Subjects -> OCCUPATIONS AND CAREERS (Total: 33 journals)
Showing 1 - 23 of 23 Journals sorted by number of followers
Work and Occupations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Palliative & Supportive Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
BMC Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Vocational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Industrial and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Education + Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Career Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Neurocritical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Psychological Issues in Organizational Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Career Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Vocations and Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Career Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Performance Improvement Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Work Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Formation emploi     Open Access  
Field Actions Science Reports     Open Access  
Recherches & éducations     Open Access  
American Journal of Pastoral Counseling     Hybrid Journal  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Career Development
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.655
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0894-8453 - ISSN (Online) 1556-0856
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Influence of Career-Related Parental Support on Adolescents’ Career
           Maturity: A Two-Wave Moderated Mediation Model

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      Authors: Qishan Chen, Min Zhong, Liuying Lu
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Based on the career resources model (Hirschi, 2012), the current study examined the mechanism underlying the relationship between career-related parental support and adolescents’ career maturity by investigating the mediating role of future time perspective. In addition, the moderating role of core self-evaluation in the relationship between career-related parental support and future time perspective was explored. A two-wave survey was conducted with 225 Chinese middle school students. The results showed that career-related parental support positively affected future time perspective and career maturity. Moreover, future time perspective was found to play a completely mediating role in the relationship between career-related parental support and career maturity. Furthermore, the mediating effect of future time perspective was moderated by core self-evaluation; for higher levels of core self-evaluation, the mediating effect was more substantial. The results indicated that social and psychological resources could promote adolescents’ career development.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-08-09T04:53:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221118927
       
  • When Debt Deters: Student Loans as a Predictor of Education-Job Match
           Among Arts Bachelor’s Graduates

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      Authors: Katie N. Smith, Hind F. Albana
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Education-job match is often associated with enhanced well-being and career satisfaction, although existing research suggests that arts college graduates are less likely to experience education-job match than graduates of other disciplines. As research also increasingly suggests that student loan debt may influence college graduates’ access to lower-paying industries and careers, this study uses a cross-sectional dataset from the Strategic National Arts Alumni Project to investigate how student loan debt predicts education-job match (entry into an arts position) among arts bachelor’s graduates. Even when controlling for individual and institutional factors, results show that arts bachelor’s graduates with over US$10,000 in undergraduate student loan debt are less likely to enter arts careers than those with no loans. Findings suggest that arts careers may be less accessible for college graduates who are most dependent on student loans, with important implications for diversity and equity within the arts.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-08-07T01:23:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221118030
       
  • Does Future Work Self Benefit Everyone Equally' The Moderating Role of
           Organizational Support for Development

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      Authors: Ming-Chuan Han, Pin-Chyuan Hwang
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      To elucidate how and why hotel employees proactively engage in career development, this study explains the indirect effect of future work self (FWS) on their proactive career behavior through career engagement. Drawing on conservation of resources theory, this study discusses the moderating role of organizational support for development (OSD) to highlight why OSD is important for those who have low-level FWS. Results of the 205 hotel supervisor–staff-matched data show that career engagement mediates the relationship between FWS and proactive career behavior. Furthermore, OSD can be considered a compensatory moderator that determines the indirect effect of FWS on proactive career behavior. This study provides further theoretical and practical implications.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-07-12T01:58:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221113810
       
  • Protean Career Orientation and Proactive Career Behaviors During
           School-to-Work Transition: Mechanism Exploration and Coaching Intervention
           

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      Authors: Ying Zhang, Qing Wang, Yuanyuan Zhang, Chenxin Xu, Ziyi Xu
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      The school-to-work transition (STWT) period is crucial for students, and a protean career orientation (PCO) is important for a successful transition. The present study aimed to examine the effects of PCO on proactive career behaviors, the underlying mechanisms, and the development of PCO using a coaching approach. Study 1 was conducted based on 250 Chinese undergraduate and postgraduate students during STWT using self-reported questionnaires. Statistical results showed that PCO positively predicted proactive career behaviors and mediated by vocational identity and career adaptability. In Study 2, a randomized controlled trial was used to implement a coaching program that aimed at improving PCO and associated positive career outcomes. Statistical analyses found that the intervention group showed significant improvements in PCO, and the increase in PCO positively predicted increases in career adaptability, vocational identity, and proactive career behaviors.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T04:57:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221113545
       
  • Mentoring and Career Success: An Examination of Management Aspirations and
           Lengthy Career Interruptions

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      Authors: Timothy R. Moake, Thomas W. Dougherty, George F. Dreher
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Mentoring is a valuable resource that enhances outcomes like career success. Applying conservation of resources theory, we examine the interaction effects of workers’ management aspirations and lengthy career interruption(s) on the mentoring-career success relationship. Utilizing 259 older professional workers, we test these relationships with both cross-sectional and time-separated data. Although the pattern of results was similar when comparing the cross-sectional data to the time-separated data, we found that relationships were stronger within the cross-sectional data, resulting in the support of two additional hypotheses. With the time-separated data, we found evidence of a three-way interaction. Specifically, mentoring is more valuable for the perceived career success of workers with higher management aspirations who had not experienced a lengthy career interruption than it is for workers with higher management aspirations who had experienced a lengthy career interruption or for workers with lower management aspirations regardless of whether they had experienced a career interruption.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-07-04T04:39:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221113298
       
  • Conceptualizing a Proposed Model for Re-Orienting Career Centers for
           Immigrant College Students

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      Authors: Matthew A. Witenstein, Natalia Davila, LaDreka Karikari, Chantelle Wright
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Immigrant college students often encounter daunting tasks and obstacles when exploring career paths, seeking employment and experiential learning opportunities aligned with their interests within the dominant US higher education structure. Considering that there is a career services and development literature gap on immigrant students (who comprise a large swath of the college-going population), it is critical to develop meaningful frameworks that support research and practice in this emerging, needed space. This conceptual paper bridges a critical theory of love with funds of knowledge to re-orient the ways in which immigrant students are served at college career centers. Four guiding principles (rooted in the frameworks) are outlined that can support a more collaborative and inclusive experience for immigrant students toward gaining meaningful support at college career centers.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T08:33:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221112441
       
  • A Meta-Study of the Journal of Career Development: An Analysis of
           Publication Characteristics from 2000 to 2019

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      Authors: Kaitlyn Mehlhouse, K. Britt Johnsen, Bradley T. Erford
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Articles published in the Journal of Career Development from 2000 to 2019 were synthesized by article content (e.g., topic, methodology, participant characteristics, sample characteristics, design, statistical sophistication, and reporting standards) and author characteristics (e.g., gender, work setting, country of domicile, leading contributors, and leading institutions) and analyzed for trends over time. International authorship is on the rise with more than half of the lead authors publishing from 2015 to 2019 from outside the USA. Author collaborations and the proportion of research articles increased; Journal of Career Development published nearly 87% of their articles as research studies in the past decade, among the highest proportion of any counseling journal.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-30T02:16:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221112110
       
  • Mentoring as an Investment: A Quantitative Review of Mentoring and
           Well-Being for the Protégé

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      Authors: Kyle J. Mann, Krystal N. Roach, Kimberly E. O’Brien
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Although mentoring often confers valuable benefits to the protégé, mentoring may also entail costs (e.g., time, effort, ego threat), resulting in added stressors and strain. Drawing on the job demands-resources model, the present quantitative review examines how mentoring influences protégé stressors and strains. We reviewed 90 published and unpublished studies with at least one mentoring variable and one stressor or strain measure to identify commonly studied relationships to analyze (e.g., mentoring functions received and role conflict). Due largely to heterogeneity in the operationalization of mentoring, only 18 samples representing six effects could be aggregated. Results indicate that mentoring may have both positive and negative relationships with stressors and strains. This is consistent with the job demands-resources theory, which suggests that job demands induce strain, but these job demands may be mitigated by resources that may be available via characteristics of the mentoring relationship.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T04:31:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221104493
       
  • Plugging the Leaky Pipeline:A Qualitative Investigation of Untenured
           Female Faculty in STEM

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      Authors: Margo Gregor, Marianne Dunn, Devynn Campbell-Halfaker, Javier Martin-Fernandez, Anthony Ferrer, Simone Robinson
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      The current study set out to highlight the voices and stories of 129 female-identifying assistant professors in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) who responded to open-ended questions regarding their perceived barriers, supports, and experiences on their journey toward tenure. The current study utilized Consensual Qualitative Research-Modified (CQR-M; Spangler et al., 2012) for the methodology and data analysis, as the current study included a relatively large number of women and brief qualitative data. Responses fell into four domains: barriers, supports, needed resources, and miscellaneous responses. Additionally, responses were compared between women in STEM fields with higher percentages of female faculty versus STEM fields with lower percentages of female faculty, with results indicating that women in STEM fields with lower gender equality reported more gender discrimination, more difficult colleagues, and less institutional or administrative supports and policies. Future directions and clinical implications are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T09:31:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221101588
       
  • Testing an Extended Social Cognitive Model of Occupational Turnover
           Intentions

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      Authors: Patrizia Salzmann, Simone Berweger, Zippora Bührer
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Workforce shortages in the health and social care sectors are a relevant issue worldwide. One measure to mitigate workforce shortages is to improve working conditions and workers’ future prospects in order to encourage worker retention. Although studies have examined factors related to organizational turnover, less is known about the factors that lead to occupational turnover intentions. Drawing upon social cognitive career theory, this study examines the reasons behind health and social care workers’ occupational turnover intentions considering emotional exhaustion as an explanatory variable. The participants were 403 health and social care workers who responded to a questionnaire about 4 years after completing their vocational education and training at the upper-secondary level. Structural equation analyses revealed that affective occupational commitment showed the highest negative correlation with occupational turnover intentions. Furthermore, the results suggest that career-related outcome expectations, wellbeing, and supportive working conditions are crucial for designing effective interventions.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T04:37:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221101404
       
  • Adolescents’ Family Socioeconomic Status, Teacher–Student
           Interactions, and Career Ambivalence/Adaptability: A Three-Wave
           Longitudinal Study

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      Authors: Lifen Zheng, Haoran Meng, Shaofan Wang, Yue Liang, Ruihong Nie, Lianjiang Jiang, Beilei Li, Hongjian Cao, Nan Zhou
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Using three-wave longitudinal data, this study tested the potential mediating roles of teacher–student relationship quality and teachers’ career support efficacy in the association between Chinese adolescents’ family socioeconomic status (SES) and career development (N = 1410). Results showed that adolescents’ family SES at Wave 1 was negatively associated with their career ambivalence at Wave 3 via positive associations with both teacher–student relationship quality and teachers’ career support efficacy at Wave 2. Moreover, adolescents’ family SES at Wave 1 was positively related to career adaptability at Wave 3 via its positive association with teachers’ career support efficacy at Wave 2. This study highlighted the important role of teacher–student interaction in adolescents’ career development.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T11:32:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221100549
       
  • Gender Typicality and Prestige of Occupational Aspirations in Adolescents:
           The Relevance of Agency and Communion

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      Authors: Selma Korlat, Marie-Therese Schultes, Barbara Schober, Christiane Spiel, Marlene Kollmayer
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Occupational gender segregation is still a persistent problem in the labor market. This study investigates gender differences in gender typicality and prestige of occupational aspirations in early adolescence, as well as the role of agency and communion in these differences. In total, 2779 adolescents (age 11–15) reported their occupational aspirations, later coded for gender typicality and prestige. Participants also described themselves spontaneously with three attributes, then coded in terms of agency and communion. The results showed significant gender differences in a stereotypical direction for 40% of the occupations named, with boys expressing a clear preference for male-dominated and girls for female-dominated occupations. Conversely, the results revealed higher aspirations among girls regarding occupational prestige. Communion was found to be a significant mediator between gender and aspirations to typically feminine occupations, while agency mediated the relationship between gender and the prestige of aspirations. The findings’ implications for theory and practice are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T12:09:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221100744
       
  • What Job is a “Good Job” for Chinese Undergraduates: An
           Exploration Study

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      Authors: Qianyu Zhu, Jing Ni, Zhi-Jin Hou, Yin Jia
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      An exploration study was conducted to explore what Chinese undergraduates considered to be a “good job.” A total of 143 (M = 21.45, SD = 1.53, 51.04% male) undergraduates from 10 cities participated in this study. The prototype research methodology was applied to explore the underlying complex structure of the “good job.” The results revealed 157 items associated with the “good job” that were merged into two categories “high-quality work” and “high-quality life.” Furthermore, each category included basic- and superordinate-levels prototypes. The structure depicted Chinese undergraduates’ expectations of a “good job” and emphasized the importance of work-life balance among young people. Additionally, traditional Chinese culture was consistently found to have a significant impact on young people’s expectations of a “good job.” These findings have implications for career development research and career counseling practices about Chinese young people.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-14T03:55:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221087975
       
  • Internship Experience and Organizational Attractiveness: A Realistic Job
           Fit Perspective

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      Authors: Tomoki Sekiguchi, Yoshitaka Mitate, Yunyue Yang
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Although job seekers often rely on indirect or inaccurate information to assess the attractiveness of potential employers, internship experience provides more realistic and accurate information, which may influence organizational attractiveness. Through the ex-ante and ex-post (i.e., pre-internship and post-internship) research design with a sample of Japanese undergraduate students in a university-sponsored internship program, we found that, although organizational attractiveness on average declined after the internship, skill variety and feedback from employees in the internship job were positively related to perceived needs-supplies (NS) fit beyond the effect of its pre-internship level. The NS fit, in turn, was related to organizational attractiveness beyond the effect of its pre-internship level. Moreover, some of the above mediating effects were stronger for interns with high social skill and/or high self-esteem. Our findings highlight the importance of the effect of internships on college students’ school-to-work transition.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-14T02:43:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221094311
       
  • Gender Differences in STEM Career Development in Postsecondary
           Vocational-Technical Education. A Social Cognitive Career Theory Test

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      Authors: María Paola Sevilla, Virginia Snodgrass Rangel
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Existing inequalities in STEM-related vocational-technical education (VTE) programs are more prevalent than within 4-year programs. Situated in Chile, this study tests whether Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) adequately explains career development among students enrolled in STEM-VTE programs. In doing so, it also examines how external factors such as supports, barriers, and secondary track differentially affect career development by gender. Using a sample of 698 students in their second year of STEM-VTE studies, we confirmed that the SCCT model produced a good fit for the data in this alternative institutional setting. The findings also showed few gender differences in the effects of external factors on self-efficacy and career expectations, except for teaching support that substantially alters these cognitive factors to more extent among males than females. Moreover, although self-efficacy beliefs were similar between gender, gains in career expectations due to these beliefs are lower for female students. We conclude by discussing implications for future research and practice.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T02:28:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221086979
       
  • Career Interruptions: A Reconceptualization From a Chinese Taoism
           Perspective

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      Authors: Xinyi Bian
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      This paper is a first attempt to draw attention to the misconception and stigma of career interruptions and provide a new conceptualization of this widely existing career phenomenon. The unique contribution of introducing Taoism into conceptualizing career interruptions is to help bring the ontological aspects of career interruptions into a sharper focus. The present study borrows the conceptions such as Wu, Wu-Wei, and the cyclic motion of time from Chinese Taoism to reveal the attributes of career interruptions and introduce the appreciator stance into the career interruption literature. The article is structured as follows. First, an overview of the literature is provided. Second, the present study argues that a reconceptualization is needed to deal with the misconception and stigma associated with career interruptions. Third, borrowing from the wisdom of traditional Chinese Taoism, four propositions are developed to help reconceptualize career interruptions. Implications for research and practice are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T05:12:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221095864
       
  • From Near and Afar: International Secondary School Students’ Career
           Influences

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      Authors: Nancy Arthur, Danni Lei, Jon Woodend
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      During the previous decade, growth in the numbers of internationally mobile students included international high school students. Prior research on international students’ career development in higher education may not account for the unique context of younger international students in secondary schools. The current study investigated career influences for international secondary students, using the Systems Theory Framework (Patton & McMahon, 2021). International students in senior years completed written, open-ended surveys and in-person interviews regarding their career aspirations, plans and key influences on their decision-making. International student coordinators and school staff also offered their perspectives about these influences. Results indicate the inter-related systemic influences of individuals, significant relationships, location and country contexts, the secondary school environment, and perceived characteristics of occupations and future career pathways. Implications for supporting international high school students in the school setting and future research directions are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T08:45:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221094309
       
  • Qualitative Job Insecurity, Negative Work-Related Affect and
           Work-to-Family Conflict: The Moderating Role of Core Self-Evaluations

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      Authors: Ziyi Li, Hao-Yun Zou, Hai-Jiang Wang, Lixin Jiang, Yan Tu, Yi Zhao
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Job insecurity has become one of the most prominent job stressors for employees. This study focuses on qualitative job insecurity (QJI) and its spillover effects to the family domain. Despite a positive association between QJI and work-to-family conflict revealed in the literature, research on why and when QJI is related to work-to-family conflict is limited. Drawing from Conservation of Resources theory, this paper empirically examines the mediating role of negative affective process underlying the relationship between QJI and work-to-family conflict as well as the moderating role of core self-evaluations in this process. A four-wave survey study was conducted in a sample of 126 Chinese employees. The results showed that psychological contract violation and job dissatisfaction mediated the relationship between QJI and work-to-family conflict. Unexpectedly, core self-evaluations were found to strengthen (not attenuate) the positive relationships of QJI with employee psychological contract violation and job dissatisfaction.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T10:45:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221090610
       
  • Middle School, Middle-Skills: 8th Grader’s Interest in Middle-Skill
           Occupations

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      Authors: Stephanie Masters, Joan M. Barth
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      There is a workforce shortage in middle-skill occupations requiring some educational training but not a 4-year college degree, such as skilled trades (e.g., construction), transportation (e.g., drivers), and manufacturing. Identifying factors that promote adolescent interest in middle-skill occupations is crucial in combating this shortage. This study examined whether variables contributing to adolescent interest in STEM occupations, such as gender, occupation goal affordances, and occupational knowledge, extend to middle-skill occupations. Results from hierarchical linear models revealed that adolescents (N = 502) were interested in middle-skill occupations for which they felt knowledgeable and perceived to afford agentic and communal goals. The effect of perceived knowledge on interest in construction and manufacturing occupations was stronger for boys than girls. Efforts to increase interest in middle-skill occupations should address the gender gap in perceived knowledge and highlight how these occupations fulfill agentic and communal goals.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T10:09:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221089364
       
  • Unpacking the Concept of Decent Work in the Psychology of Working Theory
           for Blue-Collar Workers

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      Authors: Esli Kekana, Eileen Koekemoer, Sumari O’Neil
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Our research aimed to expand the understanding of decent work at a micro level by exploring the concept among the intended target group for which the Psychology of Work Theory (PWT) was developed for (unskilled and semi-skilled workers). By using an interpretive phenomenological approach and drawing on 13 focus group discussions (with 71 South African blue-collar workers), our findings revealed both objective (e.g. job characteristics and resources, working conditions and skills reproduction) and subjective dimensions (e.g. challenge and mastery and fairness) of decent work. We expand existing knowledge about the work experiences of blue-collar workers as an underrepresented research sample, specifically within a non-western context (i.e. South Africa). Furthermore, we provide some in-depth nuances when considering the PWT for blue-collar workers. Based on our empirical findings and extant literature, our study shows ways in which the existing conceptualizations of decent work can be expanded in order to reflect the perceptions of blue-collar workers in South Africa.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T03:34:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221086980
       
  • Towards Career Satisfaction by Career Adaptation Model Among Individuals
           With Visual Impairment

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      Authors: Samaneh Salimi, Parisa Nilforooshan, Ahmad Sadeghi
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      The present study aimed to examine the fit of the career adaptation model for individuals with visual impairment. This study was conducted on 319 individuals with visual impairment. The results demonstrated the relationship between adaptivity and adaption was fully mediated by adaptability and adapting. In addition, career adaptability partially mediated the relationship between adaptivity and adapting. However, the results did not confirm the mediating role of adapting in the relationship between adaptability and adaptation. Finally, the results indicated the full mediator role of adaptability in the association between adaptivity and adaptation. The findings highlighted the important role of adaptability in the career adaptation model to explain career satisfaction. Therefore, intervention programs based on career adaptability can empower individuals with visual impairment and promote career satisfaction.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T03:03:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221084138
       
  • Career Planning and Self-Efficacy as Predictors of Students’
           Career-Related Worry: Direct and Mediated Pathways

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      Authors: Anne-Kathrin Kleine, Antje Schmitt, Anita C. Keller
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      The current study seeks to shed light on social-cognitive resources that mitigate master students’ experience of dysfunctional career-related worry before graduation. Based on the career self-management model (CSM; Lent & Brown, 2013), we investigate concurrent and time-lagged direct and mediated relationships between career planning, career-related self-efficacy, and career-related worry among a sample of 482 students shortly before graduation. Using data collected at three time points, a negative relationship was found between career planning (T1) and career-related worry (T3) via career-related self-efficacy (T2). Our findings shed light on the role of career planning and career-related self-efficacy as malleable social-cognitive resources that diminish dysfunctional thinking before graduation in sequential order. These findings imply that career planning and career-related self-efficacy are relevant predictors of affective states and can be incorporated into the CSM.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-11T03:03:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221078950
       
  • Validation of the Chinese Decent Work Scale

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      Authors: Yin Ma, Kelsey L. Autin, Gabriel N. Ezema
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Chinese-language version of the Decent Work Scale (Duffy et al., 2017). An exploratory factor analysis was conducted with a randomly selected proportion of the sample (n = 291) and resulted in five factors: safe conditions, access to healthcare, adequate compensation, time and rest and values match between organizations and communities. A confirmatory factor analysis was performed with the remaining sample (n = 390). We examined factor structure, convergent, discriminant, and predictive validity. We also tested invariance across gender and work sector groups. Results demonstrated that the bifactor structure of the English version scale was a good fit to the data. Evidence supported convergent, discriminant, and predictive validity of the scale. The bi-factorial structure did not differ across gender and work sectors. Results suggest the scale is an appropriate measure of decent work among Chinese workers.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T05:51:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221080980
       
  • Socioeconomic Differences in the Transition From Higher Education to the
           Labour Market: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Ayla De Schepper, Noel Clycq, Eva Kyndt
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      The transition from higher education to the labour market is considered an important and uncertain life stage wherein young adults exchange an academic environment for an often-chaotic entry into the labour market. Specifically, for graduates with a lower socioeconomic status (SES), this transition involves several difficulties. Investigating these persisting SES differences in the transition is becoming more relevant given the increasing participation of students from lower SES backgrounds in higher education. This systematic review studies SES differences in the transition by looking through the lens of resource acquisition. The results demonstrate that graduates from lower SES backgrounds have more difficulty finding suitable employment and often experience lower job quality. Moreover, our findings show that the strong interdependence between the importance of different forms of capital and the (implicit) symbolic value attached to these capitals makes it difficult for graduates from lower SES backgrounds to overcome barriers in the transition.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-03-31T03:25:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221077674
       
  • Examining Links Between Black Women’s Intersectional Identities and
           Career Interests

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      Authors: Daniel G. Lannin, Jeremy B. Kanter, Dominiqueca Lewis, Alexis Greer, Wyndolyn M. A. Ludwikowski
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      The current study examined associations of intersectional social identities on Black women’s (N = 126) career self-efficacy and interests at a Historically Black College and University (HBCU). Structural models examined associations of different aspects of gender and racial identity on Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) predictors (i.e., learning experiences and self-efficacy) for each RIASEC career interest. Social Cognitive Career Theory paths from learning experiences to career interests, via self-efficacy, were supported for all six career interests. For gender norms, domesticity directly predicted learning experiences and indirectly predicted interests for enterprising, investigative, social, and conventional themes; however, primacy of work conformity was not associated with learning experiences or indirect effects for any career interest. Racial centrality only predicted learning experiences and indirect effects on career interests for social careers. Aspects of racial and gender identity may set forth educational decisions that have implications for the eventual careers that many undergraduates pursue.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T10:59:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211069600
       
  • The Impact of Perceived Organizational Care on Employee Engagement: A
           Moderated Mediation Model of Psychological Capital and Managing Boundaries
           

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      Authors: Sheng Cheng, Chien-Chih Kuo, Huai-Chieh Chen, Mei-Chi Lin
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Although the research has demonstrated the crucial effect of perceived organizational care on employees’ interests and development in the workplace, the psychological mechanism by which it affects employees’ attitudes and behaviors at work remains unclear. This three-wave prospective study examined the effects of organizational care on employees’ work outcomes and elucidated the underlying mechanism from the perspective of psychological capital theory. The results obtained from 194 individual employees revealed that positive psychological capital generated a positive correlation between organizational care and work engagement. Furthermore, managing boundaries not only moderated the relationship between organizational care and psychological capital, but also played a notable moderated-mediating role in the indirect relationship between organizational care and work engagement through psychological capital.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T10:58:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211070829
       
  • STEM Stories: Fostering STEM Persistence for Underrepresented Minority
           Students Attending Predominantly White Institutions

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      Authors: Rashné R. Jehangir, Michael J. Stebleton, Kelly Collins
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Challenges persist in creating a diverse pipeline of STEM professionals. This study aims to understand the multifaceted experiences and needs of Underrepresented Minority (URM) college students as they navigate STEM environments and career choices. Utilizing social cognitive career theory (SCCT), this qualitative, multi-institutional study explored the varied experiences and barriers that 44 URM STEM students negotiated at two Predominantly White Institutions (PWIs). Implications for practice, research, and policy focus on interventions aimed at increasing persistence and fostering STEM career decision-making.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T10:58:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211073706
       
  • Clarifying Work Values Through Seasonal Employment: An Instrumental Case
           Study of Summer Camp Employment

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      Authors: Robert P. Warner, Jim Sibthorp, Victoria Povilaitis, Jennifer M. Taylor
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Emerging adults need opportunities to clarify their work values. Although researchers have examined how transitions and work experiences influence emerging adults’ work values and job choices, less is known about how seasonal employment shapes work values. Using the theory of work adjustment as a guide, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 20–27 year olds (n = 76; mage = 22.03, SD = 1.82) to understand how their seasonal employment at summer camps influenced their work values. We found that seasonal camp employment aligned with and helped participants clarify their desire for dynamic work that makes a difference and that offers a supportive social environment with adequate work-life balance. Our findings suggest that seasonal employment affords emerging adults important opportunities to discover, reinforce, and prune work values in a temporary employment setting. We conclude by discussing implications for emerging adults’ career development and offer suggestions for career counselors.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T10:57:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211069115
       
  • Work Placement Supervisor Support and Students’ Proactive Career
           Behaviors: The Moderating Role of Proactivity

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      Authors: Ugochukwu Chinonso Okolie, Sunday Mlanga, Hyginus E. Nwosu, Kelechi Mezieobi, Cornelius Ofobuisi Okorie, Sunday O. Abonyi
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing upon social cognitive career theory model of career self-management, we examined the relationship between work placement supervisor support (WPSS) and students’ proactive career behaviors (PCB), mediating role of work placement learning self-efficacy and the moderating effect of proactivity in the indirect relationships. Data were collected from 275 university undergraduate students undertaking placement learning in 129 firms. The regression analysis revealed that WPSS associated positively with all the constructs of PCB namely: career planning, proactive skills development, career consultation, and career network building, as well as work placement learning self-efficacy. Also, work placement learning self-efficacy mediated the relationship between WPSS and the constructs of PCB except career consultation. Proactivity moderated the relationship between work placement learning self-efficacy and career planning and career network building, and the indirect effects of WPSS on career planning and career network building via work placement learning self-efficacy were significant at low, average, and high levels.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T10:56:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211073913
       
  • “No Girls on the Software Team”: Internship Experiences of
           Women in Computer Science

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      Authors: Julia C. Lapan, Katie N. Smith
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Despite computer science (CS) students’ widespread participation in internships, few studies have examined how internship experiences impact career decision-making. Because women are severely underrepresented within CS, understanding how internship experiences impact career decision-making can provide critical insight into women’s career development processes and longevity in the field. Using the concept of career self-management within social cognitive career theory as a theoretical framework and standpoint feminism as a critical lens, we conducted interviews with 13 women CS majors to learn how internship experiences influenced their career decisions. Findings reveal three major career development process themes, including questioning technical competence, navigating gendered “microclimates,” and reflecting on careers in CS. While internships largely affirmed women’s career interests in CS, participants also navigated challenging gendered dynamics and often made career decisions directly influenced by these experiences. Findings inform how CS educators, career development practitioners, and employers may better develop inclusive internship cultures in computing.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T10:56:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211070842
       
  • Examining Differentiation of Self Within Career Construction Model of
           Adaptation

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      Authors: Çise Akün, Erkan Işık, Mark Savickas
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      The present study examined the role of differentiation of self (DoS) in the career construction model of adaptation (CCMA) using a total sample of 243 married adults. Specifically, career construction theory (CCT) was extended by integrating Bowen family systems theory (BFST) and incorporating DoS as an adaptivity construct into the model. The data displayed a good fit to the model, and all hypothesized associations were supported. The direct paths from DoS to career adaptability, job, life, and marital satisfaction were positive and significant, as were the paths from career adaptability to job, life, and marital satisfaction. Furthermore, the mediation effect of career adaptability between DoS and job, life, and marital satisfaction was also significant. Based on these results, the implications and future research directions were discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T10:55:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211070027
       
  • “Called” To Speak Out: Employee Career Calling and Voice
           Behavior

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      Authors: Jiatian (JT) Chen, Douglas R. May, Catherine E. Schwoerer, Matt Deeg
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      This study is the first one to explore the relation between career calling and employee voice and two potential mediators of this relationship, felt responsibility for constructive change and employee optimism about the future. Surveys from 406 employees of a law enforcement agency in the Midwest U.S. were analyzed using logistic regression and bootstrapping method with Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) to examine support for the hypotheses’ main and mediating effects. A behavioral measure was used to capture employees’ promotive voice behavior. Results indicated that individuals with stronger career calling were more likely to engage in promotive voice, after controlling for personality, perceptions toward work, and organizational tenure. In addition, career calling was positively associated with both felt responsibility and employee optimism. Finally, felt responsibility for constructive change fully mediated the relationship between career calling and promotive voice. The implications of these findings for researchers and practitioners are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-01-05T03:36:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453211064943
       
  • A Glimpse Into an Uncommon Mind: A Review of My Life with a Theory

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      Authors: Arnold R. Spokane
      First page: 965
      Abstract: Journal of Career Development, Ahead of Print.
      Rayman & Gottfredson’s (2020) My Life with a theory is reviewed with comments on the insights provided by the volume.
      Citation: Journal of Career Development
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T04:59:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/08948453221090486
       
 
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