perceived career barriers and institutional support for work–life balance) would directly predict career aspirations and tenure expectations. We also expected that these contextual variables would be indirectly related to career aspirations and tenure expectations through our self-efficacy variables (faculty task-specific self-efficacy and impostor beliefs). Data were collected from 214 untenured female faculty in STEM departments. Path analyses indicated that the hypothesized model was a good fit for the data. Institutional support for work–life balance produced direct and indirect pathways to career aspirations through faculty task-specific self-efficacy and an indirect pathway to tenure expectations through impostor beliefs, whereas perceived career barriers produced a direct pathway to career aspirations. Implications for research and practice are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-03-26T03:46:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211005032
       
  • Dysfunctional Career Thoughts and the Sophomore Slump Among Students With
           Learning Disabilities

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      Authors: Abiola Dipeolu, Stephanie Hargrave, Stephen J. Leierer, Yajaira A. Cabrera Tineo, Ashley Longoria, Madelyn Escalante
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      The present study sought to underline the need for expanded transitioning college programming to the 2nd year by examining dysfunctional career thoughts among college students with learning disabilities (LDs). Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used to examine the mean differences between 93 college sophomores and seniors with LD on the three subscales of the Career Thoughts Inventory (CTI). Findings from the MANOVA showed significant mean differences among groups. Follow-up analysis found that sophomores showed significantly higher dysfunctional career thoughts than seniors. Seniors displayed substantially lower mean scores on the CTI subscales than sophomores. Findings support the need to extend transition programming that includes addressing students’ dysfunctional career thoughts beyond the 1st year to help ease college transition difficulties and thus promote persistence and retention of students with LD. Research and practice implications are presented for career scholars and practitioners working with college students with LD.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-03-22T08:28:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211000130
       
  • The Role of Emotion in Job Search Behavior Among College Students

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      Authors: Eunjin Kim, Bora Lee
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Korean college students preparing to enter the world of work are going through a long-term process of job searching. During the process, individuals experience various emotions, which can motivate (or demotivate) them to keep going. The present study, grounded in motivational systems theory, examined the roles of emotions in job search behavior. A sample of 116 college students, who were seeking a job for the first time, participated. Using three-wave longitudinal data and multilevel modeling, within- and between-person-level associations were examined. The outcome variables were job search behavior and the number of resumes submitted. The results showed that individuals who experience more positive emotions and negative emotions were more likely to engage in job search behavior at both the within- and between-person levels. However, the number of resumes submitted was not significantly related to positive or negative emotions. The implications of the study were discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-03-02T09:51:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0894845321993554
       
  • Career Decision, Work Adjustment, and Person–Job Fit of Adolescents:
           Moderating Effects of Parental Support

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      Authors: Markus P. Neuenschwander, Jan Hofmann
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      We applied the social cognitive model of work satisfaction to the transition from lower secondary education to work in Switzerland and combined career decision and adjustment to work. The model assumes that self-efficacy affects career decision outcomes and adjustment after transition to work. Self-efficacy interacts with parental support during career decision making. We tested the model using a longitudinal sample of 603 adolescents who filled out questionnaires in seventh grade, ninth grade, and 1 year after starting work. Structural equation models showed that parental support weakens the effect of self-efficacy on anticipated person–job fit and expectations of work conditions (moderation). Expectations of work conditions and a company’s support help newcomers to attain a high perceived person–job fit. These findings have several implications on how to support adolescents’ school-to-work transition.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-23T09:54:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0894845321995960
       
  • Career Decision-Making Difficulties and Life Satisfaction: The Role of
           Career-Related Parental Behaviors and Career Adaptability

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      Authors: Anna Parola, Jenny Marcionetti
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      According to the Career Construction Model of Adaptation, career decision-making difficulties (CDD) and life satisfaction are important adaptation results, and career adaptability is a crucial resource to attain positive adaptation results. This study focused on the influence of parental career-related behaviors on career adaptability, CDD and life satisfaction, and the mediating role of career adaptability between parental career-related behaviors and CDD and life satisfaction. Five hundred thirteen Italian students (182 of middle school, 141 of high school, and 190 of university) were involved. The results showed that parental support influences CDD and life satisfaction both directly and indirectly through the mediation of career adaptability. Parental interference and lack of engagement have a positive direct effect on CDD. Finally, CDD and life satisfaction are significantly and negatively associated. The data support the key role of parental support and career adaptability in CDD and life satisfaction. Practical implications are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-23T09:52:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0894845321995571
       
  • A Broken Pipeline: Effects of Gender and Racial/Ethnic Barriers on College
           Students’ Educational Aspiration–Pursuit Gap

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      Authors: Xu Li, Young Hwa Kim, Brian T. H. Keum, Yu-Wei Wang, Kelley Bishop
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the long-term effects of perceived educational and career barriers due to sexism and racism in college students’ pursuit of postgraduate education (PE) and how such effects were different across gender and racial majority/minority groups. With a sample of 2,717 undergraduate students, results from multinomial logistic regression showed that female and students of color not only perceived higher levels of barriers due to sexism and racism, such experiences further predicted the discrepancies between their precollege aspirations and actual pursuit for postgraduate degrees upon graduation. The higher the perceived barriers, the higher the odds of female and students of color not pursuing PE that they had aspired before college. This negative long-term effect was not observed in male students or White students. Moreover, when intersectionality was considered, women of color was the only group where perceived barriers had significant negative effects on the PE gap. Implications were discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-17T09:40:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0894845321994196
       
  • A Latent Profile Analysis of Living a Calling, Burnout, Exploitation, and
           Work–Life Imbalance

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      Authors: Joo Yeon Shin, Eunseok Kim, Jina Ahn
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Research has predominantly focused on the positive aspects of living a calling (LC), hence more attention needs to be given to its potentially negative aspects. The current study examined profiles of 237 South Korean working adults, defined by individuals’ scores on LC, burnout, exploitation, and work–life imbalance from a person-centered perspective. Then, we examined the role of psychological capital, organizational support, and adequate compensation in predicting profile membership. Lastly, we examined mean differences across class membership in the levels of job satisfaction and work-related psychological and physical symptoms. Latent profile analysis identified three distinct profiles of individuals: the adaptive, average, and maladaptive. Psychological capital, organizational support, and adequate compensation predicted a higher likelihood of membership into the adaptive group, compared to the average group. The adaptive group showed the highest job satisfaction and the lowest work-related psychological symptoms. Implications for calling-related interventions and directions for future research are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-17T09:40:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0894845321994168
       
  • Development and Validation of a Career Sustainability Scale

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      Authors: Tachia Chin, I. M. Jawahar, Genyi Li
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      While prescriptions based on anecdotal data and theoretical accounts of career sustainability abound, empirical research has been hampered by the lack of a scale to measure career sustainability. Thus, the primary purpose of this study is to develop and validate a new measure of career sustainability. In Study 1, we relied on Chin, Li, Jiao, Addo, and Jawahar’s framework to develop a measure of career sustainability. We then conducted two studies to provide preliminary construct validity evidence. In Study 2, we show that scores on Career Sustainability Scale are related to career plateaus and career satisfaction in predictable ways. In Study 3, we show that career sustainability is positively related to psychological well-being, and this relationship is stronger for gig workers who are freelancers than for conventional workers. We discuss implications for research and practice and hope that our new measure facilitates empirical research on career sustainability.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-17T09:36:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0894845321993234
       
  • Examining the Role of Peer Support on Work Experiences for Young Women
           With Disabilities

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      Authors: Kara A. Hirano, Atika Khurana, Lauren Lindstrom, David DeGarmo
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the protective effect of perceived peer support on involvement in work experiences in a sample of 366 young women receiving special education services in 26 high schools. Career self-efficacy and career outcome expectations are well-established predictors of behaviors aimed at achieving career goals, such as obtaining work experiences. Hence, we also evaluated their role as mediators of the hypothesized effect of perceived peer support on work experiences. Regression analyses (accounting for clustering within schools) revealed that perceived peer support had an indirect effect on work experiences, with the effect being channeled through career self-efficacy, but not through career outcome expectations. Although perceived peer support was significantly associated with career self-efficacy and career outcome expectations, only career self-efficacy predicted work experiences at follow-up. Our findings suggest that perceived peer support, a relatively malleable factor, can promote career self-efficacy and career outcomes for this population.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-17T09:35:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0894845321991647
       
  • Assistant Teachers, Workplace Satisfaction, and the Creation of a
           Culturally Competent Workforce Pipeline in Head Start

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      Authors: Jennifer Wallace Jacoby, Allegra Corwin-Renner
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Early care and education programs like Head Start provide a critical foundation for later achievement for children from vulnerable communities. Notably, recruiting and retaining bilingual teachers is an ongoing struggle for many Head Start agencies. Assistant teachers are more likely to be bilingual than their lead teacher counterparts (Jacoby, in press) and are important contributors to a workforce pipeline that diversifies staff. We conducted this qualitative study with 35 assistant teachers to understand how workplace attributes influence satisfaction and job retention in Head Start. Workplace attributes such as wages and support for professional education and those with symbolic value, such as the robustness of the program, both played an important role. We also found that the instrumental-symbolic framework demonstrated utility for understanding how workplace attributes might be leveraged to recruit and retain linguistically and culturally competent teaching staff.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-17T04:35:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0894845321993237
       
  • Profiles of Calling and Their Relation to University-to-Work Transition
           Outcomes

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      Authors: Chunyu Zhang, Andreas Hirschi, Mengzhu Li, Xuqun You
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we adopted a person-centered approach using latent profile analysis to explore whether profiles of calling based on the internal and external sources of a calling are identified and how these profiles relate to successful university-to-work transition outcomes (i.e., higher career satisfaction, higher person-job fit, and lower turnover intentions). We assessed a sample of 684 Chinese university graduates 1 week before and 6 months after graduation and found five profiles of calling: strongly undeveloped calling, moderately undeveloped calling, transcendent calling, highly transcendent calling, and modern calling. We found that a calling that was driven by internal and external sources (i.e., transcendent calling) or predominantly by internal sources (i.e., modern calling) was related to more successful university-to-work transition outcomes. Our findings contribute to the literature on calling by showing that the sources of calling are important to conceptualize different types of calling and differentiate the role of different callings.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-12T10:17:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0894845321992873
       
  • Moving Toward Decent Work: Application of the Psychology of Working Theory
           to the School-to-Work Transition

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      Authors: Jonas Masdonati, Koorosh Massoudi, David L. Blustein, Ryan D. Duffy
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      This conceptual contribution aims to adapt and apply Psychology of Working Theory to the specificities of the school-to-work transition (STWT) process. The STWT is thus conceptualized as a first attempt to access decent work under the influence of specific predictors, mediators, and moderators and leading to particular outcomes. Based on recent literature, we consider that (1) socioeconomic constraints and belonging to marginalized groups are contextual predictors of a successful transition; (2) psychosocial resources, including self-efficacy and adaptability, and vocational and work role identity, are mediators of the relation between contextual factors and a successful transition; (3) moderator factors include the education system, labor market conditions, social support, and critical consciousness; and (4) decent and meaningful work are the optimal outcomes of the STWT process.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-11T09:23:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0894845321991681
       
  • Job Seekers’ Self-Directed Learning Activities Explained Through the
           Lens of Regulatory Focus

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      Authors: Adam M. Kanar, Dave Bouckenooghe
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to understand the role of regulatory focus for influencing self-directed learning activities during a job search. The authors surveyed 185 job-searching university students at two time points to explore the conditions under which regulatory focus (promotion and prevention foci) impacts self-directed learning activities and the number of employment interviews secured. Both promotion and prevention foci showed significant relationships with self-directed learning activities and number of interviews, and positive and negative affect partially mediated these relationships. The relationships between both regulatory focus strategies and self-directed learning were also contingent on self-efficacy. More specifically, prevention focus and self-directed learning showed a positive relationship for job seekers with high levels of self-efficacy but a negative one for job seekers with low levels of self-efficacy. This research extends the understanding of the role of regulatory focus in the context of self-directed learning during a job search. Implications for research and practice are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-11T09:22:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0894845321991648
       
  • Autonomous Versus Controlled Motivation on Career Indecision: The
           Mediating Effect of Career Exploration

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      Authors: Olímpio Paixão, Vítor Gamboa
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Effective career decision-making outcomes may depend on the type of motivation underlying career development. The purpose of this study was to analyze how autonomous and controlled motivation predict exploration behaviors and career indecision and in which degree the effect of motivation on indecision is mediated by career exploration (environmental exploration, self-exploration, intended-systematic exploration and amount of information), among a group of high-school students (10th, 11th, and 12th grades, N = 523, M = 16.40). An integrative model was tested using path analysis to test direct and indirect effects and model fit (AMOS 20.0). The final model showed good fit to the data. Three indirect effects were found significant, being self-exploration, and amount of information presented as mediators. Our results highlight the importance to design career interventions not only focusing on promoting exploration behaviors but also on creating purposeful planning, based on students’ reasons underlying their involvement in the career decision-making process.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-10T09:40:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0894845321992544
       
  • Career Competencies and Career Success: On the Roles of Employability
           

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      Authors: Alessandro Lo Presti, Vincenza Capone, Ada Aversano, Jos Akkermans
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Building on the integrative career competencies framework, we examined the indirect association between career competencies, assessed at graduation, and subjective career success (SCS) via employability activities, both assessed six months after graduation, among a sample of 613 Italian graduates. We also examined the moderating role of three facets of academic satisfaction (i.e., vocational choice, educational goals, and occupational prospects). Our findings showed an indirect relation between career competencies and SCS through employability activities. Furthermore, academic satisfaction acted as a moderator. The results of this time-lagged study, that tapped into the actual transition into work process, have implications for (1) school-to-work transitions, providing insights into graduates’ transition into the labor market, (2) employability, focusing on employability activities and providing additional knowledge on their antecedents and outcomes, and (3) career competencies, providing further empirical evidence that career competencies are an important resource that graduates can mobilize to during and after their school-to-work transition.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-10T09:40:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0894845321992536
       
  • Mentoring Barriers, Expected Outcomes, and Practices in Scientific
           Communication: Scale Development and Validation

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      Authors: Cheryl B. Anderson, Shine Chang, Hwa Young Lee, Constance D. Baldwin
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Developing new scales to measure aspects of mentoring, including guidance in scientific communication (SciComm), is important to enhance success among trainees pursuing research careers in science and medicine. This study examined the psychometric properties of three new measures, based on social cognitive career theory (SCCT), as mentors address skills in scientific writing, oral presentation, and impromptu speaking. Faculty research mentors (N = 194) completed online questionnaires assessing perceptions of mentoring barriers in SciComm, outcome expectations, and practice behaviors in research and SciComm. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses rendered support for a three-factor measure of barriers, one-factor measure of expected outcomes, and a five-factor measure of practices. Good support was also found for a path model that included the variables in the prediction of mentoring practices. Findings support applying SCCT to mentoring and clarify contextual barriers–choice outcome relations which can inform barrier-coping, SciComm interventions among mentors.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-10T09:38:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0894845321991680
       
  • Are Girls More Ambitious Than Boys' Vocational Interests Partly
           Explain Gender Differences in Occupational Aspirations

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      Authors: Alexandra Wicht, Ai Miyamoto, Clemens M. Lechner
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Previous research suggests that girls have higher occupational aspirations than boys before entering the labor market. We investigate whether this gender gap in occupational aspirations generalizes to secondary school students in Germany and illuminate the possible mechanisms behind these purported gender differences. For this purpose, we used a large and representative sample of ninth graders (N = 10,743) from the German National Educational Panel Study. Adolescents’ occupational aspirations were coded on the International Socio-Economic Index of Occupational Status (ISEI) according to the socioeconomic status of the aspired occupation. Results showed that girls’ occupational aspirations were 6.5 ISEI points higher than boys’ (Cohen’s d = .36). Mediation analyses further revealed that gender differences in vocational interest could explain one-half of the gender gap in occupational aspirations. This suggests that girls’ higher occupational aspirations reflect their specific vocational interests rather than a general striving for higher status and prestige compared to boys.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-10T09:37:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0894845321991665
       
  • Adolescent–Parent Career Congruence as a Predictor of Job Search
           Preparatory Behaviors: The Role of Proactivity 

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      Authors: Dian Ratna Sawitri, Peter A. Creed
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Based on social cognitive career theory, we examined the mediating roles of job search self-efficacy and outcome expectations in the relationship between adolescent–parent career congruence and job search preparatory behaviors and investigated the influence of proactivity as a moderator in these direct and indirect relationships. Participants were 236 Grade 10 and 11 Indonesian students (mean age 16 years, 67% male), who were attending a vocational education school and would not be progressing to post–high school study. After controlling for educational achievement, we found congruence to be associated with self-efficacy (24% of variance explained), outcome expectations (23%), and job search preparatory behaviors (46%). Self-efficacy, but not outcome expectations, was related to more preparatory behaviors, and self-efficacy fully mediated between congruence and preparatory behaviors. Proactivity moderated the direct relationships between congruence and self-efficacy and outcome expectations, but not preparatory behaviors, and did not moderate any of the indirect relationships.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2021-02-08T08:44:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0894845321992548
       
 
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